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Masters Degrees (Intellectual Property Law)

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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

Intellectual Property Law is required for a surprising amount of industries across creative, marketing, architecture, all new business in terms of trade marks and brand protection, innovations in terms of new product patents and intellectual property rights, internet businesses including e-commerce,  and many many other organisations and businesses. It is international in its protection with variations upon how the law is interpreted depending upon where you trade. For anyone trading internationally it is essential to know how the law is interpreted in the country you are selling in.

Intellectual property law protection can include a wide range of different levels of protection which include full rights, in which you give all rights for a specific tangible or intangible item with specifications written down to protect your idea, partial rights when licensing to others either long term or short term, creative commons to allow access to the idea and monetisation by a different method or the ability to license at specific times and periods of time, specific tangible products. All companies with a creative component are at risk of infringement from when they start to trade to when they cease business so it is a question of how to manage intellectual property, keep growing and trading and benefitting from the turnover that your creative assets bring into your company.

If you want to specialist in intellectual property law this can be a hugely challenging and rewarding area and you are guaranteed to have no two clients that are alike in terms of needs. Intellectual property law is very closely linked to international trade, contracts, exporting, importing, and extending monetisation of assets. You study the deep issues and challenges of intellectual property law and its application to innovation, creativity, and creative development within a business or organisational context at international level.

Courses listed for the programme

  • Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship x2
  • Master of Law Dissertation

Optional

  • International Intellectual Property
  • Cultural Property Issues: Law, Art, and Museums
  • Intellectual Property Law, Human Rights and Development
  • Trade Marks and Brand Development
  • Commercialising Innovation and Law

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You study at a top 10 ranked UK Law School (The Complete University Guide 2018) 
  • 98% of students felt their LLM added value to their career prospects and 97% would recommend their course to others
  • Study with over 40 different nationalities, network and discover intellectual property law in their country
  • Work with creative industries, innovators, growth companies to protect and extend their rights to trade without infringement 

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full Time or Part Time
  • September or January
  • 12 Months or 24 Months

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about international fees:

Find out more about fees on the programme page

*Please be advised that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page and the latest postgraduate opportunities

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs

You may be interested in:





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Intellectual property law is a crucial part of an innovative and creative economy, and has become central to government and international policy. Read more

Intellectual property law is a crucial part of an innovative and creative economy, and has become central to government and international policy.

Overview

Intellectual property law is a central part of an innovative and creative economy; it has now become central to government and international policy. There is a need for expertise in the field for lawyers, policy makers and others involved with developing a knowledge economy.

The LLM Intellectual Property Law aims to meet the needs of students, lawyers, policy makers and others who wish to study intellectual property law from an international and comparative perspective.

This programme provides an overview of current issues in specific areas of intellectual property law, both domestic, EU and international, with a critical evaluation of current and proposed regulation. 

Distinctive features

The LLM Intellectual Property Law programme:

  • Provides you with a general appreciation of current issues in specific areas of intellectual property law, domestic, EU and international
  • Stimulates a critical approach to evaluation of current and proposed regulation and cultivates independent and original thought
  • Enables you to undertake in-depth research and demonstrate advanced knowledge in specific areas of law.

The LLM Intellectual Property Law programme is very flexible and offers a wide range of modules providing you with the ability to customise the programme to meet your own professional and/or employment needs or interests.

Learning and assessment

How will I be taught?

Study for an LLM is intensive and challenging and it is important that you take full advantage of the teaching that is provided in order to succeed. Attendance at classes and dissertation supervisions is compulsory and we will expect you to be well prepared. 

Our teaching is very flexible and your modules may be delivered through seminars or a combination of lectures and seminars. Other teaching methods include the online use of discussion boards, self-access study packs and formative quizzes and activities.

Modules may be diverse in content to cater a high proportion of overseas students or students with previous qualifications other than in law. Modules are typically led by experienced staff actively engaged in research relevant to their subject area.

How will I be supported?

We have created a specially designed research and study skills module which is studied by all LLM students at the beginning of the programme. We also offer writing skills support for students whose first language is not English.

Your learning will be supported through e-learning. All modules are supported by Learning Central, a virtual learning environment that is available on and off campus through which you will access a wide range of materials for your modules.

You will receive dedicated pastoral support through our personal tutor scheme. We offer an extensive programme of careers lectures and workshops within the School with an in-house Law Careers Consultant and a Pro-bono Scheme Co-ordinator. 

A designated Disability and Diversity Officer ensures that reasonable adjustments are made for students with disabilities. The University has a range of services to support you, including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service and excellent libraries with specialist law librarians and resource centres.

Career prospects

A law degree doesn’t restrict graduates to careers within the legal profession and law graduates enter professions as diverse as finance, sales and marketing, digital communications and recruitment.

We are committed to extending extracurricular opportunities to our students, helping to enhance their CVs in a competitive graduate job market. We work in partnership with lawyers, charities and voluntary organisations to give students the opportunity to practise and extend their skills and we run several Pro Bono schemes and provide advice to members of the community on different legal issues.

Students successfully completing the LLM programme may have the opportunity to continue their legal study through the School’s PhD programme or through the Centre for Professional Legal Studies professional programmes (the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course). 



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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Read more
The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Students will be able to study a wide range of topics from the protection of inventions, products, trade marks, creative works and designs to the global policy surrounding the law.


Modules:


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Intellectual Property Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM162 Intellectual Property Taxation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM308 Civil Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM309 Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM336 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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This programme is designed to equip you with an advanced knowledge and understanding of intellectual property law within an international, European and domestic (UK) setting. Read more

This programme is designed to equip you with an advanced knowledge and understanding of intellectual property law within an international, European and domestic (UK) setting.

The core subjects of the programme cover both substantive intellectual property law and the place and role of intellectual property, not just in its legal context but also in its social, ethical, cultural and commercial contexts. The programme spans patents, copyright, trade marks, designs, database rights, breach of confidence, passing off and sui generis rights, as well as investigating a range of issues which underpin contemporary intellectual property law and policy.

Programme structure

You must complete 180 credits of study – 60 credits are taken in the compulsory dissertation and the remaining 120 credits are taken in taught courses.

Courses will be led by members of the Law School academic community, who are leaders in their field. You are expected to prepare in advance by reading the required materials and by reflecting on the issues to be discussed, and your participation in classes will be assessed.

For the dissertation you will have a supervisor from whom you can expect guidance and support, but the purpose of the dissertation is to allow you to independently design and conduct a piece of research and analysis.

Please note that due to unforeseen circumstances or lack of demand for particular courses, we may not be able to run all courses as advertised come the start of the academic year.

Learning outcomes

The subjects of the degree are intended to equip students with both an advanced knowledge of substantive intellectual property law and of the place and role of intellectual property within a domestic, regional and international context, laying a foundation for a specialised dissertation.

By the end of their studies for this degree, students will have acquired a high level of knowledge in the field of intellectual property law, a sophisticated awareness of the problems in the area and of the differing approaches to their solution.

Having studied the programme, students will emerge with an understanding of intellectual Property law not just in its legal but also social, ethical, cultural and commercial contexts.

During their study students will have access to the results of innovative cross-cutting research of the highest quality. The programme is suitable to prepare students for advanced research.

Career opportunities

This programme provides excellent preparation for anyone seeking to work in intellectual property in a legal, business, industry or academic setting, or who wishes to advance their knowledge in the field. Recent graduates have entered legal practice as specialists in intellectual property law, and are also working as trademark attorneys and royalties administrators.



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The Postgraduate Certificate in Intellectual Property is designed for trainee patent attorneys and others working within, or embarking on, a career in intellectual property law and practice. Read more

About the course

The Postgraduate Certificate in Intellectual Property is designed for trainee patent attorneys and others working within, or embarking on, a career in intellectual property law and practice. This part-time programme provides a comprehensive overview of theoretical, practical and management aspects of intellectual property.

The course is suitable for both law graduates and those with backgrounds in the sciences, technology, engineering and business. Non-graduates who currently work with intellectual property are also considered. No prior legal knowledge is required, as you will be introduced to essential legal principles as the course progresses.

The course is accredited by the statutory regulator Intellectual Property Regulation Board (IPReg) and the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys. Upon successful completion of the Intellectual Property Postgraduate Certificate, students who wish to qualify as Patent Attorney in the UK receive exemptions from the foundation level papers set by the qualifying examinations agencies (see more details in Special Features ).

The programme starts at the end of September and goes through to March and it is delivered on Wednesdays from 1pm to 5pm.

This is a unique programme designed by the Law School to support Law Firms and the IP industry. The part-time nature of the course makes it possible to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property law whilst in full-time employment. UK employers sponsor over 80% of students taking the course.

Aims

The programme will provide students with essential knowledge about the theoretical rationales and policy arguments for the recognition of intellectual property rights.

It will explain the basic principles of Intellectual Property Law and the nature and scope of these rights. It will also explore the procedures, both national and supranational, for the granting and recognition of the rights, and mechanisms for enforcement as well as defences against enforcement.

Course Content

The PGCert consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Copyright, Design and Allied Rights
Patent Law and Practice
Trade Marks and Allied Rights
Managing Intellectual Property

Assessment

Each module will be assessed independently by way of a written examination or coursework.

Term 1 modules are assessed at the beginning of January. Term 2 modules are assessed during the University’s main exam period – the end of March to the beginning of May. Exact dates are confirmed to all students during the academic year.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is well established and highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard. Staff teaching at the Intellectual Property Postgraduate Certificate include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Exemptions
The course is accredited by the Intellectual Property Regulation Board (IPReg), the statutory body regulating the professions of patent attorney and trade mark attorney. It provides exemptions in the examinations to become a qualified Patent Attorney in the UK.
For more details on qualifications, examinations, and exemptions please visit the website of the Joint Examination Board (JEB), the body responsible for the organisation and management of the examinations of CIPA for entry onto the Register of Patent Attorneys.

Patent Attorney
Students preparing to train as Patent Attorneys will receive full exemption from all Foundation Level Papers (P1, P5, P7, D&C, Law) set by the Joint Examination Board and the Institute of Patent Attorneys.

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This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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This pathway in Intellectual Property Law equips postgraduate students with the necessary in-depth knowledge to practise intellectual property law or work in creative industries. Read more

This pathway in Intellectual Property Law equips postgraduate students with the necessary in-depth knowledge to practise intellectual property law or work in creative industries. It also provides an excellent foundation for students who may wish to pursue a research degree in the field.

The pathway provides students with a detailed insight into the dynamic and growing area of intellectual property law by taking a distinctively contextual approach: delineating its histories, materialisations and practices, as well as analysing their conceptual foundations and dilemmas.

The students will be introduced to critical, practical and socio-historical approaches to the framing and studying of intellectual property related problems. Such a contextual and critically informed approach to the study of intellectual property is unique in the UK and international postgraduate degree programmes. The modules are taught by distinguished academic specialists who cover a large and diverse range of subjects within the field.

Students can choose to spend one term (either Autumn or Spring) at our Canterbury campus and one (either Autumn or Spring) at our Brussels centre (returning to Canterbury to complete the dissertation) under our split-site option for this programme. The split site option is charged at a different rate. Please see under Fees below for more information. Programmes at our Brussels centre are offered primarily in International Law and Human Rights Law. Students are responsible for organising their own accommodation in Brussels. Please contact the University's Accommodation Office for information about the availability of short term accommodation in Canterbury.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of pathway open until after you arrive - your pathway being determined by the modules you choose.

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field.

You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

National ratings

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by Kent Law School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity. We were also ranked 7th for research power and in the top 20 for research output, research quality and research impact. An impressive 99% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

Kent Law School is one of the leading law schools in the UK; we are ranked 14th in The Times Good University Guide 2018, 15th in The Guardian University Guide 2018 for law and 19th in The Complete University Guide 2018.

The Law School has an excellent international reputation; ranked 50th in the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings for law 2018, it is also listed amongst the top 100 law schools in the world in both the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2017 and the Shanghai Ranking’s Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2017.

Fees

The fees for the Canterbury-only delivery of this programme are the same as those for the standard LLM programme. However, fees for our split-site option (which is taught in Canterbury and Brussels) are charged at a different rate. Please refer here for the current fees for the split-site 90 ECTS option.

Funding

The University has a generous postgraduate scholarship fund in excess of £9m available to taught and research students studying at Kent. There are also scholarships specifically for Law School students including a Taught Overseas Scholarship and Taught Home/EU Bursaries. Kent Law School has also established a major fund to support students who are from or who have studied in Kenya, Nigeria or Thailand, and who undertake a Master's in Law (LLM) at the Canterbury campus of the University of Kent.

Modules

Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Our current module handbook is available to download on our website. The modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules are normally assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2015 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Information about the internship programme for LLM students can be found on the Kent Law School Employability blog.

Learn more about Kent

Visit us

Information for international students

Why study at Kent?

Apply online



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Intellectual Property (IP) is a fast growing area of the law, requiring highly qualified multilingual specialists who can deal with IP rights across national borders. Read more

Intellectual Property (IP) is a fast growing area of the law, requiring highly qualified multilingual specialists who can deal with IP rights across national borders. The new LLM International Studies in Intellectual Property Law course offers a specialised programme of study, which will enable you to meet the requirements of a future career in this area. The course covers copyright, trade mark and patent law, along with its European and international aspects, as well as legal questions associated with new technologies, multimedia and cyberspace.

This course is designed for law graduates, practising lawyers and business professionals from anywhere in the world who want to develop a specialist legal and commercial expertise in technology and IP law.

Course detail

You will study the most important components of international intellectual property law such as copyright, patents and trademarks and how these forms of intellectual property are protected in the digital age.

The course is therefore designed for law graduates, practising lawyers and business professionals from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist legal and commercial expertise in intellectual property law and technology. In addition to specialised courses, they will also study international commercial law and other subjects, which will help put intellectual property into the context of modern international business relations.

Modules

• Intellectual Property in the Digital Economy

• Commercial Intellectual Property Law

• International Commercial Arbitration and Mediation

• International Commercial Law

• Research Methodology

• Dissertation.

Format

The course is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, small group sessions, practical experience and workshops. We teach two modules each week, over four hours of teaching time. In addition, students will complete a 15,000 word dissertation, which will be supported by a Research Methodology module.

Assessment

The taught modules adopt a standardised and consistent approach. In each of these modules, there will be a formative assessment, which will not count towards your final module mark. Following this, there will be two assessments – a piece of coursework of 3,000 words and an end of semester (pre-release) exam. Both will count towards your final mark. Normally, you will receive feedback within two weeks of submitting coursework and within three weeks of sitting exams.

Career and study progression

Our aim is to produce graduates who have employment prospects with multinational corporations, because they understand the legal regulations and constraints of international business, as well as the financial world of international trade agencies and multinational corporations.

You can seek employment opportunities in careers with investment, law, consultancy and accounting firms, especially those focusing on international practice. Practising legal professionals and human resource professionals can use their qualification and the skills and knowledge they have gained on the course to progress in their chosen field.

On completing this course successfully, you can choose to continue your studies with Ealing Law School and progress on to a PhD.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business. Read more

The LLM Intellectual Property Law will give you a thorough understanding of the law concerning intellectual property and patents in modern business.

Our intellectual property (IP) experts will take you through the economic, social and philosophical aspects of IP law development and encourage you to critically analyse the current legal framework. You will gain advanced knowledge in IP law and concomitant policy, and learn about national and international grant, enforcement and defence of intellectual property rights on a multi-jurisdictional basis.

With research expertise in important industry sectors such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology, our teaching staff offer strong links to the wider IP profession. Contentious issues in intellectual property are connected to developments in high-tech sectors as well as the arts and popular culture, so the course has appeal to a wide range of backgrounds and IP-related careers.

Special features

Our award-winning careers service offers you all year round dedicated postgraduate support including employability sessions, and advice for those aspiring to a PhD and career in academia.

Teaching and learning

We use various teaching methods across the course to enable you to participate in debate and hone the analytical and reasoning skills vital to legal and business professionals.

Coursework and assessment

Most course units are assessed by standard methods - either one unseen written examination, or one coursework essay, or a combination of these two methods of assessment. The assessment method of each individual course unit is listed in the course unit description.

This LLM has a compulsory research component, in which students have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). If students choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research paper must be within the area of a semester two course unit that you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve students' legal writing and research skills. For specialised streams, dissertation topic must be within those streams while for general LLM dissertation topics must be within one of the elective units chosen by the student.

Course unit details

You will be doing 180 credits in total, 120 of which will be taught modules and the remainder 60 credits in the form of two research papers (30 credits each) or a dissertation.

The LLM course will typically offer around 30 different course units in any one year, and will always reflect a wide range of subjects across the legal spectrum. There will usually be course units offered on such diverse topics as international trade and corporate law, financial services regulation, European law, international economic law, intellectual property law, human rights law, corporate governance, and law and finance in emerging markets.

Course units are of the value of 15 or 30 credits. You will be required to select course units to a total of 120 credits, and so must choose a minimum of four course units or may be able to choose a maximum of eight course units to make up your course of study. The LLM Intellectual Property Law has three core course units: Trade Mark Law and Policy ; Patent Law and Policy ; and Copyright Law and Policy . These core course units constitute 75 credits of the 120 taught credits required for the course.

The course has a compulsory research component, in which you have the option of choosing either to submit two research papers of 7,000-8,000 words each (and each of the value of 30 credits) or writing a 14,000 to 15,000 words dissertation (60 credits). The taught element of the degree programme will total 120 credits and the research element of the degree programme will total 60 credits i.e. you will study 180 credits for a master's programme. If you choose the option of submitting two research papers, the first research paper must be within the area of a semester one course unit that you have chosen, and the second research within the area of a semester one or a semester two course unit you have taken. If you choose to complete a dissertation this must be within the area of one units you have chosen. The research element of the course is supported by weekly research methodology lectures delivered throughout semesters one and two designed to improve your legal writing and research skills.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School is offering a number of awards for students applying for masters study. To find out more please visit our  Master's funding opportunity search page .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This master's course offers training for a professional career in IP law in a range of industries, such as life sciences, healthcare, communications and information technology sectors. It also allows the development of research skills for those wishing to pursue an academic career in IP law.



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Intellectual property has a central role in the enhancement of creativity, innovation and commercial growth in the modern economy. Read more

Intellectual property has a central role in the enhancement of creativity, innovation and commercial growth in the modern economy.

The LLM Intellectual Property Law and Management is designed to respond to the emergent demand for professionals who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. This course is relevant to those graduates wishing to acquire an advanced knowledge of legal and business aspects of intellectual property in a commercial context.

This course is unique in that it offers a multi-disciplinary comprehensive overview of core issues of intellectual property law and management. You can take some core and optional modules at the Law School as well as the ICMA Centre, Henley Business School and Arts and Communication Design, providing an invaluable opportunity to develop an interdisciplinary perspective of intellectual property transactions.

What will you study?

Modules include:

  • Copyright and designs
  • Patents and trademarks
  • Internet law
  • Digital marketing
  • Privacy and data protection

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

What career can you have?

Graduates from our courses have gone on to work in various capacities, in major national and international law firms, as in-house lawyers, in international organizations in UK and abroad. While many law graduates take professional exams in law and go on to practise law either in the UK or abroad, many others pursue alternative careers. A postgraduate law degree will open many doors not only in specialised areas of employment, such as law firms, European and intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations, but also in academia (with further postgraduate study), creative organisations, the media (journalism and broadcasting), the entertainment industry, the civil service, and other branches of public service.



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This course offers a detailed insight in law, management and policy relating to patents, copyright, trademarks and other intellectual property rights. Read more

This course offers a detailed insight in law, management and policy relating to patents, copyright, trademarks and other intellectual property rights.

It provides international and comparative perspectives that cover not only traditional intellectual property issues like industrial property, artistic works and brands, but emerging areas of policy including the digital economy and biotechnology.

This programme reflects the growing importance of international developments in intellectual property, and confronts growing controversies such as the relationships between intellectual property and human rights norms, access to knowledge, new technologies and economic development.

You’ll explore the international norms and institutions relating to intellectual property such as the World Trade Organisation’s TRIPS Agreement, and consider the wider social and economic implications of intellectual property for health, culture, education, technology, innovation and economic development.

You’ll benefit from the expertise of leading academics in a stimulating research environment. Our research groups include:

Course content

The compulsory modules studied will give you an opportunity to:

  • study the key principles and features, rules and court decisions concerning patents, copyright and trademarks
  • examine the key cases that have shaped intellectual property rights law in the major legal jurisdictions
  • discover other rights such as designs and geographical indications
  • learn about how business acquires and deploys intellectual property rights.

These compulsory modules will also enable you to hone your legal research and writing skills, which you’ll be able to demonstrate in your dissertation – an independent piece of research on your chosen topic.

If you study with us, you’ll also benefit from our academic skills programme. This 10-week programme runs alongside your taught academic programme, and is specifically designed to meet the needs of home and international students in the School of Law. It allows you to refine and develop the academic and transferable skills to excel during your taught postgraduate programmes, as well as prepare for professional roles after graduation.

The wide-ranging list of optional modules means that you can explore a mixture of related subjects of interest to you.

As a part-time student, you’ll take four compulsory modules in your first year and two optional modules. In your second year, you’ll carry out your dissertation and study two optional modules.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Postgraduate Legal Research Skills 15 credits
  • Trade Marks, Geographical Indications, Designs and Trade Secrets 15 credits
  • Patent Law 15 credits
  • Copyright Law 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Cyberlaw: Regulation of Cyberspace 15 credits
  • International E-Commerce Law 15 credits
  • Intellectual Property Management 15 credits
  • Digital Environment: Law, Technologies & Human Rights 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Intellectual Property: Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Expressions 15 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Intellectual Property: Health, Food and Biotechnology 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Intellectual Property Law LLM Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our compulsory and optional modules are taught through a range of weekly seminars, lectures and workshops.

You’ll need to prepare for your seminars and lectures, undertaking any exercises that might be prescribed in advance. Independent study is integral to this programme – not just to prepare for classes but to develop research and other critical skills.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a variety of methods but for most modules you’ll be required to write an essay at the end of each module. You’ll also be expected to write a final dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme, which is also accessible to non-lawyers, provides essential knowledge and skills should you wish to embark upon a career in the legal professions, and in knowledge-intensive commercial sectors. These include the technology and creative industries as well as their representative organisations.

The degree will attract employers in other occupations where in-depth understanding of intellectual property is considered economically or strategically important. These include government service as well as intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations.

Careers support

The School of Law offers career and personal development support through the School of Law Careers Advisor. The School also arranges career development workshops, seminars and one-to-one sessions for students on all postgraduate programmes.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The future of the law is digital. . Our innovative LLM in Information Technology and Intellectual Property. offers you critical and intellectual specialisation in this rapidly developing area. Read more

The future of the law is digital. 

Our innovative LLM in Information Technology and Intellectual Property offers you critical and intellectual specialisation in this rapidly developing area. You’ll explore the issues responsible for placing the legal system at the forefront of governance of the internet. You’ll also gain theoretical and practical insights, enabling you to master the intertwined areas of information technology and intellectual property law. 

Based at Silicon Beach in Brighton – just an hour’s train journey from London – you’ll have the opportunity to experience the work of digital law firms and the formation of legislation in European institutions and United Nations bodies.

Why Choose Sussex?

  • Students studying the LLM in Information Technology and Intellectual Property law will learn from today’s leading lawyers.
  • Prepare for your future career – our courses are designed with skills training at their core, enabling you to think logically about legal problems and gain a good representation of Information Technology and Intellectual Property law in practice.
  • Benefit from a truly international, stimulating and engaging environment, with both international students and faculty, thus exposing you to viewpoints from across the world.

How will I study?

You will learn through core modules and options over the autumn and spring terms. In the summer term, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation. 

Our core modules give you the necessary theoretical, methodological and empirical foundations. Our options are taught by specialist academics based on their areas of expertise. They include:

  • Communications Law and Regulation
  • Cyber Law
  • International Aspects of Intellectual Property and Technology Regulation
  • Privacy and Data Protection Law
  • Regulating the Creative Industries

You will be assessed through coursework, essays and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Find out more about our core modules and options on the University of Sussex LLM Information Technology and Intellectual Property website.

Study visit

You have opportunities to visit European Union institutions in Brussels and Luxembourg, along with WIPO and other UN agencies in Geneva

Funding opportunities

The University of Sussex is proud to offer a range of postgraduate funding awards up to £5000, in order to help talented students to come and study at Sussex.  Find out more about funding awards available to you by visiting our funding database.

Careers

You’ll graduate with the skills to become a digital lawyer, able to practise in a major law firm (regulator or government). You will master both content and carriage issues to become a truly converged digital lawyer.

You'll also be equipped with the skills for further study at doctoral level as well as to go on to professional practice in IT and IP in London, Brussels and around the world. 



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Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. Read more

Overview

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The MSc in Management of Intellectual Property explores the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trade marks and the other core areas within this field.

This Masters of Science is primarily aimed at science and engineering graduates who wish to pursue a career as patent or trade mark attorneys, though it is also open to graduates from all academic backgrounds who wish to study Intellectual Property (IP) at postgraduate level.

There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and this MSc gives you the opportunity to study IP to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates), and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of IP.

Professional stream
The professional stream is directed towards graduates (primarily sciences and other technical industries, but also from all other backgrounds) seeking qualification as patent and trade mark attorneys.

Business stream
Students on the business stream will gain profound knowledge of the law and its operation with a view to working in areas such as the press and media, the entertainment industry, the internet and software industries, or the luxury goods industries. Further sectors where knowledge in Intellectual Property and related areas is seen as a particular advantage include governments, international organisations, universities or non-governmental institutions.

This programme will:
◦Give you a choice of two streams to suit your background; a professional stream for science and engineering graduates, and a business stream for graduates of other disciplines.
◦Offer science and engineering graduates the opportunity to gain professional exemptions from Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

What is Intellectual Property (IP) law?

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprising law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. This programme teaches the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trademarks and the other core areas within this field.

Why study Intellectual Property law?

The MSc Management of Intellectual Property programme was developed as we recognised the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is an emerging need in industry, in commerce and in those professions concerned with intellectual property law, for science and technology graduates who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. In industry, particularly in small and medium-sized firms involved in research and development, where there is no in-house lawyer or patent agent, there is often a need for an intermediary between the firms and the external lawyer or patent agent for example; or for an executive to handle the inward or outward licensing of technology, to negotiate research and development contracts (where ownership of intellectual property is usually central to the bargaining) or generally to have a basic knowledge of current developments in the field of business law (eg. contract law, product liability law) insofar as these may relate to the firm's present or future activities.

With the introduction of the new business stream we also offer a distinct avenue for graduates from all backgrounds to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property.

Structure of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property

Classes usually commence mid-September with examinations in May/June. Courses are taught during the day at Queen Mary University of London campuses and usually take place between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

There is an initial Basic English Law examination which takes place two weeks after the start of the programme. Students then select which stream they wish to undertake.

Compulsory modules:

◦Study project (45 credits)
◦Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice (non-credit bearing but all students must pass this module at the start of the programme)

All students require 180 credits in total.

Professional stream students have core modules plus one free choice half module of 22.5 credits. In addition to this, professional stream students also sit two additional papers to gain exemption from the foundation papers of CIPA and ITMA, both papers must be passed to gain the exemption for either institution.

Business stream students have a free choice of 135 credits (three full modules or six half modules, or a combination of the two.)

All students are required to study the core subject units: Patent law, Copyright and designs law, Law of trade marks and unfair competition, Competition law, and Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice in term one. Occasional additional second semester options may be available.

]]Modules:]]

Read the full module descriptions on the QMUL web site.

Modules which run annually:
◦The law of copyright and design I (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦The law of patents I and II (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦Trade mark law I and II (Compulsory for Professional Stream
◦Study Project (Core Module for all students)
◦The law of competition I
◦Media law
◦Trade mark law I
◦The law of patents I
◦Intellectual property in food, biotechnology and agriculture
◦Intellectual property in the United States.

Modules which may run but cannot be guaranteed:
◦Competition law and licensing I and II
◦The law of copyright and design I and I
◦Information technology law
◦Intellectual property transactions
◦Licensing practice.

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This programme enables you to develop a fully rounded understanding of intellectual property (IP) rights. The programme aims to equip students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of IP law and policy within a domestic (UK), regional (European) and international context. Read more

This programme enables you to develop a fully rounded understanding of intellectual property (IP) rights.

The programme aims to equip students with an advanced knowledge and understanding of IP law and policy within a domestic (UK), regional (European) and international context.

The programme covers substantive law on all of the major IP rights, including copyright, designs, trade marks, and patents, as well as confidentiality, passing off, database rights and other IP protection. The programme also addresses the international treaties that govern IP law, legal aspects of commercialising and enforcing IP and a range of topical legal and policy issues.

Online learning

Find out about studying online with Edinburgh Law School

Programme structure

To be awarded LLM Intellectual Property Law you must successfully complete six courses, four of which must be IP law courses, and a 10,000-word dissertation during your chosen duration of study.

During your studies you will also have the opportunity to study up to two courses from different subject areas such as information technology law, medical law or international commercial law.

Learning outcomes

The subjects of the degree are intended to equip you with both an advanced knowledge of substantive intellectual property law and of the place and role of intellectual property within a domestic, regional and international context, laying a foundation for a specialised dissertation.

By the end of your studies you will have acquired a high level of knowledge in the field of intellectual property law, a sophisticated awareness of the problems in the area and of the differing approaches to their solution.

Career opportunities

Graduates of our online distance learning programmes progress to a range of careers in law and related legal fields, including work in local and international firms, government legal departments, other public institutions, international organisations and in academia.

The programmes are also an ideal platform for advanced research.



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