• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Queen Mary University of London Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
"international" AND "crim…×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (International Criminal Justice)

  • "international" AND "criminal" AND "justice" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 258
Order by 
This distance learning degree will develop your understanding of the internationalisation of criminal justice and the importance of comparative perspectives, for an informed broad-based understanding of international criminal justice in the contemporary context. Read more

Why take this course?

This distance learning degree will develop your understanding of the internationalisation of criminal justice and the importance of comparative perspectives, for an informed broad-based understanding of international criminal justice in the contemporary context.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study a curriculum that is responsive to the diverse international backgrounds of students
Examine national and international criminal justice with reference to international norms and standards of human rights and police ethics
Study the development of international and transnational offending from criminological, legal and political perspectives

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course supports entry to or promotion within careers that have an international policing context. This could include working for international criminal justice and law enforcement bodies such as Europol, Interpol and the International Office of Migration, or working as an investigators or administrator at international criminal tribunals. Alternatively, careers in private sector investigation or national/international non-governmental agencies would be open to you.

Module Details

On this course you will study:

International Justice: This unit covers concept of justice and the differing systems of criminal justice. You will also review the development and source of international norms and standards in criminal justice; the role, function and policy-making processes of international criminal justice bodies; the human rights system within United Nation and European Union criminal police and judicial cooperation.

Research Methods and Research Management: Research methods in crime, criminal justice and related settings include complex statistical modelling and analysis, surveys to establish self-reported offending and victimisation, in-depth interviews, ethnographies, as well as various forms of content, narrative and documentary analysis. This unit prepares you for your dissertation and will give you an overview of many of the possibilities, as well as directions on where to look for more information and ideas about particular techniques, approaches or issues. It covers structured literature reviews, the web and the methodology behind systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Dissertation: You will conduct a small-scale 15,000-word research project, giving you the chance to demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole. You will need to demonstrate your grasp of research design, methods and ethics, as well as your personal organisation and planning in the conduct of your criminal justice research-based project. You will choose you own topic taking into account academic advice and guidance as well as the broad parameters of the expertise of the Institute’s academic staff.

You will also choose two optional units from:

International and Transnational Offending

Contemporary Security in International Relations

Managing Justice and Security Organisations

International Fraud and Corruption

Cybercrime, Risk and Security Management (Campus Block Teaching)

Please note that all options are subject to minimum student numbers and may not all be available. The course structure may vary from year to year, but course content and learning opportunities will not be diminished by this.

Professional Accreditation

Through their studies students can also gain professional accreditation that could assist them in the development of their further career prospects. These opportunities are for 0 credit professional Units, in addition to their normal study programme. Opportunities include those from the:

College of Policing, with the Certificate of Knowledge in Policing (exempting them from parts of police training), subject to any additional requirements set down by the College of Policing.

Counter Fraud Professional Accreditation Board, as an Accredited Counter Fraud Technician (ACFTech), subject to additional requirements set down by the Counter Fraud Professional Accreditation Board

Counter Fraud Professional Accreditation Board, as an Accredited Counter Fraud Specialist (ACFS), subject to additional requirements set down by the Counter Fraud Professional Accreditation Board.

Programme Assessment

This course is delivered entirely over the web. You will have access to our virtual learning environment where the learning materials are hosted. These include specially authored online multimedia learning materials, online 'thematic debates' and a broad range of electronic texts that cater for a diverse range of student interests, professional backgrounds and geographic locations. Throughout the course you will also have access to your course leader via a virtual classroom as a group and for one-to-one tutorials via Skype.

Assessment will be in the form of academic essays, some assessment of online discussion contributions, research reports, a literature review and dissertation proposal focussed on your chosen project, and finally a 15,000-word dissertation. For each assignment full academic support is provided by an academic subject expert and you will be provided with an academic supervisor once you have identified the subject area for your research project.

Student Destinations

Students have enrolled on the award to further develop their professional expertise in the international criminal justice or international policing context, or to help support a career change or specialisation in this direction. Our students have included UK police, civil servants or private sector investigators either within or moving towards international and transnational criminal justice responsibilities.

Over the years, we have also attracted a wide variety of nationalities working for international criminal justice and law enforcement bodies. These have included those performing a variety of roles within Europol, Interpol, the International Office of Migration, or those working as investigators or administrators at international criminal tribunals.

Read less
In 1998, Nottingham became the first Law School in the UK to offer a postgraduate module in international criminal justice. Read more
In 1998, Nottingham became the first Law School in the UK to offer a postgraduate module in international criminal justice. Since then, the LLM in International Criminal Justice and Armed Conflict has been further enriched with a list of complementary modules and has grown from strength to strength attracting students from all over the world.

This specialisation provides a holistic overview of the law governing the use of force by States, the law applicable to the conduct of hostilities, the measures adopted to combat terrorism, as well as the legal and philosophical responses to international criminality through the examination of the emerging system of international criminal justice. Current affairs issues and modern challenges to the law and politics surrounding war and justice are extensively discussed as part of the above modules.

Taught by internationally recognised experts in the field, supported by an impressive list of visiting speakers, LLM students will be immersed in this fascinating and fast-moving area of the law. The LLM at Nottingham allows students to acquire the requisite expertise in order to understand the intimate details of the workings of the law applicable prior to, during and following an armed conflict. Students will successfully apply this knowledge to their professional careers in the future.

Through an exclusive co-operation agreement held between the Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre and the International Criminal Court, selected students undertaking the LLM in International Criminal Justice and Armed Conflict will be given the opportunity to work on a project which forms part of the Court’s Legal Tools, further enhancing their exposure to application of the law in practice. Past graduates of this specialisation have secured internships with international organisations, courts and tribunals as well as NGO’s specialising in the field with many of them subsequently undertaking employment in their chosen area of expertise.

Since its introduction in 1987, our LLM programme has continued to grow in popularity and prestige. Offering a wide and diverse range of over 50 options, the programme now attracts some 150 to 180 candidates each year, from more than 50 countries, confirming its s

Read less
In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS). Read more
In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Programme Content

In the light of the close inter-relationship of international criminal justice and human rights, the International Criminal Justice & Human Rights programme offers students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of both these areas of law. The international criminal justice side of the programme sets out to provide students with a detailed understanding of contemporary issues relating to international criminal justice. Organised crime, terrorist threats and internal civil wars transcend national boundaries, impacting far beyond the interests of individual nation states. The effective detection, investigation and prosecution of crime are now dependent upon increased harmonisation and co-operation amongst global institutions. It is therefore no longer helpful or sufficient to confine the study of criminal justice to narrow jurisdictional confines. Similarly, the human rights dimension of the programme seeks to develop students' understanding of the main global and regional systems for the protection of human rights, as well as their appreciation of a selection of major issues of controversy in contemporary human rights law.

The programme offers five modules

Individual Criminal Liability in International Law focuses on the principles of individual liability and procedures in regard to the International Criminal Court, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. Transnational Crime and Counter-Terrorism considers the impact of the international response to organised crime and terrorism on traditional liberties and fundamental tenets such as freedom from torture, coercion and oppression in the state's pursuit of criminal investigations. It examines the judicial response to the admissibility of evidence obtained by torture into the legal process and explores the developing tensions between human rights and the duty of governments to protect their citizens from attack by organised terrorist networks.

UN Human Rights Law introduces students to the major UN human rights treaties and the other UN mechanisms for the protection and promotion of human rights. Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Africa, America, and Europe focuses on three advanced regional legal systems governing and affecting fundamental rights, examining their constituting treaties and associated institutions. Global Human Rights: Traditions & Inspirations seeks to promote students' understanding of human rights at a conceptual level by considering the issue of the universality of human rights in the light of varying cultural traditions from across the globe.

Methods of Assessment

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Read less
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

Following a specialisation in International Criminal Justice enables you to develop a critical understanding of the operation of international and transnational criminal justice, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution. You learn about the main legal instruments and institutions that provide for international co-operation and prosecution of international, transnational and national crime and the impact of human rights and combine this with critical reflection of the broader context and of the effectiveness of law.

There is co-operation with the MA in Criminology, run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. In addition to available law options, you may choose one module from the MA in Criminology. This includes modules on terrorism and sociological theories of violence and gender and crime in a globalised world.

You are also encouraged to participate in the activities of the Kent Centre for Critical International Law (CeCIL).

International Criminal Justice will be of particular interest to those who work, intend to work, or have an interest in the fields of international and transnational criminal justice, criminal justice and human rights more broadly.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact.

An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

As a student on the LLM at Canterbury, your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation with your dissertation also focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are also required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you will need to choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining which is your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW843 International Human Rights Law

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog - http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/klsemployability/postgraduates/llm-internships/

Learn more about Kent

Visit us - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/visit/openday/pgevents.html

International Students - https://www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/

Why study at Kent? - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Read less
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

Read less
Criminal Justice is a one-year Master’s at the renowned Leiden Law School at Leiden University. The programme focuses on criminology, criminal law and their mutual relationship. Read more
Criminal Justice is a one-year Master’s at the renowned Leiden Law School at Leiden University. The programme focuses on criminology, criminal law and their mutual relationship. It is unique in its cross-national and multidisciplinary scope.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/criminal-justice/en/introduction

Course detail

Criminal Justice is a one-year Master’s programme at the renowned Leiden Law School at Leiden University. This programme focuses on legitimacy and effectiveness of criminal justice systems around the world and the challenges they face in a globalising world. Applying a comparative perspective, criminal justice systems are analysed regarding their ability to deal with crimes that take place both within and beyond their national borders. Transnational crimes like human trafficking and terrorism increasingly demand coordinated criminal justice responses on a European or international level. The comparative study of criminal justice institutions therefore includes the study of supra-national bodies.

Comparative and multidisciplinary perspectives

The Criminal Justice Master distinguishes itself by its international comparative perspective, analysing criminal justice systems, legislation and policies in common law and civil law countries. The programme is unique both in its comparative and multidisciplinary focus. Students from all over the world with different backgrounds, such as Criminology, Social sciences, Law, Political sciences, and Philosophy, critically engage themselves with important questions in small-scale groups. Leiden Law School is located in two beautifully renovated national monuments in the historic heart of the medieval city of Leiden. Leiden is the place to study Criminal Justice because of its vicinity to the Hague: international city of peace and justice.

Purpose

Due to the Criminal Justice Master’s unique multidisciplinary and comparative perspective, graduates gain a deep understanding of the dynamics against which criminal justices processes take place. As the program provides students with a broad and solid background in the realm of Criminal Justice, they are widely deployable in a variety of national and international institutions. At the same time, they are offered plenty of space to pursue their own specific topics of interest through various practical assignments.

Format

This programme is interactive and taught in small groups resulting in compelling discussions with students from all over the world with different disciplinary and (legal) cultural backgrounds. As a result, you will benefit from an extremely rich and interactive learning environment. Another advantage is that the academic staff in this Master has close ties with the relevant Criminal Justice issues in practice. Apart from following lectures, you will also participate in fieldtrips to Dutch and international institutions such as the Netherlands’ Council of State, Europol and the European Parliament.

Careers

The Criminal Justice Master’s programme offered by the Leiden Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology is the gateway to an exciting national or international career. The programme is optimally designed to suit requirements for professional positions. Possible career perpectives are:

- Consultant for municipalities, NGO’s or other national or international organizations that deal with international crime and safety issues
- Policy maker for actors in the criminal justice system or government
- Policy maker for international organizations that deal with crime control
- Academic researcher

How to apply:

http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

Read less
Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment. Read more

Overview

Are you fascinated by criminology? Hoping to increase your suitability for higher level positions within the criminal justice sector? Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme will help you to develop an advanced understanding of the contemporary issues and debates surrounding criminal justice institutions, crime and criminal punishment.

- The course is delivered by an experienced course team with established links to criminal justice agencies, private businesses and charities.
- The teaching team are active researchers and have contributed internationally renowned research projects.
- Students study contemporary and comparative criminology, criminal justice and essential human science research skills.
- Students can also tailor the degree to their own unique career ambitions, picking from optional units in penology, international policing, historic crime, drugs and terror security.
- Optional study trips are available throughout the year, including an unfunded visit to the USA.
- The course concludes with a final research project, where students will research and write a unique dissertation under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.
- Many students focus their dissertation on the area of criminology in which they would like to work, using it to demonstrate their knowledge to employers after graduation.
- Students benefit from small class sizes and regular one-to-one support.

The industry -

Whether you want to work in the social support and welfare sector, in the justice system or with relevant charities - your understanding of criminology and criminal justice will give you the opportunity to make a positive impact on people’s lives.

This is an essential degree for many careers in these sectors, but can also help with a range of roles in other industries. These include various applied and research-based roles that focus on helping people with social or personal issues and supporting the rehabilitation of offenders.

The programme -

Students on Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme study the core curriculum alongside a choice of two specialist units. This chance to specialise is important, helping students to orient their knowledge towards specific roles in the criminal justice sector.

This programme also encourages students to develop a range of transferable interpersonal and verbal communication skills through presentations, role-plays, debates, interviews and group work. These competencies are valued in a wide range of industries.

To find out more about the content of each specific unit, please see the ‘course content’ tab.
Enrichment activities and learning opportunities are available alongside the core curriculum, giving students the chance to learn from guest speakers, visit criminal justice organisations and network at industry events. These additional activities help to provide detailed insights into the criminal justice system and the careers it offers. Past speakers have come from the police, courts, prisons, probation services, youth justice services and cyber security firms.

The course team themselves have had extensive experience of the criminal justice system and its related disciplines, providing students with unique personal insights. The ties they have with the professional world have helped past students secure volunteer placements, temporary paid work, work shadowing weeks and internships.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through lectures, group work and projects, and supervision for independent writing and research.

You will be allocated a personal tutor and a dissertation research supervisor.

Work experience -

Past students have completed a wide range of interesting and informative placements with:

- the Association of Chief Police Officers Criminal Records Office
- the criminal justice sector (paid work)
- witness and victim services
- probation services
- youth offending teams
- voluntary positions in the criminal justice field.

Assessment -

You will participate in group work, independent writing and research, group projects and discussions. You will be assessed via a number of 3,500-word assignments and individual and group presentations, in addition to a 20,000-word dissertation.
Study abroad
We run an optional ten-day study trip to the USA during the Christmas break, with visits to the FBI and New Jersey State Police.

There will be opportunities to attend lectures and share views and ideas with students at Ocean County College and Monmouth University. Please note this trip is not included in your tuition fees, and you’ll need to cover your travel and living costs.

Other study trip opportunities may also be available.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

With this internationally respected qualification, you’ll be well placed to pursue a variety of career opportunities.

Past graduates have pursued careers in police management, international law enforcement, the National Offender Management Service, financial security and academia.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Prison service
- Police
- Probation
- Courts
- Drugs services
- Security
- Public and private sector security and investigation
- Local government community safety

Links with industry -

We welcome regular guest lecturers who provide a detailed insight into working in the criminal justice sector and prospective career opportunities.

Recent speakers have included:

- serving and former police detectives in the Metropolitan and Hampshire Police
- serving chief officers from Hampshire and Dorset Police
- judges and magistrates
- staff from the National Crime Agency, the Association of Chief Police Officers, the National Offender Management Service and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Transferable skills -

You will gain a detailed understanding of criminological issues, which can be applied to many different careers. You will also develop your research and critical analysis skills and gain experience in communication, teamwork and leadership.

Further study -

The MSc provides a solid foundation for subsequent research at MPhil and PhD level.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £5,665

International full-time fees: £12,380

UK and EU part-time fees, year one: £1,895

UK and EU part-time fees, year two: £3,790

International part-time fees: £6,190 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Would you like to improve your career prospects within the criminal justice sector? With an expert teaching team, strong links with industry and a curriculum, tailored to suit your ambitions, Southampton Solent University’s postgraduate criminology and criminal justice programme could be the ideal next step towards your dream career.

Read less
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc. Read more
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc.

Who is it for?

This degree is for independent, critical thinkers who want to work, or are working, within criminal justice or want to undertake further research. Many of our students have undergraduate criminology degrees, and come from universities across the world. Often they want to continue their learning or specialise within a specific subject area. Students also come from other science, humanities and legal backgrounds and from within the criminal justice system. Research methods form a key component of the programme so having an interest in data collection and analysis is valuable.

"To understand crime in the 21st century you have to have specialist criminological knowledge. We don’t just focus on the criminal act; we look at the societal reaction to crime and the cultural narratives that exist around it. At City we will encourage you to develop your criminological imagination but also to use it." - Professor Eugene McLaughlin

Objectives

At City we believe crime is multi-dimensional, which is why this MSc course brings the victim into focus, not just the offender. The criminal mind is complex and our understanding of it matters – not just to the individual, but also to their family, the community and wider society at large.

We live in a criminogenic global society; one that is producing new forms of crime, and new criminal opportunities. City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc course unpicks the power of the criminological imagination within this society.

This is not a Masters that focuses purely on criminal justice or crime control – instead we emphasise cutting-edge theoretical analysis and methodological training, so you can research the contemporary significance of crime and see how it can be a powerful marker of social and institutional change.

Originally part of City’s MA in Human Rights, this degree offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between criminology and human rights violations. It is global in outlook because, by its nature, crime is transnational and is taught by eminent criminologists who author the books that appear on reading lists across the country.

Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Why don’t more people commit criminal acts?
-What does crime tell us about the society in which we live?
-Why is crime considered abnormal but at the same time central to news, fiction and popular culture?
-What would a victim-centred justice system look like?

Academic facilities

When it comes to studying criminology, London is an amazing facility. It is one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories offering a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy, justice and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We will teach you through a combination of lectures, interactive workshops and seminars, in the first and second term (September-April). This is supplemented by insight from external visiting criminologists, criminal justice charities, research agencies and, in some cases, retired criminals. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions, debate your ideas and present your own evidence around particular arguments.

During the dissertation phase of the degree you also have the chance to visit the Central Criminal Court (otherwise known as the Old Bailey) and in some cases undertake a prison visit. One student is currently in New York, researching the New York Police Department, as part of her dissertation on the stresses of being a police officer in 2016.

The majority of postgraduate sociology modules are assessed by coursework. However, if you choose to study some modules outside of the department you may have different assessment methods so please check this carefully. You will need to gain a minimum pass mark of 50% in all assessment components.

The dissertation marks the point in the course where you begin to take hold of your research and let your criminological imagination come into play. The dissertation (of 15,000 words) accounts for one third of the total marks for the Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc degree. By the end of the first term you will have to start considering your dissertation topic. You may already know you area of focus, but we offer guidance and support through dissertation workshops.

Modules

You will take three 30-credit compulsory core modules and two 15-credit elective modules. You can then choose from two of four elective modules to hone your degree towards your own area of interest. In the final part of the course you take part in a dissertation workshop and produce a dissertation over the summer period.

The first module, ‘Analysing crime’ makes up the course’s theoretical base. You then research contemporary developments in criminal justice and penal policy within the second core module. At this point in the course you get to choose from a number of elective modules covering diverse topics including the dark side of media notoriety and celebrity, and the criminal mind. All these modules draw on the School’s research strengths making them unique to City.

Core modules
-Analysing crime
-Criminal justice policy and practice
-Research Workshop
-Dissertation

Elective modules
-The criminal mind
-Victims: policy and politics
-Developments in communication policy
-Celebrity

NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Career prospects

The Criminology and Criminal Justice course is taught by internationally recognised experts and prepares you for careers across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

From research to policy development and from the security services to the criminal justice system and victim support, you will have a wealth of employment options once you graduate. Previous graduates are now working in:
-The Metropolitan Police
-The National Probation service
-The UK Foreign Office
-The prison service
-Education
-Mental health
-Criminal justice charitable sector
-Doctoral research
-Prison Service

Read less
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?. Read more
Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector?

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills you will be well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors.

This course has several different available start dates and study options - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtfscj6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/criminology-and-criminal-justice-dtpscj6/

Learn From The Best

You will learn from a vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who will provide you with an outstanding learning experience, support and engagement in a research rich environment.

The academic team includes 16 criminology-specific academics with extensive research and engagement with the criminal justice system who bring their real-life experience to their teaching.

Nearly all criminology staff have received funding from leading research institutions and organisations such as Economic and Social Research Council, and they often work in partnership with state and third sector organisations such as Youth Offending Teams and homelessness charities.

They play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals.

The department also has excellent international links within Europe, America and Australia where members of the staff team have been Visiting Fellows and Professors.

Teaching And Assessment

You will learn about research methods and their relevance to the global study of criminology, giving you the relevant skills to conduct your own research and engage with contemporary debates. These debates will be covered in the areas of global penal policy, international policing and security, and social exclusion.

All modules are compulsory, but assessment topics and dissertation allow you to concentrate on your own areas of interest as you develop your knowledge of theory, methods and practical topics.

Your learning combines formal input and practical exercises and discussion, allowing you to develop your ideas through interaction with academic staff and your peers.

Your dissertation is an independent and innovative piece of work, which is designed to demonstrate your skills in researching, collecting evidence, and organising that evidence. Working independently, with the support of a tutor, you’ll find your own sources and evaluate their helpfulness to your study topic.

Module Overview
CR7001 - Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7002 - Comparative Penal Policy (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7003 - International Crime, Policing and Security (Core, 30 Credits)
CR7004 - Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core, 30 Credits)
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)

Learning Environment

We want to make sure that you can conduct your studies to the best of your abilities, so we’ll always do our best to ensure that you know exactly what is expected of you.

The academic team will help you develop the skills required to plan, manage and review your learning, and support you if you have any issues. A central principle of this system is to help you develop a well-honed ability to work independently upon graduation.

You will be given a dedicated dissertation supervisor with relevant subject expertise and you’ll also have a guidance tutor who will provide support for your personal and academic development.

As you progress, the links between taught elements and your own independent learning will be explained at regular intervals, giving you every opportunity to achieve your full potential.

Research-Rich Learning

According to the UK’s most recent research excellence framework, the criminologists on this course are producing research outputs of international quality within world-leading peer reviewed journals such as Criminology, British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Policing and Society, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, and the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice.

Research is embedded throughout your course at all stages. You will be introduced to research methods to equip you with all the relevant skills you’ll need throughout your studies and beyond.

The Advanced Study Skills module introduces higher level reading, writing and research skills to help support you through the course. Whatever your previous background this module will provide you with important skills to succeed with your studies and to boost subsequent career prospects.

Give Your Career An Edge

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice focuses on embedding skills to prepare you for a career in a crime related area or for further doctoral study.

You will write traditional essays and develop skills sought by employers through real-world assessments including debate logs, a critical literature review, a portfolio, a research bid and a dissertation.

The department has close links with a range of relevant agencies, including the Prison Service, law enforcement agencies and the voluntary sector, and these close networks will further enhance your learning experience throughout the course.

You will also have access to tailored career guidance in 1-to-1 and CV skills sessions with the Northumbria Careers team.

Your Future

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminological concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

Read less
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

Read less
Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas. Read more
Security is a major contemporary preoccupation; criminal law and criminal justice are key responses. This postgraduate degree in criminal law and criminal justice offers an exciting, challenging and distinctive opportunity to undertake advanced study in these areas.

The central focus of the programme is the interface between criminal law and criminal justice. It offers a theoretically informed and multidisciplinary course of study. In addition to studying the now established critical and theoretical perspectives relevant to criminal law and criminal justice, the programme also has a humanities focus, which offers an opportunity to explore and engage with cutting-edge scholarship in criminal law and criminal justice studies.

The programme is delivered by staff from the School of Law, the Institute of Criminal Policy Research at Birkbeck, and a range of visiting international scholars and practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Designed for students who are passionate about criminal law and criminal justice, who want to face new challenges, and who are interested in exploring and developing new critical perspectives on major contemporary national and international debates.
Flexible learning, studying in the evening, makes it particularly attractive to legal and criminal justice professionals and practitioners.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
The School of Law is also the home of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research. Mike Hough and Paul Turnbull, its co-directors, lead a team of outstanding researchers. They bring a wealth of knowledge to the Master's programme, participating in core and specialist modules and providing dissertation supervision.
We use technology, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. For example, it provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

Read less
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. Read more
Crime and punishment are issues of central importance to society and by bringing academic rigour to their examination the UCD Institute of Criminology contributes to the achievement of national priorities. The Institute brings together leading academics from across UCD and is the only centre of its kind in Ireland. Its members have conducted major research projects on a wide range of topics in the field of criminology and criminal justice, including work on coercive confinement, prison violence and desistance from crime. The work of the Institute has been the focus of debates in parliament, legislative and policy initiatives and numerous reports in the media.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- To understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and social policy that come to the fore in the study of Criminology and Criminal Justice;
- To apply their knowledge and understanding of Criminology and Criminal Justice to real and hypothetical factual situations;
- To conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

A specialisation in criminology and criminal justice will be of interest to graduates who want to work in one of the criminal justice
agencies and to those working in prisons, probation, policing and the courts. This specialisation will equip you with a head start for a career in criminal law and the criminal justice system.

Features

The Institute of Criminology offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Criminal Justice History considers the history of specific offences in a broad socio-political context. Offences examined will include the history of unlawful killing and the evolution of sexual offences alongside aspects of the criminal justice process.

- Advanced Criminological Theory explores key theories of crime both classic and recent, including biological, psychological and sociological explanations of criminal behaviour and their potential application in the Irish context.

- Crime and Punishment explores a number of central issues in criminal jurisprudence such as responsibility, culpability, harm and moral wrongdoing to deepen an understanding of the basis on which conduct is criminalised and criminal liability imposed.

- International and Transnational Crime focuses on the emergence of international criminal law has emerged as a distinct body of law responding to genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, before considering the impact of globalisation on crime.

Careers

This programme provides opportunities for those who wish to work or are already working in relevant areas, such as policing, youth justice, prisons, probation and voluntary organisations to enhance their knowledge of the field. It also provides a good platform for doctoral studies and a possible academic career in what has become an area of substantial growth in universities around the world.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/msccriminologyandcriminaljustice/apply,80113,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the
world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part- time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

Read less
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

Through critical and comparative studies of justice and the criminal litigation process this course will give you demonstrable understanding of the key principles that ground the UK criminal justice system, its issues, approaches and topical debates.

If you are a recent graduate, or already working within the criminal justice field, you'll further your academic and practical knowledge of the litigation process. The programme is also highly relevant to human rights workers and policy agents working in the UK or abroad. Upon completion you'll have acquired an in-depth and systematic understanding of criminal litigation and criminal justice and will be able to work at the cutting edge of practice and research in these areas.

This course is distinctive for the following reasons:

- Emphasis on human rights and justice issues;
- Practical legal problem-solving drawing upon a variety of legal and non-legal knowledge, understanding and skills;
- Leading practitioner insights into current legal and criminal justice practice issues;
- Strong national links with the legal profession;
- The learning environment is greatly enhanced by guest lectures, delivered by distinguished scholars and practitioners.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/crime-and-litigation-llm

Modules

Core Modules:
- Research methods
This module is essential to understanding the development, implementation, and analysis of graduate level research in legal studies. It is designed to assure that you have a comprehensive knowledge of research design development, and the ability to review and understand journal articles in various subjects of common law. The ultimate purpose of the Module is to encourage you to become engaged in independent legal research in order to be able to submit successfully the dissertation of 15,000 words by the end of the course. You'll build on the research skills already acquired in undergraduate studies by covering topics such as literature review, research presentation and research evaluation, with an emphasis on practical exercises.

- Criminal litigation
You'll be introduced to the structure and process of the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales and explores some of the socio-political issues, which arise from the function of the law in practice. You'll be provided with a critical overview of the system of justice and the key procedural decisions that are made within the system. You'll consider the process of justice via practical, classroom (and E-learning) based, engagement with the litigation process and use case studies and group role play to enhance their practical and theoretical understanding of the criminal process.

- Criminal justice
You'll critically consider the criminal justice system by exploring the role of key players in the criminal justice system such as a) the police b) the Crown Prosecution Service c) defence lawyers' d) magistrates, juries and judges. All those players both individually and collectively will be examined and evaluated.
Although we will focus mainly on the English criminal justice system, learners will be encouraged to take a wider comparative perspective to the various issues involved, special reference will be made to contemporary elements of victimology and the way the criminal justice system deals with different kind of victims in order to introduce learners to the various ways in which different agents of the criminal justice system deal with victims i.e. police and courts.

- Dissertation

Module options:
After completing core modules you'll choose from options that reflect the practical/ theoretical and social justice context of the course. Choices are made following discussion with your personal tutor and also guided by your own professional interests and career aspirations.
- International criminal law
- Evidence/science and technology
- Psychological aspects of investigation
- Decision making in the forensic context
- Advocacy
- Policing
- Investigative psychology
- Terrorism
- Citizenship and combating crime in the EU

- Criminal litigation
If you're interested in criminal litigation you may prefer options such as: Advocacy, Evidence, Forensic Science and Technology or International Criminal Law

- Criminal justice
Or if you want to focus on the criminal justice system you may prefer options such as: Policing, Terrorism, Investigative Psychology, Forensic Psychology.

Study modes

Full-time:
- 14 months (taught stage: October-June; dissertation: July-October)
-Full-time; six modules plus a dissertation to be completed July-October

Part-time:
- Part-time: 26 months (taught stage: October-June years one and two. Dissertation: July-October or July to January in year 2)

- Three modules a year for two years; plus a dissertation completed July-January, or, July-October. Students can alternatively opt for the accelerated part-time learning mode (Saturday classes).

All modules (core and optional) achieve a balance between practice, theory and the development of professional skills.

Employability

Upon completion of the course you'll have developed advanced legal practice skills and an informed and reflective understanding of the criminal justice system. As well as legal practice, graduates of this LLM may seek employment in a variety of related fields such as research and policy making the police, prison and probation services.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or, a combination of coursework, presentations and online assessments. Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports.

Read less
Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes. The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'. Read more

Why this course?

Study full or part-time with the option of early evening classes.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change examines the range of legal, political and social responses across the world to what is widely known as 'the penal crisis'.

Blending a rigorous understanding of fundamental theory with evidence about real world problems you’ll analyse recent innovations in theory, policy and practice.

Drawing on a range of disciplinary approaches, the course will enable you to develop a rational and just response to crime.

The LLM/MSc in Criminal Justice & Penal Change is unique in both its approach and its flexibility.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/criminaljusticepenalchange/

Study mode and duration:
- LLM/MSc: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
- PgDip: 9 months full-time; 21 months part-time
- PgCert: 8 months part-time

Key features

- our focus is on pressing contemporary national and international issues of policy and practice
- you can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc
- study full-time or part-time
- learn from a world-class teaching team
- students are from a range of nationalities and disciplinary backgrounds
- you'll benefit from the work of the Centre for Law, Crime and Justice

Who is the course suitable for?

- practitioners working in a wide range of law, justice and welfare areas
- professionals developing justice policy
- members of the third /voluntary sector
- recent graduates in law, social sciences and humanities

Flexible study options

You can choose to graduate with either an LLM or MSc or complete the course early with a PGDip/Cert.
You'll have the option of studying full or part-time and attending classes in the early evening.

Centre for Law, Crime and Justice (CLCJ)

You’ll benefit from the work of the CLCJ, which brings together expertise in the study of law, crime, criminal justice as well as interdisciplinary areas between law, sociology, social work, psychology and computer and information science.

As well as providing distinctive postgraduate courses and research opportunities, it conducts internationally leading research and helps to shape public policy, discourse and practice.

Teaching staff

You'll be taught by some of the world’s foremost experts not only in academic research but also from the fields of policy and practice.
The course is run by Strathclyde Law School’s Centre for Law, Crime and Justice. It brings together world leading research expertise with some of the most accomplished practitioners and policy officials.

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

As well as seminars, you’ll be asked to take part in role play exercises, presentations and other forms of learning.
We've an active programme of public lectures from eminent visiting speakers on contemporary topics. There'll be a programme of visits to local justice agencies designed to stimulate your academic learning.

Careers

Students on the Strathclyde Masters (LLM or MSc) in Criminal Justice and Penal Change come from a range of backgrounds.
Some are recent graduates in law, humanities and the social sciences from around the world. Many are current practitioners, policy-makers in different fields of criminal justice. They find the course of invaluable assistance in gaining a step up the career ladder.

Where are they now?

Occupations which criminal justice students may (and do) take up include:
- Advocacy
- Central Government Criminal Justice Research Manager
- Council of Europe Analyst
- Criminal Barrister
- Defence law
- European Union Policy Analyst
- Forensic Services
- Judiciary
- Local Government Criminal Justice Policy Manager
- Lecturer in Criminal Justice
- Parliamentary Advisors on Criminal Justice
- Prosecution Service
- Prison Management
- Prison Psychologist
- Prison-based Social Work
- Victim Support

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

Read less
The LLM in Criminal Justice programme will allow you to gain an in depth knowledge of criminal justice systems at international, supranational and domestic levels. Read more
The LLM in Criminal Justice programme will allow you to gain an in depth knowledge of criminal justice systems at international, supranational and domestic levels. The programme aims to foster an understanding of the challenges criminal justice is facing at national, EU and international levels and in a comparative context; and to provide a potential route to post-graduate research in the area of criminal justice.

Criminal Justice Centre at Queen Mary University of London

The Criminal Justice Centre (CJC) provides a forum for research and learning in all aspects of criminal justice, with members are drawn from both the legal profession and academia. The centre provides advice and training to the legal profession, governments and judiciaries, author key publications on criminal justice, engage with the media, undertake collaborative research, supervise post-graduate research and regularly host seminars, lectures, workshops and conferences.


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Criminal Justice (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM078 Mental Health Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM169 Punishment in England 1750-1950 (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM313 Criminal Justice and Surveillance Technologies (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X