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Masters Degrees (Interactive Art)

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The Communication Design pathway supports students with a specialist interest in typography, graphic design, illustration, interactive design and branding. Read more

The Communication Design pathway supports students with a specialist interest in typography, graphic design, illustration, interactive design and branding. The pathway is concerned with the exploration, development and synthesis of conceptual, theoretical and practical skills to create compelling design solutions.

Course Overview

Our Master’s programme has been designed to support and enhance the skills of art and design practitioners who want to work in the cultural and creative industries. Awarded by Falmouth University and delivered in partnership with Hearst Magazines UK, publishers of ELLE, Cosmopolitan, Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar, together we have designed an exciting and industry-connected Master’s to equip you for the real world.

The 12-month MA supports students across a range of Art & Design specialisms and you will be given the unique opportunity to explore your area within an interdisciplinary global culture. Bringing together students from a variety of disciplines through dialogue, idea-exchange and collaborative activities, the course prepares students for the hybrid and dynamic nature of contemporary creative practice. By enabling the pursuit of specialist subject expertise alongside opportunities to acquire the skills, experience and outlook necessary for professional success, we give our graduates the confidence to take the next step toward building their own creative futures.

The course is open to graduates from any art and design related degree subject and who already have knowledge and experience of a specialist area. Our MA will allow you to enhance your skills within your existing area, taking it in your own direction with support from a subject tutor. We currently support pathways in Fine Art, Communication Design, Illustration, Animation, Photography, Fashion Design, Fashion Communication, Product Design, Craft and Spatial Design.

Alternatively, you may be looking for a Master’s degree, but you are not clear which specialist pathway to follow, this course is designed to support those students arriving from a variety of undergraduate programmes with varying degrees of focus. The scope of the award in Art & Design is flexible enough to provide opportunities for you to experiment and try out new approaches before finding your focus.

Unique Opportunities

This programme offers outstanding specialist tuition combined with extensive academic contact and studio access. As a Master’s student, you will have:

  • exclusive access to media and industry expertise through Hearst Magazines UK and their teams
  • regular workshops with key industry stakeholders
  • industry projects
  • internship opportunities through Hearst Magazines UK and other creative industry contacts
  • your own individual design space giving you flexibility on where you study
  • lecturers who are visible and accessible five days a week
  • opportunities to expand and enrich your ideas through daily interaction with students across other disciplines

The inter-disciplinary nature of the course and the teaching team, along with the wider staff expertise within the college means that specific tuition can be provided on a ‘bespoke’ basis if and when needs arise. In addition to support from academic staff, you will have regular group and one-to-one access to our Study Skills Coordinator for support with writing, research and academic skills.

Our dedicated Welfare Team are resourced and prepared to support all students. Should you require help with English language, support is available from our in-house provision. 

Course Structure

The course is structured to provide you with a wide range of activities in the modules at the start of the course, together with the opportunity to experiment and explore different methods and approaches. As you move through the programme you will then start to focus and identify individual ambitions, and plan and execute your final project.

Semester One

EXPERIMENTAL PRACTICE

Introduces you to new methods and approaches. You will take part in a series of set projects, which will encourage collaboration, experimental practice and creative activity.

THEORY AND RESEARCH

Within this module you will be exposed to a series of lectures and seminars around a series of shared themes that cut across theory and practice. You will be inspired to try out fresh and innovative methods in practice and you will work collaboratively and individually.

Semester Two

FOCUSING PRACTICE

This module will support your development of independent and self-initiated project work in your specialist area. To build your portfolio you will take part in live briefs set by our partners in the creative industries and supported to enter local and international competitions.

ART & DESIGN FUTURES

You will be asked to look ahead by engaging in the issues shaping the professional practice of art and design today. Lecturer talks will introduce you to a diverse range of contemporary art and design practices to inspire and orient your own career pathways. This module also gives you the opportunity to organise and complete a work placement enabling you to gain valuable professional experience.

Semester Three

FINAL MAJOR PROJECT

You will spend the final semester working on a self-initiated project in your area of specialism, underpinned by the cross discipline culture of the course. Your final submission will be a portfolio of work and a written report culminating in a final MA show.

Careers and Employability

With staff and visiting tutors active in the creative industries worldwide as researchers and practitioners, as artists, designers, writers, and curators you will be exposed to issues, debates and challenges that are transforming art and design practice in the 21st century.

More specifically, the modules encourage you to reflect upon the broad and hybrid nature of art and design and the emerging global workplace in which you will ultimately take your next steps. To offer you real-world experience through live briefs and the work placements, we collaborate with both international media and communication organisations (such as our partner Hearst Magazines UK) as well as local creative businesses on our doorstep in Cambridge—one of the UK’s centres of leading-edge creativity and innovation.

Visit the website for full specifications: http://www.csvpa.com/art-and-design/ma-art-design/course-details/about.htm

Click here to apply online: https://www.csvpa.com/apply-online/step1



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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. Read more

Why study an MA by Dissertation in Art & Design?

MA by Dissertation in Art & Design is designed to help students review, develop and progress their practice as an artist or designer. The course has been created to enhance the breadth and depth of students’ artistic abilities and capacities for self-direction and professionalism. It will allow students to develop an individual practice and engender the required excellence to successfully become a creative professional.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses in Art & Design please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/design/postgraduate.cfm

Who is the course for?

The MA by Dissertation in Art and Design is for those with art and/or design degrees or related Honours qualifications. These include, for example: fine art, graphic design, illustration, interactive media, networked media, architecture, interior, landscape and garden design, and art history. Students may choose to progress straight from their undergraduate studies or return to their studies after a period of work. As a non-taught postgraduate degree, the MA by Dissertation offers students the opportunity to identify and refine an area of research within an open studio culture of debate and practice led by established practicing artists, curators, theorists and art historians. A portfolio of work and CV are required, together with a letter addressing research interests and reasons for applying.

Course aims

Giving students an intellectually-stimulating and creative environment in which they can further develop their potential as an artist or designer.
Providing teaching and peer-group learning that is both challenging and responsive to student needs.

Providing a place for debate that aids students in becoming increasingly articulate and professional in questioning and improving their works and goals.

Providing practical support and the necessary technical resources for creating works in a range of different media.

Developing a range of transferable skills and the knowledge of how to apply them in the art and design industries.

Delivery and assessment

While the MA by Dissertation is a non-taught postgraduate degree, students benefit from, and contribute to, the dynamism of the studio-based Art and Design courses at Writtle School of Design. Students attend a weekly seminar in which they present their research findings and practice to tutors and fellow students.
Assessment is in three parts: a dissertation, portfolio of practice-based research and an exhibition or final major project that embodies the results of the research carried out.

Dissertation:

The dissertation comprises a written thesis (of up to 10,000 words) which sets out the relationship between the student’s work and the wider field of knowledge/the subject area, addressing the theoretical, historical and critical context of their work.

The Portfolio of Research:

The portfolio of research is a comprehensive body of developmental work that demonstrates an exploratory and reflective approach to an appropriate breadth of media, tools and techniques. The format of this portfolio is agreed with supervisors but may include a blog, journal, sketchbook and/or a collection of sketches and models.

The Final Exhibition:

The public presentation of art and design work is an important aspect of creative professional life and students will be supported in planning, promoting and implementing a public presentation of their work to a professional standard at the end of the course.

Throughout the programme students will engage with the following activities:

Semester one:
• Introduction to Research Methods
• Discussion of texts
• Exhibition visits
• Exploration and reflection on tools, techniques, materials
• Seminars

Semester two:
• Development of work towards final exhibition or major project
• Discussion of texts
• Exhibition visits
• Seminars

Spring-Summer:
• Dissertation – supported by seminars and tutorials

Career prospects

Career possibilities for art and design graduates have increased over recent years, reflecting the burgeoning opportunities within the cultural sector in the UK and internationally. Graduates work as professional artists, filmmakers, graphic designers, game designers, curators, and gallery professionals in public and private galleries. They also write for magazines, newspapers and journals on a whole variety of cultural topics. Other career opportunities for MA graduates include residency programmes, community-led outreach work and teaching art or design. Students who are on our MA programme may already be professional artists or designers who wish to reinvigorate and refocus their practice.

To find out more about our careers guidance, please see here: http://www.writtle.ac.uk/Careers

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As a graduate from an art and design discipline, you will find this course balancing the practical – exploring and developing your own art and design work – with a strong culture of research. Read more
As a graduate from an art and design discipline, you will find this course balancing the practical – exploring and developing your own art and design work – with a strong culture of research.

You will develop essential career management skills, such as self-managing your learning and development, together with specialist skills chosen from: advertising design, graphic design, illustration, interior design or interior architecture, fine art, photography and video art, fashion, animation, motion graphics and interactive design.

Intermediate qualifications available:
• Postgraduate certificate – 60 credits at Masters level
• Postgraduate diploma – 120 credits at Masters level

Visit the website: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/courses/postgraduate/next-year/art-and-design

Course detail

• Study with staff who are established tutors and practitioners in your chosen field and who place emphasis on your personal creative development
• Explore a range of art and design disciplines as you develop both research and practical skills to help you work directly in contemporary arts or access careers such as art administration/promotion, community arts projects or further study on an MPhil or PhD
• Develop both self-reliance and career management skills as you produce creative and realistic solutions to complex problems and build on your professional attitude to creative practice and enterprise
• Gain a deep understanding of the artistic, critical and cultural contexts associated with Art and Design to enable you to better understand the value of your work
• Benefit from access to a lively, creative studio space and excellent facilities including printmaking, technical and digital media such as image processing software, moving image software, high definition video equipment and high quality photo equipment, screen-printing and materials workshops.

Modules

• Historical Contexts: Art and Design
• Studio and Professional Practice
• Contemporary Issues: Art and Design
• Studio Practice and Research
• MA Art and Design Major Project

Assessment

A range of appropriate assessments will enable you to grow in confidence and demonstrate your skills and knowledge.

Since self-directed practical projects are at the heart of learning activities they will logically be the subject of assessment. Formative and summative assessments of practical assignments are seen as an important method of ensuring your understanding, developing relevant cognitive and practical skills and of ensuring personal creative development and progress.

Careers

Employability skills are integrated into the course and provide you with an awareness of the real-world context of the creative industries in general and Art and Design professions in particular. You will be helped to develop a strategy for obtaining appropriate employment at the end of your course.

Professional practice will be emphasised as part of all learning units.

Funding

For information on available funding, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/money/scholarships/pg

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow the link: https://www.beds.ac.uk/howtoapply/course/applicationform

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This MA responds to the pressing need for a high quality postgraduate degree serving the computer games and entertainment industries. Read more

This MA responds to the pressing need for a high quality postgraduate degree serving the computer games and entertainment industries. The emphasis is on games design, art and animation, and will also develop the fundamentals of computer programming, entrepreneurship/business, and your own practice. You'll also be able to work with industry partners.

The computer games and interactive entertainment business is a fast-growing multi-billion dollar worldwide business, with games platforms from handhelds and mobiles including iPhones, iPads and Android phones, through consoles such as the Playstation 4, Xbox One and Nintento Wii U, to PCs and massively-multiplayer online games involving tens of thousands of people.

This MA will produce graduates who are well-positioned to have a career in this exciting worldwide industry, meeting the strong demand for graduate computer games designers and artists in the UK and abroad. The programme is delivered by a mix of professionals from the games and effects industries and from the research world.

Potential employers include EAUbisoftSony SCEECreative AssemblyMicrosoftCinesiteFramestore, and many others.

The influence of computer games is spreading to other digital industries, with gamification and games-based learning, social machines and interactive visualisation of scientific and financial data all exploiting techniques from computer games, and all fields where graduates from this MA could make their mark.

Industry placements

We work closely with industry leaders to shape the course content and to offer industry placements at studios including:

Modules & structure

The skills you will learn throughout the programme will have a focus on games design, art and animation, in addition to gaining the fundamentals of computer programming, entrepreneurship/business and practice. 

You will study the following modules:

You will also study:

  • Industry Placement or Research Project and Dissertation (60 credits)

Industry Seminars Series (shared with the MSc in Computer Games and Entertainment course) 

  • With leading speakers from the games and entertainment industry

Skills & careers

We expect that you will leave this programme with strong creative skills, production experience and management capability, giving you the potential for senior roles in the computer games and entertainment industries.

Skills

This MA builds on the success of the MSc in Computer Games and Entertainment, and will develop your skills in game design, art and animation. You'll have the opportunity to work with students from this industry-recognised programme on placements and final projects. Through these creative collaborations with artists, games designers and developers we hope that many exciting and innovative projects will emerge. This mix of students also replicates the typical mix of workers in games development and special effects studios. 

It's likely that this will encourage exciting and innovative projects to emerge, through creative collaborations 

Careers

You'll be well equipped to pursue a career in the computer games industry, covering mainstream computer games for mobile, PC, tablet and console platforms, through to gamification and 'serious games'. 

Or you could choose to work in the broader entertainment industries – including advertising, special effects, television and web/design studios.

Graduate employment destinations of our computing programmes include: 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory. Read more
Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory.

Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

If you have a degree in an art and design or computer games-related subject, our course will allow you to specialise in games art at Master's level.

Based in the inspiring environment of our new Compass House Games Centre, you’ll learn all about best practice in the games industry. We’ll encourage you to work in design production teams, tackling a series of creative and technical challenges with programmers and industry professionals. You'll develop your design skills and learn how to create and publish successful games across a range of platforms.

Cambridge accounts for nearly 20% of the UK computer games industry, so it's a great place to study as we enjoy excellent links with the major games developers in the area. What's more, our Computer Games Centre offers studio space to local indie developers, who'll share their knowledge and experience with you.

We're partners with the Global Science & Technology Forum, allowing our students access to cutting-edge research materials.

While you're studying, we'll encourage you to take on work placements and collaborate on live projects with the games industry. You’ll also have the chance to enter games events, such as Brains Eden, which Anglia Ruskin hosts every year.

This course runs in parallel with our MSc Computer Games Development (Computing), reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of games creation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

Careers

Our MA gives you the chance to specialise in the design and technical implementation of computer games, whether you already have a games-related degree, or you're a recent graduate of a non-games-related degree who's looking to move into this area. Our course is also suitable if you work in another creative industry and are looking to move into games design and creation.

The skills you'll learn on this course are relevant to other forms of games - including board games and educational games - allowing you to consider a number of career options.

Interactive computer games is a relatively new medium; as the industry grows, you’ll find more and more opportunities to use the computing and creative skills you'll hone while studying here.

Modules & assessment

Core modules:
Process and Practice as Research
Games Development 1
Games Development 2
Digital Arts - Experimental Practice
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written and practical work, carried out individually and as part of a team.

What you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Facilities

Based at the new Compass House Computer Games Centre, a three-minute walk from our main Cambridge campus, you’ll have 24-hour access to a hub space with group work naturally forming a part of your studies.

The centre includes a start-up lab for small games companies, supported by Games Eden, the Cambridge Computer Games industry network. This will give you excellent opportunities to work in an entrepreneurial games environment.

All students on our Computer Games courses – undergraduate and postgraduate – have access to industry-standard PCs running Maya, 3DS Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Motion Builder, After Effects, Unity 3D, and UDK. You’ll be able to use motion capture equipment, 3D monitors, VR equipment, graphics tablets, a render farm, HD cameras and digital SLRs (for HDRI capture).

Links with industry

Cambridge is home to nearly 20% of the UK’s computer games industry, including Sony’s Guerrilla Studios, ARM, Jagex, Ninja Theory, Frontier, Geomerics and a host of smaller indie developers. Our Computer Games Art department is a member of TIGA, the Business & University Games Syndicate, and a partner of the Global Science & Technology Forum, giving you access to cutting-edge research materials.

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-The MA Games Art and Design degree allows you to develop your Games Art and Design skills and knowledge to a professional level. Read more
-The MA Games Art and Design degree allows you to develop your Games Art and Design skills and knowledge to a professional level
-You will produce a commercial-standard personal portfolio that reflects the forefront of current practices in approach, style and vision
-Explore the theoretical and contextual understanding of games art, its audiences and significances in our contemporary media culture
-Develop professional-level enquiry, research, creative invention, project planning and management practices
-On this masters degree you will learn in a multi-disciplinary environment through discussion and the exploration of ideas

Why choose this course?

This MA Games Art and Design degree meets the needs of the games industry. The games industry has developed dramatically from the days of the solo practitioner to become a global market where large teams of artists work in unison to create content for the next generation of interactive game technologies. The current games art and design practitioner is likely to become a specialist in one area, such as character modelling, environment creation, lighting, animating etc. This award fuses technical knowledge of real-time rendering with the aesthetic decisions and traditional skills you will need as a games artist.

On this postgraduate Games Art and Design degree, your study will include ways of thinking about the cultural resonance of your work and about the audiences it is made for, about the nature of creativity, and the role of the Cultural Industries in a modern knowledge economy. Through your study you will develop a range of project management skills, and an ability to identify and manage your own learning. You will consider the role of enterprise opportunities in commercial, professional and social environments. Enquiry, research and clear communication underpin work throughout the programme. As well as specialist modules in your chosen discipline area the programme includes modules that are shared with other postgraduate awards in the School of Creative Arts.

The structure of MA Games Art and Design promotes cross-discipline discussion and maintains the enthusiasm and focus of discipline specialists. It enables you to develop the key transferable skills of postgraduate study grounded in activities that have currency, relevance and application for your future career and for further academic study.

The MA Games Art and Design course, part of the postgraduate Media programme, offers you a coherent learning in one of several awards. It enables you to develop creative practical skills in a discipline of your choosing. That work may extend your existing skills, knowledge and understanding, or it may mean a change of direction, new learning, and new experiences. Induction, seminars and social events for students and staff mean that you will be part of a friendly and supportive postgraduate community, which includes film makers, musicians and professionals working in new media. Senior research staff and internationally renowned professionals work with postgraduate students, helping you to develop original and challenging work.

Careers

Particular emphasis is given to providing you with the skills necessary to further your career as an Games Artist. The course is designed to help you understand and work within the contemporary media environment.

You will also acquire enquiry and information handling skills, enterprise skills in the development and presentation of ideas, in communicating in the spoken and written word, and addressing particular audiences.

Teaching methods

On this programme teaching and learning emphasises enquiry led project work, developing the kind of independence and autonomy that is appropriate for postgraduate education. Lectures, seminars and other discussions bring students together in multi-disciplinary groups where ideas are shared, challenged, developed. Workshops and other activities develop specific discipline centered skills and understandings while tutorials develop individual study trajectories and responses to assignment tasks and briefs.

Much of the time students are engaged in self-managed independent study, undertaking enquiries and research, developing skills, inventing and developing ideas, realizing project outcomes, exploring the cultural resonance of their work.

All students on the PG Media programme engage in an interdisciplinary project as a part of their MA study, giving them an opportunity to work with students from other disciplines in an experimental and creative way.

Work Placement

There are work related learning opportunities on this course, all students complete a live external brief as part of their coursework.

Structure

Core Modules
-Creative Economies
-Major Study: Games Art and Design
-Media Discourses
-Practice 1: Media
-Practice 2: Media
-Research and Enquiry

Optional
-Creative Economies (Online)
-Research and Enquiry (Online)

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This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. Read more

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. It serves as excellent preparation for a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, and it provides all the training necessary for embarking on and envisioning novel strands for a PhD in electroacoustic composition, including those informed by other scientific and arts form.

All teaching, research and compositional work is carried out in the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound Art with its state-of-the-art £2.5 million electroacoustic studios. Opportunities for the performance of new works are offered using the 55-loudspeaker sound diffusion system of MANTIS (Manchester Theatre in Sound) and through events such as the Locativeaudio Festival (locativeaudio.org) and Sines and Squares Festival for Analogue Electronics and Modular Synthesis (sines-squares.org). Acousmatic, mixed, live electronic and multimedia works are all possible, with composers able to incorporate the spatialisation of sound and interactive new game-audio media into the presentation of their work.

In addition to the final portfolio, all electroacoustic music and interactive media composition students take the compulsory course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit,Fixed Media and Interactive Music . Optional course units normally include Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound, Interactive Tools and Engines, Contemporary Music Studies, Advanced Orchestration, and Historical or Contemporary Performance. There are also choices outside the MusM Composition (subject to course director approval), such as Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Mobile Communications, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography , and Work Placement (Institute of Cultural Practices).

For more information visit the NOVARS website .

SALC Placement offers students the opportunity to spend a minimum of 20 days over a period of up to 12 weeks with an arts and cultural organisation, business or service provider. Placements will be established in Semester 1 to take place early in semester 2; they will be supervised by a work-based mentor and overseen by an academic staff member. The placement may take the form of an investigation of a specific business idea, development strategy or management proposition to resolve a problem or particular issue, and will result in a placement report, proposal or essay.

Aims

This programme aims to:

  • Build on undergraduate studies, developing skills in electroacoustic composition to Master's level.
  • Increase knowledge and a systematic understanding of electroacoustic music.
  • Foster the particular creative talents of each individual student.
  • Provide all the training necessary for embarking on a PhD in electroacoustic composition.
  • Prepare students for a career as a composer and in the wider music industry where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.

Special features

The NOVARS studio complex supports a broad range of activities in the fields of electroacoustic composition and new media. The studios incorporate the newest generation of Apple computers, Genelec, PMC and ATC monitoring (up to 37-channel studios) and state-of-the art licensed software (including Pro Tools HD, Max MSP, GRM Tools, Waves, Ircam's Audiosculpt and Reaper and, for Interactive Media work, Oculus Rift, Unreal Engine 4, Unity Pro and open-source Blender3D). Location and performance work is also supported by a new 64-channel diffusion system.

Postgraduate students at the NOVARS Research Centre play an active role in the planning, organisation and execution of performance events such as the Sines & Squares Festival and MANTIS Festival (over 20 editions since 2004), and projects such as LocativeAudio and our regular Matinée presentations. Relevant training, including rigging and de-rigging the MANTIS system, health and safety, sound diffusion workshops, organisation of Calls for Works when needed, etc., is an important part of the course.

There are a number of internal composition opportunities offered to MusM students, allowing them to compose for our world-leading ensembles in residence and association. For more information, see ourComposition at Manchester site .

Teaching and learning

The MusM degree consists of 180 credits in total, made up of four 30-credit taught course units and a 60-credit portfolio. Full-time students take two course units per semester; part-time students take two course units but across the two semesters. Most course units are delivered via regular seminars and/or tutorials, supported where appropriate by practical workshops. The portfolio is supported by one-to-one supervision and is submitted at the beginning of September. (Part-time students may submit in either September or December following their second year of study.) Members of the academic staff are also available for individual consultation during designated office hours.

Alongside their taught units, students have access to a range of non-assessed seminars, workshops and training sessions offered by the Graduate School of the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. All postgraduate students are expected to undertake their own programme of self-directed learning and skills acquisition. This may also involve wider reading, language work, computer training and attendance at research seminars in other parts of the university.

Coursework and assessment

There are no formal examinations. Taught course units - all of which must be satisfactorily completed - are assessed by compositions or other coursework tasks, normally submitted at the end of each semester (January and May). Assessments may involve the premiere of new compositions, oral presentations of repertoire, musical analysis or essay topics in the field. The portfolio is created over the entire duration of study and is submitted at the end of the academic year (after the summer vacation). Topics and focus are to be discussed with project supervisors and can include compositions involving fixed or interactive media, locative and game-audio technologies. All work is double-marked internally and moderated by the External Examiner.



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With the enrichment and advancement of your studio practice at its core, this course welcomes highly motivated and independent thinkers. Read more
With the enrichment and advancement of your studio practice at its core, this course welcomes highly motivated and independent thinkers. You will have the opportunity to advance your critical thinking, and will be encouraged to experiment and take risks. Develop your skills and expertise for transferrable professional knowledge, with access to extensive specialist workshops and realise your practice to the fullest extent on this challenging and inspiring MA.

Key features

-Develop your studio practice and related research through a range of approaches. Undertake single, multi- or inter-disciplinary study within interactive and digital technologies, film and video, sound, painting, printmaking, photography, drawing and sculpture.
-Advance your practical skills with our high-specification workshops. You’ll have access to fully equipped digital production, sound recording and editing, film, photography, video, ceramics and print facilities and excellent technical support.
-Direct your studies through four independent study modules underpinned by critical frameworks and research methodologies and a substantial MA project in year 3.
-Connect with contemporary artists and curators through our weekly visiting artists programme. Participate in stimulating debates and shared dialogue with diverse research groups across the faculty with our interdisciplinary seminars series.
-Integrate any external projects, internship possibilities or client commissions you are awarded into your course. We embed professional practice into our academic framework, facilitating transferrable knowledge and skills in the workplace.
-The option to study part-time allows you to balance your work and external commitments with postgraduate education.
-Benefit from the knowledge and experience of a teaching staff of artists and researchers with substantial expertise with international exhibition, residency and research profiles.

Course details

Year 1 & 2
You’ll develop your practice through independent study projects (ISPs) and specialist workshops. The ISPs will help you explore and understand the wide range of methods, media and approaches that might underpin your practice. You'll to be encouraged to develop, question and critically reflect upon your art practice to the fullest extent. You will also focus on how contexts and conditions frame and inform contemporary art practice.
Core modules
-MAC701 Contemporary Art Practice 1
-MAC702 Contemporary Art Practice 2

Year 2
You'll further develop your artistic practice through an individual or collaborative project, building on and advancing work undertaken in concurrent and/or previous module(s). You'll write an MA project proposal that will inform the research stage of your MA project.
Core modules
-MAC703 Contemporary Art Practice 3
-MAC704 Contemporary Art Practice 4

Optional modules
-MAC706 International Exchange

Final year
Building on the insights and skills gained in your first year, you’ll develop a proposal for, and carry out, a substantial MA Project. The MA Project culminates in a public exhibition and Project Report, the form of which is negotiated and relates to your practice.
Core modules
-MAC705 MA Project

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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Immerse yourself in the world of emergent digital technologies. Integrating science, technology and art, we’ve created a multi-disciplinary, research-focused environment in which you can develop your own personal digital practice. Read more
Immerse yourself in the world of emergent digital technologies. Integrating science, technology and art, we’ve created a multi-disciplinary, research-focused environment in which you can develop your own personal digital practice. From artists and designers to curators and musicians, our programme encourages critical discourse through the creative and innovative application of digital technologies.

Key features

-Break through the traditional boundaries of science, art and technology. Work in a cross-discipline environment and learn to implement pioneering digital technologies.
-Build a path to an exciting and dynamic career – our students have gone on to work as web designers, games developers, lecturers and digital consultants.
-Engage in a dynamic and integrated approach to teaching, designed to nurture creative communities and define new areas of innovation.
-Participate in international research collaborations though close relationships with the Centre for Media Art and Design Research (MADr) and the Institute of Digital Art and Technology (i-DAT). You’ll also benefit from strong links to all of their affiliated PhD programmes.
-Cultivate advanced digital skills through access to exclusive technological facilities including the Immersive Vison Theatre and IBM funded Smarter Planet lab.
-Join our network of award-winning graduates in the creative and technology sectors. Previous students such as Adam Montandon and Gianni Corino have gone on to win accolades from the Media Innovation Awards, Summit International Awards and Scrittura Mutante Awards.
-Study remotely, foster professional relationships and work alongside your studies through our flexible approach to learning. Modules are delivered via workshops and symposium sessions in digital media venues, supported by interactive online technologies.
-Establish and define your personal digital practice through your major project. Tailor your assessment to your own creative needs, by choosing from different proportions of practical and written work. Explore your individual interests with the support of two dedicated project supervisors.
-Choose to study digital art and technology as either a Master of Research (MRes) taught programme or Research Masters (ResM) research programme.

Course details

Benefit from both online and offline learning, giving you the flexibility to study remotely and maintain employment alongside your programme. Learn to embed theory in critical practice and prepare for your final project. Investigate virtual, networked and augmented environments in context and explore new digital architectures through diverse development tools and models. Full-time study allows you to take taught modules in parallel with your research project over one year. As a part-time student you’ll study the taught modules first, followed by the research project over a period of two years. Undertake a creative and experimental production accompanied by a dissertation or report as your final major project. Choose from different ratios of practical to written work and define your own digital practice, exploring your individual interests. You’ll also benefit from having two allocated project supervisors.

Core modules
-DAT701 Invisible Architecture
-DAT702 Synthesis
-DAT703 Project/Dissertation

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This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. Read more
This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. As an advanced product designer, this course supports your continued development and will refine your practice in interaction and user-centred product design.

The course explores academic theories as well as industry practice within interactive media, digital arts, entertainment and product design; and is a combination of two separate fields: product design and interactive media.

In Interactive Product Futures you will focus on user-centred design processes and research and analyse “user interaction” as your primary focus. The emphasis is on technology-mediated communication between humans and objects or spaces, allowing you to apply design and apply technological solutions to people’s infinite needs. You will also examine how technology gives personality to objects, and thereby how to ensure technology and design are more empathetic to people and their behaviours.

In the early units of the course you will be given short project briefs in which to design, implement, test and evaluate solutions in the form of an interactive product. Each project brief may take the form of an online or offline product; for example: an online quiz, an e-commerce type application, a toy. This is also an opportunity to produce a series of creative works within the specialisation of rapid prototyping (3D printing), animation, game design, web design, installation art, projection mapping, creative coding, computation design and entertainment media. The aim is to provide you with the opportunity to develop a software solution to a given problem, or aspect of a larger problem.

You will be encouraged to experiment with new ways of working with objects/scenarios and their integration with technology both creatively and collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technological solutions through personal fabrication, research and the experimental application of technology.

The course promotes cross disciplinary thinking as an approach to product design, so that the relationship between interactivity, artefacts, environments and the systems and organisations in which they operate can be re-examined.

By studying the course you will develop your creative design skills to innovate and influence product and interaction design practice and realise the commercial potential of your design proposals.

- Collaborative project
'The Digital Gym' project, which allowed students to research how emerging technologies are applied and user behaviour enhanced to provide a distinct, immersive gym experience on the Greenwich Peninsula.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Through the Business and Innovation unit you will have the opportunity to explore the generation of innovative new business models that will help to shape your emerging project concept.

The Technology Issues unit encourages you to engage and explore emerging new technologies as well as skills in scripting and coding, first within a group, then as a cross-disciplinary, and finally in an individual project.

Through the Research Process unit, you will explore academic theoretical frameworks and research methodologies and their application within industry practice.

In both the Technology Issues and Concept and Prototyping units, youwill explore the dialogue between product and user, the function, usability and forms, flow and creativity and user experiences.

The course will culminate in your final Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The M.Sc. Read more
The M.Sc. programme in Computer Science (Interactive Entertainment Technology) equips students with the theoretical and practical knowledge to enable them to participate in the design and development of the technology that underpins the fast moving video game market as well as providing transferable skills relevant for careers in the wider industries of interactive entertainment, communication and simulation. The course, which has been developed in co-operation with leading indigenous and international game industry companies, immerses students in a state of the art learning environment using the very latest tools and technologies, as used by professional game development companies.

The course is assessed based on a combination of assigned coursework, written examination, a group project and a research dissertation. The taught component will be composed of 30 ECTS of compulsory modules and 30 ECTS of elective modules. The compulsory components of the course are:

Numerical Methods and Advanced Mathematical Modelling
Software Engineering for Concurrent and Distributed Systems
Software Engineering Individual Project
Seminar Series
Interactive Entertainment Technology Group Project
Individual Research Dissertation

All students will select an additional 30 ECTS of elective modules from the following pool of topics:

Data Communications and Networks
Graphics and Console Hardware
Real-time Rendering
Artificial Intelligence
Autonomous Agents
Real-time Animation
Real-time Physics
Vision Systems
Augmented Reality

In addition, students will be expected to complete an individual research dissertation worth 30 ECTS.

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This innovative programme explores the theory and practice of political resistance. Read more

This innovative programme explores the theory and practice of political resistance. The programme examines how resistance has featured in the history of political ideas, from Plato to Badiou, and investigates past and present practices of resistance as articulated in a wide range of activities including politics, art, film, poetry and fiction.

As a key feature of the MA, you not only study resistance but are also given the opportunity to practice what you have learned by submitting for assessment a ‘documented practice of resistance’ for assessment. Since the programme was first introduced, our students have submitted a wide range of practices including political campaigns, campus protests, sculptures, paintings, poems, video installations, films, architectural designs, photography and indeed creative, interactive, participatory work that cannot easily be categorised. This demonstrates how the MA provides a space where you can explore your own creativity and find and use your own voice.

While the theme of resistance is discussed in general terms, the programme pays particular attention to artistic practices of resistance. As one of the Founding Associate Partners of the TATE Exchange initiative, the School maintains a link with the TATE Modern museum in London, which enables our students to present their documented practices of resistance in the TATE’s new Switch House, thus allowing you to interact with the global audience of one of the most important museums of modern art in the world.

Teaching on the core courses is highly interactive, emphasizing the importance of experiential learning in conjunction with traditional academic studies. For example, in addition to the work with TATE, you will also be invited to take part in a Gandhian fast and to discuss and instantiate ‘utopia’. In a mark of the high-quality teaching offered by the programme, it won in 2015 the prestigious Teaching Innovation Award from the UK’s Political Studies Association.

About the School of Politics and International Relations

The School of Politics and International Relations is one of the most dynamic places to study Politics and International Relations. We combine high-quality teaching with cutting-edge research in a supportive environment that welcomes students from all over the world.

All lectures and seminars on postgraduate modules are informed by the latest research and scholarship, and are delivered by full-time academic staff who have internationally recognised expertise in their field.

Careers

The School of Politics and International Relations has a dedicated Employability, Internships, Placements and Alumni Manager who works with students to develop work-based placements in a range of organisations. Centrally, the Careers and Employability Service can help you plan for your future by providing one-to-one advice at any stage of your postgraduate studies.



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Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas. Read more

Art Gallery and Museum Studies (AGMS) has been taught at The University of Manchester for more than 40 years. It is one of the longest established MA degree courses in museum studies in the country, and our alumni have reached senior positions in museums and galleries throughout the UK and overseas.

Today, the AGMS course is continually being reviewed and developed in response to new research, emerging critical approaches and shifts in museum practice. Manchester's traditional focus on the art gallery remains, but is now balanced by course units which address history, theory and practice in a range of institutions.

Throughout the degree, you will examine diverse issues related to museum theory and practice, visit numerous museums, galleries and cultural organisations, and have many opportunities to discuss ideas and issues with professionals and academics in the field. The AGMS course combines both guided and independent study, and includes seminars, guest lectures and site visits.

Special features

Work Placement (Semesters 1 and 2)

One of the most popular aspects of the AGMS is the work placement that you undertake in a museum or gallery. Each placement involves a minimum of 20 days work on a specific project, such as exhibition development, collections management, or education programme. Many students find this such a positive experience that they carry on working in their museum when the work placement has finished, and each year a few students are offered jobs by their placement hosts. Work placements start in Semester 1 (November/December) and finish in Semester 2 (June).

You can take the work placement either as 15-credit or 30-credit course.

During the MA, students have opportunities to design and participate in live projects with cultural organisations in Manchester. These include curating a collection, developing exhibitions, producing cultural events and working on creative collaborative projects.

Teaching and learning

Most teaching takes place in small interactive seminar groups, involving, as appropriate, directed-reading, fieldwork in museums and galleries, staff and student presentations, discussion, debate, problem-solving and group-work.

Most courses run one day/week over 12 weeks and there are variations in the number of class hours per teaching day depending on the course/week (i.e. 2-5 hours). As a general rule, a 30 credit course includes 300 learning hours, which can be roughly divided as follows: a third in classes or class-related work; a third in independent study; and a third in preparation of assignments.

Students undertake also a collections management group project (as part of the 'Managing Collections and Exhibitions' and an exhibition group project (as part of the 'Professional Practice Project' course) in collaboration with a museum, gallery or related cultural organisation in Manchester or the North West of England.

Postgraduate life in the Centre for Museology

Both the Centre for Museology and the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures host a varied programme of activities and events for postgraduate students, including occasional master classes and workshops, as well as our regular calendar of:

  • Museology research seminars
  • 'Showcase' seminars at the Manchester Museum
  • Institute for Cultural Practices events
  • Research forum for PhD students

Full-time or part-time?

The AGMS MA is available as a 1 year Full-time or a 2 year Part-time course. We particularly welcome part-time students and there are many advantages in combining study with work practice, whether you already have a museum post, or are just setting out on your career. Each year, a number of mid-career professionals take the MA degree on a part-time basis and find that the University provides a valuable space for reflection as well as for further learning. Part time students have classes one day per week (usually Tuesday or Thursday; although in Semester 2 it might be a different day depending on the option course you choose). On this one should also add our Thursday 5pm research, professional practice and academic skills workshops. You should also count time for library work/fieldwork that may require you coming to Manchester and although sometimes this can be done on the day of teaching, often one needs to come in a second day (and if you do this on Thursdays then you can combine it with the 5pm workshops). When the work placement kicks off (about November/December in Year 1 or Year 2) you should also count one more day/week (on average) at the Work Placement institution (which, if appropriate or relevant, can be the organisation where you currently work; but undertaking a project different to your day-to-day work) - this is of course if you decide to take the Work Placement module.



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Our Digital Media Arts MA is taught both at the University of Brighton and at Lighthouse. The Lighthouse is a digital culture agency where a key part of its work is education and professional development (PPD). Read more
Our Digital Media Arts MA is taught both at the University of Brighton and at Lighthouse. The Lighthouse is a digital culture agency where a key part of its work is education and professional development (PPD). Through short technology labs and courses they help empower the digital artists and creative engineers of tomorrow.

We have developed the course in the context of Brighton’s status as one of the main centres of the media economy, adopting an interdisciplinary approach that allows you to use and develop your existing skills in an environment that encourages both innovation and high-quality production.

The course provides excellent training for artists, designers and arts professionals wishing to seek a career in the creative industries, offering expert education in the areas of interaction design, social media, programming, digital film, installation, public art and interactive art. You will learn core digital media production skills, explore a broad range of creative digital practices, and access the most up-to-date developments and critical debates in the discipline.

While our professional studio environment enables you to explore the full creative potential of digital media arts practices, we also encourage live project work so that you gain direct experience and develop valuable links to the digital media and wider cultural industries.

The course offers a suitable route and an appropriate academic grounding for PhD study, as has been evidenced by recent student progression on to PhD programs at the University of Sussex, Goldsmiths, Plymouth University and The University of Auckland in New Zealand.

Areas of study

The course is designed to support your individual development and creativity as an artist and producer and is based around an essential core of practice-based learning, underpinned by a programme of theoretical lecture series, artist talks, seminars, workshops, tutorials and independent study.

You will learn core digital media production skills. Specialist workshops have included processing, motion graphics and sound art.

The course supports an interdisciplinary approach that enables you to develop existing skills and experiences in an environment that encourages both innovation and high quality production. Live project work in modules throughout the course will help you gain direct experience and develop valuable links in the digital media industries and wider cultural industries.

Modules will be relevant and up-to-date in this fast changing and evolving digital climate, allowing for flexibility to expand into new areas of development. Examples of theses areas include screen based web design, social media and interactive installations and also including using data analytics, coding, programming and hacking.

You will be taught by a diverse and experienced lecturing team, all of whom are creative practitioners.

The course offers a flexible mode of study for students, either as a part-time route (two years) or full time (one year).

Modules:

Cultures of Media Authoring and Web Design
Virtual Culture and Network Practices
Practice based Research Methods
Beyond the Screen: Interactive Installations
Presenting a Body of Work
Critical Theory: Media Concepts Research Paper

There will be an increasing emphasis on engaging with script and code, which is particularly pertinent to practical modules as they include the building blocks of developments for creative design, and web applications. These include the following languages - CSS, Flash, Processing, Pure Data, ActionScript 2.0 and 3.0, Wordpress, PHP, HTML5, Javascript, jQuery. MFC, C, OpenGL, Java and Lingo.

We encourage students to create work through the use of open source data and engaging with hacker ethics, which are concerned primarily with sharing, openness and collaboration, rather than using commercial software.

Student work

The Digital Media Arts MA at Brighton develops your production skills and unique artistic approach. Over the course, you will build a substantial body of digital artwork that will help you get ahead in the fast-moving and competitive new media industries.

You will create your art and design work using a range of digital technologies, producing screen-based work, interactive installations, social media interventions and soundscapes. All students produce work for the assessment show towards the end of the course.

Careers and employability

The Digital Media Arts MA is a practical course that teaches a range of skills in digital development and design that you can apply outside of university. The course aims to empower digital artists and critical engineers of tomorrow, in exploring the creative thinking that is critical to working effectively with technology.

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