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Masters Degrees (Intellectual History)

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The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). Read more
The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History is aimed at students who have an interest in both the theory and history of political thought (including those wider intellectual idioms which provide the context for its development). It also welcomes students whose previous study had a more specialised historical or theoretical (or philosophical) bent, provided that while doing this course they are willing to engage themselves with both approaches to research.

This MPhil attracts students from all over the world, and its training provides an ideal foundation from which to proceed to doctoral research, not only in the United Kingdom, but in North American, European, Asian and Southern Hemisphere university systems.

Priority is given to the pursuit of the individual student’s research: all examined work derives from this research. Classes are provided in Methodology, in the reading of selected texts, and in selected concepts: these are intended to be ‘exemplary’, offering opportunities to explore different methods used in the field, different approaches to reading texts, and a variety of political concepts. Work done in classes is not examined.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimppth

Course detail

The MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History offers students a rounded and flexible Masters programme that provides them with an introduction to all three of the fields contained within its scope (History of Political Thought, Political Theory, Intellectual History), while allowing them to specialise in their own area of particular interest. It offers a thorough training in the key techniques of higher-level academic study and research.

The MPhil is inter-Faculty: History, Politics, and Classics are the participating departments. The teaching staff, and examiners, have diverse disciplinary backgrounds, as do students on the course.

Learning Outcomes

After completion of the MPhil in Political Thought and Intellectual History, students should have:

1. acquired an enhanced understanding of the history of political thought as well as an appreciation of the broader theoretical approaches and intellectual idioms that inform its study.
2. acquired the analytical capacity to pursue independent study of primary texts in the history of political thought and to evaluate the findings of secondary commentators
3. acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field of political thought and intellectual history

Format

The course comprises two kinds of work: group study and individually tailored supervised research training. Both persist simultaneously throughout the year, so that students are expected to attend the course classes, research seminar, and lectures while at the same time researching their essays. While there are no fixed course classes in Easter Term when students will be concentrating on their dissertation, they will be required to present their work at a Dissertation Seminar and encouraged to continue attending lectures and the research seminar. Postgraduate students in Cambridge are expected to work continuously throughout the year with the exception of a few days’ break at a time, so that the ‘vacation periods’ are in fact periods in which required work must be completed.

Students will receive the following feedback:

- oral supervision feedback
- writen termly CGSRS reports
- written essay feedback
- oral dissertation workshop feedback
- formal written feedback from two examiners after the submission and examination of their dissertation.

Assessment

A thesis of 15,000 - 20,000 words is submitted at the end of the course. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Two essays of not more than 6,000 words each, one submitted at the end of Michaelmas Term, the second at the end of Lent Term. These essays constitute Part I of the MPhil, and contribute to the final overall mark.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Ideas and patterns of thought always have been, and continue to be, subject to historical change. The ways in which they change, and the reasons why they do so, make for fascinating study. Read more

Ideas and patterns of thought always have been, and continue to be, subject to historical change. The ways in which they change, and the reasons why they do so, make for fascinating study. In this comprehensive programme, you’ll be introduced to the principal methodologies of intellectual history. You will also have the opportunity to explore particular themes in intellectual history, developing a detailed understanding of their origins, historical circumstances and implications.

By the end of the programme you will have the tools you need to appreciate the interdependence of text and context and the importance of ideas in past and present, as well as the ability to research effectively and present your work with confidence.

Programme structure

You will take a variety of seminar-style courses in small groups. Most courses are assessed by means of an extended piece of written work, while some courses may also assess non-written skills. You will complete two compulsory courses and select a further four options from a wide range on offer. You will then complete an independent research dissertation and will be assigned a supervisor from the outset.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Historical Methodology
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Myth and the History of Scholarship in Early Modern Europe
  • The Scientific Revolution in Global Perspective
  • Citizens and Subjects: Concepts of Citizenship in Modern African Intellectual History
  • Currents of Radicalism, 1776-1848
  • Debating Marriage from Antiquity to the Middle Ages
  • History as Romance, Profession, Critique: Theory and Scholarship in the West, 1835 to 1985
  • Literature and History in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland
  • Thinking the 20th Century - Hannah Arendt and the Breakdown of European Civilisation

Learning outcomes

Students are expected to achieve several aims, which will be assessed primarily by essays and a dissertation, such as:

  • knowledge of the chief methods of practising intellectual history
  • a detailed understanding of certain major episodes in intellectual history
  • an appreciation of the interdependence of text and context, and of the importance of ideas in past and present

A wide variety of intellectual skills are promoted through seminars, discussions and advanced study, encouraging the development of the:

  • ability to develop tight and coherent arguments both orally and on the page
  • capacity to read texts critically and sensitively, evaluating their arguments as well as situating them in their practical and intellectual contexts
  • appreciation of a variety of approaches to intellectual history
  • ability to cross-disciplinary boundaries, for example, between philosophy, science and history

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers, others are interested in pursuing long-term academic careers and therefore consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD. The combination of skills training courses, specialised seminars, and independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose.

Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think tanks,national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts while others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



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This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. Read more
This intercollegiate programme draws on the expertise of academic staff in the fields of the history of political thought and intellectual history from across the Colleges and Institutes of the University of London. The programme is administered from Queen Mary, so you register as a Queen Mary student � once you complete the programme, your degree will be a joint University of London-UCL MA. The MA Programme as a whole offers advanced training in intellectual history, the history of political thought and the history of philosophy, spanning the period from the ancient world to the Twenty-First Century. You will also be provided with an essential grounding in the various methods and approaches associated with the study of the history of thought developed over the past quarter-century in Europe and the United States.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module: Method and Practice in the History of Political Thought and Intellectual History, a selection of modules chosen from the list below, and an individually supervised dissertation. Below is a typical sample of module options that may be offered in a given year:

Democracy: Ancient and Modern Richard Bourke (Queen Mary)
Propaganda and Ideology in Rome Valentina Arena (UCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
Languages of politics: Italy 1250-1500 Serena Ferente (KCL)
Political Thought in Renaissance Europe Iain McDaniel (UCL)
Early-modern theories of the state Quentin Skinner (Queen Mary)
The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476 - 1800 Jason Peacey (UCL)
Signs, Mind, and Society: Early Modern Theories of Language Avi Lifschitz (UCL)
Enlightenment and Revolution: Political Ideas in the British Isles 1688-1800 Ian McBride (KCL)
Selfhood, Sensibility and the Politics of Difference in the European Enlightenment Adam Sutcliffe (KCL) [please note: not running 2011-12]
From Hume to Darwin God, Man and Nature in European Thought Niall O'Flaherty (KCL)
Visions of Capitalism Jeremy Jennings (Queen Mary) [please note: not running 2011-12]
In the Shadow of the French Revolution: Political Thought 1790-1890 Gareth Stedman Jones (Queen Mary)
Theories of Empire: from Enlightenment to Liberalism Maurizio Isabella (Queen Mary)
Crisis and Future in Nineteenth-Century European Thought Axel K�rner (UCL)
Nationalism, Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism in Political Thought, 19th�20th Centuries Georgios Varouxakis (Queen Mary)

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The MLitt in Intellectual History is an interdisciplinary taught postgraduate programme. The course explores major historical, historiographical, and methodological aspects of intellectual history alongside an individually tailored programme of directed reading. Read more

The MLitt in Intellectual History is an interdisciplinary taught postgraduate programme. The course explores major historical, historiographical, and methodological aspects of intellectual history alongside an individually tailored programme of directed reading.

Highlights

  • This interdisciplinary programme brings together experts from across the University with a common interest in researching and contextualising key ideas in their subject areas.
  • Students learn to treat past ideas as historical phenomena, as well as assess the meanings of these ideas as intended by their authors, and in contexts beyond those their authors may have foreseen.
  • The course covers the different kinds of intellectual history being practised today, and the relationship between intellectual history and philosophy, literature and literary studies, international relations, law, politics, economics and theology.

Teaching format

The modules are taught through seminars and fortnightly tutorials, with class sizes ranging from individual supervision up to 12 students. The modules are assessed by coursework only; there is no final exam.

Students will spend the final three months of the course focusing on researching and writing the final assessment piece for the MLitt, a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

Each module typically comprises:

  • seminars ranging from 1.5 to 3 hours per week
  • fortnightly tutorial sessions for directed reading
  • 100% coursework assessment.

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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This MA builds on Sussex’s long tradition of innovation and expertise in intellectual history. Exploring the major transformations and discourses in intellectual life since 1500, you’ll focus on. Read more

This MA builds on Sussex’s long tradition of innovation and expertise in intellectual history.

Exploring the major transformations and discourses in intellectual life since 1500, you’ll focus on:

  • the history of political ideas
  • religious and economic thought
  • the Enlightenment
  • the history of science.

Democracy and rights, war and empire, and toleration and persecution are all studied historically. You explore the ideas of thinkers through their literary texts and their practical contexts.

Genuinely interdisciplinary in approach, the course examines the interrelations between philosophy, politics, science, religion and literature in Britain, Europe, North America and China.

Full-time and part-time study

Choose to study this course full time or part time, to fit around your work and family life. Modules for the full-time course are listed below.

For details about the part-time course, contact us at 

How will I study?

Modules are taught in seminars, while specialist lectures, workshops and conferences organised by the Centre for Intellectual History give you access to cutting-edge historical research and debate.

A lunchtime seminar series provides training in research methodologies. Modules are assessed by term papers. You’ll also write a 20,000-word dissertation, supervised by an expert in the field.

Academic activities

History at Sussex has a thriving and animated research culture, with regular seminars, workshops and conferences on interdisciplinary research, and specific modules on research methods and skills. 

You’ll attend the Department of History’s weekly work-in-progress seminar throughout the academic year. 

Our postgraduate students run the well-established University of Sussex Journal of Contemporary History, an innovative online journal of creative and interdisciplinary historical research. 

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Working while you study

Our Careers and Employability Centre can help you find part-time work while you study. Find out more about career development and part-time work

Careers

An Intellectual History MA at Sussex will develop your skills in attention to detail, research, written communication and teamwork. Many of our graduates have gone on to careers in areas such as:

  • teaching, research and publishing
  • law and the Civil Service, 
  • museums, libraries and archives.

A number of our graduates opt to undertake further study.

Graduate destinations

92% of students from the Department of History were in work or further study six months after graduating. Our students have gone on to roles including:

  • visitor services, Harewood House Trust
  • data analyst, Deloitte
  • management consultant, InterConnect Communications.

(EPI, Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015 for postgraduates)



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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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What is the 'Master of Medieval and Renaissance Studies' all about? . The Master's Programme of Medieval and Renaissance Studies will stimulate your independent study skills within a wide range of issues ranging from philosophy, theology, law, history, literature and the arts. Read more

What is the 'Master of Medieval and Renaissance Studies' all about? 

The Master's Programme of Medieval and Renaissance Studies will stimulate your independent study skills within a wide range of issues ranging from philosophy, theology, law, history, literature and the arts. Specialised seminars will bring the cultural and intellectual history of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to life, with a particular emphasis on the Low Countries.

The programme draws on the combined expertise of various research groups and specialised centres at KU Leuven, including the Faculty of Arts for the History of the Middle Ages, Early Modern History and the Illuminare and Seminarium Philologiae Humanisticae centres), the Institute of Philosophy's (De Wulf-Mansion Centre for Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy, as well as Aristoteles Latinus), the Faculty of Theology and Religious Studies' group for the History of Church and Theology), and the Faculty of Law. All of these research groups and centres all play a role in this MA programme, which is monitored by the interfaculty Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Strengthened by KU Leuven's in-house expertise in ancient and modern languages and by its excellent library collections, you cannot ask for a better home to carry out your historical-philological research.

Spotlight

The Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at KU Leuven boasts a long academic tradition: founded in 1966, it stimulates and coordinates multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary research and graduate teaching in the history of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Reformation.

Strengthened by its expertise in ancient and modern languages, KU Leuven's historical-philological research strongly emphasises the interdisciplinary study of texts. In the Leuven context, special attention is devoted to the role of the Church and its stimulating influence on intellectual life in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Objectives

The aim of this one-year Master program is to prepare students for the independent study of the cultural and intellectual history of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance form a multi- and interdisciplinary point of view. Taking its point of departure in texts, the program is designed to address a wide spectrum of issues in the fields of language and literature, political thought, law, urban history, art history, philosophy, history of the church and theology, history of education and science. Special attention is devoted to the relation between text and image, the afterlife of Antiquity, and the significance of the Low Countries in the cultural and intellectual history of Western Europe.

Graduates will:

  • exhibit sufficient familiarity with manuscripts or old editions, the publishing of texts, their interpretation, and/or the study of illustrations;
  • be able to independently formulate and research a problem, and present the results in an adequate manner;
  • exhibit competence in innovative and groundbreaking research and be in a position to make a contribution to the process of knowledge development and situate the contribution culturally and historically.

Career perspectives

Our graduates go on to find employment as researchers, academic and professionals in the cultural sector.

Graduates from the programme are well placed for positions in university research projects, academic appointments and career positions in the cultural sector.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study History at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA by Research in History is a research degree pursued over one year full-time or two years part-time. Students on the History research programme undertake research under the supervision of History staff, and produce a thesis that makes an original contribution to knowledge and understanding of some aspect of the past.

Key Features of the MA by Research in History

The expertise of the Department of History and Classics spans from the ancient cultures and languages of ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the history of late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Europe. The research of our staff and postgraduates is integral to the life of the Department of History and Classics, and it means that Swansea is a dynamic, exciting, and stimulating place to study.

History and Classics is part of the Research Institute for the Arts and Humanities (RIAH: http://www.swansea.ac.uk/riah/), which organises a large number of seminars, conferences, and other research activities. There are also a number of research groups which act as focal points for staff and postgraduates, including: the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales, Centre for Ancient Narrative Literature (KYKNOS), Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research (MEMO), and the Centre for research into Gender in Culture and Society (GENCAS).

As a student of the History research programme you have access to skills and training programmes offered by the College of Arts and Humanities and the University.

The MA by Research in History is ideal for those who would like to do an initial research degree, either as a stand-alone culmination to their studies or with a view to further, subsequent research, e.g. in form of a PhD. Research proposals are invited on any topic in medieval, early modern, or modern history for which staff can provide supervision.

For informal enquiries regarding the MA by research in History programme please contact: Dr Fritz-Gregor Herrmann ().

Research Interests

Research interests in the Department of History and Classics include:

Medieval History

• The Anglo-Norman ‘Realm’ and the Angevin Empire

• Capetian France, especially the monarchy, aristocracy, and religious orders

• The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade

• Charters and the documentary records of medieval France and England

• The Mediterranean world, especially the Crusades, later medieval Italian society and politics, and the Italian Renaissance, including art history

• England and Wales in the central and late Middle Ages, including the aristocracy and gentry, the Welsh Marches, urban history, law and crime, women and the law, religious belief and practice, and education and literacy

• Gender and the life cycle in late medieval Europe

• Medieval frontier societies and borderlands, and concepts of frontiers from the late Roman Empire to the present day

Early Modern History

• Most aspects of British history between 1500 and 1800, especially religious, scientific, cultural and gender history

• The history of health and medicine in early modern Britain

• History of Disabilities

• The Portuguese Empire

• The Reformation and Counter-Reformation

• Science, intellectual life, collecting and museums in early modern Europe

• The social history of early modern sex and marriage

• Crime and witchcraft

• The Enlightenment, republicanism and international relations in the eighteenth century

Modern History

• Most aspects of Welsh history, especially industrial society

• The cultural, intellectual and urban history of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century Britain

• Modern international history

• The United States since 1750, in particular slavery, the South and the Civil War

• The economic and imperial history of Britain in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

• Emigration and urbanisation in the British Isles between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries

• The political history of the UK since 1800

• Military and society in Europe between 1750 and 1815

• Austrian and German history in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries

• Austrian, German and Central European history, especially in the fields of urban, labour and post-1945 history

• Modern economic history

• Quantitative aspects of British economic growth from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries

• Anti-capitalist and socialist political economy

• Policing and police forces in twentieth-century Europe

• Italian fascism

• Allied Occupation of Italy

• Contemporary French and Italian social an d cultural history

• Memory studies and oral history of twentieth-century Europe

• History of protest and activism in the 1960s and 1970s



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The MLitt in Middle Eastern History is a taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History. Highlights. Students explore in depth a broad variety of historical topics including social, political, cultural and intellectual history of this crucially significant region of the world. Read more

The MLitt in Middle Eastern History is a taught postgraduate programme run by the School of History.

Highlights

  • Students explore in depth a broad variety of historical topics including social, political, cultural and intellectual history of this crucially significant region of the world.
  • Fields available to explore include: classical Islamic history (Umayyads and Abbasids); the Seljuks; the medieval Islamic east; mediaeval Anatolia; the Ayyubid and Mamluk Near East; Early Ottoman History; Mediaeval Armenia; Islamic intellectual history.
  • The course introduces students to methodological and analytical approaches, including Orientalism.

Teaching format

The course comprises two semesters of taught components followed by submission of a 15,000-word final dissertation.

Teaching methods include:

  • classroom lectures
  • textbook work
  • language exercises
  • tutorials
  • individual reading projects
  • essay assignments.

Class sizes range from individual supervision up to 12 students. The modules are assessed by coursework or a combination of coursework and examination.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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The European History MA is designed to encourage students to pursue their interests in European history in depth, at the same time as maintaining a broad view of the history of Europe and the region as a whole. Read more

The European History MA is designed to encourage students to pursue their interests in European history in depth, at the same time as maintaining a broad view of the history of Europe and the region as a whole.

About this degree

Students are introduced to different theoretical, methodological and historiographical approaches to writing European history. The chronology of the various components covers the ancient, medieval, early modern, modern and contemporary periods.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three taught elements: one core module (30 credits), compulsory European language module (15-30 credits), optional modules (30-45 credits), and dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Advanced Skills, Concepts and Theory for MA Historians
  • Modern European Language
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

Options available to students in 2017-18:

  • Weber for Historians
  • American History on Film
  • Continental Connections: Britain and Europe in the Eighteenth Century
  • Hollywood Genres
  • Britain and Decolonisation since 1945
  • Public History, Slavery, and the British Colonial Past
  • Gender and Sexuality in Modern Britain, c. 1850 to the present
  • Enlightenment Histories: History and Time in Eighteenth Century Thought and Culture
  • The Ottoman Mediterranean: Reform and Integration, 1800-1914
  • Paradoxes of Enlightenment
  • Latin America in Global Intellectual History
  • Theories of Totalitarianism
  • Colonialism in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Twentieth Century British History: Ideologies, Identities, Cultures, Controversies
  • Pornography, Obscenity and Politics in Europe since 1789
  • Crisis and Future in 19th Century European Thought
  • Students may also take modules from other UCL departments, subject to the approval of the degree tutor

This list is indicative only: not all modules are available every year.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a topic in European history which culminates in a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and a language module taught either through the UCL Centre for Language & International Education or through the language departments. Students will be assessed by a variety of methods including unseen written examination, oral assessment, written coursework and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: European History MA

Careers

This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector. Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future career. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Adoption Policy Adviser, Civil Service Fast Stream
  • Document Specialist, Sektor Solutions
  • Research Co-ordinator, UCL
  • PhD in History, University of St Andrews
  • Digitization Assistant, Dalhousie University

Employability

The programme is designed to enable students to obtain training specifically aimed at further research in the field of European history, by introducing them to the remarkable range of historical sources available in London, and equipping them with the skills needed to locate and interpret sources relevant to their particular areas of interest.

The analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading historians.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg Institute and the Institute of Historical Research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This MA draws on the wide range and depth of research and teaching expertise in UCL History to give students the opportunity to choose modules relating to a variety of historical periods and locations. Read more

This MA draws on the wide range and depth of research and teaching expertise in UCL History to give students the opportunity to choose modules relating to a variety of historical periods and locations. The programme offers advanced-level teaching by leading practitioners in a range of fields.

About this degree

Students will be introduced to key historical concepts and theories. The core course offers a forum for such debates, and also provides students with the technical and intellectual apparatus to pursue their own research interests under expert guidance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), between two and four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • History Dissertation
  • Advanced Skills, Concepts and Theory for MA Historians

Optional modules

Optional modules will be finalised in Spring 2018. Please contact the department for more information. The following optional modules were available in 2017/18 and this is an indicative list only:

  • Weber for Historians
  • American History on Film
  • Continental Connections: Britain and Europe in the Eighteenth Century
  • Hollywood Genres
  • Britain and Decolonization since 1945
  • Public History, Slavery, and the British Colonial Past
  • Gender and Sexuality in Modern Britain, c. 1850 to the present
  • Enlightenment Histories: History and Time in Eighteenth Century Thought and Culture
  • The Ottoman Mediterranean: Reform and Integration, 1800-1914
  • Paradoxes of Enlightenment
  • Latin America in Global Intellectual History
  • Theories of Totalitarianism
  • Colonialism in Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Twentieth Century British History: Ideologies, Identities, Cultures, Controversies
  • Pornography, Obscenity and Politics in Europe since 1789
  • Crisis and Future in Nineteenth Century European Thought
  • Students may also be able to select modules from the Ancient History or Medieval and Renaissance Studies curricula, and from other departments in UCL

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project on a topic in History, which culminates in a dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Some sessions will take place outside UCL in institutions such as the British Library, the National Archives, and the Institute of Historical Research. Students are assessed through written coursework, examination, and the dissertation.

Detailed module information

See full details of modules for this programme.

Careers

This programme not only provides an outstanding foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, but is also popular with students wishing to go into journalism, the civil service, business, museum and heritage and the education sector.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Curator, Pusan National University Musuem
  • Journalist, World News Media
  • Press Officer, HM Treasury
  • Secondary School Teacher (Head of History), Sutton High School
  • PhD in History, University of Cambridge

Employability

Debates, small group seminars and tutorials help students to acquire strong presentation and negotiation skills for their future careers. Likewise the analytical and research skills gained by students on this programme are highly valued by employers from a range of industries. There are many additional activities available, both within the department and the wider UCL community, to help students focus on employability skills whilst they are here, for example departmental careers talks and networking opportunities with history alumni.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading historians.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg and the Institute of Historical Research. UCL is ideally located at the heart of various historical societies and academic communities.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: History

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History). (MA title is subject to approval). The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. Read more
Taught jointly by the Leo Baeck Institute and the Department of History)

(MA title is subject to approval)

The Leo Baeck MA is the only taught postgraduate programme in the UK focusing on the rich field of European Jewish History. It trains scholars towards undertaking independent research on Jewish history, culture and thought in Europe. You will consider patterns of inclusion and exclusion and questions of citizenship and emancipation. The MA will introduce you to a wide range of sources for European Jewish studies. Particular attention will be paid to the Jewish response to modernity and problems around issues of assimilation and identity. The role of antisemitism and the origins of the holocaust are central, as is Jewish intellectual history, in particular the ideas of eminent Jewish thinkers about the place of Jews and Judaism in premodern and modern society.

Programme outline
The MA consists of the core module, three modules chosen from a series of options and an individually supervised dissertation. Students will also take a non-assessed research methods module. Part-time students
take the core module and one option in the first year, and two options and dissertation in the second year.

Optional modules may include:

Modern Jewish History and Culture
Christians and Jews in Europe: Perceptions and Encounters, 1100-1600
Jews, Power and Intellectual History
Antisemitism and the Holocaust
Modern European Jewish Literature
Hollywood and the Second World War
Understanding Religion Historically
Overcoming Nazism

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History MA is a stimulating programme that offers students the opportunity to create individual study pathways through time, space and methodology. Read more

History MA is a stimulating programme that offers students the opportunity to create individual study pathways through time, space and methodology. Pathways can be chronological (medieval, early modern or modern), geographical (European, transnational, international) or methodological (e.g. cultural or, economic and social history). Alternatively, students can maximise choice by exploiting the diverse range of courses on offer. All students undertake robust theoretical and methodological training, accredited by the Economic and Social Research Council. Vocational training opportunities are promoted through work placement, `Public History' and documentary film-making modules. The Manchester History MA also offers an innovative suite of thematic courses that transcend orthodox boundaries to facilitate intellectual breadth and imagination. As integrated members of the research community, Manchester MA History students engage with outstanding researchers, resources and facilities.

Coursework and assessment

All History MA Programmes comprise of 180 credits:

  • Advanced Course-work: 90 credits;
  • Research Training: 30 credits;
  • Dissertation: 60 credits.

Taught courses are generally assessed by a 6000-word essay per 30-credit unit (this will vary for the quantitative and qualitative research methods units).

Our courses are interactive, and the small seminar is the rule. Normally students and sometimes staff present papers to form the basis of lively discussion - not an invariable experience at an undergraduate seminar!

Research and writing of the dissertation are undertaken from Spring through to August. Supervision is offered at least until July.

The degree is awarded at Pass, Merit, and Distinction levels

Course unit details

History MA maximises the strengths of Manchester's vibrant research community: 30 members of staff with world class expertise in medieval, early modern and modern history, stretching across national and international boundaries, with strong representation in economic, social and cultural approaches to history. History MA offers students the opportunity to range across this expertise or to specialise. 

Specialist pathways include Modern European History, World History, Modern British History, Early Modern History, Medieval History, Cultural History or Economic and Social History. Each of these areas is represented in advanced, core modules (accredited by the ESRC). All students take one of these modules. History MA offers outstanding doctoral research preparation training through the core module and skills training programme. Skills training can be tailored to specialist interest with language training, including Latin, and palaeography or methods training in social science. History MA skills training also equips students to pursue the MA dissertation, a major piece of original research. This year, the Board of Examiners commended the exceptional quality of research, highlighting dissertations that were `publishable'. 

Students applying to the MA are eligible to apply for AHRC and ESRC funding. 

New opportunities in `Public history' and work placement facilitate a vocational pathway through the programme by promoting transferable skills and focusing on the significance of history in heritage, social policy, third sector work and the media.

Additional to core courses, students take four optional modules. Options in History are organised chronologically and geographically but also include a suite of innovative thematic courses, for example, on material culture, that transcend orthodox boundaries. History has a strong record in promoting interdisciplinary study and students may select options from across the School or other faculties with permission.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Apart from PhD research, the high standard of arts research training, both formal and practical (in the dissertation), opens doors to many kinds of modern public and private sector graduate employments requiring research skill, formulation of projects and policy documents, etc.

Our new and popular Work Placement Scheme (introduced 2014-15) offers our students the opportunity to gain valuable work experience and learn about history in practice, in one of our partner institutions in the Manchester area. Examples include: Manchester Histories Festival, People's History Museum, Chetham's Library and University History and Heritage.



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The aim of this course is to put something very big under the microscope. . Read more

The aim of this course is to put something very big under the microscope. 

By expanding the scale at which historians would normally operate, our Global History MA will present you with an opportunity to think with growing confidence and imagination about your world, its origins, its complexities and continuous transformations across a uniquely broad geographical and chronological scope.

You will be taught the latest skills, concepts and approaches to the subject, and you will share in the imaginative challenges and intellectual vistas that this exciting new field of history is opening up. It is from this largest of historical perspectives that you will be invited to choose your own specialist research topic, culminating in a supervised 15,000-word dissertation.

Times Higher Education ranked the Department of History first in the country for its performance in the latest Research Excellence Framework exercise.

Course details

You will study two course-specific core modules:

  • Global Histories: Comparisons and Connections
  • The Making of the World: Themes in Global History

Both of these modules are team-taught, drawing on the diverse regional and chronological expertise available in the Department of History. Tutors include: Dr Arezou AzadDr Jakub BenesDr Courtney CampbellDr Michelle ChresfieldDr Simon JacksonDr Christopher MarkiewiczDr Sadiah QureshiDr Daniel ReynoldsDr Lucie RyzovaDr Margaret SmallDr Kate SmithProf. Naomi StandenDr Frank UekotterDr Simon Yarrow; and Dr Shirley Ye.

You will also study two core modules focused on developing your research skills:

  • Historical Methods: Research Skills
  • Research Methods and Skills: Dissertation Preparation

Full descriptions of these four modules are available below.

You will also choose two optional modules, or a double special-subject module, from a wide range available across the Department of History.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by written assignment. You will also complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Learning and teaching

Learning and teaching takes on this course place via seminars, tutorials, reading texts on theory and methods and your own research on primary sources and secondary material.

Support with academic writing

As a postgraduate student in the College of Arts and Law, you have access to the Academic Writing Advisory Service (AWAS) which aims to help your transition from undergraduate to taught Masters level, or back into academia after time away. The service offers guidance on writing assignments and dissertations for your MA/MSc programme with individual support from an academic writing advisor via tutorials, email and the provision of online materials.

International students can access support for English Language development and skills through the Birmingham International Academy (BIA).

Employability

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University.

The University's Careers Network provides advice and information specifically for postgraduates that will help you to develop an effective career and skills development strategy, and to make the most of your time with us at the University. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated careers and employability team to deliver tailored programmes of careers events and local support.

You will have opportunities to: meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs; attend employer presentations and skills workshops; receive individual guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique; and access to comprehensive listings of hundreds of graduate jobs and work experience opportunities.

You will also be able to access our full range of careers support for up to two years after graduation.

Postgraduate employability: History

Birmingham’s History graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills that are highly valued by a range of employers. These skills include: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on statistical research.

Some of our History postgraduates go on to use their studies directly, for example in heritage, museums or the armed forces; others use their transferable skills in a range of occupations from finance, to publishing, to fundraising. Employers that graduates have gone on to work for include: Royal Air Force; Ministry of Defence; University of Birmingham; Big Lottery Fund; Royal Air Force Museum; and University of Oxford.



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Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the early modernists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the early modern world from the mid-fifteenth century through to the early nineteenth. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of early modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Early Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of early modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of industrial revolution, of vernacular architecture and of early modern globalisation. Early Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the History of Medicine, consumer culture, print and information, court culture, ecclesiastical and intellectual history, and political thought. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Early Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

Archives and Sources (15 credits)
Issues in Early Modern History (30 credits)
*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)

Critical Practice (15 credits)
Option module (30 credits)

Easter Term (April-June)

Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9199&title=Early+Modern+History&code=V1K607&type=MA&year=2016#essentials; a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Early Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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