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The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. Read more
The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. The course is based upon the concept of a learning community, whereby learners come together to share experiences and best practice. It works on the belief that within the context of community leadership, individuals learn best from a peer led programme.

The course focuses on core themes relating to politics and governance, faith, gender, global society, and community resilience. In addition to the MA, students will also be eligible for an optional exit award in Strategic Leadership at Level 7 from the Institute of Leadership and Management. Through the Interfaith Dialogue route, he course offers an annual field visit to an international destination, usually Cordoba in Spain, but this varies according to availability. Further international visits and collaborations are available at the discretion of the course tutor and subject to numbers.

Modules:

Understanding Equality and Community Practice
Leadership: Theory, Practice and Reflection
Community and Practice-Based Research
Community Research project
Global Project Development
Interfaith Dialogue and Contemporary Society (Andalucía, Spain)
Gender and Community Leadership
Community Resilience
Professional Writing and Communication

The programme is delivered at the UCLan Burnley Campus or at the Institute of Leadership and Management

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This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Read more
This innovative MA allows you to explore ways in which drama and theatre might be applied to educational, therapeutic and community contexts. Applied drama/ theatre is an umbrella term which includes the practice of drama in a wide range of settings, such as drama and theatre in education; young people’s theatre; drama, health and healing; reminiscence and heritage theatres; theatre in prisons; theatre for development and community theatre.

This course addresses the 'social turn' at the cutting-edge of contemporary theatre, where new forms of participation are blurring the boundaries between performer and spectator. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore creative and research opportunities in some of these diverse and dynamic contexts and analyse the politics and values of applied drama. You will experience radically different approaches to performance-making in both conventional theatre spaces and in non-theatrical settings, enabling you to consider the relationship between innovative performance practices and work in applied theatre. The programme considers the international dimension of applied and participatory theatre, and the local and global implications of artistic practice.

By the end of this degree you will be well prepared to work in different locations and have developed your own praxis and practical skills as a practitioner, workshop leader and artist.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/coursefinder/maappliedandparticipatorytheatre.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught by world leading experts in applied theatre, whose published research includes theatre education, theatre and health, theatre and refugees, devised theatre and applied drama/theatre.

- You will have the opportunity to benefit from our industry partnerships and our professional links with theatre companies. Previous students have benefitted from working with Age Exchange Theatre Trust, the Lyric Hammersmith, The Globe Theatre Education, Attic Theatre, Bravo 22 Company and many local schools, museums and hospital settings.

- The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise ranked the majority of the Department's research activities as world-leading (4*) or internationally excellent (3*).

- Royal Holloway has the largest Drama Department in the UK with 25 academic members of staff working at the cutting edge of the discipline.

- We foster an excellent research environment and support a vibrant community of postgraduate and doctoral students.

- You will benefit from a range of unique performance spaces which include a traditional Japanese Noh theatre, the fully equipped Caryl Churchill Theatre and the substantial Victorian Boilerhouse.

Department research and industry highlights

You will benefit from working in partnership with professional practitioners, undertaking placements in different settings and developing your own practice. Previous practical projects have included reminiscence theatre in a day centre for the elderly; theatre with young people at risk of offending; drama and film with young carers; an interfaith installation with students of different religious beliefs; theatre with young people in hospital; theatre with young disabled performers; performance with unaccompanied refugees, and many, many more. Each project is designed and facilitated by students, and professional placements support their development.

Course content and structure

You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

Core course units:
The MA in Applied and Participatory theatre will appeal to anyone who is interested in socially engaged art. It is focused on theatre in different institutional, therapeutic and community settings, and raises questions about how artists might encourage public participation in a range of different forms of theatre and performance-making. You will study three core course units and complete a dissertation.

You will follow a course called Applied and Participatory Theatre Workshop where you will develop your skills as a practitioner and artist, as well as engaging in critical debates about the field. The next specialist module is the Independent Practical Project, where you gain valuable professional experience in community settings.

In addition to the two modules above you will study a shared module for all MA students in the Drama and Theatre Department that considers the contexts for theatre and performance, its histories and practices. The details and assessment methods of this course are being updated for the new year and will appear in more detail on the department website once validated.

The fourth module is the dissertation on a chosen subject within your field of study with accompanying Research Methodologies course that supports students in independent research and writing.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- enhanced and applied their skills as reflective theatre practitioners
- explored the scope of theatre studies and its critical and research methodologies
- developed their understanding of contemporary performance practices and its contexts
- explored the links between theory and practice
- developed their ability to undertake independent research and analysis.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of means including essays, performance analyses, evaluative reflections on practice, and practical projects, as well as a final dissertation of 10-14,000 words. Practical projects are sometimes carried out in a group and may include an element of assessment for an individual’s contribution to group working and direction. All students undertake a summer term practical project.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different drama and theatre-related areas, including careers in professional theatre, training and education. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies and many of our students go on to advanced research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS offers the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa.

The programme is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in theories and methods in the study of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions. It ensures students can benefit from the unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

Email:

Phone: 020 7898 4217

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/mareligions/

Structure

Overview:
1. Students take taught courses (half and/or full units) equivalent to three units in total from the list of taught courses.

2. The 4th and final unit is a Dissertation.

3. Languages: Students in the MA Religions of Asia and Africa may substitute one of their taught courses for a language course (most are taught in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures).

Note: Students wishing to take other SOAS courses relevant to their studies but taught outside the department may do so with the written approval of the tutor of the relevant course, the Department's MA Convenor and the Faculty's Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa Programme Specification 2012-13 (msword; 223kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/mareligions/file80695.doc

Employment

An MA in Religions of Asia and Africa from SOAS equips students with important knowledge and understanding of different cultures, history and beliefs across the regions of Asia and Africa. As well as subject expertise, students develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional careers in the private and public sectors as well as essential skills necessary to pursue further research. These include: the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources - often both in the original or other relevant languages; analytical skills to assess critically the materials relevant to a specific issue; written and oral communication skills to present, discuss and debate opinions and conclusions; and problem solving skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Faculty of Arts and Humanities

Welcome to the Faculty of Arts & Humanities at SOAS, University of London. The Faculty is home to the departments of Anthropology & Sociology, Art & Archaeology, History, Music, Study of Religions and the Centre for Media Studies, as well as a number of subject specific Centres.

The study of arts and humanities has been central to SOAS activity since 1917. All Faculty staff are specialists in regions as well as disciplines, and all subjects taught at undergraduate level within the Faculty can be combined with other disciplines across the School. Indeed, the range of course options and combinations is a distinctive characteristic of studying at SOAS, with the option of studying language units included within all our degrees.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework Music, which was already ranked highly, has risen to 5th in the UK, with over half of its publications judged ‘world-leading’; History of Art and Archaeology has seen a dramatic rise up the league tables, from 17th to 8th (out of 25), coming in the top 5 nationally for the quality of its publications. This is just one indication of the international importance of the research activity carried out by academic staff, and staff research provides the basis of teaching activity in the Faculty.

At postgraduate level the Faculty is committed to providing stimulating courses that enable students to study particular countries or regions in depth, and to explore comparisons and contrasts across the major areas of Asia and Africa. The programmes are designed to provide students with the knowledge they need to understand the nature of other societies and cultures, and to form ideas about the past, present and future of the complex and multicultural world in which we all live.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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In recent years, biological research has become increasingly interdisciplinary, focusing heavily on mathematical modeling and on the analysis of system-wide quantitative information. Read more

Computational Life Science

In recent years, biological research has become increasingly interdisciplinary, focusing heavily on mathematical modeling and on the analysis of system-wide quantitative information. Sophisticated high-throughput techniques pose new challenges for data integration and data interpretation. The Computational Life Science (CompLife) MSc program at Jacobs University meets these challenges by covering computational, theoretical and mathematical approaches in biology and the life sciences. It is geared towards students of bioinformatics, computer science, physics, mathematics and related areas.

Program Features

The CompLife program is located at Jacobs University, a private and international English-language academic institution in Bremen, Germany. CompLife students at Jacobs University take a tailor-made curriculum comprising lectures, seminars and laboratory trainings. Courses cover foundational as well as advanced topics and methods. Core components of the program and areas of specialization include:

- Computational Systems Biology
- Computational Physics and Biophysics
- Bioinformatics
- RNA Biology
- Imaging and Modeling in Medicine
- Ecological Modeling
- Theoretical Biology
- Applied Mathematics
- Numerical Methods

For more details on the CompLife curriculum, please visit the program website at http://www.jacobs-university.de/complife.

Career Options

Graduates of the CompLife program are prepared for a career in biotechnology and biomedicine. Likewise, graduates of the program are qualified to move on to a PhD.

Application and Admission

The CompLife program starts in the first week of September every year. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/graduate-admission or use the contact form to request details on how to apply. We are looking forward to receiving your inquiry.

Scholarships and Funding Options

All applicants are automatically considered for merit-based scholarships of up to € 12,000 per year. Depending on availability, additional scholarships sponsored by external partners are offered to highly gifted students. Moreover, each admitted candidate may request an individual financial package offer with attractive funding options. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/study/graduate/fees-finances to learn more.

Campus Life and Accommodation

Jacobs University’s green and tree-shaded campus provides much more than buildings for teaching and research. It is home to an intercultural community which is unprecedented in Europe. A Student Activities Center, various sports facilities, a music studio, a student-run café/bar, concert venues and our Interfaith House ensure that you will always have something interesting to do.

For graduate students who would like to live on campus, Jacobs University offers accommodation in four residential colleges. Each college has its own dining room, recreational lounge, study areas, and common and group meeting rooms. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/study/graduate/campus-life for more information.

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Big data has turned out to have giant potential, but poses major challenges at the same time. On the one hand, big data is driving the next stage of technological innovation and scientific discovery. Read more

Big Data and Data Engineering

Big data has turned out to have giant potential, but poses major challenges at the same time. On the one hand, big data is driving the next stage of technological innovation and scientific discovery. Accordingly, big data has been called the “gold” of the digital revolution and the information age. On the other hand, the global volume of data is growing at a pace which seems to be hard to control. In this light, it has been noted that we are “drowning in a sea of data”.

Faced with these prospects and risks, the world requires a new generation of data specialists. Data engineering is an emerging profession concerned with big data approaches to data acquisition, data management and data analysis. Providing you with up-to-date knowledge and cutting-edge computational tools, data engineering has everything that it takes to master the era of big data.

Program Features

The Data Engineering program is located at Jacobs University, a private and international English-language academic institution in Bremen, Germany. The two-year program offers a fascinating and profound insight into the foundations, methods and technologies of big data. Students take a tailor-made curriculum comprising lectures, tutorials, laboratory trainings and hands-on projects. Embedded into a vibrant academic context, the program is taught by renowned experts. In a unique setting, students also team up with industry professionals in selected courses. Core components of the program and areas of specialization include:

- The Big Data Challenge
- Data Analytics
- Big Data Bases and Cloud Services
- Principles of Statistical Modeling
- Data Acquisition Technologies
- Big Data Management
- Machine Learning
- Semantic Web and Internet of Things
- Data Visualization and Image Processing
- Document Analysis
- Internet Security and Privacy
- Legal Aspects of Data Engineering and Data Ethics

For more details on the Data Engineering curriculum, please visit the program website at http://www.jacobs-university.de/data-engineering.

Career Options

Demand for data engineers is massive – in industry, commerce and the public sector. From IT to finance, from automotive to oil and gas, from health to retail: companies and institutions in almost every domain need experts for data acquisition, data management and data analysis. With an MSc degree in Data Engineering, you will excel in this most exciting and rewarding field with very attractive salaries. Likewise, an MSc degree in Data Engineering allows you to move on to a PhD and to a career in science an research.

Application and Admission

The Data Engineering program starts in the first week of September every year. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/graduate-admission or use the contact form to request details on how to apply. We are looking forward to receiving your inquiry.

Scholarships and Funding Options

All applicants are automatically considered for merit-based scholarships of up to € 12,000 per year. Depending on availability, additional scholarships sponsored by external partners are offered to highly gifted students. Moreover, each admitted candidate may request an individual financial package offer with attractive funding options. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/study/graduate/fees-finances to learn more.

Campus Life and Accommodation

Jacobs University’s green and tree-shaded campus provides much more than buildings for teaching and research. It is home to an intercultural community which is unprecedented in Europe. A Student Activities Center, various sports facilities, a music studio, a student-run café/bar, concert venues and our Interfaith House ensure that you will always have something interesting to do.

For graduate students who would like to live on campus, Jacobs University offers accommodation in four residential colleges. Each college has its own dining room, recreational lounge, study areas, and common and group meeting rooms. Please visit http://www.jacobs-university.de/study/graduate/campus-life for more information.

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All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Read more
All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants for this course are expected to have a university qualification in either Hebrew or Arabic (Muslim-Jewish Relations stream) or Persian (Persian Cultural History stream).

Once admitted onto the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies), applicants will have the option of studying one of two streams:

- Muslim-Jewish Relations;
or
- Persian Cultural History

For each of these streams, students are required to choose three papers - courses usually run over two terms - in addition to doing a 15,000-word MPhil dissertation under the supervision of a supervisor. The dissertations are submitted no later than mid-August following the start of the course.

MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They may attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei

Course detail

* Muslim-Jewish Relations*

Students taking the Muslim-Jewish Relations stream will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying Muslim-Jewish relations, primary sources in translation and original language, bibliographical method, objectivity in the study of interfaith relations and controversial themes. Topics may include the Jewish languages of the Islamic world; key historical documents in the study of Muslim-Jewish Relations; Muslim and Jewish thought; Law and Society and the Arab-Israeli conflict.

* Persian Cultural History*

Students taking the Persian Cultural History stream will be offered readings in Persian cultural history, identifying persisting trends in Persian literature and cultural production from the medieval period down to modern times. These themes revolve around kingship and the image of the ideal prince, theories of justice and good government, and competing sources of secular and religious authority. Similarly, the motif of love, both earthly and divine, is a common thread running through Persian literature and entails also the extensive use of imagery of the natural world. In the modern world, the course examines a number of issues by studying Iranian cinema and focusing on gender, historical adaptation, nation and approaches to narration and resistance to dominant discourses, reflecting also on how the stories and legends of the classical tradition are adapted for contemporary literature and media. In discussing these topics, attention is paid to their visual as well as written representation.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Hebrew, Arabic or Persian;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Muslim and Jewish or Persian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

The one-year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies) will have the following structure for the (1) Muslim-Jewish Relations option and (2) Persian Cultural History option:

1. Three modules each assessed by an examination or a 5,000 word course exercise
2. A 15,000 word dissertation.

With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.
Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:

http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpmei/apply

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline. Read more
Development and expansion in undergraduate studies in religion and belief, together with the expansion of national and international ‘faith awareness’ initiatives, has resulted in a high demand for postgraduate studies within this discipline.

The programme explores the impact and influence religion and belief has on social structures, community, politics, economics, policy (education), citizenship, culture & identity, sexuality, pluralism, spirituality, and national & international relationships. The MA also introduces critical analysis of ethics, systems of belief, human rights and social justice issues and the application of these concepts within lived environments from diverse religious perspectives.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture & Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector.

INDUSTRY LINKS

The RCS team at UCLan have a wide variety of links with local, national and international faith and intercultural forums, faith schools and academic institutions, all of which provide valuable contacts for students wishing to enter professions related to Teaching, Ministry, inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue and relations. RCS also work with charity organisations both home and abroad and global outreach programmes. Further details and contacts are available from members of the RCS teaching team.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

Students may study the MA full time over one year or part time over two or three years. In either case students will be required to successfully complete six MA modules and one MA dissertation (the dissertation is equivalent to 3 x modules). Each module requires an estimated 2 hours class contact per week plus extensive reading and dedicated personal study.

We strive to give our students key employability and transferable skills which will serve them in the world of work. Our assessment practices illustrate a move away from exams and essays per se and incorporate a move towards a more inclusive assessment which benefits our diverse student body. Assessment strategies include coursework, individual and group presentations, individual and/or group projects, reviews and ICT interaction.

OPPORTUNITIES

Religion, Culture & Society (RCS) also includes field trips to national and international places of interest such as; Rome, Istanbul, Auschwitz, Liverpool Cathedrals, Ladywelle Pilgrimage and Shrine, the Hindu Temple etc. Although these trips are optional to MA students, they aim to draw attention to shared values, beliefs and practices, and supports students in achieving a mutual appreciation of different faiths and traditions. The international trips in particular aim to develop an experienced awareness of cultural heritage, traditions and practices of different faiths, and widen students’ appreciation of how those faiths and belief systems interact within lived environments, communities and in different social settings. Thus enhancing not only MA provision but also the learning experience and the environment where that learning experience takes place.

The programme is of interest to both graduates and practitioners who wish to specialise further in Religion, Culture and Society. Graduates may wish to extend their knowledge to prepare for academic and professional careers in the private or public sector, including local government, race relations officers, ministry, equality/diversity training officers, social services, social welfare, community development, youth work, research, education and communication support workers, lecturing in further or higher education. Practitioners may wish to update their knowledge or gain a higher qualification for personal or professional development. The programme will also appeal to working individuals who are interested in the range of topics offered and do not wish to specialise in a rigidly defined Theology based MA programme. In addition, many students are currently seeking Masters’ programmes as a way of weathering the economic recession.

RCS offers progression routes onto PGCE courses for graduates wishing to develop a career in teaching. There are also opportunities to further study for PhD or professional doctorate.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Religion, Culture & Society brings together disciplines of Theology, Philosophy, Sociology and International Relations – a very innovative, exciting and challenging post-graduate degree award.

The whole philosophy of the Religion, Culture and Society MA is to promote inclusively, encourage reflection on interfaith dialogue and highlight the important contribution religion and belief can make to community cohesion and the combating of religious prejudice and discrimination (QCA & DfES, 2004). The MA evaluates how and why the role of religion and culture has changed within society, and explores the impact and influence of religion and belief within economical, political and social constructs. Religion and faith is critically analysed within the framework of theistic and atheistic approaches to sexuality, spirituality, human rights, territory and space and cultural relationships. The application of classical and contemporary theological and philosophical concepts and theories of faith are examined in relation to lived environments.

The MA in Religion, Culture and Society embodies and supports the objectives outlined in the AHSS 2007-2012 strategy, is aligned to Theology and Religious Studies benchmarks, HEQ (2008) descriptors and is situated specifically within a social science framework. The course supports a pluralistic perspective on and within religion and belief traditions, and engages with a range of methods of study, explores a number of interesting and challenging modules and includes and a diversified range of assessment practices.

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The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. Read more
The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. The course is based upon the concept of a learning community, whereby learners come together to share experiences and best practice. It works on the belief that within the context of community leadership, individuals learn best from a peer led programme.

The course is grounded in the educational philosophy of Paulo Freire, and uses action reflection praxis as a basis for learning, allowing students to take new theoretical concepts and critically challenge them within their own communities. It also utilises and explores the management concepts of the community educator Mary Parker Follett (1868 to 1933); a woman recognised as ahead of her time in management science and whose ideas are hugely pertinent to the community sector today. The staff engaged in the delivery of the programme are all practitioners and internationally recognised in their fields. Their role is to share their knowledge on a peer to peer basis and support learners in developing new and innovative solutions to current issues.

INDUSTRY LINKS

An academic qualification in community leadership provides an excellent and recognised foundation for a career in the field. The course is designed to prepare the student for senior positions of community leadership within the third sector, the public sector, governance and politics, and also to play a leading role on the international stage. The course provides excellent opportunities for international, national, regional, and local networking and the development of personal social capital which will serve to effectively enhance employability prospects.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

The course is available part time and includes a flexible teaching pattern. Some modules are taught in short intensive blocks of five days. Other modules adopt a blended teaching approach where lectures are delivered once per month.

This makes it possible for students that are working or live at a distance to be able to take individual modules without regular weekly attendance at the University. However, the ethos of a strong peer learning community is central to all modes of learning, regardless of being either classroom or web based.

A range of assessment methods will be used during your course. Your skills, knowledge and understanding will be formally and informally assessed through written assignments, oral presentations and through practical tasks. The requirements and the marking criteria for all course assessments are clearly set out for you in this handbook and module handbooks. Tutors may provide additional supportive material to you.

Opportunities will also be provided throughout the course for informal, formative assessment of your skills, knowledge and understanding. You will be invited to present seminar papers, contribute to class and online discussions, apply your learning informally in the workplace and take part in tutorials.

FURTHER INFORMATION

The MA in Community Leadership is a unique course developed and inspired by individuals who work within communities as activists and change makers. The course is based upon the concept of a learning community, whereby learners come together to share experiences and best practice. It works on the belief that within the context of community leadership, individuals learn best from a peer led programme.

The course can be taken at either MA, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate level. Students who successfully complete three taught modules are eligible for the award of PG Certificate.

The course focuses on core themes relating to politics and governance, faith, gender, global society, and community resilience. In addition to the MA, students will also be eligible for an optional exit award in Strategic Leadership at Level 7 from the Institute of Leadership and Management. Through the Interfaith Dialogue route, he course offers an annual field visit to an international destination, usually Cordoba in Spain, but this varies according to availability. Further international visits and collaborations are available at the discretion of the course tutor and subject to numbers.

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