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Masters Degrees (International Criminal Law)

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

Modules

International criminal law
International criminal procedure and practice
International law and human rights
Research methods
Dissertation

Plus two options from:

International humanitarian law
International human rights and development
Terrorism
Case management
Advocacy
Migration and development

Assessment

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

Coursework

Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:

• Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
• Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
• Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
• Imran Khan, Solicitor;
• Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Employability

New international criminal law:

This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations:

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This masters of law programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more

This masters of law programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.



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This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). Read more
This programme will provide you with an opportunity to explore and analyse global relationships between criminal laws and national security (ICLAS). With the rise in the threat to national and global security at unprecedented levels, the time to further study this area is now. You will study many aspects of international criminal law, for example, the balance that is struck between human rights and the threat of terrorism in the UK and internationally and the way in which differing jurisdictions tackle international organised crime.

If you are looking to work for international bodies such as the United Nations or the International Criminal Court, or you are looking to continue your studies within this fascinating field, then this course will be the ideal next move to help further develop your career.

Course content

This course will develop analytical, evaluative and research skills and provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the tensions between security and human rights that exist in the contemporary UK, European and international legal frameworks. In particular you will consider how effectively human rights standards are protected both from an EU and global perspective and the response to the threat of terror and international crime in different jurisdictions.

You will also have the opportunity to probe in detail an area of particular interest when you produce your dissertation. You will be supported by experienced lecturers who use a range of innovative teaching methods, which will enhance your overall studies.

To be eligible for the award of LLM International Criminal Law and Security, you must successfully gain 180 credits from the below compulsory modules. If you must successfully gain 120 credits from the below but not including the Dissertation you would be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma, if you gain 60 credits not include the Dissertation you would be awarded the Postgraduate Certificate.

Course modules (16/17)

-European Crime and Security
-International Organised Crime
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and the Rule of Law
-Research Methods
-Dissertation
-Diversity, Migration and the Law
-Research Methods

Methods of Learning

The LLM is offered for full time study over 12 months. The course is also available part time and via distance learning.

You will typically study three or four modules in each semester. This is followed by the dissertation period of 18 weeks.

This course is also available through distance learning, as well as taught at the University of Northampton. The distance learning element of the course delivery will vary module-by-module but typically includes podcasts of lectures combined with weekly or fortnightly online reading, exercises and discussions using a range of platforms, including blogs and discussion boards.

Where appropriate, PowerPoint slides will be available online at the same time as the lecture podcast. The readings will be in the form of links to online documents, case reports, book extracts or similar and will be available through online systems. Formative assessment is carried out regularly so that you can ensure on a regular basis that you are at the right place in the course. You will be allocated a personal tutor and will be able to arrange live one-to-one tutorial sessions using Skype or Google Hangouts as necessary.

Assessments

Formal course assessment is centred on module essays and submission of a dissertation, although the precise method of assessment may vary across modules. In addition, students may be informally assessed in a number of different ways, including individual presentations.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise, with substantial teaching experience on both undergraduate and postgraduate courses.
-An enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.

Careers

You will be provided with the skills and knowledge to work in, or continue your studies in modern warfare, security and terrorism. You could also expand your academic knowledge through PhD studies in your chosen field.

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International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance. Read more
International criminal law is a dynamic, controversial and fast-moving field that increasingly touches on, and affects matters of, key international significance.

At the core of the subject are legal institutions such as the International Criminal Court that have been established to realise the ideal of holding to account those responsible for offences such as war crimes and genocide.

Our LLM combines a study of the legal doctrine underpinning the investigation and prosecution of international crimes with a critical analysis of the political context in which such prosecutions are undertaken.

How will I study?

You’ll study two core modules in the autumn term and choose two options in the spring term. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation. You will be assessed through coursework, an unseen examination, essays and a dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

Law at Sussex has active research groups in its primary research fields, exploring legal conceptualisations of responsibility and issues of citizenship and governance.

These groups meet regularly for the presentation of work in progress, as reading groups, to host external speakers and to plan the organisation of research seminars, workshops and conferences.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you want to work in any area of criminal law – from practising as a lawyer to policy review and reform – but particularly if you wish to pursue a career with an international angle.

Our graduates have progressed to work and research with human rights NGOs, in education, as legal professionals, with several working and interning at the international criminal tribunals in The Hague.

Several have also chosen to continue with doctoral-level study in the fields of human rights and international criminal law.

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This programme offers students from a wide variety of backgrounds the opportunity to develop their legal knowledge and skills in some of the most intellectually challenging and practically relevant areas of trade and commercial law. Read more
This programme offers students from a wide variety of backgrounds the opportunity to develop their legal knowledge and skills in some of the most intellectually challenging and practically relevant areas of trade and commercial law. The course has a particular emphasis upon the international aspects of these areas of legal knowledge and practice.

During the first two terms of the programme, students study taught modules drawn from a wide variety of topics on international trade and commercial law. Students then complete their studies by writing a dissertation on a topic chosen by them, and supervised by a member of staff with expertise in their selected subject area. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminar or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research with individual supervision.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The School is host to the Institute of Commercial and Corporate Law, and students on the LLM are encouraged to participate in its activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environement Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to EU Law
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation). In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation stimulates a critical awareness of the operation of international environmental law and policy, and features a particular focus on topics that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You develop a sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy, and the contexts within which international law operates.

You study the theoretical, social, political and scientific perspectives that underlie the substantive areas of law, as well as the practical situations in which international environmental law operates. Graduates of the LLM take with them the knowledge and expertise required to pursue a professional or academic career in this contemporary and developing discipline.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and three defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW852 European Union Environmental Law and Policy

LW906 International Environmental Law – Legal Foundations

LW884 International Environmental Law – Substantive Legal Aspects

LW888 Climate Change and Renewable Energy Law

Assessment
The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit Us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Read more
This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, as well as in areas falling outside those commercial law subjects, such as in International Co-operation in Criminal Law, or International Human Rights.

Having completed your taught modules, you will undertake an extended dissertation of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words in length, under the supervision of a member of staff who is an expert in your chosen field of research. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminars or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The Law School hosts a number of research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Durham European Law Institute, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice and the Human Rights Centre. Students are encouraged to participate in all their activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environment Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to EU Law
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation). In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of the law of the European Union, with particular emphasis upon its commercial aspects. Read more
This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of the law of the European Union, with particular emphasis upon its commercial aspects. If you are new to European law, there is a (compulsory) foundation course providing a solid grounding in the subject. Having completed your choice of taught modules, you will then undertake an extended dissertation on a European law topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff with expertise in their chosen subject area.

Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminar or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research with individual supervision. Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme

The School is host to the Durham European Law Institute, and you are encouraged to participate in its many activities. The Library, which includes a European Documentation Centre, has extensive holdings of European materials.

Course Structure

Students must study modules in Introduction to EU law, and Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Introduction to EU Law (unless you have previously studied such a module)
-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environment Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

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International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject. Read more
International trade is a complex and ever evolving area, requiring practitioners to be at the cutting edge of the subject.

On the LLM International Trade Law you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. You will gain specialist legal knowledge within a practical context, whilst developing expertise in these areas and enhancing your research skills.

With maximum flexibility in mind, this distance learning course allows you to work towards your LLM in stages. To access the LLM you will have previously completed the awards of Postgraduate Certificate and Postgraduate Diploma.

Students are required to pass three modules: Legal Research, International Sale Contracts, and Carriage of Goods. There are no examinations for each module. Instead, students research and write a 3,000 word essay on a topic selected by the module tutor. They graduate with the PgCert International Trade Law and may, if they wish, continue on to study for the PgDip International Trade Law the next academic year.

Learn From The Best

Study on the LLM International Trade Law and you will learn from inspirational academics that have a real passion for their subject. The course is accredited by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales, and is shaped by internationally excellent research to ensure the course is up-to-date and relevant.

Lecturers on this course have research expertise and practice-based experience in the areas of international business transactions; international commercial litigation; international commercial arbitration, international public procurement regulation; comparative corporate and financial law, and EU law; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

The course is delivered by Northumbria Law School, three times winners of the prestigious “Best Law School” accolade, awarded by the Attorney General’s Student Pro Bono Awards.

Teaching And Assessment

On this innovative distance learning LLM International Trade Law course you will acquire a wide range of knowledge on issues relevant to international trade, such as international sale contracts, carriage of goods and international dispute resolution and in areas such as international finance, intellectual property, international energy law and transnational competition law. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and applying what you have learnt to your own organisation.

You will learn through a combination of online lectures and seminars and eLearning technology, able to tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Modules are assessed through coursework and for the award of LLM, you will complete a 15,000-17,000-word project, based on an area related to your own practice or intended practice.

Module Overview
LW7003 - Legal Research (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7036 - Carriage of Goods (Core, 20 Credits)
LW7051 - International Sale Contracts (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

The eLearning Portal provides students with written materials that are the equivalent to ten (10) one-hour lecture periods and five (5) two-hour workshop periods on the FT LLM International Trade Law. Written lecture materials tend to focus on the delivery of a particular legal topic and written workshop materials tend to focus on the actual application of topics in practical situations which business persons or lawyers would encounter. The DL PgCert/PgDip/LLM International Trade Law is practically oriented.

There is an on-line surgery at the beginning of each module with the module tutor, and an optional Study Day is held on campus on a Saturday near the beginning of each module. The Study Day is recorded using Panopto so that students who are unable to attend in person can view and listen to the day’s learning activities. There is no difference in the substantive content of each module between the DL PgCert/PgDip International Trade Law and the FT LLM International Trade Law.

Research-Rich Learning

Research rich learning (RRL) is embedded through the programme. Law School research focuses on the areas of Law and Society, Legal Education and Professional Skills, and the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies. These internationally recognised groups act as a focus for research activity across the Law School, and their work feeds into the courses to ensure taught course content is informed by research developments in the sector.

The LLM culminates in the project module in which you will undertake a piece of independent legal research, informed by current practice and advanced scholarship and research, including a critical awareness and evaluation of current issues and developments in the field.

Give Your Career An Edge

The LLM is designed to enhance your career prospects in the international trade law arena. You will be encouraged to reflect upon your own practice, applying legal skills to the common problems you are experiencing or are likely to experience in practice, examine policies and undertake independent legal research to update your knowledge. You will have the opportunity to produce a project in your chosen field undertaking research and personal development in an area of particular relevance to your work.

The course is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) by the Law Society of England and Wales and the General Council of the Bar of England and Wales.

Your Future

The LLM International Trade Law course has been designed to meet the needs of practitioners in business and industry and law firms engaged in the area of international trade law.

You will graduate fully equipped with expert legal knowledge, greater awareness of legal commercial issues, and the ability to critically evaluate legal issues in the context of international trade law. You will be able to further develop your intellectual curiosity, to recognise uncertainty in the law, to produce and present reasoned arguments and to offer creative solutions to complex legal and ethical problems. You will develop your critical, analysis, research and the professional and reflective skills necessary for practice in this exciting field.

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LLB Law. Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. . As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will. Read more

LLB Law: Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. 

As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will:

  • Gain a sound grounding in the Law of England and Wales
  • Learn how to apply legal concepts in a practical environment
  • Gain transferable skills, including team working, communication, presentation, problem-solving, research and analytical skills

Key Features of the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) 

  • Graduates achieve an LLB accredited Law degree
  • This course covers all the compulsory foundation modules required for a qualifying law degree

Choosing law will enable you to expand your intellectual skills in the context of a discipline which touches upon every aspect of human endeavour. As the degree progresses you will notice a marked improvement in your ability to manage large amounts of materials, to express yourself in an organised and convincing manner both in writing and orally, and to evaluate the strength of arguments you encounter. Not only will this give you a sense of personal satisfaction, but you will also have acquired skills which are highly relevant to a range of career options attracting competitive salaries.

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) Programme

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) may include:

Year 1

  • Contract Law 1
  • European Law 1
  • Public Law 1
  • Tort 1
  • Contract 2
  • European Law 2
  • Public Law 2
  • Tort Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Medical Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Planning Law
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law

Year 2

  • Criminal Law 1
  • Land Law 1
  • Equity and Trusts 1
  • Criminal Law 2
  • Equity and Trusts 2
  • Land Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Legal History of Wales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Planning Law
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Agreements
  • Terrorism: The Legal Response
  • Criminal Evidence
  • Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Medical Law
  • International Law - Principles and Procedures
  • Jurisprudence
  • Company Law: Incorporation, Constitution and Control
  • Sports Law and Liability
  • Legislation
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Criminal Procedure and Sentencing
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Dominance
  • Human rights-based research with children
  • Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Company Law: Governance, Rights and Liquidation
  • Legal Issues in Sport
  • Multi-level Governance
  • Cymraeg y Gyfraith
  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Street Law
  • Medical Law: Reproduction

Graduate Employability and Careers

The College of Law and Criminology takes a proactive approach to enhancing graduate employability. The College offers a range of local, national and international work placements, professional courses and the advice and support to help you develop the skills to achieve your ambitions.

Our Law graduates find careers in:

  • Advice Worker
  • Barrister
  • Barrister's Clerk
  • Chartered Accountant
  • Chartered Legal Executive
  • Civil Service
  • Company Secretary
  • Lecturer
  • Licensed Conveyancer
  • Patent Attorney
  • Police
  • Researcher
  • Solicitor
  • Stockbroker
  • Trading Standards Officer


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International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects states but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Read more

International law is a dynamic subject which has to respond to real world problems. It directly affects states but is increasingly a matter of concern for public and private international and national organisations and individuals. Given contemporary and future global problems – for example, protecting human rights and security and the conservation of resources – the significance of international law is growing in a multipolar world.

This programme will enhance your understanding and challenge preconceptions of the complex legal and political nature of international law-making and governance and explore the often competing concepts that infuse the subject of international law.

You’ll investigate and apply the theories, principles and rules of international law to novel problems, real-world and hypothetical scenarios, and examine the rules, legal and political bodies such as the Security Council and the International Court of Justice and underlying policies governing international law.

You’ll benefit from the expertise of leading academics in a stimulating research environment. Our research groups include:

Course content

This programme includes Global Governance Through Law and International Human Rights Law as compulsory modules, and offers many optional modules in specialised subjects in international law. You’ll critically engage with a rich collection of contemporary themes set against the background of the concerns and activities of states and non-state actors in the international community.

You’ll also examine controversial areas of international law including how human rights laws are developed, how international laws are made and to what extent they are applied, the structure of relevant institutions such as the UN, the development of legal norms and the monitoring of states.

The programme will give you the opportunity to:

  • explore the legal nature of international law on a global, regional and local level
  • examine the impact of international law on contemporary problems
  • consider how international law has failed to address certain issues and may be harnessed to tackle future problems
  • investigate principles relating to sovereignty, universality, jurisdiction, territory, self-determination and human rights
  • hone your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll demonstrate in your dissertation.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programme, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a mixture of related subjects of interest to you.

If you're a part-time student, you’ll take three compulsory modules in your first year and two optional modules. In your second year, you’ll carry out your dissertation and study one or two optional modules.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits
  • Global Governance through Law 30 credits

Optional modules

  • International Human Rights and Disabled People 15 credits
  • European Human Rights 15 credits
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution 15 credits
  • International Corporate Rescue 15 credits
  • World Trade Organisation Law 15 credits
  • International Economic Law 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Law LLM Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is through seminars and lectures in which a high level of student engagement and discussion is expected. You are encouraged to carry out significant advanced levels of independent legal research.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by essays. This is usually the most effective method for you to showcase advanced legal research.

Career opportunities

Students who have graduated from this degree often choose careers that centre on or involve understanding and applying international law and developing policies at organisational level. Further training is required but many also go on to practise as lawyers or legal advisors.

Our alumni include people working at the EU Commission, at the United Nations, non-governmental organisations and in the government sector.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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Developing an elaborate understanding of European and international law, including in-depth knowledge of the external dimension of EU law and the rules that govern the Union’s international relations. Read more
Developing an elaborate understanding of European and international law, including in-depth knowledge of the external dimension of EU law and the rules that govern the Union’s international relations.

The Master’s specialisation in International and European Law Advanced gives you the opportunity to acquire an advanced understanding of the core issues of European Union law and public international law. This specialisation offers considerable freedom to focus on the subjects that you find most relevant for your future career. Besides EU competition law and external relations law, you may choose to enrol in courses on topics of public international law, including international arbitration or international individual criminal responsibility. You may also further deepen your knowledge of EU internal market law, immigration law, or European private law. You can therefore apply a particular focus yourself, and opt for a thematic package instead of a purely disciplinary one, something that is not common in other programmes and law schools.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/advanced

Peace, security, human rights and sustainable development

All important issues that are relevant in today’s globalised landscape will be discussed in the courses, for example, maintaining peace and security, protecting human rights, and promoting sustainable development. The core programme centres on how the European Union law upholds these principles, and how it relates to and influences other actors like the United States, the BRIC countries, and international organisations such as the United Nations. Students will become fully aware of the dynamic interplay between national, European and international law: a process that develops and changes constantly.

Unlike other specialisations in the Master’s programme of European Law, this specialisation aims at training students to become a generalist in the field: a person with intricate and comprehensive knowledge of international and European law who grasps the bigger picture. The programme is therefore well-suited to those interested in a profession in academia and research, legal consultancy or diplomacy.

Why study International and European Law Advanced at Radboud University?

- Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

- You’ll study at a Law School that is rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.

- The Faculty of Law in Nijmegen was the first in the Netherlands to set up a dedicated European Law programme. It has built an international reputation in the field of European law, immigration law and private law, and is part of a large network that includes more than fifty universities in Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia.

- The international mix of students gives the classes and project work a multicultural touch. This will give you the extra benefit of gaining multicultural communication skills as well as a multitude of legal and cultural perspectives in this field. By the time you receive your Master's diploma, you’ll have gained excellent skills to work in the Netherlands or in any other country.

- Students of Radboud University regularly take part in international and European Law moot court competitions, enabling you to put academic theory into legal practise during your studies.

- You have the option of going abroad, either for an internship or to follow additional courses as an exchange student at our academic partner institutions. This adds to your personal international experience as well as increasing your knowledge further. Our professors have a good network, and are willing to assist you in finding a position that meets your interests, for example at the OSCE or the Council of Europe.

Change perspective

At Radboud University you will not only learn what the law entails, but also why it has come to be this way. And if a different approach might be possible. In this way you will come to a profound understanding of the law. A theoretic study is combined with practical insights to provide a good mix. Many teachers still practice law in one form or another and enrich their lectures with real-life cases. This will broaden your horizon and enhance your perspective as a lawyer.

Career prospects

Besides in-depth knowledge of international and European law, you’ll also acquire the skills needed to conduct high-level legal research, or policy analysis in adjacent fields. In the field of law, linguistic skills are also extremely important. This intensive Master’s programme enables non-native speakers to improve their legal English, in order to successfully pursue a career in an international, often English-speaking, environment.

The specialisation offers you a broad perspective on European Union and international law, and is therefore most suited to students interested to take up positions in research, consultancy or diplomacy. At the same time, graduates are also well-qualified for work in the practise of law, counselling and advocacy. Prospective employers interested in your expertise include NGOs and international organisations such as the European Commission, the European Central Bank, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, the United Nations, international courts and tribunals, lobby organisations, and charity foundations.

Our approach to this field

At Radboud University, we strive for clear practical relevance of academic knowledge.
1. Many of our lecturers are also law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain rules, legal instruments or strategies.

2. Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their experiences, enlightening students with real-world scenarios, and providing them with tips on how to deal with cases that don’t follow the official norms.

3. In the Master’s programme in European Law we focus on the law in force, and in accordance with the approach of professionals, focus on justifying decisions in legal terms, in reference to legal rules, principles, and precedents. However, we don’t shy away from critically analysing those rules, principles and precedents, indicating possible alternatives and desired emendations where necessary.


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/advanced

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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international commercial and business law before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international commercial and business law before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our School of Law.

At Essex, you can progress onto our LLM International Commercial and Business Law.

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also develop an understanding of the substantive issues of law necessary for the successful study of law at Masters level, improving your knowledge in the subject area and familiarising you with the legal terminology and concepts.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are Top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for law.

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our extensive law facilities:
-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
Take advantage of networking opportunities with visiting law firms

Example structure

-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-English for Academic Purposes
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-International Trade Law
-Criminal Law
-Tort Law (optional)
-Equity and Trusts (optional)
-Public Law II (optional)
-Family Law (optional)
-Introduction to Public International Law (optional)
-Selected Issues in Public International Law (optional)
-European Human Rights Law (optional)
-Banking Law (optional)
-Company Law (optional)
-Investigating Miscarriages of Justice (optional)
-Race Equality Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law II (optional)
-Clinical Legal Education (Law Placement) (optional)
-Consumer Contract Law (optional)
-Commercial Contract Law (optional)
-Employment Law and Practice
-Understanding Judges (optional)
-Jurisprudence I (optional)
-Law of the European Union (optional)
-Land Law (optional)
-Law of Evidence (optional)
-Intellectual Property Law (optional)
-Commercial Property I (optional)
-Cybercrime (optional)
-Competition Law (optional)
-Internet Law and Regulation (optional)
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Law, Policy and Practice (optional)
-Music Law (optional)
-Project: Law (optional)
-Advanced Legal Advice Case Work (optional)
-Criminology (optional)
-Justice (optional)

Read less
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international trade law before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of international trade law before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our School of Law.

At Essex, you can progress onto our LLM International Trade Law.

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also study international trade law and legal systems, evaluate sources critically, and learn to produce a synthesis of relevant doctrinal and policy issues.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are Top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for law.

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our extensive law facilities:
-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
-Take advantage of networking opportunities with visiting law firms

Example structure

-Legal Research and the English Legal System
-English for Academic Purposes
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-International Trade Law
-Criminal Law
-Tort Law (optional)
-Equity and Trusts (optional)
-Public Law II (optional)
-Family Law (optional)
-Introduction to Public International Law (optional)
-Selected Issues in Public International Law (optional)
-European Human Rights Law (optional)
-Banking Law (optional)
-Company Law (optional)
-Investigating Miscarriages of Justice (optional)
-Race Equality Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law I (optional)
-Medicine & the Law II (optional)
-Clinical Legal Education (Law Placement) (optional)
-Consumer Contract Law (optional)
-Commercial Contract Law (optional)
-Employment Law and Practice
-Understanding Judges (optional)
-Jurisprudence I (optional)
-Law of the European Union (optional)
-Land Law (optional)
-Law of Evidence (optional)
-Intellectual Property Law (optional)
-Commercial Property I (optional)
-Cybercrime (optional)
-Competition Law (optional)
-Internet Law and Regulation (optional)
-Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice: Law, Policy and Practice (optional)
-Music Law (optional)
-Project: Law (optional)
-Advanced Legal Advice Case Work (optional)
-Criminology (optional)
-Justice (optional)

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Law and the Humanities is a distinct field of interdisciplinary study of growing significance. As the only programme of its kind in the UK, this LLM specialisation, taught at the University’s Canterbury and Paris centres, offers a unique perspective on the study and practice of law.

It draws upon the theoretical and methodological richness of the humanities, including history, political and social theory, literature, theatre and visual culture studies, to equip students with the conceptual tools and skills for a more thorough understanding of the traditions and workings of the law. It develops and strengthens students’ analytical, critical, and imaginative capabilities, and cultivates specific skills such as textual analysis, critical reading, and effective argument.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive - your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels campus). The KLS programmes enable you to gain expertise in a wide range of international and domestic subjects and to develop advanced, transferable research, writing and oral communication skills. All of our LLM and Diploma programmes allow you to broaden and deepen your understanding and knowledge of law.

Our programmes attract excellent law graduates from around the world and are also open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Several modules from the MA on Resistance offered by the School of Politics are also available.

LW 927 - Law and the Humanities I: Ethos and Scholarship - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW927
LW 928 - Law and the Humanities 2: Current Issues - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW928
LW 925 - Cultural Heritage Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW925
LW 843 - International Human Rights Law - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW843
LW 813 - Contemporary Topics in Intellectual Property - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/modules/module/LW813

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

- LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

- LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

- LLM & PDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

- LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

- LLM & PDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

- LLM & PDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

- LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

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