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Masters Degrees (International Economic Law)

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This innovative LLM enables you to tailor your studies to your professional and research interests. You choose 1 out of 2 critical pathways, electing to combine the study of international economic law with either finance and global markets or with justice and development. Read more
This innovative LLM enables you to tailor your studies to your professional and research interests. You choose 1 out of 2 critical pathways, electing to combine the study of international economic law with either finance and global markets or with justice and development. Both pathways draw on cutting-edge critical research to examine contemporary issues and problems.

If you are interested in finance, global markets and international economic institutions, you may select the LLM International Finance and Economic Law (Intensive).

If you wish to study global development issues and economic institutions you should consider the LLM International Economic Law, Justice and Development (Intensive).

LLM International Finance and Economic Law (Intensive)

What is it about finance that makes it appear powerful? How does finance relate to different senses of law, norms and regulation?

The first time the concept of 'freedom' was written down, in Mesopotamia c.2400 BC as ama-gi, its use did not relate to liberty from tyrannical rule, but to freedom from debt-slavery. Why is it that from the first civilisations to the present, debt-finance has exercised such power over peoples that it has led thinkers as diverse as Hindu theologians and classical economists to link finance to power?

Adopting an avowedly critical perspective, this programme refuses simply to accept current financial law and economics as given. The programme develops an understanding of the conditions in which financial crises develop. It is designed to examine the nature of finance and the power it exercises within society. Focusing on the law, economics and practice of international finance leading up to the Global Financial Crisis of 2008, you will be presented with critical theoretical tools with which to interrogate the role of finance in society, and in particular its effects on value systems. This programme’s critical depth and breadth affords you a unique opportunity to concretise and engage with the questions you have asked about the failures of finance.

To achieve this, you will be given a solid grounding in the legal and economic principles of finance. We examine the practice of finance in today’s financial capitals with their money markets and complicated corporate structures. You will develop practical knowledge and the theoretical tools necessary to critique finance as such: from questioning the concepts of money and value, to the power of finance with respect to time and space, the nexus of finance and consciousness, to the deep relations between finance, consumption, desire and life itself.

The study of finance will be combined with that of international economic institutions, and a range of specialised modules that you can choose based on your individual interests.

LLM International Economic Law, Justice and Development (Intensive)

Should those who are relatively poor regard international economic law as a means, end, obstacle or irrelevance to improving their lives? What role do international economic institutions play in shaping and responding to global events and crises?

The impact of international economic law and institutions upon justice and development justifiably commands increasing attention from all quarters: local politicians and international celebrities, savvy pharmaceutical companies and bewildered farmers, moral philosophers and foreign investors.

This is the only postgraduate programme in the UK to address the law, institutions and practices that constitute global and local economies from an avowedly critical perspective. It is particularly well suited to (current and aspiring) lawyers and non-lawyers within non-governmental organisations, government departments and in-house corporate social responsibility departments who wish to critically reflect on their role as practitioners. It also offers an opportunity for research and study for those considering a career change in the direction of working in, and with, international economic institutions or international development.

Preliminary reading is sent to new students in January, with the first block of intensive, face-to-face teaching in March/April.

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The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals. Read more

Why this course?

The development of the global trading system has created an increasingly sophisticated system of trade and related rights. It not only governs relations between states but impacts on relationship between states and individuals.

At both policy and practical level, there's tension surrounding the function and role of international institutions such as the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

These debates are not confined to the realm of academia. The highest 'court' of WTO has opined that decisions must take into account "[h]uman societies as they actually exist, in other words... in the real world where people live and work and die." (WTO Appellate Body Report, EC-Hormones, paragraph 187)

This LLM in International Economic Law offers you the opportunity to explore how international economic law deals with real world challenges. You’ll gain an understanding of the fundamental rules and principles supporting international economic law.

You can tailor your degree to suit your intended career path by choosing elective modules from outside of our Law School.

The course is for those wanting to develop careers with international law firms and other organisations with an international focus. It’s also useful if you want to work in the international development sector in management, planning, or policy related areas.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/internationaleconomiclaw/

You’ll study

This programme is available full-time and part-time with three potential exit points. You can choose to study for a:
- Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert)
- Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip)
- Masters degree (LLM)

Core classes:
- Legal Research
- World Trading Systems: Law & Policy

In addition to the core classes, you'll have the opportunity to pursue elective classes from other Masters programmes in Law as well as related programmes across the university.

- Elective classes
Choices may include:
- Comparative Law of Obligations
- International Environmental Law
- E-Commerce
- Comparative Company Law and Regulation
- Competition Law and Policy in the EU
- Legal Process and the Law of Contract and Other Obligations (For non-lawyers)
- UK and EU Environmental Law
- Intellectual Property
- Digital Copyright Law and Policy-Making
- International Trade Theory, Policy and Institutions
- Telecommunications Law

Please note that the classes offered may change from year to year.

Field dissertation

A unique aspect of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.

This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis. It lasts for up to 12 weeks between July and September. Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law and will form the subject of your dissertation.

Previous students have undertaken placements in countries including Sri Lanka, Tanzania, South Africa, India and Kenya. Examples of projects which our students have undertaken include:
- assessing the extent to which Indian environmental and energy laws promote the development of micro-renewables
- an analysis of whether Tanzanian land law discriminates against women and what reforms would be needed to address the discrimination
- an exploration of the low take-up of Clean Development Mechanism [CDM] in Sub-Saharan Africa and how the situation could be improved
- an assessment of environmental justice in Nigeria and South Africa

The project/field work is organised and supported by Challenges Worldwide. Challenges Worldwide is an innovative, award-winning, social enterprise working in international development.

The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources, which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Additional Entry requirements

If your first language is not English, you must provide documentary evidence of an appropriate level of competency of written and spoken English. The minimum standards are an IELTS minimum overall band score of 6.5 (with no individual test score below 6.0).

The University's English Language Teaching department offers pre-entry and pre-sessional courses for new international students from April each year. Full fee paying students are entitled to one month of the pre-sessional English course free of charge.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As a general rule, classes taught within the Law School will normally be taught over a ten-week teaching period with one two-hour seminar per week.
However in some cases, classes will be offered intensively over a shorter time period because of the availability of staff teaching them.

Assessment

A variety of assessment methods and weightings are used on Law School Masters programmes. The classes developed specifically for this programme generally follow this format:
- two x 4,000-word essays or one final exam together with a 4,000-word essay
Each component of assessment is generally worth 50% of the final mark of a class. To pass each class, you need an average overall score of 50% across all assessments as well as a minimum score of 40% in each individual component of assessment.

Careers

Increasingly, lawyers and other related professionals are operating in environments that demand an understanding of international economic law.

Studying on this programme will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and analytical skills relevant to working or planning a career with an international focus.

Students on this programme and the LLM in International Law and Sustainable Development have gone on to take up varied positions including:
- Analyst in the Private Wealth division of a multinational bank
- Policy Officer with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency
- Logistical Co-ordinator with Oxfam America
- Legal counsel for an energy utility company based in Switzerland
- Responsible Investment Analyst for a leading global provider of research into corporate environmental, social and governance performance
- Project Associate for an international non-profit organization working to advance global public health
- Senior manager at Ofgem
- Lecturer at a technical college in Bahrain

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme offers an in-depth study of all the different aspects of the contemporary regime of international economic law. Read more
The programme offers an in-depth study of all the different aspects of the contemporary regime of international economic law. Unlike most other programmes, it overcomes the division between the main branches of international economic governance - world trade, investment, and finance - and raises awareness for common themes and challenges facing international economic law in these different areas.

Why this programme

-The core course is designed to provide a bird’s-eye-view of the field of international economic governance and the multiple roles played by international law in that context.
-Key areas of focus include the structure of global economic governance, the rules and institutions of world trade, international investment, and international finance.
-Drawing on a range of different legal, critical, and interdisciplinary approaches, it aims to provide the students with the opportunity to study at advanced level the various aspects of contemporary international economic regulation in its full normative, political, and historical complexity.
-You will benefit from the combined experience of a lecturing team representing a rich diversity of professional and international backgrounds. Theorists and practitioners, litigators and consultants, our lecturers come from more than half-a-dozen countries, including Germany, Canada, Portugal, UK, and Uzbekistan.
-The programme is supported by excellent facilities, including two dedicated law libraries, extensive online resources, and access to various official publication databases, such as the European Documentation Centre.
-Guest-speaker presentations, an active research seminar series and other extra-curricular events provide you with a unique opportunity to meet international lawyers and academics from around the world, become exposed to some of the most topical discussions shaping the field of international economic law, and to engage with current debates.

Programme structure

You will take one core and three optional courses, at least one of which must fall in the field of either international trade law or international investment law. . Courses will be delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. You will also be required to submit a 15,000 word dissertation on a related topic.

Core course
-International law and international economic governance

Optional courses
-EU trade law
-Globalisation and governance
-International and comparative intellectual property law
-International finance law
-International financial regulation
-International investment law
-International tax law
-International trade law
-Settlement of international disputes

Note: Some courses might not be available every year.

Career prospects

The rare combination of doctrinal, theoretical, legal-historical, comparative, and policy perspectives which this programme provides will prove highly attractive both to public- and private-sector employers. The programme will be of particular interest to those students interested in pursuing a career in international organisations, government service, advanced research institutions, think-tanks, NGOs, independent consultancy, and academia. Students seeking to pursue a career in legal practice will benefit from the programme's broad approach: they will be able to situate specific legal problems arising in highly practical areas (such as world trade, or investment law) within the broader context of international economic law.

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In just one generation, the world has witnessed a dramatic increase in the economic interdependence of countries and shifts in global economic power. Read more
In just one generation, the world has witnessed a dramatic increase in the economic interdependence of countries and shifts in global economic power. This reshaped global economic map has many drivers, including key international institutions and accords that seek to promote enhanced competitiveness, trade and foreign direct investment globally.

The LLM in International Economic Law aims to provide students with both a theoretical understanding and the practical legal skills set for analysing the roles that institutions play in regulating crucial international economic relations and their specific rules that often become the agreed framework for national regulation across economic sectors.

This programme will enable you to explore the significant policy issues that arise in the development and implementation of these international economic legal frameworks.

You will be able to choose from a comprehensive range of modules that focus on these international economic regulatory frameworks as they impact diverse economic sectors, including finance, trade, investment, innovation and knowledge.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and, in many cases, professional experience from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

You will have the opportunity to critically explore pressing development, environmental and financial stability concerns arising from the globalisation of the world economy in a genuinely international atmosphere.

The knowledge and skills gained on this course are suitable for careers in government, international organizations, law firms and NGOs concerned with international development, trade, investment and finance.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of International Economic Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM044 International and Comparative Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM364 Law and Finance in Emerging Economies (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)

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Should those who are relatively poor regard international economic law as a means, end, obstacle or irrelevance to improving their lives?. Read more
Should those who are relatively poor regard international economic law as a means, end, obstacle or irrelevance to improving their lives?

From Shock Therapy 1992, to Seattle 1999, to Shock and Awe 2003, to Live8 2005, to Financial Crisis 2007, to G20 2009, to Haiti 2010, the impact of international economic law and institutions upon justice and development justifiably commands increasing attention from all quarters: local politicians and international celebrities, savvy pharmaceutical companies and bewildered farmers, moral philosophers and foreign investors.

This is the only postgraduate programme in the UK to address the law, institutions and practice which constitute global and local economies from an avowedly critical perspective, part- and full-time, in face-to-face evening sessions. It is particularly well suited to (current and aspiring) lawyers and non-lawyers within non-governmental organisations, government departments and in-house corporate social responsibility departments, who wish to critically reflect on their role as practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

A unique programme, training you in the critical examination of the law, institutions and practice that constitute global and local economies.
Taught by established experts on theory and practice in the field.
Introduces you to a broad geographical and institutional spectrum, from Latin America to Africa, from the European Union to the World Bank, and onwards to the World Social Forum.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
We use technology, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines such as economics, politics and sociology. You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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Explore the legal foundations of the global economy with the in depth study of the effect of trade, investment and competition on international business. Read more
Explore the legal foundations of the global economy with the in depth study of the effect of trade, investment and competition on international business.

Who is it for?

The LLM in International Economic Law is ideally suited to law students seeking to deepen their legal knowledge of the regulatory environment underpinning the global economy. It will also be attractive to legal practitioners who wish to expand their expertise or to change directions in their career. This qualification should assist lawyers at all stages and from all backgrounds in cultivating an international dimension to their existing knowledge-based and professional portfolio.

Objectives

The LLM in International Economic Law focuses on the international laws which underpin the broad functioning of the global economy across a range of legal fields. It consists of classic modules on World Trade Law and International Investment Law as well subjects such as International Tax, Competition and Energy Law.

The demand for graduates in this specialist field is growing rapidly along with the increasing global integration of regulation of economic activity as seen in the rise in free trade agreements, investment treaties and international energy agreements.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as ten weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-World Trade Law
-Energy Law
-International Tax Law
-EU Tax Law
-International Law & The Global Economy
-European Business Regulation I
-European Business Regulation II
-Comparative Antitrust Law
-International Investment Law
-International Cartels
-International Intellectual Property Law
-Mergers

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in trade, investment, and intellectual property.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines. Read more
The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines.

Who is it for?

This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As this course has an international dimension it will appeal to students from around the world and at all stages of their legal education and professional experience.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in Public International Law concentrates on the development of a thorough and critical understanding of Public International Law, the law governing the interaction of states. The last decade or so has seen tremendous challenges for International Law including matters relating to armed conflict, commercial relations and human rights. This course gives you the opportunity to trace and evaluate some of these practical and theoretical developments guided by leading academics and expert practitioners.

City's LLM in Public International Law takes a contemporary approach to the study of international law. You may choose from an extensive list of electives including the law of treaties, human rights, economic law, law of the sea and others.
All electives adopt a curriculum that is cutting edge in its theoretical approach and a skill-based methodology to enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in the subject in the best manner possible.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10-weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.
-10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits)
OR
-20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30 credit modules:
-Air and Space Law
-Comparative Constitutional Law
-International Law of the Sea
-Public International Law
-Law of Treaties
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice
-International Investment Law
-Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Responsibility of States and International Organisations
-Law of International Organisations
-International Law and the Global Economy
-International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
-International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
-Law and War
-World Trade Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in Public International Law you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of publc international law.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed. Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School. Master and research students are encouraged to play an active role in our activities, which include a series of seminars organised by the International Law and Affairs Group at the City Law School.

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The LLM in International Economic Law provides the opportunity to study the international law of trade and finance from the public policy perspective of the regulator. Read more
The LLM in International Economic Law provides the opportunity to study the international law of trade and finance from the public policy perspective of the regulator. It enables the student to specialise from, a wide range of subjects and topics in areas such as the regulatory framework of the global trading system, the resolution of trade disputes, and the legal and policy mechanisms affecting foreign direct investment.

The course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective, and is ideally suited to students from a law, politics, business, economics or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice, international development, trade, finance, and banking.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-economic-law/

Why choose this course?

- It provides a wide choice of subjects and topics, exploring international economic relations in the context of business practices, human rights, global security and the pursuit of sustainable development.

- All members of the LLM course team undertake original and internationally-recognised research in their subjects and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard commercial and trade law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- As well as providing the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice, international development, trade, finance, and banking, it would also appeal to those who intend to pursue careers in emerging markets, jurisdictions, international and national trade bodies, as well as in government and academic posts.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the university, the city of Oxford and in nearby London. In addition to our own excellent libraries and resource centres, LLM students have access to the unparalleled legal holdings at the Bodleian Law Library.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practise legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high-flying diplomats and commercial lawyers.

LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the School of Law and is one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation opens up access to a range of occupations that require specialist expertise. It equips you with the necessary intellectual tools to practise international commercial law, or work for relevant government departments, regulators and international organisations in a policymaking or advisory capacity. It also provides an excellent foundation for students who may wish to pursue a research degree in the field.

It combines a thorough grounding in technical legal instruments of international commercial law, with sophisticated training in interdisciplinary frameworks for analysis of global business regulation, as well as reflective evaluation of the operation and effectiveness of law. Emphasis is also placed upon the interaction of law with other disciplines, particularly economics and politics. The modules are taught by distinguished academic specialists who cover a large and diverse range of subjects within the field.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/127/international-commercial-law

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW801 Intellectual Property Law

LW802 International Business Transactions

LW810 International Law on Foreign Investment

LW847 World Trade Organisation Law and Practice

LW905 International Financial Services Regulation

LW908 International and Comparative Consumer Law & Policy

LW923 Economic Sociology of Law

LW811 International Commercial Arbitration

LW813 Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property

LW899 Corporate Governance

LW907 Commercial Credit

LW918 International and Comparative Bankruptcy and Insolvency Law & Policy

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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LLM - 1 year full time, 2 years part time. Diploma - 7 months. Read more

Mode of study

LLM - 1 year full time, 2 years part time
Diploma - 7 months

Course details

Are you looking to gain a theoretical and practical introduction to the main legal issues arising from the globalisation of the world economy? This course focuses specifically on the interplay between international and national regulatory frameworks, through attention to macro-level regulation and micro-level ventures, contracts and transactions.

In the core module, you’ll explore recent significant restructuring of international institutions and the persistent erosion of the traditional boundaries dividing public and private international law. You’ll then choose a further five optional modules from an extensive selection of law modules and approved non-law modules.

Our programme examines both the wider issues of governance of the world economy and the specific legal issues arising from various types of international business transactions. You’ll gain a working knowledge of practical legal problems, but the course is equally suitable if you are seeking to embark on an academic career in Law.

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Since the establishment of the Bretton Woods System in the aftermath of the Second World War, we have seen an extraordinary evolution of international economic relations towards interdependence and integration. Read more

Programme description

Since the establishment of the Bretton Woods System in the aftermath of the Second World War, we have seen an extraordinary evolution of international economic relations towards interdependence and integration.

Discussions on this process, known as economic globalisation, are commonplace in academic and other fora.

This programme seeks to provide participants with in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the institutions, rules and principles of the international economic system, as well as of key legal and policy issues arising from the globalisation of the world economy.

Programme structure

This programme offers a wide range of subjects on economic law and commercial law with an international perspective, enabling you to tailor the LLM to meet your specific interests.

The programme structure for 2017/18 is currently being finalised. You will take a total of 120 credits in taught courses, 60 in each semester, which may include the following:

WTO Law
International Investment Law
The Law of International Trade
International Commercial Arbitration
Principles of International Tax Law
Advanced issues in International Economics Law
Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law

You will also complete a 10,000 word dissertation worth 60 credits.

Learning outcomes

This programme is designed provide an advanced understanding of the law, institutions and policy concerning international economic relations and their ongoing development by the United Nations, the World Trade Organisation, the World Bank, and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

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In­te­gra­ting pu­blic and pri­va­te eco­no­mic law, the pro­gram­me brings to­ge­ther two are­as of law that are of­ten co­ve­r­ed in­de­pen­dent­ly in le­gal li­te­ra­tu­re as well as in teaching. Read more
In­te­gra­ting pu­blic and pri­va­te eco­no­mic law, the pro­gram­me brings to­ge­ther two are­as of law that are of­ten co­ve­r­ed in­de­pen­dent­ly in le­gal li­te­ra­tu­re as well as in teaching. This di­vi­si­on will be over­co­me wi­t­hin the frame­work of this pro­gram­me to pro­vi­de stu­dents with a ho­lis­tic ap­proach on in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law that cha­rac­te­ri­ses this area of law in prac­tice. The pro­gram­me aims to de­li­ver a broad, sci­en­ti­fic and pro­found en­ga­ge­ment with the play­ers and struc­tu­res of in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law (first stu­dy year in Lüne­burg) and, as well as to fa­ci­li­ta­te an ad­di­tio­nal spe­cia­li­sa­ti­on in one of the core sub­jects of in­ter­na­tio­nal eco­no­mic law such as Cor­po­ra­te & Fi­nan­ci­al Law, In­ter­na­tio­nal Com­mer­ci­al Law, In­ter­na­tio­nal Com­pe­ti­ti­on Law & Po­li­cy or In­tel­lec­tu­al Pro­per­ty & the Di­gi­tal Eco­no­my (se­cond stu­dy year in Glas­gow).

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Dual Master’s programme in which you develop an understanding and knowledge of comparative and international corporate, insolvency and European Law for a legal career with a strong international focus. Read more
Dual Master’s programme in which you develop an understanding and knowledge of comparative and international corporate, insolvency and European Law for a legal career with a strong international focus.
Since the start of the global financial crisis, there has been a surge in the number of companies that find themselves in financial difficulties. It has not only greatly increased the need for experts in insolvency law but has also profoundly changed this field of law. It has given insolvency law a much higher profile.
Insolvency is no longer a national issue. Due to globalisation, most companies have international contacts that have to be taken into account during a reorganisation or liquidation process. Given the new transnational scope of this field of law, the Faculty of Law at Radboud University and the Nottingham Law School have joined forces to offer students a unique Master’s programme that joins comparative and international insolvency and corporate law, thus meeting the demands and challenges of contemporary insolvency law.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/insolvency

Two Master’s degrees in one year

This dual LL.M programme will give you the opportunity of attaining two Master’s degrees in law in one academic year while living both in the Netherlands and the UK, thus adding to your personal international experience as well as increasing your knowledge. The courses taught at both campuses are presented in English, and you’ll enjoy the benefits of being taught by experts from both law schools.
Graduates of the insolvency law specialisation can expect to find a wide variety of employment prospects. These include law firms, financial institutions, multinationals and listed companies as well as governmental institutions and NGOs.

Why do the dual Master’s in Insolvency Law?

- You will participate in a unique and intense Master’s programme specialising in insolvency law.
- You will be awarded two LL.M degrees in the space of just one academic year: the LL.M Corporate and Insolvency Law from Nottingham Law School, and the LL.M European and Insolvency Law from Radboud University.
- You will study at a British Law School that was rated ‘excellent' by the British Law Society, and a Dutch Law School that was rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.
- You will work together with two prestigious research centres in the field of insolvency law: The NLS Centre for Business and Insolvency Law at Nottingham Law School, and the Business & Law Research Centre at Radboud University.
- You will be taught in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups by internationally recognised professors of law, all specialists in their specific fields.
- You will have a chance to live in both Nijmegen in the Netherlands and Nottingham in the United Kingdom. The programme starts in the Netherlands and after the Christmas break you move to the UK.

Challenging, broad and interesting

During a reorganisation or liquidation process all (legal) relationships of a company are in a high state of tension and every aspect of a company is under severe scrutiny. This is what makes insolvency law a particularly challenging field of law, and the Master’s specialisation so broad and interesting. Experts in insolvency also need to deal with other fields such as corporate law, commercial law, administrative law and labour law.
At Radboud University and Nottingham Trent University we take a holistic approach to insolvency law while at the same time providing a level of practical detail through real-world scenarios. This ensures that our graduates get the relevant in-depth knowledge that is highly sought-after by employers all over Europe.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is primarily designed for students who wish to pursue an international legal career in the area of insolvency law. It offers a thorough and broad education in insolvency law that includes corporate law, commercial law, labour law, personal bankruptcy law and competition law. And because it’s part of the European Law programme at Radboud University, you will also gain a good understanding of the internal and external markets of the European Union and the position of Europe in the world.

Job positions

As far as job positions go, it is seldom that you will find job positions advertised for insolvency law experts. That is not to say that these experts aren't highly sought after, especially since the start of the economic crisis. However, insolvency law experts will usually be part of a banking or corporate litigation team.
Graduates of Insolvency Law can expect to find a wide variety of employment prospects. You could work for financial institutions, multinationals and listed companies as well as governmental institutions and NGOs. There is also a high demand within the legal profession and judiciary for lawyers with thorough knowledge of insolvency law.

Our approach to this field

Besides the required knowledge of theories in Corporate, European and Insolvency law, and of insolvency law reform and policy, this specialisation specifically focuses on two aspects within the field of insolvency law:

1. Comparing national laws
When a company is in need of a corporate rescue, it has the possibility to use the legal instruments of several jurisdictions, not just the one in which it is located. This is known as forum shopping or regulatory arbitrage. To optimally do this, you need very good insight as to what’s out there. During this Master’s we teach students the basics they need to know to be able to compare the legal possibilities of several (European) countries.

2. Understanding the international consequences
If a company in, for example, the Netherlands goes bankrupt, what effect does this have in other countries? This dual Master’s teaches you how you can oversee the possible international consequences of relevant actions.


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/insolvency

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