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Masters Degrees (Intelligence Analyst)

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Understanding data is becoming increasingly important for us all. This is especially true for the intelligence analyst working for a police intelligence unit or business analytics department. Read more

Understanding data is becoming increasingly important for us all. This is especially true for the intelligence analyst working for a police intelligence unit or business analytics department.

Course details

The work boundaries of the traditional police intelligence analyst and digital forensic investigator are becoming blurred – today’s analysts need to be cyber aware, understanding how communication records and web search histories can be extracted and analysed.

This course covers these areas as well as theories that provide a better sense of the causes of crime and the prevention measures that can be put in place to stabilise and reverse these trends. Analysts shouldn’t be phased by data simply because of its size, complexity or format. This course provides you with the skills to work effectively with large datasets, allowing you to make more informed decisions in relation to criminal investigations. Key features include writing code to quickly clean up data and packaging it so it’s suitable for analysis and visualisation. You will discover that the world constantly presents data in data frames or spreadsheets – our daily activities are invariably logged by a time, date, geolocation. You develop these skills along with your confidence in applying them to make more sense of the data – analysing Twitter downloads, searched words and images, geolocation points or big data. This course also explores strategies employed in forensic investigation. It gives you the space and opportunity to develop your own area of interest in a 60-credit research project where your supervisor enables you to maximise your skillsets from academic writing to data analytics.

What you study

For the PgDip award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For the MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

Course structure

PgDip and MSc core modules

  • Coding for Intelligence Analysts
  • Crime Science: Theories, Principles and Intelligence Sources
  • Cyber Security and Digital Investigation
  • Forensic Investigative Strategy
  • Legal Issues and Evidence Reporting
  • Research Methods and Proposal

MSc only

  • Research Project

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

You learn through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials and IT laboratories using a variety of software. Simulated problems and scenarios are posed in much the same way that analysts would face in the real world. You can expect to use software that is found in real-world intelligence analysis/digital forensic units and data science. An element of the learning is through peer engagement, learning from others to achieve solutions. Much of the software you use in class can be downloaded for home use.

How you are assessed

You are assessed in formal examination settings as well as through structured coursework.

Employability

Career opportunities

You could expect to apply for intelligence researcher and intelligence analyst roles in a wide variety of career opportunities ranging from security, policing and business.



Read less
Understanding data is becoming increasingly important for us all. This is especially true for the intelligence analyst working for a police intelligence unit or business analytics department. Read more

Understanding data is becoming increasingly important for us all. This is especially true for the intelligence analyst working for a police intelligence unit or business analytics department. The MSc Crime Intelligence and Data Analytics (with Advanced Practice) course helps you develop the necessary skills to work in these sectors.

Course details

The work boundaries of the traditional police intelligence analyst and digital forensic investigator are becoming blurred – today’s analysts need to be cyber aware, understanding how communication records and web search histories can be extracted and analysed.

This course covers these areas as well as theories that provide a better sense of the causes of crime and the prevention measures that can be put in place to stabilise and reverse these trends. Analysts shouldn’t be phased by data simply because of its size, complexity or format. This course provides you with the skills to work effectively with large datasets, allowing you to make more informed decisions in relation to criminal investigations. Key features include writing code to quickly clean up data and packaging it so it’s suitable for analysis and visualisation. You will discover that the world constantly presents data in data frames or spreadsheets – our daily activities are invariably logged by a time, date, geolocation. You develop these skills along with your confidence in applying them to make more sense of the data – analysing Twitter downloads, searched words and images, geolocation points or big data. This course also explores strategies employed in forensic investigation. It gives you the space and opportunity to develop your own area of interest in a 60-credit research project where your supervisor enables you to maximise your skillsets from academic writing to data analytics.The two-year MSc Crime Intelligence and Data Analytics (with Advanced Practice) is an opportunity to enhance your qualification by spending one year completing an internship, research or study abroad experience. Although we can’t guarantee an internship, we can provide you with practical support and advice on how to find and secure your own internship position. A vocational internship is a great way to gain work experience and give your CV a competitive edge. Alternatively, a research internship develops your research and academic skills as you work as part of a research team in an academic setting – ideal if you are interested in a career in research or academia. A third option is to study abroad in an academic exchange with one of our partner universities. This option does incur additional costs such as travel and accommodation. You must also take responsibility for ensuring you have the appropriate visa to study outside the UK, where relevant.

What you study

For the MSc award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Coding for Intelligence Analysts
  • Crime Science: Theories, Principles and Intelligence Sources
  • Cyber Security and Digital Investigation
  • Forensic Investigative Strategy
  • Legal Issues and Evidence Reporting
  • Research Methods and Proposal

Advanced Practice options

  • Research Internship
  • Study Abroad
  • Vocational Internship

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

You learn through a range of lectures, seminars, tutorials and IT laboratories, using a variety of software. Simulated problems and scenarios are posed in much the same way that analysts would face in the real world. You have the opportunity to use software that is found in real-world intelligence analysis and digital forensic units and data science. Engaging and learning from your peers will help you to achieve solutions. Much of the software you use in class can be downloaded for home use.

How you are assessed

You are assessed through a formal exam as well as through structured coursework.

Employability

You can expect to apply for an intelligence researcher and intelligence analyst role in a wide variety of career opportunities ranging from security, policing and business.



Read less
Intelligence and security policy issues are now one of the fastest growing areas of academic and public concern, especially since '9/11' and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Read more

About the course

Intelligence and security policy issues are now one of the fastest growing areas of academic and public concern, especially since '9/11' and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today more than ever before national governments, international agencies and most major international corporations have an identified need for staff with a strong grasp of intelligence and security issues who can also demonstrate first-rate skills of research and assessment.

Taught by the internationally respected scholars of the Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, backed up where required by practitioner expertise, the MA in Intelligence and Security Studies (MA ISS) now available by Distance Learning) offers a unique opportunity for practical, policy-oriented graduate study of intelligence issues applicable across the private and public sectors around the world.

Aims

This course will be of value to individuals seeking to go into security-oriented careers in both the private sectors, as well as to individuals engaged in the security professions who seek further qualifications and professional enhancement.

A distinctive feature of the course lies in its combining the rigorous study of intelligence and security policy studies with practical opportunities to develop intelligence skills through case studies and simulation exercises dealing with intelligence analysis.

Course Content

The MA consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Year 1

Compulsory modules:

Intelligence Concepts: Issues and Institutions
Intelligence History: Failure and Success
Intelligence and Security Studies Project

Year 2

Compulsory modules:

Contemporary Threats and Analytical Methodology
Intelligence and Security Studies Project

Optional modules:

Intelligence Analysis Foundations, Methods and Applications
Counterintelligence and Security

Typical Dissertations

Dissertation (60 credits)
All students produce a supervised research dissertation/project of 15,000 - 20,000 words. Students may pick their own topics subject to approval. Students generally undertake topics which might assist them in their intended field of employment, or as suggested by their home agencies or governments.

Teaching

Students will undertake a practical dissertation project over one year where they will have support from the first stage on research methods and guidance on their research proposal through the final stage.

Each of the four taught modules will be taught over two terms to enable students to absorb and reflect on their learning. The three compulsory modules will provide students with the core knowledge, while choosing one out of two options will enable students to specialise in their area of interest.

Effective Interaction

In additions, the design addresses the need for effective interaction with and among students via live online office hours with lecturers, who will also provide timely feedback on students’ regular short assignments, where they demonstrate understanding of key concepts.

Online Resources

To further utilise the online platform, students learning will be supported by the use of specialised analysis software tools in intelligence and they will engage with multimedia material where possible. Moreover, students will have access – via the integrated online platform – to supportive teaching materials and workshops provided by Brunel Graduate School and the several units of Brunel Educational Excellence Centre.

Students will have access to Online Journals, E-Books, Digital Copies, and other online materials (such as government declassified documents).

Assessment

All modules are taught on the basis of lectures, seminars and directed reading. Additionally, the second term Case Studies course is a student-led seminar programme in which participants present detailed case studies and are peer reviewed on their presentation skills.

The second term Analytical Simulation Exercise will involve students working in groups in a simulated joint, all-source intelligence assessment modelled on the actual joint assessment processes in the US and UK governments. Students are assessed on a mixture of individual and group work.

Special Features

BCISS
The Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies is Britain's first academic centre dedicated to intelligence scholarship and policy-analysis. It includes one of Britain's most innovative scholars in the field, Dr Philip H J Davies, as well Dr Kristian Gustafson (director of the MA programme), an expert on covert action and military intelligence doctrine. The newest member of staff is Mohamed Gaballa. An alumni of the MA, he is a specialist in Structured Analytic Techniques, with a focus on Analysis of Competing Hypothesis. The former senior military imagery analyst, Geoff Oxlee, OBE, joined BCISS as an Honorary Fellow and completes the core team. Together, these scholars not only produce important original research, published worldwide, but actively contribute to the success of government and business in the UK.

The Centre, though, is an inter-disciplinary endeavour, and includes participation from some of the leading Brunel University London academics in the fields of cryptography, computer networking, imagery, economics and even law. Many of these experts already assist our teaching. As well, the centre benefits from the assistance, from time to time, of various officials of Her Majesty’s Government. MA ISS, therefore, benefits from practitioner input and insight as well as instruction by leading international academics.

Thematic Video Lectures (TVLs):
The thematic video lectures and reading materials will provide grounding in the theoretical, methodological and practical issues upon which good research in intelligence and security studies is conducted. It will focus on providing conceptual mapping to the subject. The Lecturer video interaction with students will be supported by well-structured lecture slides. This is to be followed by problem based learning where students engage in practical exercises, case studies, and simulations.

Residential Block Week (RBWs):
Students join Brunel campus for one week in each year, dedicated to supporting the teaching and assessment. Each module assessment has one element – at least – to be conducted while students are on campus. The week consists of Workshops – involving Presentations and Exercises – that will be used as opportunities to test ‘test-fly’ students’ arguments that they wish to make in their final essay in a setting of open discussion and challenge by their peers as well as academic staff.

RBW (1) covers the two modules of the first year and introducing students to the research methods and support available at Brunel for their practical dissertation. RBW (2) hosts the Syndicate Meetings of Brunel Analytical Simulation Exercise (BASE), where students’ teams engage in discussions and produce their joint assessments.

Attendance of the two RBWs is compulsory. Each student will be hosted in on campus accommodation.

Brunel Analytical Simulation Exercise (BASE):
BASE, the jewel in the MA ISS crown, provides a hands-on, practical experience in the skills and techniques of simulations in intelligence collection and analysis. It provides students with a conceptual understanding of the strengths and pitfalls of collective intelligence analysis, assessment, and decision-making; and gives students first hand insight into the management problems of generating an agreed, collective or joint assessment.

Flexible and Interactive Features
-Online office hours with lecturers,
-Timely feedback on students’ regular short assignments.
-Individual and team assignments.
-Use of multimedia materials and software resources in teaching and assessments.
-Pre-recorded lectures and materials are available throughout the week.
-Materials can be accessed via standard and Apple computer devices.

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Our MA Intelligence & International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. Read more

Our MA Intelligence & International Security examines the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century. You will develop an awareness of the ways in which intelligence issues manifest themselves in security issues in peace and war. You will also gain an understanding of ethical dilemmas associated with intelligence activity.

Key benefits

  • Our MA Intelligence & International Security is excellent preparation for employment in government service or in commercial risk management and open-source intelligence providers.
  • You will be taught by visiting academics, serving and former officials and other intelligence experts who give regular public lectures and seminars.
  • Enables you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security.
  • You have the advantage of attending events run by the Intelligence and International Security Research Group which provides a platform for sharing ideas.

Description

Our course will enable you to examine the nature, processes, roles and case studies of intelligence and their interaction with developments in international security. In examining the trends that continue to shape intelligence and geo-strategic developments in the 21st century our course offers a unique multidisciplinary approach based on the strengths of the department. We aim to provide a framework in which to understand the nature and role of intelligence in its relationship to wider issues in war and international security; an understanding of the processes, practices and institutions that have characterised intelligence in the modern era; an understanding of the problems connected with intelligence collection,assessment and ability to predict events in world affairs; and an appreciation of the particular ethical concerns generated by intelligence related phenomena.

Course purpose

Our course is for graduates and professionals with an interest in understanding the nature and role of intelligence. It is designed to have broad-ranging appeal if you are interested in pursuing graduate studies in intelligence and security studies. You will also find this programme of interest if you are a graduate in politics, history, international relations and strategic studies; if you have practical experience in the intelligence community and wish to reflect on the wider issues and implications of your experience; or are a professional in defence, diplomacy and foreign affairs.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

Per 40-credit module, you will have 40 hours of lectures, semianrs and feedback, as well as 340 hours of self-study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work. For the dissertation module, you will have 12 hours of supervision to complement the 588 hours of self-study.

Assessment

Most 20 to 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3000-6000 words), presentation, oral vivas, and/or exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be based on a 80% dissertation assignment (up to 15,000 words) and a 20% dissertation proposal.

Career prospects

War Studies Graduates go on to work for NGOs, the FCO, the MOD, the Home Office, NATO, the UN or pursue careers in journalism, finance, academia, the diplomatic services, the armed forces and more. Recent posts held by our alumni include Threat Analyst, Director of Political Violence Forecasting, Research Advisor at NATO Defence College, Foreign Policy Fellow.



Read less
Intelligence and security policy issues are now one of the fastest growing areas of academic and public concern, especially since '9/11' and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Read more

About the course

Intelligence and security policy issues are now one of the fastest growing areas of academic and public concern, especially since '9/11' and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Today more than ever before national governments, international agencies and most major international corporations have an identified need for staff with a strong grasp of intelligence and security issues who can also demonstrate first-rate skills of research and assessment.

Taught by the internationally respected scholars of the Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, backed up where required by practitioner expertise, the MA in Intelligence and Security Studies offers a unique opportunity for practical, policy-oriented graduate study of intelligence issues applicable across the private and public sectors around the world.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

This course will be of value to individuals seeking to go into security-oriented careers in both the private and public sectors. It is suitable to individuals engaged in the security professions who seek further qualifications and professional enhancement.

A distinctive feature of the course lies in its combining the rigorous study of intelligence and security policy studies with practical opportunities to develop intelligence skills through case studies and simulation exercises dealing with intelligence analysis.

Course Content

The professionally-oriented course is offered on either a full-time basis, taught over two terms and a dissertation during the summer, or part-time basis taught over four terms with the dissertation completed during the summer of the second academic year.

The MA consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Intelligence Concepts: Issues and Institutions
Intelligence History: Failure and Success
Contemporary Threats and Analytical Methodology
Intelligence and Security Studies Project

Optional modules:

Intelligence Analysis Foundations, Methods and Applications
Counterintelligence and Security

Assessment

All modules are taught on the basis of lectures, seminars and directed reading. Additionally, the second term Case Studies course is a student-led seminar programme in which participants present detailed case studies and are peer reviewed on their presentation skills.
The second term Analytical Simulation Exercise will involve students working in groups in a simulated joint, all-source intelligence assessment modelled on the actual joint assessment processes in the US and UK governments. Students are assessed on a mixture of individual and group work.

Special Features

The Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies is Britain's first academic centre dedicated to intelligence scholarship and policy-analysis. It includes one of Britain's most innovative scholars in the field, Dr Philip H J Davies, as well Dr Kristian Gustafson (director of the MA programme), an expert on covert action and military intelligence doctrine.

The newest member of staff is Mohamed Gaballa. An alumni of this course, he is a specialist in Structured Analytic Techniques, with a focus on Analysis of Competing Hypothesis.

The former senior military imagery analyst, Geoff Oxlee, OBE, joined BCISS as an Honorary Fellow and completes the core team.

Together, these scholars not only produce important original research, published worldwide, but actively contribute to the success of government and business in the UK.

The Centre, though, is an inter-disciplinary endeavour, and includes participation from some of the leading Brunel University London academics in the fields of cryptography, computer networking, imagery, economics and even law. Many of these experts already assist our teaching.

The centre also benefits from the assistance, from time to time, of various officials of Her Majesty’s Government.

The degree, therefore, benefits from practitioner input and insight as well as instruction by leading international academics.

Read less
This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism. Read more

This MSc, designed by a panel of academic departments, industrial partners and law enforcement and security agencies, introduces students to the fundamental knowledge, core expertise and advanced, evidence-driven methodological tools and approaches required to understand, analyse, prevent, disrupt and detect organised crime and terrorism.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of how science, engineering and a variety of professional disciplines can contribute to tackling organised crime and terrorism. By the end of the programme, they will be able to apply appropriate scientific principles and methods to security problems, think strategically to develop and implement countermeasures, and appreciate the complexity involved in the design and implementation of organised crime and terrorism threat-reduction technologies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Students are required to complete five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising five core modules (75 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), and which may lead to the MSc, is offered.

Core modules

  • Perspectives on Organised Crime
  • Perspectives on Terrorism
  • Foundations of Security and Crime Science
  • Designing and Doing Research
  • Quantitative Methods

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following:

  • Qualitative Methods
  • Crime Mapping and Spatial Analysis
  • Investigation and Detection
  • Cybercrime
  • Intelligence Gathering and Analysis
  • Risk and Contingency Planning
  • Introduction to Cybersecurity
  • Prevention and Disruption
  • Terrorism (UCL Political Science, not available for distance learning students)

NB: places for optional modules are awarded on a first-come first-served basis.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, projects and laboratory classes. Student performance is assessed through laboratory and project reports, unseen written examination, coursework, presentations, and the research project and dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Countering Organised Crime and Terrorism MSc

Careers

This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Police Officer, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Threat Assessor, Imperial Protective Service
  • Criminal Intelligence Analyst, Avon and Somerset Constabulary
  • Field Intelligence Officer, West Mercia Police
  • Intelligence Analyst, Cambridgeshire Constabulary

Employability

This programme equips students with the knowledge to develop operational strategies to counter organised crime and terrorism. This unique linking of organised crime and terrorism, and the study of methodologies that can practically tackle both of these areas, means that this MSc holds appeal for employers across a broad range of industries.

Each year we ask our graduates to tell us about their experience of the programme and their career after leaving UCL and we include some real-life graduate profiles on our website.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Jill Dando Institute, of which UCL Security & Crime Science is the core component, is the first research institution in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime through teaching, research, public policy analysis and by the dissemination of evidence-based information on crime reduction.

This MSc programme is delivered by experienced practitioners and researchers working in counter-terrorism, intelligence, law enforcement, risk assessment and security technology. It boasts a unique multidisciplinary platform, being the only postgraduate programme of its kind in the world taught in a faculty of engineering sciences, integrating the cutting-edge of the social and engineering sciences in the security domain.

Our graduate students come from varied backgrounds; many are practitioners and are encouraged to contribute their experience in and out of the classroom.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Are you interested in applications of Artificial Intelligence in communication techniques? Are you triggered by the question of how human reasoning can be represented in computer systems? Would you like to work for a company like Google or Philips? Then our interdisciplinary Master’s track Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence is your right choice!

The CSAI program draws on breakthrough discoveries and insights in the two closely related scientific disciplines Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Cognitive Science is the study of human reasoning, emotions, language, perception, attention, and memory. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of computers and software that are capable of intelligent behavior.

Career Prospects Communication Design

Graduates will be able to contribute to advancements in working fields like artificial intelligence and robotics, data science, data mining, knowledge technology and decision support systems.

This is a small selection of positions you may apply for after you have completed your programme:

•Intelligent Software Developer

•Web Analyst

•Social Media Analyst

•Data Journalist

•Social Robot Developer

•Web Data Entrepreneur

•E-Health and Healthcare Quality Analyst



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This master's degree aims to provide students with professional training in computer engineering, telematic engineering and related ambits that specialise in Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence. Read more
This master's degree aims to provide students with professional training in computer engineering, telematic engineering and related ambits that specialise in Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence. Specifically, the master's degree:
-Provides students with the skills to use advanced ICT for designing and implementing safe intelligent systems.
-Provides students with the skills to use advanced ICT to ensure the safety of information in applications, services and ICT systems and the privacy of their users.
-Provides students with the skills to lead, manage and carry out ICT systems projects based on Artificial Intelligence.
-Provides students with the skills to innovate and conduct research in the field of Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence.

Student Profile

Students wishing to study the master's degree should possess the following personal and academic qualities:
-Bachelor's degree in computer engineering
-Knowledge of Engineering Programming and Mathematics.
-Personal maturity and skills deriving from their previous university training that will be strengthened and improved further by the master's degree (e.g. work planning, knowledge of information research tools, oral and written communications skills, English, the ability to work in a team or autonomously).

Career Opportunities

The Master's produces professionals with the skills to work in the following positions, among others:
-Head of Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence projects.
-Management of groups of developers for Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence projects.
-Analyst of advanced ICT applications, particularly in the ambits of Computer Security and Artificial Intelligence.
-Academic and research career in universities and research centres.

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Marketing managers oversee the research that provides market knowledge to help guide their decisions. This double degree (Groningen and BI Oslo) will teach you how to become a market-oriented manager. Read more
Marketing managers oversee the research that provides market knowledge to help guide their decisions. This double degree (Groningen and BI Oslo) will teach you how to become a market-oriented manager.

How can you obtain knowledge about what your customer really wants? How can you implement this knowledge in a financially sound marketing plan? How can insights from marketing research be used in marketing plans?

Truly market-oriented (marketing) managers need customer insights to guide decision-making on issues such as which markets to target, which new products to develop, and what communication themes and channels will best build customer and brand equity.

In the Groningen programme the focus is on customer relations and gaining insight into customers. You will learn to collect qualitative and quantitative data about customers and to analyze it using the latest and most advanced marketing research methods.

In the Oslo programme the focus is on strategic marketing theory, statistical methods and financial implications of marketing investments. In both programmes, practitioners in the field relate theory to practice.

The two degrees you get are:
* MSc in Marketing/profile Marketing Intelligence (University of Groningen)
* MSc in Strategic Marketing Management (BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo)

Degree: MA/MSc in Marketing

Why in Groningen?

The programme is a unique combination of two degrees, in Groningen and Oslo. You learn about marketing research and strategic marketing management in an international environment. Besides, it is an internationally accredited programme, ensuring a high quality education that meets both the AACSB and EQUIS standards, which only one percent of universities reach worldwide.

Job perspectives

This double degree has been designed for individuals who aspire to a career as a market researcher in the private or public sector, as a strategic marketing expert, customs relations manager, product or brand manager, database analyst or market intelligence expert.

Graduates qualify for a range of positions in international, multinational or transnational companies.

Some examples:
› strategic marketing expert› customer relationship manager› market researcher› product or brand manager› database analyst or market intelligence expert

Graduates have also acquired the qualifications to enter PhD programmes and work in international research institutions.

Because all our programmes are EQUIS and AACSB accredited, a standard which only one percent of universities reach worldwide, your degree will be highly valued on the labour market.

Linking education to research and career preparation

Our education is strongly rooted in business practice and society. Also right from the start of your degree programme attention is paid to academic research and preprofessional development. Since an analytical and critical mind and problem-solving capabilities are important qualities in any career our students aspire.

In collaboration with external partners we conduct research projects on e.g banking, local government, customer insights, leadership, energy, healthy ageing and lean operations.

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Data is the blood flow of organisations. and the efficient use of information has become more important than ever. The Master of Science in Business Intelligence & Analytics at ESC Clermont in France is a . Read more

Data is the blood flow of organisations and the efficient use of information has become more important than ever. The Master of Science in Business Intelligence & Analytics at ESC Clermont in France is a 14 to 18-month master programme taught fully in English and accredited by the CGE. The programme trains Business Intelligence and Analytics professionals able to decode, analyse and interpret data in order to efficiently use the information to opitmize the decision-making process for the management. Students will practice the usage of analytical techniques, software tools, information systems and applications that are used to analyse what happened in the past while better anticipating the future. The programme focuses on the following areas: business modeling, data discovery, data visualization and data analysis.

Lectures are given by academic professors along with experts of different industries delivering real examples and transmitting their knowledge directly to the students.

Classes last from October to May, followed by an internship of a minimum of 4 months along with an executive report.

Target

Recent graduates and professionals from different backgrounds and expreiences looking forward to bridging the gap between IT and business requirements in order to enhance the decision-making process.

Strengths

  • Taught fully in English
  • Practical training: Mix of theory, practice and external conferences from professional references.
  • Mastery of world-famous tools and software : Use of market-leader software as MicroStrategy and SPSS through projects in agile method. Mix of theory and practice.
  • Preparation of future expertsAn executive internship to apply the knowledge learnt and obtain professional experience.

Professionalisation

Internship and Thesis

As part of the master programme, students of the MSc. in Business Intelligence & Analytics take on an internship or a work placement for a minimum of 4 months. The internship can be in France, Europe or any other international destination.

The internship is a great opportunity for students to conquer the business data worldobtain professional experience, acquire new skills, and develop existing skills.

Each student is individually supervised by a designated advisor and completes a professional thesis, followed by an oral defense and company assessment.

  Companies that welcome our students:

  • Microsoft
  • Capgemini
  • Valeo
  • BNP Paribas
  • Limgrain
  • L’Oreal
  • Michelin

Financing

Various flexible payment plans and scholarships are offered to international students.

Careers

On Business side

  • Business Analyst
  • Data Manager
  • Information Manager
  • BI/BA Project Manager
  • BI/BA Team Manager

On Information Systems side

  • BI/BA Functional Analyst
  • BI/BA Consultant
  • BI/BA Architect
  • BI/BA Scrum Master
  • BI/BA Domain Manager


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This programme offers knowledge and expertise to prepare for research in linguistics and language and communication, as a PhD researcher, or in professional or commercial spheres. Read more
This programme offers knowledge and expertise to prepare for research in linguistics and language and communication, as a PhD researcher, or in professional or commercial spheres.

You will receive a grounding in relevant foundational research methods and theoretical paradigms before choosing from a variety of modules that examine the use of language and visual media in professional practice, and consider how language is employed in creating our identities, in interacting with others and in the ideological construction of discourses in a range of social and institutional contexts.

Distinctive features:

Our Centre for Language and Communication Research has a well established reputation in a broad range of teaching and research areas, including sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multimodality, forensic linguistics, systemic functional grammar, phonology, and lexical studies.

The full-time programme carries Advanced Course Recognition from the ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council) as a postgraduate research training scheme.

Structure

The MA in Language and Communication Research is a modular programme that can be completed in one year by full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

Stage one comprises the taught element of the programme while stage two involves a supervised dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words between May and September.

Core modules:

Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Qualitative Research Methods (optional for part-time students)
Quantitative Research Methods (optional for part-time students)
Research Experience
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Phonology
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

Teaching

Teaching is delivered by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research across a broad spectrum of interrelated issues.

You will be taught core knowledge and understanding through lectures, small-group seminars and group discussion.

Teaching for core modules combines discussion of theoretical issues and the practical challenges of qualitative and quantitative analysis of language/communication data, while teaching for optional modules provides further theoretical discussion with some focus on the development of practical research skills.

Intellectual Skills are promoted via lectures, seminars and group discussions individual supervision and guidance for research undertaken in planning and writing the dissertation. You will also learn via one-to-one supervision of individual ‘research experience’ projects and dissertations.

The learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

You will be encouraged to explore our excellent library resources and expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Assessment of the taught component is by coursework only.

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You are encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate their analyses to areas of personal interest.

Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly essays presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

You are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader to discuss the main ideas and the plan for your assignments. Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for disabled students, if any, are noted in the Module Descriptions.

The second part of the MA is examined by dissertation, supported by individual supervision.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much enhanced career prospects. Example employers in the UK include Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Poetry Wales Magazine, Teach First, and Welsh Government, with jobs that include Crime Intelligence Analyst, Creative Writing Lecturer, Librarian, Poet, Recruitment Consultant, Teacher, and Writer.

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Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. Read more
Our innovative Forensic Linguistics programme offers the theory and techniques to critically analyse the use of language in a variety of legal contexts. You will learn to critically evaluate expert testimony on forensic matters and to consider the role of expertise in legal systems more generally.

You will receive a grounding in research methods and issues and debates in forensic linguistics. You will acquire tools for evaluating and examining a range of legal language in relation to issues such as power and comprehensibility. You will also develop skills in research and writing at higher degree level and learn to engage with the legal system as a site of social life where important decisions are made through language.

On successful completion of the programme you will have achieved the following outcomes:

• the application of descriptive data analysis skills in a wide range of spoken and written discourse contexts within the legal process, including emergency calls, police interviews, courtroom interaction, judicial judgments;

• a critical understanding of investigative data analysis skills in both spoken and written discourse contexts, including such areas as disputed authorship and plagiarism detection;

• critical understanding of the work of linguists as advisers and activists on legal systems and settings.

Structure

Students can complete either a PGDip or an MA in Forensic Linguistics. Both courses can be completed in year by full-time study or 2 years by part-time study.

• PGDip core modules:

Forensic Linguistics I
Forensic Linguistics II
Foundation Module: Core Skills, Principles, and Issues Involved in Language and Communication Research
Project in Forensic Linguistics

• PGDip optional modules:

Language Description
Discourse and Social Interaction
Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
Phonology
Qualitative Research Methods
Quantitative Research Methods
Text and Social Context
Second Language Development and Pedagogy

• MSc core modules:

Same modules as PGDip PLUS dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words.

• MSc optional modules:

Same modules as PGDip

Teaching

Core knowledge and understanding is delivered via lectures and small-group seminars.

The teaching for core modules combines discussion of theoretical issues and practical challenges raised by the forensic setting, while the teaching for optional modules provides further theoretical discussion with some focus on the development of practical research skills. Sessions rely on your good preparation.

Core knowledge and understanding are also delivered via one-to-one or very small group supervision of individual projects. Intellectual Skills are promoted via lectures, seminars and group discussions, as well as small-group supervision and guidance for research undertaken in a small, team research project.

The learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but will usually include interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

The programme will be assessed by such means as essays, data analyses, critical reviews, posters and oral presentation. Emphasis in assessment is placed on critical and conceptual sophistication as well as on the production of clear, persuasive and scholarly work presented in a professional manner and submitted on time.

Formative work is offered for one of the modules, in which you may undertake forms of assessment that may be new to you. Other modules offer a series of assignments with the express intention that you might learn cumulatively. Elsewhere, you are encouraged to consult the relevant module leader on the main ideas and plans for your assignments.

Modules are assessed on the basis of analytical descriptions of texts or other media and/or discursive essays. You will be encouraged to choose your own texts for analysis, or even to collect original data, and to relate your analyses to areas of personal interest or experience.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to further study (e.g. a PhD or law degree) or have pursued careers in a number of relevant areas such as policing, the courts and Government as well as careers in areas without a forensic connection.

Employers for graduates from this programme include: local government departments, police forces, secondary schools, language schools, universities, banks, solicitors and utility companies.

Career destinations include: crime intelligence analyst, crime analyst, specialist police interviewer, emergency call handler, lawyer, lecturer, teacher, programme administrator, research assistant, PR executive, marketing executive and writer.

Graduates from this programme also move on to non-legal careers and find that the legal and linguistic focus of their studies provides their employers with something a little unusual. Graduates in the job market have also benefited from the training in processing and using information thoughtfully, writing effectively and speaking convincingly which is essential to good postgraduate study.

Placements

We encourage students to make contact with local organisations in order to explore the opportunity of short placements. We provide work experience through the project module where you will work on an authentic research project.

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Our one year full-time or two year part-time Ethics and Social Philosophy Master’s emphasises the enhancement of skills relevant to advanced philosophical research. Read more
Our one year full-time or two year part-time Ethics and Social Philosophy Master’s emphasises the enhancement of skills relevant to advanced philosophical research.

The programme offers knowledge and expertise for further research, postgraduate vocational training, or entry on to a variety of professional career paths.

Distinctive features:

• Suitable either as preparation for further research in ethics and social philosophy or as a stand-alone postgraduate qualification.
• Teaching is by seminars and discussion.
• Specialist courses and dissertation supervision.
• Extensive library holdings of books, journals and electronic sources.
• Regular research seminars with visiting speakers and additional postgraduate research seminars.

Structure

You will take two modules per semester or one module per semester for part-time study. Each module is assessed by 4,000 word essay, with feedback supplied on a first draft of 3,000 words.

Following successful completion of the taught element, you will progress to research and submit a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic of your choice (subject to approval by the Board of Studies).

Core modules:

Philosophy MA Dissertation

Optional modules:

White
Philosophy of Feminism
Agency and Responsibility
Social and Political Philosophy
Rationality and Normativity
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

The modules available on the MA in Ethics and Social Philosophy offer you the opportunity to explore in depth a number of Philosophical issues and critical ideas while gaining experience in research methodology.

All of the MA modules are taught in a weekly seminar for 10 weeks. The sessions include presentation of material by the module tutor, student presentations and class discussion.

The teaching programme for each module will be issued or finalised at the very beginning of each semester; this will detail required readings to ensure that you have the necessary background preparation.

Each module is taught for two hours a week by seminar. It is essential that you prepare for each seminar by reading the set texts and undertaking supplementary research. You will received individual guidance on the development of a range of skills.

Assessment

Each of the four modules you study as part of the degree is assessed by an essay of 4,000 words, submitted for summative examination at the end of the course.

Each summative essay may be a revised version of a formative essay of 3,000 words submitted to the module leader on an agreed topic.

You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice approved by the Philosophy Board of Studies (15,000 – 20,000 words). You can access up to five one-hour supervisory sessions with your allocated supervisor.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study in the School is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia. Many overseas postgraduates return to lectureships with much-enhanced career prospects.

Example employers in the UK include Researchers with Cardiff University, HMRC, Mencap, Research Analyst, Marie Curie Trust, Teach First, and Researchers in the Welsh Government, with jobs that include Crime Intelligence Analyst, Lecturer, Librarian, Recruitment Consultant and Teacher.

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This Bologna-style two-year Master’s degree is taught entirely in English. You can elect to take a Russian course when in Moscow, which can be a beginner's course. Read more

This Bologna-style two-year Master’s degree is taught entirely in English.

You can elect to take a Russian course when in Moscow, which can be a beginner's course. The course consists of the larger British-style modules taught over 20 weeks and smaller modules as taught at MGIMO. The subject area covers general topics in the area of international relations and contemporary international affairs, but allows you to specialise in subjects relating to Russia in an international context or else in more general sub-areas such as diplomacy, media or business economics. No knowledge of Russian necessary!

What will you study?

Modules include:

  • International relations
  • International security studies
  • (Year 2 at MGIMO) Political process in contemporary Russia
  • Foundations of Russia’s foreign policy
  • Russian language module (beginner’s or advanced).

What career can you have?

Our graduates have gone into many walks of life, from UK Ambassador, military officer, members of the SAS or intelligence analyst, to banker, political analyst, university lecturer, staff college lecturer, journalist, official in an international organisation, or policeman. Others have gone into industry, teaching, local government administration, work for charitable foundations or parliament. Our courses give both a deep understanding of the specific subject matter and a range of transferable skills that can be utilised in a wide variety of future careers.



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The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research. Read more

The MRes Criminology will provide you with the expertise and skills necessary to undertake and evaluate socio-legal and criminal justice research.

Combining core research skills with specialist criminology and criminal justice teaching from research-active staff, this course will encourage you to critically examine the theoretical foundations that underpin applied criminological research.

You will develop a critical understanding of research methods and their application as well as specialist knowledge of the issues within contemporary criminological and criminal justice debates.

The dissertation component of this course will enable you to study an area of your interest in-depth, under the supervision of one of interdisciplinary team of sociological, legal and psychological experts.

Aims

Aims of the course:

  • Meet national and regional demands for new research and policy oriented competencies in criminology or socio-legal studies.
  • Provide advanced, systematic and critical knowledge of research methods and theoretical arguments in criminology or socio-legal studies which are at the forefront of the subject area in the context of an vibrant research context.
  • Offer a course integrating a grounding in research methodology with understanding of the implications for policy.
  • Offer students the opportunity for developing their understanding of the key theoretical and epistemological debates within the subject area and to assist them to engage in theoretical debates at an advanced postgraduate level.
  • Provide a formal, comprehensive, multi-disciplinary training for students in research methodology and transferable employment related skills.
  • Prepare students for PhD level research careers in academic life or as professionals in government and voluntary agencies.
  • Contribute to the national need for skilled social science researchers in criminological, socio-legal and related matters.
  • Train students to appreciate the relationship between research on the one hand and the implementation and operation of policy and practice in the implementation of justice.
  • Provide graduates with the tools for further research/study in criminology and/or socio-legal studies.

Special features

This acclaimed course has ESRC recognition as a Foundation Course for Research Training and is an essential step if you wish to progress onto doctoral studies or pursue a career in research in the public or voluntary sectors.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by an interdisciplinary team of experts using a variety of delivery methods: lectures, workshops, student-led presentations and debate, group work and individual research.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by 3500 word essay or by essay and presentation.

Course unit details

To meet the requirements of the taught element of the course, all students must take course units totalling 120 credits. This is normally attained with eight 15-credit course units, as listed below, with 60 credits taken each semester. Students take 5 core units. The availability of individual optional course units is subject to change (due, among other factors, to staff availability to deliver the course units in any given year). Information that is sent to students in the month of August preceding registration onto the course will clearly state the course units that are available in the academic year ahead.

In addition, students who pass the taught element of the course and who are permitted to progress to the research element of the course, must also submit a dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words worth 60 credits.

Part-time  students take four out of the five compulsory course units in the first year, and then take the other one in year two. The remaining 60 credits of optional course units are selected and taken accordingly over the two years. 

 Dissertation

  • Supervised summer dissertation of 12-15,000 words. 
  • Part-time master's students undertake a dissertation in the summer months of year two. Please note that the part-time students can extend their registration for extra 3 months to submit their dissertations in December of their second year, instead of September (you will be advised of the exact date on the second year of the course).

Exit awards

Students who fail to fulfil the requirements to pass the 180 credits necessary to attain the final degree of MRes can leave the course with the award of Postgraduate Diploma by passing 120 credits at the pass mark of 40%, or can qualify for the Postgraduate Certificate by passing 60 credits at the pass mark of 40%. Students who do not fulfil the criteria for passing the taught element of the course at the Masters' level of 50% will not be permitted to progress to the dissertation element of the course, and will leave the course with the highest award that the credits that have been passed will allow.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The degree is designed to appeal to recent graduates looking to work for local/central government, the criminal justice agencies e.g. as a criminal intelligence analyst within the police; probation, voluntary sector and NGOs, pressure groups and think-tanks -such as The Howard League Reform Trust, as well as for a private sector.



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