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Your programme of study. The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. Read more

Your programme of study

The General Law programme at Aberdeen is one of the best programmes in terms of scope and areas of interest you can choose to study at advanced level. If your first degree was in a specific area of law there is nothing preventing you from choosing another area of law completely or a complementary area. You could study environmental law areas such as oil and gas law, energy and environmental law, low carbon energy transition with further environmental regulation. If you are more interested in criminal law you could look at Criminology, the politics of human rights, humanitarian law.  If you are more interested in business you might choose international law, intellectual property law, world trade organisation or for business with a creative aspect you might think about specialist in cultural property issues or law for business and arts and museums law.  There are many possible mixes of these general areas of law you might want to explore. Employment possibilities are huge from this range of areas of law and include all notable areas to practise law and careers within the legal profession to welfare sectors such as employment, business, HR and finance.

Law careers

You may become a Barrister if you wish to represent people at High Court and Magistrates court to put legal argument forward for decision. You could start off as a legal executive to later qualify as a solicitor with further training or after a number of years experience you may wish to become a judge. If you want some work experience you could become a court usher. Other careers include a Paralegal. This role undertakes much of a lawyers role in drafting documents, meetings and contracts.  If you decide your law degree is useful for other areas you may look at Civil Service careers, become a politician, work in the police, city, or teach.

This programme is ideal if you want to be a generalist to an advanced level rather than a specialist in a specific area of law. You develop your analysis and research skills and you have the option of wide ranging courses to choose from which stretches your intellectual thinking capabilities in a top 10 School of Law (Complete University Guide 2018)

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Compulsory

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship

Optional (4 courses 2 in Semester 1 and 2)

  • International Energy and Environmental Law
  • Oil and Minerals for Good
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Renewable Energy Law
  • International Law: A Time of Challenges
  • The Politics of Human Rights
  • Oil and Gas Law
  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • International Commercial Arbitration In the Asia Pacific
  • Private International Law: Concepts and Institutions
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • World Trade Organisation: Gatt
  • Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions
  • International Intellectual Property: Frameworks and Challenges
  • International Criminal Law
  • Copyright and Patents
  • Private International Law - Jurisdiction, Recognition and Enforcement

Semester 2

Optional

  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art and Museums
  • Principles of Environmental Regulation
  • Choice of Law for Business
  • International Humanitarian Law
  • Low Carbon Energy Transition: Nuclear Energy and Carbon Capture and Storage
  • Criminal Evidence and Proof
  • Criminal Law
  • The use of Force in International Law
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • International Trade and Finance Law
  • Private International Law of Family Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Carriage of Goods By Sea
  • Oil and Gas Law: Taxation of Upstream
  • Downstream Energy Law
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law
  • Commercial Tax Law and Policy
  • International Investment Law and Arbitration in the Energy Sector

Semester 3

  • Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by a School of Law ranked 10th in the UK (The Complete University Guide 2018). The University has been teaching and researching law since the Middle Ages.
  • You develop skills which are vital to the legal profession in a highly personalised environment with high contact from your lecturers.
  • You get a great range of options which you can tailor to your own requirements and build upon your undergraduate degree and experience to widen your career options, and you can take your qualifications further with programmes such as International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months or 24 Months
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • January or September

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life" target="_blank">living in Aberdeen and https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php" target="_blank">living costs

You may be interested in:



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With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. Read more
With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. The programme is also especially relevant to those seeking opportunities in the commercial world. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of the complexities of regulation.

A sound knowledge of international commercial law is increasingly necessary given the demands imposed by globalisation, whether
you wish to join a major law firm or be engaged in a company with european and international aspirations.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes critical analysis of different aspects of international commercial law. Leading the analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law involved in the programme have engaged in major research. This spans the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of international
commercial arbitration.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law and the Smurfit School of Business offer a wide range of modules for this Master’s programme. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme are modules such as: Corporate Governance; International Economic Law; International Commercial Arbitration; International Tax Law; International Aviation Law; and, Law of International Finance. Having completed six modules, students will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of International Commercial Law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful if you intend to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms, or want to work as an in-house legal adviser.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Corporate Governance which examines the legal and regulatory environment and the informational and market infrastructures which apply in Ireland and the wider EU to promote an understanding its importance to companies and their stakeholders.

- Insolvency Law which examines the legal principles relating to the insolvency of corporations and individuals in Ireland and other common law jurisdictions to develop an understanding of the legal mechanisms available for the distribution of the estates of insolvent debtors.

- EU Competition Law which offers a critical examination of how EU competition law governs particular actions of private market actors, considering the rationale behind this area of law and how it fits into the EU's economic order and philosophy.

- Regulatory Governance which offers insights into competing conceptions of regulatory governance and explanations both for emergence of and variety in regulatory regimes as well as normative arguments concerning arrangements for regulatory regimes.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM in International Commercial Law is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally. It is particularly useful for students wishing to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms or wishing to work as an in-house legal adviser.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/apply,80078,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Security and Development is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA in International Security and Development is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Security and Development is the Department of International and Area Studies at The University of Oklahoma. The Department of International and Area Studies is an exciting and rapidly growing academic unit within the University of Oklahoma. It has approximately twenty faculty members and, critically for this EMA in International Security and Development, their expertise lie within the fields of security and development. The University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is located approximately 20 minutes south of Oklahoma City on a breathtaking campus. Created in 1890 The University of Oklahoma enrols more than 30,000 students, it has achieved the Carnegie Foundation’s highest tier of research activity classification, and is ranked in the top 400 universities in the world according to the Times Higher rankings.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Civil Society and International Development

• Approaches to International Relations

• War, Identity and Society

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• War in Space

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security

• Development Studies

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA



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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

Modules

International criminal law
International criminal procedure and practice
International law and human rights
Research methods
Dissertation

Plus two options from:

International humanitarian law
International human rights and development
Terrorism
Case management
Advocacy
Migration and development

Assessment

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

Coursework

Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:

• Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
• Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
• Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
• Imran Khan, Solicitor;
• Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Employability

New international criminal law:

This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations:

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This pathway allows international law and international relations to inform each other. It covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law, international humanitarian law and international relations. Read more

This pathway allows international law and international relations to inform each other. It covers the general methods, scope and theories of international law, international humanitarian law and international relations. It provides a detailed understanding of the role, potential and limitations of public international law in international affairs. Its interdisciplinary approach is particularly suited to those involved with, or hoping to work for, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, foreign affairs departments and international law firms.

Students studying International Law with International Relations are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL) at Kent. These include workshops, trips to international courts and tribunals, and guest lecture series.

Students can choose to spend one term (either Autumn or Spring) at our Canterbury campus and one (either Autumn or Spring) at our Brussels centre (returning to Canterbury to complete the dissertation) under our split-site option for this programme. The split site option is charged at a different rate. Please see under Fees below for more information. Programmes at our Brussels centre are offered primarily in International Law and Human Rights Law. Students are responsible for organising their own accommodation in Brussels. Please contact the University's Accommodation Office for information about the availability of short term accommodation in Canterbury.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of pathway open until after you arrive - your pathway being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact. An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Kent Law School is one of the leading law schools in the UK; we are ranked 14th in The Times Good University Guide 2018, 15th in The Guardian University Guide 2018 for law and 19th in The Complete University Guide 2018.

The Law School has an excellent international reputation; ranked 50th in the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings for law 2018, it is also listed amongst the top 100 law schools in the world in both the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017 and the Shanghai Ranking’s Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2017.

Fees

The fees for the Canterbury-only delivery of this programme are the same as those for the standard LLM programme. However, fees for our split-site option (which is taught in Canterbury and Brussels) are charged at a different rate. Please refer here for the current fees for the split-site 90 ECTS option.

Funding

The University has a generous postgraduate scholarship fund in excess of £9m available to taught and research students studying at Kent. There are also scholarships specifically for Law School students including a Taught Overseas Scholarship and Taught Home/EU Bursaries. Kent Law School has also established a major fund to support students who are from or who have studied in Kenya, Nigeria or Thailand, and who undertake a Master's in Law (LLM) at the Canterbury campus of the University of Kent.

Modules

Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Our current module handbook is available to download on our website. The modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules are normally assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2015 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us

Information for international students

Why study at Kent?

Apply online



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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines. Read more
The Specialist LLM course in Public International Law provides a critical understanding of the principles within which public international law operates, raising issues of treaty interpretation and enforcement across a range of sub-disciplines.

Who is it for?

This course will be of interest to individuals who seek a deeper understanding of the many dimensions of public international law from both a theoretical and practical perspective. As this course has an international dimension it will appeal to students from around the world and at all stages of their legal education and professional experience.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in Public International Law concentrates on the development of a thorough and critical understanding of Public International Law, the law governing the interaction of states. The last decade or so has seen tremendous challenges for International Law including matters relating to armed conflict, commercial relations and human rights. This course gives you the opportunity to trace and evaluate some of these practical and theoretical developments guided by leading academics and expert practitioners.

City's LLM in Public International Law takes a contemporary approach to the study of international law. You may choose from an extensive list of electives including the law of treaties, human rights, economic law, law of the sea and others.
All electives adopt a curriculum that is cutting edge in its theoretical approach and a skill-based methodology to enable you to develop your knowledge and skills in the subject in the best manner possible.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10-weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write their dissertation on a subject within the specialism.
-10,000 word Supervised Dissertation (30 credits)
OR
-20,000 word Supervised Dissertation (60 credits)

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30 credit modules:
-Air and Space Law
-Comparative Constitutional Law
-International Law of the Sea
-Public International Law
-Law of Treaties
-International Human Rights in Law and Practice
-International Investment Law
-Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law
-International Dispute Settlement
-International Responsibility of States and International Organisations
-Law of International Organisations
-International Law and the Global Economy
-International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
-International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
-Law and War
-World Trade Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in Public International Law you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in house in a legal practice, policy and government, non-governmental organisations, and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of publc international law.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed. Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School. Master and research students are encouraged to play an active role in our activities, which include a series of seminars organised by the International Law and Affairs Group at the City Law School.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Civil Society and International Development

• Approaches to International Relations

• War, Identity and Society

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• War in Space

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security

• Development Studies

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA



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International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject. Read more
International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject.

On the LLM International Trade Law you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in these areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards your LLM in stages. To access the LLM you will have previously completed the awards of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Students are required to pass three modules: Legal Research, International Sale Contracts, and Carriage of Goods. There are no examinations for each module. Instead, students research and write a 3,000 word essay on a topic selected by the module tutor. They graduate with the PgCert International Trade Law and may, if they wish, continue on to study for the PgDip International Trade Law the next academic year.

Learn From The Best

Study on the LLM International Trade Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course is accredited by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, and is shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of international business transactions; international commercial litigation; international commercial arbitration, international public procurement regulation; comparative corporate and financial law, and EU law; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

On this innovative distance learning LLM International Trade Law course you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and applying what you have learnt to your own organisation.

You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology, able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Modules are assessed through coursework and for the award of LLM, you will complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

The eLearning Portal provides students with written materials that are the equivalent to ten (10) one-hour lecture periods and five (5) two-hour workshop periods on the FT LLM International Trade Law. Written lecture materials tend to focus on the delivery of a particular legal topic and written workshop materials tend to focus on the actual application of topics in practical situations which business persons or lawyers would encounter. The DL PgCert/PgDip/LLM International Trade Law is practically oriented.

There is an on-line surgery at the beginning of each module with the module tutor, and an optional Study Day is held on campus on a Saturday near the beginning of each module. The Study Day is recorded using Panopto so that students who are unable to attend in person can view and listen to the day’s learning activities. There is no difference in the substantive content of each module between the DL PgCert/PgDip International Trade Law and the FT LLM International Trade Law.

Research-Rich Learning

Research rich learning (RRL) is embedded through the programme. Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

The LLM culminates in the project module in which you will undertake a piece of independent legal research, informed by current practice and advanced scholarship and research, including a critical awareness and evaluation of current issues and developments in the field.

Give Your Career An Edge

The LLM is designed to enhance your career prospects in the international trade law arena. You will be encouraged to reflect upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examine policies and undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge. You will have the opportunity to produce a project in your chosen field undertaking research and personal development in an area of particular relevance to your work.

The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

Your Future

The LLM International Trade Law course has been designed to meet the needs of practitioners in business and industry and law firms engaged in the area of international trade law.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, and the ability to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international trade law. You will be able to further develop your intellectual curiosity, to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to complex legal and ethical problems. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in this exciting field.

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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