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Masters Degrees (International Aid And Development)

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population. Read more

The Master in International Cooperation and Development (MIC&D) offers a privileged framework for designing tentative solutions to poverty, inequality, conflict, instability and uncertainty which still affect the everyday life of a majority of the world population.

Learning objectives

The Master trains professionals to contribute to development cooperation with creativity, personality and competence by interpreting local and international events, interacting with stakeholders, identifying and managing environmentally and local culture-friendly interventions. This Master provides students with multidisciplinary training and specialized technical and managerial competences.

Career opportunities & professional recognition

Students who have completed the Master in International Cooperation and Development are working in various national and international institutions and organizations: NGOs, public administration, private companies, dealing with poverty eradication, emergency, development, migration, institution and democracy building in many different countries. The Master supports the students professional career in cooperation and development, building on their previous background and expertise.

Curriculum

The Master in International Cooperation and Development is structured as four complementary levels, fostering multidimensional training and integrating scientific methodologies and operative competences.

1st level - Scientific Training. The first level provides students of different academic backgrounds with a multidisciplinary education on various dimensions of development processes aimed at acquiring the relevant economic, political, historical, legal, institutional and managerial competences, with a special focus on fighting against poverty and fostering social inclusion. Areas of study:

● Economic and human development

● Geopolitics

● Trade and finance for development

● Development law and institutions

● Project cycle management

2nd level - Professional Training. The second level intends to develop practical skills required to operate in development and emergency cooperation: actors and strategies for conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction, natural disaster management, development programs and projects concerning poverty eradication, food security, environmental sustainability, community-based development initiatives.  Areas of study:

● Development actors and strategies

● Crisis prevention, relief and recovery

● Development aid and governance

● Partnerships for human rights and development

● Enhancing cooperative skills

3rd level and 4th level - Project Work and Internship

Students are required to develop a personal research project on a topic related to development cooperation, under the supervision of a MIC&D professor and/or a professional from a partner institution. The project work will often be connected to the internship experience. The Master is then completed with an internship within one of the ASERI partner institutions or other entities whose mission and activities are consistent with the program.

Faculty & teaching staff

The Master in International Cooperation and Development offers high quality training to a group of 25 students from all continents. The learning platform includes lectures, seminars and a tutored internship. A faculty composed of scholars and professionals from international institutions and non-governmental organizations shares its experience with the class.

Faculty members:

● Prof. Simona Beretta - MIC&D Director, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Anni Arial - consultant in land governance, former FAO officer

● Dr. Sara Balestri - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Frank Cinque - ALTIS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Luigi Curini - Università degli Studi di Milano

● Prof. Paul H. Dembinski - University of Fribourg

● Dr. Giuliano Gargioni - Global Tuberculosis Programme, WHO, Geneva

● Dr. Christophe Golay - Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights

● Prof. Xuewu Gu - University of Bonn

● Prof. Marco Lombardi - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Mario Agostino Maggioni - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Alberto Monguzzi - International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Budapest

● Prof. Mathias Nebel - Institut Catholique de Paris

● Dr. Valeria Patruno - IAL Puglia s.r.l.

● Dr. Giovanna Prennushi - The World Bank, Washington

● Dr. Manuela Prina - European Training Foundation, Turin

● Prof. Riccardo Redaelli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Javier Revilla Diez - Global South Studies Center, University of Cologne

● Prof. Michele Riccardi - Transcrime, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Dr. Andrea Rossi - UNICEF, Kathmandu

● Dr. Javier Schunk - PCM Trainer

● Dr. Nicola Strazzari - Vision Plus Media Enterprises, Turin

● Dr. Manuela Tortora - UNCTAD, Geneva

● Prof. Teodora Erika Uberti - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Prof. Roberto Zoboli - Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore

● Professionals from international institutions, non-govern- mental organizations, applied researchers

ASERI - a center of excellence

Since its foundation in 1995, ASERI has formed young professionals in the fields of international relations and international cooperation, in a stimulating, multidisciplinary learning environment. Students from all over the world, faculty, and professionals find a unique space for discovering new opportunities for their professional enhancement and create a valuable network for future collaboration.

Our experts

Both academics and experienced professionals share their knowledge with students during group activities at ASERI, fostering critical and innovative thinking in facing development and emergency challenges.

Job ready

The Master in International Cooperation and Development provides an opportunity for learning critical and systematic analytical tools, and practical competences for international cooperation. Personal skills are developed in class work and enhanced during the curricular internship.

Global perspective

Students from all continents find at ASERI a unique opportunity for meeting an international faculty. They learn how to cooperate for a world of dignity, justice and peace by practicing cooperation with each other, in a rich and challenging multicultural environment.

Scholarships

All scholarships are assigned on a merit basis and will be mostly given to students who apply by the priority deadline. Some scholarships may also target specific geographic regions.

Scholarships cover 25% of the tuition fees.

Language proficiency

Applicants whose first language is not English will need to have either: TOEFL iBT overall score of at least 80; or Academic IELTS overall score of at least 6.0; or successfully completed a degree program taught in the English language.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Department of Political and Cultural Studies (PCS) boasts a dynamic research environment with a committed staff all of whom are research-active. Academic members of staff on the International Development programme have a very considerable range of research interests on which we offer supervision for research degrees.

Key Features of My by Research in International Development

An MA by Research in International Development offered in PCS gives you the chance to pursue a major research project based around your own passions and interests in International Development, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia. It will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing in International Development and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

Typically, as a student of the International Development research programme, you will work closely with your supervisors, meeting them regularly, in many instances fortnightly, in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

Students enrolled in the MA by Research in International Development are required to attend skills and training courses at College and University level. You may also be expected to give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and attend the postgraduate conference of the College of Arts and Humanities which is held in October.

The MA by Research in International Development is ideal for those who want:

- an MA qualification in areas where taught programmes are not offered;

- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD at the outset.

Research proposals in International Development are invited on any topic for which staff in PCS can provide supervision. It is a good idea to enter into discussions about your research project with the Department's Director of Postgraduate Research, Professor Roland Axtmann (), before drawing up an initial proposal and starting the application process.

Departmental Research Expertise

In the area of International Relations and Development Studies, the department has expertise in:

International Security and Strategic Studies

The international politics of space

Gender, childhood and child soldiers

North- and South East Asia

West Africa

Transitional justice and international crimes

Post-war reconstruction

Multi-nationals and corporate social responsibility

Governance and international development, including aid policy and practice

The role of civil society organisations in development contexts

Human rights and international development

History of military thought and military culture

European diplomatic history



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The Educational Planning, Economics and International Development MA will provide students with the relevant knowledge, understanding and skills to work in educational planning, policy, management and administration in the context of international development. Read more

The Educational Planning, Economics and International Development MA will provide students with the relevant knowledge, understanding and skills to work in educational planning, policy, management and administration in the context of international development. The programme focuses on issues affecting low and middle income contexts.

About this degree

This programme provides students with an opportunity to identify the interconnections between society and the economy, and the implications for educational planning, whilst applying economic principles to educational planning issues. It will also provide the opportunity to critique the ways in which economic analysis and evidence are applied to education policy issues, giving students an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to educational planning in low and middle income contexts.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or two optional modules (60 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Economic Perspectives on Education Policy (EPEP)
  • Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues (CTI)
  • Planning for Education and Development (PED)

Optional modules

Modules are chosen from a wide range across the UCL IOE Master's-level offering and include:

  • A range of statistical analysis modules
  • Education and Development in Asia
  • Education, Conflict and Fragility
  • Educational Testing
  • Impact Evaluation Methods

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in either a report of 10,000 words or a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning

This programme is delivered by lectures, participant-led presentations, discussions based on selected readings, inputs by guest speakers, group work and debates. Some modules are available through online learning and may be studied remotely. Assessment is through coursework assignments and the dissertation/report.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Educational Planning, Economics and International Development MA

Careers

Graduates are currently working in a variety of roles in aid agencies, UN institutions, government departments, international NGOs, research centres and think tanks. Some graduates go on to work in social entrepreneurship or in development consultancy, while others proceed to doctoral study, some winning competitive scholarships and being published in international journals. 

A number of students are mid-career professionals (including teachers, ministry staff and NGO professionals), for whom the programme forms part of their wider professional development, providing access to more senior roles or to a change of career direction.

Employability

The degree provides an excellent platform from which to pursue and develop a career which draws on the analytic skills and techniques required for educational planning and economic analysis in the context of international development. The programme encourages critical reflection on the application of economic theory and planning tools to 'planning problems' including those relating to project design and evaluation, which have wide application in development practice, research and consultancy. In employment terms, students benefit from the international reputation of the institution and staff at UCL as well as the diverse international perspectives of fellow students and the central location in one of the world's most dynamic and connected cities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Institute of Education has an outstanding and well-established reputation in the field of education and international development. This specialist programme focused on the application of economic theory and principles to issues of educational planning within the broader area of education and development is unique.

Students benefit from teaching by staff with international reputations in research in education and development within an institution which is a global leader in policy-oriented research in the field.

The programme offers opportunities to interact and network with fellow students currently or formerly employed across the education and development sectors; with internationally renowned researchers and with guest speakers including practitioners and policy-makers. A study tour to major institutions involved in the field of educational planning (UNESCO, IIEP, OECD) is offered annually (not included in the course fee). 

UCL is located in central London, close to key UK government institutions, think tanks, NGOs, donor organisations and other key actors in the field of international development.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Education, Practice & Society

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. Read more

This programme is designed to deliver a substantial theoretical and practical understanding of the role and contribution of the tourism industry in the context of international development. You will gain the skills required to manage sustainable tourism businesses, alongside the specialisms of strategic destination management and marketing. You will explore tourism’s relationship with the socio-economic and political contexts within international development, tourism disasters affecting tourist destinations, and the role of tourism in the development of countries that have experienced conflict. An emphasis upon the micro-economic contribution of enterprise projects to support development and sustainability also features within the curriculum; delivered through the Ashoka Changemaker philosophy.

Upon completion of the programme, you may wish to progress your studies through a doctoral qualification.

Course content

The programme encourages you to analyse and evaluate the relationship between sustainable development principles and the management of destinations to achieve long-term viability of resources; and the role of event tourism in destination development as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. In addition, the programme provides insight into the political economies surrounding development and the contribution that tourism makes to a destination’s risk mitigation, social renewal and recovery after disasters and post conflict scenarios.

Drawing on a variety of case studies and projects, the programme explores the global scope of tourism, the policies and strategies associated with successful management, the role the industry plays in international development, and the stakeholders involved in its development. The programme will also prepare students for the practical, project based, and customer focused characteristics of the tourism industry.

Semester 1

From the beginning of the programme, you will be introduced to some of the main themes in destination and tourism management, to enable you to analyse the strategic and dynamic nature of international tourist destinations and issues facing managers of such destinations. Modules in semester one will highlight the need to ensure long-term viability of destination resources through themes such as sustainable development and political economies of international development.

Semester 2

You will examine the vulnerability of destinations and the strategies and approaches needed by managers to develop and recover, particularly post-conflict. The strategic use of events in both the public and private sectors will be examined, particularly their use as a catalyst for physical, economic and socio-cultural regeneration. There is a strong emphasis on developing personal adaptability in cross cultural (work) environments as Master graduates can be expected to, and will have the expectation to – lead and manage other people internationally. You will also begin to prepare for the completion of a dissertation through a series of taught research methods sessions, during which a research proposal is produced.

Semester 3

The research proposal produced in Semester two will guide the development of a clearly defined and evidenced study purpose, a critical review of the extant literature, and a robust methodology. Data is then collected, analysed, interpreted and applied to the study purpose, and a 15-20,000 word research report (dissertation) is produced, with the support of a dissertation supervisor.

For further information on course content and modules please refer to the award map: http://oldweb.northampton.ac.uk/caf/pgmsaward/international-tourism-development-ma

Course modules (17/18)

-Political Economies of International Development

-International Sustainable Tourism

-Strategic Destination Management

-Risk, Crisis and Post-conflict Management in Tourism

-Strategic Events Management

-Managing Across Cultures

-Dissertation​ and Research Methods

Opportunities Abroad

In previous years students have participated in an optional study trip to an international destination. The cost of this optional trip would not normally exceed £500 for flights and accommodation. Students normally allow an additional £100 for their expenses.

The programme team also aims to provide a regional or national study trip annually to a tourism attraction or exhibition. In some cases students are required to contribute to the cost of entry; this would normally not exceed £50.00.

Methods of Learning

Typically you will have nine hours (approximately) of contact time with your tutor in the first semester and eleven hours (approximately) in the second. Overall you will spend 108 hours per module in self-directed study (reading and research).

Assessments

A variety of individual and group based assessments are used including reports, presentations, posters, e-portfolios, projects, client briefs, multiple choice tests and examinations.

Facilities and Special Features

Ashoka U is the global association of the world’s leading universities supporting social entrepreneurs; those working together to create solutions for the world’s most urgent social problems. The programme emphasises this philosophy, through Ashoka Changemaker projects.

Careers

The programme will interest students wishing to pursue a specialist career in destination management, sustainable tourism management or international development, with an emphasis on employment within development organisations, NGOs, aid organisations, post conflict and disaster charities, as well as public and private sector tourism organisations.



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The International Development program at Centennial College focuses on international development as the study of providing support to the world's developing populations and improving their quality of living. Read more
The International Development program at Centennial College focuses on international development as the study of providing support to the world's developing populations and improving their quality of living.

If you previously earned a college diploma or university degree, you may be eligible to benefit from the unique courses in the three-semester International Development program, with its emphasis on interdisciplinary and cross-sector studies.

Facilitated through the School of Business, this offering helps you to meet the needs of this growing industry by giving you practical knowledge and hands-on experience to tackle development challenges while working in Canada or abroad. Among the critical issues with which you become familiar are:
-Human rights
-Poverty reduction and human development
-Microfinance
-Health and disease prevention
-Education and training
-Economic development and income growth
-Social entrepreneurship and innovation
-Gender and development
-Energy and environmental sustainability
-Corporate social responsibility
-Humanitarian assistance
-Finance for development
-Project management

Once you successfully complete the International Development program, you become a general development professional and will be able to seek employment in a wide variety of institutions. International development professionals work in every country in the world to address crucial issues in developing communities.

Career Opportunities

Program Highlights
-International Development program faculty members have extensive industry experience and many hold PhD credentials.
-You learn to manage a project cycle through problem identification, analysis, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.
-As courses are designed to utilize case studies and real-life examples, emphasis is placed on practical applied studies.
-Seasoned international development practitioners are invited to lead course lectures, allowing you to benefit from their wealth of experience.
-Once you graduate, you receive support to pursue a domestic or an international internship. Priority is given to finding employment in the developing world. Possible study tours in select developing countries provide valuable experiential learning.

Career Outlook
-Program/project coordinator
-Economic development officer
-Social development specialist
-Corporate social responsibility manager
-Research officer
-Program/project director
-Aid/development worker
-Fieldwork facilitator
-Monitoring and evaluation officer

Areas of Employment
-Canadian or international NGOs or foundations
-Socially driven enterprises
-Government agencies
-International financial institutions (working on impact investments)
-Private sector companies including mining companies (working on corporate social responsibility)
-Energy companies (working on environmental sustainability)
-Social entrepreneurship
-Academic/research institution

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The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. Read more
The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor Gaim Kibreab and taught by excellent research-active lecturers who specialise in social and economic development, as forced migration. See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group.

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:

• Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
• Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
• Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
• Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
• Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
• Environmental policies and sustainable development;
• Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The course develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

Modules

Contemporary issues in development
Human development in a globalised world
Research methods for development
Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
Forced migration and development
Human rights and development
Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Teaching and learning

Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

Placements

Our social policy students have taken up work placements at the following organisations:

• Chance UK, a unique early intervention mentoring organisation who provide adult volunteer mentors to work with children aged 5-11 years at risk of developing anti-social behaviour in later life)
• Kairos in Soho (a pan-London LGBT Community Development Organisation)
• Naz Project London (a sexual health organisation that works to mobilise Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) communities in relation to HIV and other sexual health concerns)
• Richmond Advice and Information on Disability (RAID)
• Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) one of the UK's largest charities and voluntary organisations who aim to give older people the opportunity and choice to get more out of life

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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There is an international need for professionals who can provide sustainable and resilient infrastructure to help alleviate poverty in low- to middle-income countries. Read more

There is an international need for professionals who can provide sustainable and resilient infrastructure to help alleviate poverty in low- to middle-income countries. This programme will create future engineers who can work in a global context and with the skills and understanding to address the challenges of poverty worldwide.

About this degree

Students gain understanding of infrastructure design and delivery processes in resource-limited settings, and learn how to mobilise technical expertise to develop solutions with local stakeholders in a global context. The wide range of taught modules also provides opportunity to critically engage with the complexities and ethical dilemmas of working as an engineer internationally.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), a collaborative project (30 credits). three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), full-time nine months, part-time two years, flexible up to five years is offered

Core modules

  • Appropriate Technologies in Practice
  • Collaborative Project International Development
  • Engineering and International Development
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Disaster Risk Reduction

Optional modules

  • Students choose a minimum of two* and a maximum of three optional modules from the following (subject to availability):
  • Environmental GIS
  • Environmental Modelling
  • Environmental Systems Engineering
  • GIS Principles and Technology
  • Natural and Environmental Disasters
  • Urban Flooding and Drainage
  • Water and Wastewater Treatment
  • *Students who choose two optional modules may choose one elective module in addition from the following:
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I – Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II – Learning from Informality: Investigative Design
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practicies and Alternatives
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
  • Clean Energy and Development
  • Water and Development in Africa
  • Housing as Urbanism
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

This programme will be delivered by a selection of taught modules, collaborative project with overseas clients and practical activities, including a site visit to the Centre for Alternative Technologies in Wales. While most of the field trip costs are met by the department, students are required to pay £300 towards the trip which contributes to accommodation and food. Assessment will range from group project presentations, coursework, and examinations to essays and a compulsory dissertation over the last term.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Engineering for International Development MSc

Careers

Graduates can expect to find employment in the following areas:

  • the Department for International Development
  • international development agencies and engineering consultancies
  • organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, and the European Union
  • non-governmental agencies worldwide, such as Practical Action, WaterAid, and Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor.

Employability

MSc Engineering for International Development graduates will be able to pursue a career in the field of engineering, working on projects in low-middle income, developing countries, as well as the broader international development sector in different capacities and within various organisations currently operating in the field, such as the UN, the EU or NGOs such as WaterAid, Practical Action, Habitat for Humanity and more.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering is an energetic and exciting department with well-established research projects and networks in environmental engineering, transportation, urban resilience, wastewater provision, human settlements and renewable energy.

UCL is also home to Engineers Without Borders UCL, the international development organisation's largest UK branch and the Engineering for International Development which is an umbrella entity for student activities in relation to international development. A self-financed summer school can be organized to Ethiopia to gain exposure to the water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programme of the UN.

Students benefit from UCL's strong links with industry-leading partners in the heart of London, through collaborative projects with businesses, charities and utility companies who work in low-middle income regions such as Water Aid, and renewable energy start-ups such as BBOXX.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering

60% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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MSc International Development. Development Management analyses the management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process. Read more

MSc International Development: Development Management analyses the management, planning and policymaking aspects of the development process.

The course is designed for social science graduates, or for those working in institutions involved in the management of development activities in developing countries, such as central and local government, parastatal organisations, nongovernmental organisations and multilateral or bilateral aid agencies.

It aims to blend theory and practice and seeks to explain policy behaviour through an integrated approach, drawing on a range of disciplinary perspectives.

The course is ideal if you're looking to acquire the practical skills to manage development interventions in an increasingly challenging field.

Aims

  • Provide an opportunity for you to deepen your understanding of management, planning and policy-making in economic, social and political spheres of development.
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to analyse effectively the relationships between development management and development processes.
  • Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different forms of development management.
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to development and management.
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication.
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within development management, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (    ).

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute (GDI) has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. Read more
This programme responds to the growing demands made on the humanitarian and development sectors by intensive urbanisation. This course has been established by the research and consultancy group on International Development, Emergencies and Refugees (IDEARS) - part of the Weeks Centre at LSBU. If you wish to pursue a career with government, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises, this course is for you.

Rapidly urbanising world

Ours is a rapidly urbanising world: by 2010 over half the world's population lived in cities. Urbanization is fastest in the developing world, where both primary and secondary cities are rapidly expanding. It is predicted that by 2020 more Africans will live in urban than in rural areas, and in China, by 2023. Except in countries emerging from war, urbanisation is closely linked to economic growth, although urban poverty levels continue to rise.

This rapid growth, particularly in the light of its links to the flight from rural poverty and the development of a massive informal sector, has posed immense challenges to all urban systems. In many Asian, Latin American and African cities 30-70% of the population lives in slums and more than 90% of new jobs are in the informal sector. In transition countries, already highly urbanised, the changing political and economic framework has led to widespread poverty. Everywhere, urban roads, utilities, education and health services, and governance processes are heavily strained. While cities experience high levels of investment, it is often uneven.

This context is now widely recognised among all major actors, with policy and programmes targeting the urban sector now a growth area. The challenge for development professionals, whether working in donor agencies, NGOs, governments or private practice, is to understand the broad economic and political context of urbanization, develop analyses of complex urban trends, opportunities and problems, and be able to draw on a range of appropriate interventions. People seeking work or progression in development practice will be moving into a growth area if they can demonstrate familiarity with urban issues and policies in developing countries.

Modules

You'll explore urban issues, strongly linked to analyses of broader development issues, which will prepare them for roles in development agencies, NGOs, urban management or community work. It provides a thorough grounding in the broad agendas of poverty reduction and its global context. At the same time it provides a thorough understanding of rapidly changing urban settings and enables students to acquire practical development planning skills for an urban setting. An emphasis on research as well as practical skills allows students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

Economies in transition
Human development in a globalised world
Urban challenges
Urban project
Research methods
Dissertation

Dissertation and voluntary work placement

Part of the dissertation may be replaced with a voluntary work placement in one of our partner organisations. Through the use of case studies you will analyse a comprehensive range of development issues, such as: markets, trade and the global economy; the role of international institutions and agencies; human development; poverty and poverty reduction; social provision in developing countries; rural development and urbanisation; environmental policies and sustainable development; empowerment and participation; migration.

Through a specialist theoretical module you'll also acquire a thorough grounding in urban development issues and their links to a broad development agenda; and this will be followed by a project module which will enable you to apply the theory and understand the necessary skills to plan, execute and monitor an urban development project. The course also develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy design and implementation.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with practicing development urbanists around the country, who provide the course with strong links to current thinking and practice; as well as with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations give regular presentations to MSc students.

Employability

Students on our MSc Development and Urbanisation course will benefit from the renewed international interest in the urban sphere. Previous graduates have entered careers with a wide range of employers, working for international organisations, such as, the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation.

Many take up important posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations or non-governmental development organisations in the UK, such as Christian Aid and Oxfam, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

For students interested in further academic development or mid-career progression, successful completion of the MSc provides eligibility for our large and lively Mphil/PhD programme.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Read more

This MSc equips students with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise needed to positively contribute to development in countries where they are actively involved. Students acquire the tools necessary to respond to a diverse range of problems including productive capacity, intersectoral integration, economic and social diversification, and self-sufficiency.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to analyse the development process and to formulate appropriate policies for meeting development goals. The field trip, conducted in a developing country, provides the opportunity to study the problems encountered in development, and the cultural, administrative and institutional context in which decisions are made.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (30 credits) and dissertation (60).

A Postgraduate Diploma, four core modules (90 credits), optional modules (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four optional modules (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

Four core modules 

  • Contemporary Approaches to Development Management
  • Development in Practice
  • Critical Ideas of Development Conceptions and Realities
  • Society and Market: Private Agency for Development

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Cost Benefit Analysis: Theory and Practice
  • Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case Studies and Alternatives
  • Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Food and the City
  • Gender in Policy and Planning
  • Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • Industrialisation and Infrastructure
  • Land, Food and Agriculture
  • Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
  • Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
  • Social Policy and Citizenship
  • The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
  • The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
  • Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
  • Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
  • Urbanisation and Development
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South

Or any other open MSc module in The Bartlett School of Planning.

Please note: not all optional modules listed above may be available.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word paper on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic is chosen by the student in dialogue with the Programme Director.

Teaching and learning

The programme consists of reading, essay writing and individual and group project work, in the context of lectures, seminars, workshops, case study analysis, and a field trip abroad. In recent years field trip destinations have included Uganda and Ethiopia. Student performance is assessed through coursework, unseen examinations and a final dissertation report.

Fieldwork

The overseas fieldwork trip is a practical research-based residential that helps draw the various elements of the degree together.

The DPU will cover the following costs of the field trip: return flights, visas, travel insurance, accommodation and fees, and costs of local experts and inputs. However, food, local travel and incidental expenses of a personal nature will not be covered by the DPU.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Development Administration and Planning MSc

Careers

Graduates are engaged in a diversity of professional activities including local, regional and national government, consultancy firms, national and international NGOs, United Nations programmes and international aid agencies. A small proportion of graduates pursue advanced research degrees while several work as academics in leading universities or as independent consultants.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Economic Development Intern, African Development Bank
  • Policy Making Intern, UNDP (United Nations Development Programme)
  • Policy Research Officer, Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Trade Negotiator, Ministry of Commerce of the Kingdom of Thailand
  • Consultant, United Nations Development Program (UNDP)

Employability

The central objective of this programme is to equip participants with the analytical, methodological and practical expertise necessary to make a positive contribution to the development effort in countries with which they are engaged. 

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Development Planning Unit (DPU) at UCL is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies and by national and provincial governments.

This MSc examines and analyses the theory and practice of development administration at international, national and regional levels to provide participants with an understanding of the processes generating social change and with the skills and abilities to respond.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Development Planning Unit

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. Read more
Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. All of these issues require professionals with the practical skills and analytical capacity to build resilience at a national and community level.

Delivered by specialists from the humanities, social sciences, medicine, business and economics, education and law, the course offers a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable development with four streams: Democracy, justice and governance; Gender, conflict and society; Crisis, change and management; and Sustainable resource management.

The course offers an applied approach to the theory and practice of international development. It offers project management, leadership skills development and rigorous research training within its interdisciplinary core curriculum. Foundation theory and practice units address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

You can tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Graduate employment opportunities may include human rights advocacy, aid agencies in government and non-government sectors, the Fair Trade business sector, community organisations, and international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank.

As part of your studies, you will be able to acquire practical experience through fieldwork and internship opportunities at sites of significant development practice in countries such as South Africa, Vietnam, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Fiji. For instance, the South Africa Student Placement Program provides Monash students with an amazing opportunity to gain first-hand experience of international and community development work, through placements with Oxfam and its partner organisations in South Africa. Options to include language extension in individual programs are also available.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-development-practice-a6006?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for international development practice, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for international development practice
These studies will introduce you to international development studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international development theory, practice and research to address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should you wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course you should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-development-practice-a6006?domestic=true#making-the-application

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This programme examines development planning in the context of environmental concerns in urban areas of the Global South. It challenges mainstream approaches to development, focusing instead upon transformative action for environmental justice. Read more

This programme examines development planning in the context of environmental concerns in urban areas of the Global South. It challenges mainstream approaches to development, focusing instead upon transformative action for environmental justice. Many of our graduates go on to help shape future sustainable development agendas in local government, international agencies and civil society organisations.

About this degree

The focus of this degree is the complexity and variety of current environmental problems in urban regions, their causes and impacts, and the possibilities and limitations of environmental planning and management. Students learn how to respond to processes that generate social and environmental change, and how to develop strategies to steer urban environmental planning towards sustainability and environmental justice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one or two optional modules (30 modules), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules

  • The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
  • Environment and Sustainable Development in Practice
  • Urban Environmental Planning and Management in Development

Optional modules

  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • NGOs and Social Transformation
  • Food and the City
  • Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
  • Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
  • Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Policy
  • Socially Sensitive Development in Practice
  • Social Development and Poverty Reduction: From Theory to Practice
  • Managing the City Economy
  • Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
  • The City and Its Relations
  • Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management

Not all modules may be available.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme comprises reading, essay writing, critical discussion and project work, facilitated through lectures, seminars, workshops, extensive fieldwork and discussions with practitioners covering theoretical and practical tasks and case study analysis. Assessment is through coursework, examinations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Environment and Sustainable Development MSc

Careers

Most previous graduates of this programme are now engaged in professional activities, ranging from local and national government, consultancy firms and national and international NGOs, to United Nations programmes and international aid agencies all over the world. 

Examples of organisations where graduates are employed include:

  • Public Sector: DEFRA and DfID (UK), Ministerio das Cidades (Brazil) and many other local government organisations
  • International Agencies and NGOs: UNEP, UNDP, UN-Habitat, JICA, GIZ (former GTZ), InsightShare, Save the Children, and WWF
  • Think tanks, academic and research organisations: IIEED, Stockholm Environment Institute, Resources for Development Center, WaterWise and the Arab Academy for Science, Technology & Maritime Transport
  • Private companies: HappoldConsulting, EcoSecurities, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, Dialogue by Design, and BioRegionalQuintain.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Campaign Manager, Urban Design Research Institute
  • Research Consultant, IIED (International Institute for Environment and Development
  • Researcher, Physical Activity Research Centre
  • Research Assistant, UCL Institute for Global Prosperity
  • Sustainable City Metabolism Officer, Peterborough City Council

Employability

Our programme equips students with several interdisciplinary and transferable skills including report writing, data collection and analysis, communication, research and project management skills and teamwork.

Our students network with diverse organisations in the UK and internationally, and in the field they may work directly with local public and private partners. Academic staff are involved in research, consultancy and development practice, influencing global debates on development such as UNFCCC negotiations, the Sustainable Development Goals and the UN Habitat III agenda. Students can meet alumni and other individuals and groups forming part of this network, which is concerned with issues of socially just and sustainable development in the Global South.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme offers an in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of socio-environmental change, equipping graduates with the skills required to face global challenges in urban regions while being sensitive to local contexts.

For the last 60 years the Development Planning Unit at UCL has championed forms of development planning that promote social justice in the context of rapid urbanisation in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The programme provides opportunities to interact with leading thinkers in development planning and students will join an international network of researchers and practitioners.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Development Planning Unit

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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