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International Children’s Rights is a programme whose time has come. Recently, the main treaty in this area – the UN Conventionon the Rights of the Child (CRC) – reached its 25th anniversary. Read more
International Children’s Rights is a programme whose time has come. Recently, the main treaty in this area – the UN Conventionon the Rights of the Child (CRC) – reached its 25th anniversary. Also, there is an ever deepening consciousness at the international and domestic levels regarding the role that implementing children’s rights can have in both the private and the public spheres of life.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/international-childrens-rights/en/introduction

Course detail

International children’s rights (law) is a unique area of law because it is multi-layered (covering international, regional and national legal spectrums) and interdisciplinary (crossing different areas of law, both domestically and internationally). Children’s rights intersect with the areas of civil, criminal and administrative law, as well as public international law, international humanitarian law, international criminal law and international labour law. A special feature concerns the interplay between children’s rights and private international law, in particular with the instruments developed by the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

The multi-layered and legal interdisciplinary nature of international children’s rights requires specialist knowledge in order to be able to assess its meaning and implications for the position of children at the international and domestic level.

Format

Our programme is characterised by small-scale teaching, which encourages intensive interaction between students and lecturers. Students in our Advanced Masters programmes come from various countries, which contributes to a truly international study environment.

For whom?

- law graduates in possession of a full law degree (offering access to legal practice) or legal professionals.
- graduates who hold an equivalent degree and/or have sufficient professional experience in the field.

Careers

Our graduates meet the requirements for a range of positions with organisations including:

- governmental and inter-governmental bodies and public administration (both national and international);
- national, regional and international (non-governmental) organisations dealing with children’s rights issues;
- the judiciary or national human rights institutions (e.g. ombudspersons) or
- law firms or companies involved with children and/or family matters.

How to apply:

http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. Read more
This programme is designed to help students become experts in the areas of International Law that directly concern the human person - International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law - whilst mastering the discipline of International Law of which they are part. In addition to the foundational courses in Legal Research Methods and Public International Law, students will be required to study International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and write a dissertation on a topic within the International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law. The remaining courses can be chosen from a range of relevant options.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing those working on legal issues concerning the human person in International Law. The LLM in International Law (specialising in International Criminal Law & International Human Rights Law) will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Dissertation on a topic within International Criminal Law or International Human Rights Law
Optional Modules (choose 2):

European Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more

About the course

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

Working with and for young people in the Global South offers an exciting career full of challenges and rewards. This MA provides a varied programme with a global perspective that equips students for roles at senior levels in international development organisations, government ministries and global agencies.

The programme equips you with:

The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare you for employment, further study and civic engagement.

Course Content

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Compulsory Modules:

International Development, Childhood and Youth
Young Lives in the Global South
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Researching Children, Childhood and Youth
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

Sociology of Youth and Youth Work
Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work
Social Policy
Anthropology of Education and Learning
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Psychological Development
Applied Learning (via placement)

Special Features

High value placements: Students may opt for the ‘Applied Learning’ module which involves a short placement (one or two days a week for 10 weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community work, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Pioneering research: In both core and specialist option modules, students will be exposed to innovative high profile research in the field of children, youth and international development.

Eramus Exchange: An Erasmus agreement exists between the Brunel University’s MA in Children, Youth and International Development, and the MPhil in Childhood Studies at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The exchange programme has two places for students from the MA Children, Youth and International Development. The exchange period is the second term / semester (approximately January to May). Erasmus students do not pay tuition fees at NOSEB, and are entitled to an Erasmus grant (€375/month) to cover any additional costs.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The MA also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this - through tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and all students are assigned to a tutorial group. Regular tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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Now running for over twenty five years, the MA in Children’s Literature is recognised internationally as a benchmark programme in the field and is delivered by the award-winning National Centre of Research in Children’s Literature. Read more

Summary

Now running for over twenty five years, the MA in Children’s Literature is recognised internationally as a benchmark programme in the field and is delivered by the award-winning National Centre of Research in Children’s Literature.

On this acclaimed MA/PG Dip in Children’s Literature you will explore landmark books such as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe or The Railway Children, alongside the contemporary innovations of Patrick Ness or Emily Gravett.

You will work alongside staff with international reputations in areas such as adolescence, critical theory, landscape, and philosophy. Plus, many of you will have the chance of working with Roehampton's Chancellor and renowned author Professor Dame Jacqueline Wilson.

As a Children’s Literature student you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books) and Booktrust. The centre also hosts and co-organises an annual one-day British IBBY/NCRCL MA Conference and runs a biennial NCRCL Conference, showcasing themes from members' research interests. Keynote speakers have included Michael Rosen, Matthew Grenby, Emer O’Sullivan, Neil Gaiman, and Julia Eccleshare.

The University is the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. The partnership provides paid and voluntary work experience opportunities for students at the festival, as well as opportunities to attend events for free.

Roehampton also hosts a number of Children’s' Literature collections in our library containing 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals. We are also home to the Richmal Crompton Collection. This includes her personal library, editions and translations of her famous Just William stories and scripts including short stories and radio plays.

Content

This stimulating programme allows for the exploration of a range of literary texts from medieval learning materials, through landmark books such as Treasure Island, The Tale of Peter Rabbit or The Eagle of the Ninth, to the contemporary innovations of Mark Haddon, Shaun Tan or Jackie Kay.

Although this is a literature programme, study is not limited to children’s books. You will also examine the relationship (both historical and ongoing) between children’s books and social constructions of childhood.

The creative writing modules, which currently include ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’, represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children.

MA students will complete the course by undertaking either a dissertation or creative dissertation. The dissertation is a supervised research project involving an in-depth study of an aspect of children’s literature that interests you. For the creative dissertation, you will produce a creative portfolio that could include short stories, picturebook scripts, poems, or a novella, alongside a critical reflections of your work.

Children's literature can also be studied by distance learning.

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Centennial College's Children's Media program not only teaches you how to create memories and childhood heroes of a new generation, it does so in a one-of-a-kind way. Read more
Centennial College's Children's Media program not only teaches you how to create memories and childhood heroes of a new generation, it does so in a one-of-a-kind way.

Guided by industry professionals at the School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design, this first-of-its-kind in Canada program teaches you to create, manage and market numerous media products for the rapidly growing children's market.

Children's Media courses explore various media including television, interactive digital media, books and games. This range allows you to hone your creative storytelling abilities, business skills and production management practices for the development of unique and innovative educational or entertaining children's media content.

You also learn all about the major components of the children's media industry, including production, budget and financing, marketing, publishing and business management. Lastly, you develop insight into child development, and the social and ethical issues related to entertaining children.

To ensure that you are ready to begin your career as a highly skilled content producer, the one-year Children's Media program includes industry events and an industry field placement in a Canadian media organization. These opportunities allow you to build networking skills and gain contacts to assist in your career launch and growth.

From Polka Dot Door and Mr. Dressup to a Annedroids and Almost Naked Animals, the business of creating exciting, quality children's media is a key part of the Canadian entertainment industry.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-Industry and education professionals developed this unique Children's Media program.
-To prepare you for a career in the children's entertainment field, the program includes hands-on, practical training through the use of on-site professional software, pitching to broadcasters and producers, and visits to production companies
-You work with high-level professionals who not only teach you but also help you to connect with the industry.
-Among the specific areas that the offering covers are: writing for children's media, marketing children's entertainment products, project management, pitching, TV and multi-platform production, team building for creative production, child development, licensing and merchandising, the legal and regulatory aspects of children's media, personal branding and career planning, and navigating the domestic and international marketplace.

Career Outlook
-Children's writer
-Marketing specialist
-Project manager
-Content manager
-Children's TV producer
-Children's multi-platform producer
-Program History

Centennial College launched its Children's Media graduate certificate program in September 2009. It was born through the recognition that Canada has, for many years, been a leader in the creation and production of internationally successful children's entertainment properties. The School of Communications, Media, Arts and Design program was formulated and developed by some of the very best and most respected contemporary producers, writers and industry leaders in Canada. As well, it is continuously guided by an active program advisory committee with members from across the spectrum of areas that involve and affect children's entertainment — from education and early childhood specialists to toy manufacturers to interactive digital media producers.

Through the program, students gain a solid developmental understanding of their audience, a strategic and entrepreneurial approach to their careers, a global perspective, and the passion and commitment to become tomorrow's industry leaders.

Areas of Employment
-The independent television production sector
-Industry funding bodies
-Freelance writing for television
-Cross-platform production

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This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels. Read more

Summary

This unique course allows you to study children’s literature in a flexible, part-time format. You’ll engage with staff working in the UK’s leading centre in the field and explore a range of landmark texts for young people, from fairy tales and picturebooks to classics and graphic novels.

This programme invites you to explore the exciting and varied world of children’s literature, and to examine how texts aimed at young people convey and challenge ideas about childhood. You will be taught by a team of staff with international reputations and expertise in areas such as philosophy, popular fiction, adolescence, critical theory, landscape, and memory.

As a distance learner you will have access to specialist services, and a wide range of e-books and digitised items from the Children’s Literature Collection at the University Library which contains 3,000 critical, theoretical, bibliographical and reference works and approximately 40 specialist children's literature journals.

As a Children’s Literature student, you will become a member of the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature (NCRCL), regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in Britain. The NCRCL has close links with organisations that work to further the study and teaching of children's literature, including The International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Seven Stories (The National Centre for Children’s Books), and Booktrust. The University is also the exclusive Creative Partner of Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, London’s largest event dedicated to children’s writing. You can stay up-to-date with the NCRCL by following their blog.

Content

This programme asks you to think about children’s literature in new ways. In your first year you will be introduced to essential critical approaches, from feminist theory, psychoanalysis, and reader-response criticism, to new ideas about the child, power and ethics. Using these tools, you’ll study fairy tales such as 'Snow White' and 'Puss in Boots,' classic children’s literature including Kenneth Graham’s The Wind in the Willows and Judith Kerr’s landmark picturebook The Tiger Who Came to Tea, and the contemporary innovations of authors like Melvin Burgess, Shaun Tan and Jackie Kay.

In optional modules you can study the history of British children’s literature from its origins to the present day, as well as texts in translation, and visual and verse forms. Throughout the course you will gain knowledge of literary works produced for children, and the social, cultural and historical contexts of their production. The eclectic and rigorous nature of the programme allows you to contribute original work from a variety of perspectives, particularly in the extended critical Dissertation. The creative writing modules, ‘Writing for a Child Audience’ and ‘Creative Dissertation’ represent exciting additions to the programme, recognising the fact that many of our students have ambitions to write for children.

The Distance Learning MA is taught through a mixture of independent study, tutor feedback, and peer support. Most modules on offer include a course pack, with digital materials and links to an online learning environment. You will work through the materials, undertake learning activities, and discuss ideas with other students through online discussion boards and online seminars. At the end of each module, you will complete a piece of coursework, usually an essay, to demonstrate your understanding of the subject.

This MA can also be studied on site.

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This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline and explore advanced level theories, as well as understand the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law. They will have a wide range of International Law options to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad as opposed to specialised knowledge.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Lawyers. The LLM in International Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Law
Optional Modules (choose 4):

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these. Read more

Overview

Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these.

Women and children, both in the UK and around the world, face inequality on a daily basis. These inequalities come from lack of access to healthcare, education, employment opportunities, technological advances, legal support, and social, cultural and political opposition (Marmot, 2010). The World Health Organisation has recognised this and explicitly targeted women and children in three of its Millennium Development Goals; to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health, alongside wider goals to improve universal access to education and to eradicate poverty that also disproportionately affect women (WHO, 2015).

This course focuses on the health of women and children. During their ‘core’ modules, students will be encourage to explore individual health issues, as well as exploring the global legislation that impacts on women’s and children’s health, and understanding how they can implement and influence policy change. The option modules will allow the student to tailor their learning to their individual practice; whether caring for the critically unwell women, doing a physical assessment of a new-born infant (NIPE), understanding the global impact of responsive parenting or as an effective leader or manager of a service.

References

Marmot, M., 2010. Fair society, healthy lives. The Marmot Review. London: University College London.

World Health Organisation, 2015. Millennium Development Goals http://www.who.int/topics/millennium_development_goals/about/en/

Careers

This course will utilise a global public health perspective and is aimed at all practitioners who work with women and children, so will appeal to students both in the UK and internationally. It will offer an inter-professional learning opportunity to a range of professionals including Midwives, Children’s Nurses, Health Visitors, Hospital and Community nurses, Family Support Workers, but is also suitable for those who work with women and children in the voluntary sector or education. The course will be taught by a range of experienced lecturers from a variety of clinical backgrounds. Please be aware that this course is aimed at practitioners working in some capacity with women’s and children’s health and does not lead to a registerable qualification with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK.

Modules & assessment

Core modules -

- Global Challenges to Women and Children's Health:
This module is designed for an inter-professional audience, and has a global public health focus, considering issues affecting women and children around the world. It is designed to provide insight and exploration of the major public health issues affecting the health of women and children. Each of the main areas explored will include an overview of the illness/problem as well as consideration of the social, cultural and political context and influence upon it and evaluation of how this leads to inequality and may reduce life chances.

- Research Proposal - Women's and Children's Health:
This module provides a critical overview of research philosophy and the major methodological and design approaches to research in order to equip you to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of published research, whether in your specialist area or in the health, welfare and social care field.

- Political Power and Policy Drivers affecting Women and Children's Health:
As part of everyday inter-professional practice, practitioners working with women and children are affected by policy drivers in a number of ways, however, differences may be apparent in how these are translated to healthcare and how they are embedded into practice. Implementing new policy requires practitioners to use their, power, influence and interpersonal skills. The module will enable the student to critically evaluate their own knowledge and skills which underpin their current practice.

- Postgraduate Major Project:
The Major Project, which is central to the Masters award, enables students to demonstrate their ability to synthesise learning from previous modules and use this learning as the basis for planning, conducting and writing up a research or work-based project. This project provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate: the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism; depth of knowledge which may involve working at current limits of theoretical and/or research understanding; critical understanding of research methods and its relationship to knowledge; awareness of and ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice; the ability to draw meaningful and justifiable conclusions from information which may be complex or contradictory; the capability to expand or redefine existing knowledge to develop new approaches to changing situations and contribute to the development to best practice; the ability to communicate these processes in a clear and sophisticated fashion; the capability to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. In the course of your studies with us you may generate intellectual property which is defined as an idea, invention or creation which can be protected by law from being copied by someone else. By registering with us on your course you automatically assign any such intellectual property to us unless we agree with the organisation covering the cost of your course that this is retained by them. In consideration of you making this assignment you will be entitled to benefit from a share in any income generated in accordance with our Revenue Sharing Policy in operation at that time. Details of our Intellectual Property Policy and Guidelines can be found on My.Anglia under Research, Development and Commercial Services or by contacting this Office for a hard copy.

Optional modules -

- Applied Leadership & Management:
This module provides an innovative exploration of leadership and management in healthcare, and examines their impact on organisations including wider considerations in the external environment. This module will enable students to assess and analyse the roles that leaders and managers play in a range of organizational contexts; and to apply the principles and techniques of leadership and management in a range of contexts.

- Care of the Critically Unwell Woman:
This module will enable you to develop in-depth knowledge and skills when caring for the critically unwell woman, during the child bearing continuum. Work-based learning is incorporated into the module in order to recognise and value your professional expertise. While practicing midwifery in an area where women with high dependency needs will be cared for, you will also spend clinical time developing your skills in the high dependency or intensive care unit.

- Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE):
This module will focus on the specialist knowledge and the clinical skills that are required to enable you to competently undertake a thorough Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE) in clinical practice. You will utilise in-depth knowledge and understanding that you have gained to enable you to recognise the deviations from the normal to initiate appropriate care and referral. Critical reflection and completion of the practice documents will allow you to further identify your learning needs and develop your scope of professional practice.

- Global Impact of Responsive Parenting:
This module is designed to examine the positive health impact responsive parenting has on the mother and infant dyad, the wider family, society and the Globe. Historical child rearing styles will be reviewed and debated to highlight their negative effects on child development and on society. The module will explore the current understanding of neurophysiology of infant brain development and how parenting interactions can affect this process. The module will conclude with positive practical steps for health professionals to encourage responsive parenting with the parents they work with every day.

Assessment -

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your learning in a variety of ways during this course. Assessment will vary between modules, but includes patchwork text, reflective essays, action plans, reports, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), essays, ‘journal style’ articles (to prepare you to publish your work) and a major project on a subject of your choice.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

Distance learning - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/distance-learning

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Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world. Read more
Prepare for an international legal career with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in international business law, supported by staff who are active researchers and qualified practitioners, alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course will give you an understanding of law in an international context. Through a combination of theory and practical application, you’ll explore issues of law and legal theory at an advanced level.

As well as investigating areas like trade law and dispute resolution, you’ll also have the chance to specialise in your own particular areas of interest, such as international governance or competition law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

You’ll also learn alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context.

Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom. You’ll have access to all our campus libraries and digital resources, including our Virtual Learning Environment which has a range of online resources to complement your studies.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-business-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you’ll need to work in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Or you might decide to carry on in academia and take a research degree like our PhD Law.

Modules

Core modules:
Business Law in the Global Context
International Trade Law
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
Competition Law in the International Context
International Governance
Comparative Company Law
Current Legal Issues in the International Business Arena

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written essays, problem-solving assignments and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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The MA offers students the opportunity to extend and deepen their understanding of concepts, theories and issues related to international development, education and sustainable ways of promoting health, wellbeing and social justice. Read more
The MA offers students the opportunity to extend and deepen their understanding of concepts, theories and issues related to international development, education and sustainable ways of promoting health, wellbeing and social justice.

Degree information

Students will:
-Build on their existing knowledge to develop new understandings of key concepts and issues in education, health promotion and international development.
-Appraise and evaluate current policy and practice through evidence-informed analysis.
-Draw connections between distinct academic disciplines with regard to the promotion of wellbeing and social justice.
-Investigate and propose sustainable ways of working.
-Through conducting a small-scale research study, apply what they have learned to create personally and professionally relevant new knowledge of the field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation

Optional modules - a range of optional modules from across UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Master's-level offering are available, including:
-Education, Conflict and Fragility
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Planning for Education and Development
-Gender, Education and Development
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Children's Rights in Practice
-Theories of Childhood and Society
-Understanding Education Research
-Understanding Research

We are keen to encourage students to select modules from across the IOE - including those related to education technology, effective learning, social policy, art education. Please discuss your optional module choices with your personal tutor so that you can build a modular programme relevant to your professional development in the field.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, participatory and interactive groupwork, online learning and individual tutorials. Assessment is through coursework, taking the form of 5,000 word assignments or equivalent, such as a 3,500-word project proposal + 1,500 word conceptual framework. The small-scale research study is assessed by way of a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Fieldwork
Fieldwork is not a compulsory part of the programme. However, students are encouraged to draw from their professional or voluntary experience as well as the ideas encountered during the programme to write critically and cogently for different audiences. The small-scale research study usually takes the form of a combination of desk-based research (a literature review) and fieldwork.

Placement
Placements are not routinely part of the programme. But good links have been established between the programme and UCL’s Volunteering Services Unit (http://uclu.org/services/volunteering-at-uclu). Some students have also taken part in the UCL ChangeMakers programme (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/changemakers). Taking part in these programmes can provide those studying in London with valuable international development-related experience. That said, both on-campus and distance learning students are encouraged to bring their own interests and concerns into their programme, helping to make it personally relevant and professionally significant.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree have been engaged:
-As policy-makers and advisers in government ministries and departments.
-As policy advocates and programme managers in international NGOs and development agencies.
-As social research consultants.
-As teachers and lecturers in schools, colleges and universities.
-As international development consultants.
-In doctoral study (either on PhD or EdD programmes).

Employability
Graduates of this Master's degree have used the academic and professional expertise gained through the programme to:
-Set up and manage an NGO or consultancy.
-Prepare successful project and research proposals.
-Develop new reporting procedures adopted throughout their organisation.
-Gain employment as consultants.
-Take on new roles and responsibilities within an organisation.
-Transfer their expertise into international development.
-Engage policymakers, practitioners and members of the public through research-informed practice.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This unique Master's programme provides students with opportunities to explore and examine the links between three academic and professional fields - education, health promotion and international development. It encourages a consideration of the ways that these fields are both distinctive, yet inter-related, and how evidence-informed practice might best contribute to working across professional boundaries, enhancing wellbeing and advocating for social justice.

Students learn alongside tutors who hold a breadth and depth of expertise in education, health promotion, social research and international development and who have professional experience in national and international contexts. Tutors are active in research on areas related to physical and emotional health and wellbeing, international development, refugees, young people, gender and sexuality, teaching and pedagogy and curriculum development.

Students on this MA benefit from involvement in a number of key academic networks including:
-Being part of a cluster of four international development MA programmes, so learning with student peers from across the world.
-An annual study visit to Paris (not included in the programme fee) and usually including visits to UNESCO, the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) and OECD.
-Membership of the London International Development Centre.

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Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. Read more
Prepare for a legal career in international commerce with this LLM from Anglia Law School. Further your knowledge of the latest issues and case studies in commercial law, especially principles of international contracts related to commercial activities. You’ll be supported by research-active staff with backgrounds in professional practice, and work alongside students from around the world.

Overview

Our LLM course offers a combination of theory and practical application that's relevant to the demands of international commercial practice, and in particular the relationship between legal disciplines and commercial undertakings.

It will give you the necessary background and legal expertise to work in international commercial law, or a range of other intellectually demanding roles – or to pursue academic research at the highest level.

You’ll investigate areas like commercial contracts, transnational commercial law and dispute resolution, but will also have the chance to specialise in your own areas of interest, such as international governance or company law.

Throughout the course you’ll develop research skills vital both to your assignments and your future career. Our teaching team consists of professionally qualified legal practitioners as well as research-active academics; in 2014, the Government acknowledged our ‘world-leading’ law research*. You can be confident you’ll receive up-to-date advice career advice as well as the latest legal theory and case studies.

Here in Cambridge, you’ll study alongside students from all over the world, giving you first-hand experience of working in a global context. Our facilities include modern teaching rooms and a mock courtroom.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/international-commercial-law

Careers

This course will give you the legal skills and knowledge you need to work in an international legal practice, as well as related careers. It will allow you to demonstrate a highly developed ability to conduct legal or legally-related academic research – a skill that’s in great demand in the legal profession and others.

Our past students enjoy careers in international law firms, legal departments of international corporations, government departments and international agencies.

Modules

Core modules:
Commercial Contracts
Business Law in the Global Context
International Law Research
Dispute Resolution
Transnational Commercial Law
Major Research Project in International and European Business Law

Optional modules:
International Governance
Comparative Company Law

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of assessments, such as coursework in which you’ll develop a critical view on a current issue in the area you're studying, and presentations.

All students take our core modules, but please note that the availability of optional modules is subject to demand.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Read more
International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South.
This specialisation offers you the opportunity to follow a state-of-the-art curriculum in International Economics with a strong empirical and analytical focus on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Hosting one of the largest databases for developing countries in the world, we offer you a unique possibility to analyse poverty, inequality, and economic development in these countries in an international context. Using recent theoretical insights and modern empirical methods, you will be actively involved in comparative research on issues in developing countries such as the impact of globalisation on economic growth, corruption, the education of children, child labour and women’s empowerment.

Why should you choose International Economics & Development in Nijmegen?

- A broad perspective on issues pertaining to low and middle income countries
- Strong comparative and empirical orientation
- One of the world’s largest micro-level database for developing countries
- Small group teaching and close contact with professors and their research
- Excellent reputation in the Netherlands and abroad

Change perspective

Radboud University Master’s specialisation in International Economics & Development pushes your curiosity to understand and evaluate the economic situation in low and middle income countries. You will be taught to look at the bigger picture and to analyse micro-level data in order to discover what is going well and what isn’t. Your analysis will provide information on intra-country or cross-national disparities. It aims to inform both national governments as well as international development organisations, and might lead to programmatic action aimed at bringing about positive changes to people’s lives in the poorest regions of our globe.

Career prospects

Scientific and societal relevance go hand in hand in this programme. We address contemporary issues like child labour, women’s empowerment, human development, children’s schooling and economic growth by evaluating societal developments with the help of sound academic theories. We not only discuss pressing issues of today but also issues we believe will be pressing in the near future.
Upon completing the Master’s programme in International Economics & Development, you will be knowledgeable about recent developments in the field. You will be an up-and-coming professional that is able to:
- Understand and reflect on the international, professional and academic literature in the field of international economics & development.
- Report independently on various issues in international economics and development, including state of the art empirical and theoretical studies.
- Use and apply statistical tools and methods.
- Conduct independent research.
- Present and clearly and consistently defend your views and research outcomes.
- Maintain a critical attitude towards your own work and that of others in your field.

We make sure our graduates have the strong academic background they need to be able to work as economists, policy-makers and researchers for international organisations (The World Bank, UN), development-oriented consultancy firms, NGOs, national governments as well as universities and research institutes.

Our approach to this field

The Master’s specialisation International Economics & Development is theoretically unique in that we not only deal with the problems that poor countries face, but also with interesting new developments taking place in the Global South. We will discuss the rise of the BRIC countries, concentrating on both the potential they have as well as the challenges they face. We will also look at unique new economic phenomena within developing countries, like the emergence of a complete pro-poor banking system based on mobile phone credits in Kenya and other parts of Africa (known as m-pesa).

- Understanding economic changes in the developing world
Our unique and interesting combination of subjects will provide you with a well-rounded understanding in this field. Apart from development economics students will get an academic understanding of economics methodology, the role of international financial markets, behavioural economics and the important influence culture has on economic phenomena. And thanks to a choice of elective subjects, you can give your programme a unique focus that meets your academic interests.

Students taking this Master’s specialisation will learn how to understand and analyse economic changes taking place throughout the developing world. Students will be taught how to discover determinants and develop indicators that make it possible to monitor changes at the sub-national level in great detail. These indicators can be used scientifically, but also for creating detailed overview scans of regions for political or humanitarian purposes.

- Database Developing World and the MDGs
One of the tools our students can use is our Database Developing World (DDW). This database constitutes a unique window to the developing world, making it possible to study important processes on a scale and with a degree of detail that is unique in the world.

The DDW also holds indicators for seven of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which range from halving extreme poverty rates to empowering woman and providing universal primary education. The target date of 2015 is fast approaching and although enormous progress has been made, the UN is working with governments, civil society and other partners to carry on with a post-2015 sustainable development agenda. As a graduate of this Master’s specialisation, you could go on to be one of the professionals that helps to achieve the MDGs and thereby making a real difference in people’s lives.

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-This course provides you with theoretical knowledge and practical experience needed to register as a nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Read more
-This course provides you with theoretical knowledge and practical experience needed to register as a nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council.
-Our academic team includes Dr Jim Richardson, an editor of the widely-used Textbook of Children's and Young People's Nursing, and Dr Jayne Price, lead editor of Palliative Care for Children and Families, which is a key text in child healthcare.
-Our lecturers receive national and international awards for their excellence in learning and teaching.
-Within our state of the art simulation suites, our children's nursing students can further develop the skills required to care for children and families in a safe environment, which closely mimics a health care environment (hospital and home). Child and family role players are central to this learning experience.
-You will have the opportunity to take a national or international elective module at the end of your first year.

Children's nurses provide care for children and young people from birth to 18 years of age across settings, for example hospital, home and hospice. The role of the children's nurse includes promoting health and minimising illness in collaboration with families. When providing nursing care for children, working with the family and consideration of their needs is essential. Moreover, children's nurses work collaboratively with a range of professionals to meet the specific needs of children, young people and their families wherever they are cared for.

What will you study?

The first year is divided into two parts. In part one you will undertake a bridging module introducing you to the foundations of nursing and healthcare. In part two you will look at the context of nursing within a variety of client groups within your specific field of nursing. General nursing topics are studied alongside subjects tailored to adult nursing.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Year 1 modules (part one and two)
-Introduction to Nursing for Graduates
-Nursing Practice Part 1
-Nursing the Acutely Ill Child
-Contemporary Issues in Children’s Nursing
-Nursing Practice Part 2

Year 2 modules (part three)
-Complexities of Children's Nursing
-Transition to Professional Practice in Children’s Nursing
-Developing and Analysing Evidence-Based Practice
-Nursing Practice Part 3

Constants/themes throughout the programme

Modules may not contain all of these themes but they will be represented across the whole two-year programme:
-Professional values
-Quality of life
-Working with diversity and anti-discriminatory practice
-Medicines management
-Safeguarding and risk
-Life span
-Life sciences
-Managing and maintaining relationships
-Self-awareness and reflection
-Working with diversity and anti-discriminatory practice
-Nursing skills (essential skills clusters)
-Study skills
-Self-awareness and reflection
-Ethics and law
-Managing and maintaining relationships
-Research and evidence-based practice
-Creativity and problem-solving skills

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Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences. Read more
Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. This new MA explains and explores what is at issue, addressing hard questions by drawing on a diversity of theoretical approaches and practical experiences.

More about this course

Human rights and international conflicts confront us with the most urgent moral and political issues of our time. Theoretically, we are confronted with the issue of how to reconcile unconditional rights with consequentialist ethics of political responsibility and rival ideologies of social order. Practically, we are confronted with particular powers, interests and conflicts demanding judgement and action that is at once moral and pragmatic. The MA in Human Rights and International Conflict will explore such issues and attempt to cultivate such judgement. The course provides both a solid academic grounding in human rights and international relations and a wide choice of optional modules. Students are trained in research methodology, before completing a 12-15,000 word dissertation dealing in depth with a subject of their choice.

Taught by published experts in human rights, peace and conflict studies, international relations, politics, history, philosophy, women's studies and other subjects, this multidisciplinary course equips students with the kind of understanding necessary to work for peace, justice and human rights in the real world.

Assessment is largely by coursework. Core modules also involve two assessed presentations and two unseen examinations. One third of the assessment for the MA is by dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-History and Theory of Human Rights (core, 20 credits)
-Human Rights and International Conflict Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Human Rights and the International Order (core, 20 credits)
-International Conflict Resolution (core, 20 credits)
-Theory and Research Methods in International Relations (core, 20 credits)
-American Foreign Policy in the 21st Century (option, 20 credits)
-Citizenship and Social Justice (option, 20 credits)
-Human Security (option, 20 credits)
-International Relations and the Legal Regulation of Conflict (option, 20 credits)
-Religion and International Relations (option, 20 credits)
-Security Studies (option, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Terrorism and Counter Terrorism (option, 20 credits)
-The New Europe in the New International Order (option, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (option, 20 credits)
-Work Placement Project (option, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will be trained in the kind of research and analytical skills that will qualify them to take a wide range of opportunities for both further study and for employment in the private, public and third sectors. Most especially, an academic training in human rights and conflict management will qualify its recipients to take opportunities in a range of exciting, international non-governmental organizations. Graduates of our previous courses in human rights or international security have gone on to work in such organizations.

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Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. Read more

About the course

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars.

On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline.

The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It is suited for those interested in critically assessing the policies and practices of international development and humanitarian assistance to war-affected regions from an anthropological perspective.

It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development).

It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

You will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Anthropology of International Development
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Optional

Dept. of Social Sciences, Media and Communications (Anthropology)
The Anthropology of Childhood
The Anthropology of Youth
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the arena of Global Health
Anthropology of Education
Anthropology of Learning
Ethnicity, Identity and Culture
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Dept of Politics, History and Law
Globalisation
Dept of Clinical Sciences
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Young Lives in the Global South
International Development, Children and Youth
Brunel Law School
Minority and Indigenous Rights
The United Nations Human Rights Regime
Theory and Practice of Human Rights
The Migrant, the State and the Law
Brunel Business School
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance

Part-time

Year 1

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Anthropology of International Development
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Year 2

Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
Dissertation in Anthropology of International Development and Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War

Special Features

While its approach is anthropological, this degree offers genuine multi-disciplinary possibilities by drawing on modules from Politics, Health Sciences, Law and Business.

Students will have the opportunity to explore the multiplicity of issues arising from critical shifts in global policy across the following key themes:

The ways in which economic anthropologists have enhanced our understandings of livelihoods in ways that are dramatically different to dominant approaches in economics.
The hazards and limitations of relying solely upon biomedical interventions to alleviate suffering and sickness.
The ostensibly positive relationship between education and development, and the role of education as a vehicle for eradicating illiteracy and lowering fertility and mortality rates.

An exploration of such themes together will make it possible for students to think and engage in new and critical ways about the relationship between anthropology and development.

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching

You will be taught via a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials and film.

Assessment

Assessment is variously by essay and practical assignment (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise). A final dissertation of approximately 15,000 words based on fieldwork in the UK or abroad, is also required. There are no examinations.

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