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Masters Degrees (Intangible Heritage)

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The ways in which we understand and manage ‘heritage’ are changing rapidly, while the physical remains of our past – buildings, landscapes, city streets, archives, artefacts and archaeological sites – and the intangible associations of tradition, language and memory continue to shape the ways in which we live our lives. Read more
The ways in which we understand and manage ‘heritage’ are changing rapidly, while the physical remains of our past – buildings, landscapes, city streets, archives, artefacts and archaeological sites – and the intangible associations of tradition, language and memory continue to shape the ways in which we live our lives.

This course poses challenging questions about our thinking and practice, and offers students the opportunity to explore this through a series of practical projects, working in partnership with a wide range of local, regional and national heritage organisations. We will help you set heritage in its social, political and economic context, and support you in a series of placements so that you can see how this plays out on the ground, for real.

“I want to know the relationship between this wooden object ... and where it has been. I want to be able to reach the handle of the door and turn it and feel it open. I want to be able to walk into each room where this object has lived, to feel the volume of the space, to know what pictures were on the walls, how the light fell from the windows. And I want to know whose hands it has been in, and what they felt and thought about it – if they thought about it. I want to know what it has witnessed.”
Edmund de Waal, The Hare with Amber Eyes: A Hidden Inheritance (Chatto & Windus, 2010)

The hare with amber eyes – a tiny Japanese netsuke – is part of de Waal’s personal inheritance, knotted into the threads of family and world history, but the questions he asks of it belong to us all.

We will ask these questions of historic buildings, museum collections, parks and gardens, archaeological sites, public and private archives. We will consider the ways in which these resources are managed, presented and explained, and explores these through a series of encounters with heritage practitioners and heritage places. What challenges are heritage bodies currently facing? What choices do they make in dealing with them? How will pressures on public funding for heritage in the UK – and further afield – shape our experience of visiting and working in museums and heritage sites in the future? And how will our wider understanding of heritage change as a result?

Trying to answer such questions provides a framework for practical work in the sector, underpinned by hands-on, supportive teaching. As well as thinking about heritage, we want you to become involved in a range of projects, working with our extensive range of partners, and to gain experience on the ground. Examples of current placements and projects include English Heritage, the World Heritage Sites at Avebury and the City of Bath, Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum, Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, HMS Victory, ss Great Britain, the Roman Baths Museum and Churches Conservation Trust.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course will be delivered mainly through intensive workshops. These will be complemented by guest lectures, offering you the chance to become involved in thinking about major heritage issues as they develop, or meetings with leading players in the sector. We also work closely with other departments within the University – for example, Business and Management and Publishing – to supplement and enhance our heritage teaching.

We make extensive use of the extraordinary heritage of Bath and the surrounding area, including the University’s own campuses at Corsham Court, where this course is based. There are two World Heritage Sites on the University’s doorstep: the iconic landscape of Stonehenge and Avebury and the City of Bath itself; and we have links with a wide range of different organisations across the country.

MODULES

Developing Heritage Thinking
This module introduces the key concepts we will use throughout the course, and provides the basis for asking how far heritage practice has kept pace with changes in heritage thinking and in society, politics and the economy. It draws on the extensive body of literature on heritage issues but, most importantly, encourages you to develop your own heritage thinking.

Policy, Strategy and Structures
What is the impact of heritage policy and strategy on current practice? How has this evolved over time? How might heritage policy develop in future?

Heritage Management: Practice and Planning
This module focuses on major areas of current practice, taught by leading practitioners in the field.

Understanding Current Practice
This research module involves the application of current thinking and policy to heritage practice. It is intended to take you beneath the surface of a new gallery, a restored garden, or a period interior, and ask you to consider: why this? It will enable you to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which the heritage sector really works, and the constraints it must work within.

Supported Placement
This might involve work on a specific project, or a broader introduction to the work of a particular organisation. We see this as the focal point of the course, and potentially of enormous value to you and to the organisations with whom you’ll be working.
Final project or dissertation

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Careers in the heritage sector include roles in collections management, education and learning, exhibition planning and implementation, community engagement and outreach, and marketing and fundraising. You might also become involved in operational management, events planning, retail and visitor services.

Not everyone will want a job in the ‘heritage industry’ and competition for jobs is fierce. Therefore, the course includes a range of generic skills and opportunities which are aimed at increasing employability for Bath Spa postgraduates in the voluntary sector, social enterprises, fundraising, and a wide range of administrative and management roles. As well as studying heritage management, you will be fostering links with external partners and with other departments across the University. These may be the connections which help lead you into other roles, including the third sector, cultural industries and tourism, or to self-employment.

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This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Read more
This MA covers practical and theoretical approaches to the key issues and working practices in the field of cultural heritage. Students benefit from the Institute of Archaeology's emphasis on the role of heritage in today's society, from the art and archaeology collections of UCL, and from the unrivalled resources of London's museums.

Degree information

Students are introduced to theoretical issues involved in cultural heritage and develop a critical understanding of the social and political context in which the processes for managing cultural heritage operate. The flexible programme structure allows students to design a theoretically based or practically based degree depending on each individual's needs and interests.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core module (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - students are required to take the following core modules:
-Critical Perspectives on Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development

Optional modules - students then choose to follow futher option choices to the value of 60 credits. At least 30 credits must be taken from the list below. The remaining 30 credits may also come from this list or can be chosen from the outstanding range of Master's option choices offered by the UCL Institute of Archaeology.
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Archaeologies of Modern Conflict
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Traditions
-Cultural Memory
-Funerary Archaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, site visits and guest lectures, and includes a 20-day placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. Assessment is through essays, projects reports, a heritage agency report following the placement, and the dissertation.

Placement
Students have the option to do a 20-day voluntary placement in a museum or other cultural heritage organisation. In recent years, these placements have included organisations such as English Heritage, The National Trust, Historic Royal Palaces, ICOMOS (Paris), World Monuments Fund (Paris), UNESCO World Heritage Centre (Paris) and the Museum of London. The placement is not formally assessed.

Careers

Recent graduates of this programme have gone on to work in policy areas and project areas for national and international organisations, such as English Heritage, the National Trust, ICOMOS and UNESCO. They have also worked in development control, consultancies (such as Atkins Global), and in museums, site interpretation and education. Many students have also gone on to further research in academic institutions around the world, such as Stanford, Athens and Leiden, or here at UCL.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Adult Learning officer, Museum of London
-Garden of Reason Assistant, Ham House and Garden
-Museum Curator, Haysrim Museum
-Researcher, Museo Nacional de Colombia (Colombian National Museum)
-Art and Finance, Sotheby's Institute of Arts, London

Employability
Graduates have a critical understanding of both the theoretical and operational aspects of heritage and its use of the past to enrich the present for the public. The interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage studies leads to creativity and initiative. Graduates are highly motivated and articulate. They have an acute awareness of the moral and ethical issues that are inherent in cultural heritage which contributes to skilful negotiation of contested matters. These abilities are valued by employers and heritage agencies and contribute to innovative exhibitions, educational activities, public programming and policy and strategy development. The breadth of the degree widens the spectrum of employment opportunities.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook and membership, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. The institute's outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

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World Heritage, both tangible and intangible, increasingly affects a significant proportion of the world’s population. It is now an essential concept for all engaged in the protection, development and management of heritage. Read more
World Heritage, both tangible and intangible, increasingly affects a significant proportion of the world’s population.

It is now an essential concept for all engaged in the protection, development and management of heritage.

This unique one-year programme is aimed at those who wish to acquire both a deeper understanding of the concepts and processes surrounding World Heritage in its cultural forms (tangible and intangible), its natural forms and as cultural landscapes. This course will provide you with necessary skills that will allow you to critically appraise and effectively manage World Heritage and its impacts in a sustainable manner. It is linked to the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage site, providing you with a unique academic experience and offering you access to unrivalled resources and over 25 years of management expertise.

As well as providing you with an excellent grounding for working in the heritage sector, the course offers ideal preparation for PhD study.

The programme also features an overseas visit. This is likely to be to the World Heritage Centre at UNESCO, Paris, to learn directly of the challenges of linking the protection and conservation of Sites with present and future environmental, social and economic needs.

You will study five core modules:

Critical Approaches to Heritage
Issues in World Heritage Management
Tourism Management at World Heritage Sites
World Heritage Case Study
Research Skills and Methods

You will also choose one optional module from a selection. The list of available modules in any one year can vary, depending on staff specialisms and availability. Modules available typically include:

Heritage Interpretation
Heritage Conservation Management
Heritage Management Practices

You will complete the MA with a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice, relevant to World Heritage.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?. Read more
Are you fascinated by history and culture? Want to help shape today's cultural landscape? Find out what defines “heritage”? Learn how museums plan exhibitions or how heritage policies are created?

Memory produces identity. That is why heritage is crucial for our sense of continuity in rapidly changing societies.Governments, national and international organizations need to make sense of the past as they make policies for and invest in heritage. The aim of this master's degree is to give you the theoretical and practical education necessary to take an active role in this exciting and growing field.

Why study heritage at a faculty of Theology and Religious Studies? Because most of the heritage around us stems, one way or another, from religious practices and ideas. If you want to understand heritage in all its facets, you want to study with experts who know the full story behind material and intangible heritages both locally and abroad.

The track Religion and Cultural Heritage in the Master's Programme in Theology and Religious Studies combines broad cultural competence with a high-level academic research training and the practical skills relevant for today's job market. Through concrete projects and internships, you can gain hands-on experience in the field.

Why Groningen?

• rated best Master's programme in Theology & Religious Studies in the Netherlands
• top 100 university
• unique focus on religion within the field of cultural heritage
• combination of broad cultural competence and academic research skills with practical skills relevant for job market;
• strong heritage region
• excellent network for internships
• taught by internationally recognized experts in the field
• vibrant research hub with global links

Job perspectives

You can advise or write policy documents on heritage subjects, such as the preservation of old churches or the distribution of funding for cultural activities. You could work for cultural organisations, the government, in the tourist business or at an NGO. You may also work in the media or as a teacher of religion in secondary education after completing your Educational Master's programme.

Would you like to stay in academia, you can choose to apply for a placement in the Research Master.

Job examples

• Cultural Education
You can work within organizations that consult upon the content and organization within the field of arts and cultural education. Or you could work at an educational department within institutions such as a cultural centers or museums.

• Consulting & Policy
Your knowledge about religious heritage will enable you to advise upon or write policy documents on the conservation of religious heritage. You could find a job with central government but also at organizations and foundations in the cultural sector. This could, for example, be the Museum Catharijneconvent in Utrecht or the Stichting Oude Groninger Kerken.

• Education
Once you have completed this Master's track, you will have sufficient knowledge of the subject to be able to teach Religious Studies or Social Studies in secondary education. Alternatively, you could opt for a position in higher vocational education. As you also need didactic skills as a teacher or lecturer, it is advisable to do a Master's in Education after you have completed your regular Master's programme.

• Media & Journalism
A number of publishers have shown renewed interest in religion and society. With your knowledge and skills, you can make an expert contribution to publications in this field. You could also use your expertise as an editor at a broadcasting company, newspaper or current affairs magazine.

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The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

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There are two routes through the MA. -The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation. -The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report. Read more
There are two routes through the MA:
-The Cultural Heritage Research route which concludes with a dissertation.
-The Professional Practice Route which concludes with an analytical case study report.

Course modules

Cultural Heritage, Communities and Identities:
This module will explore the conceptual, intellectual and philosophical frameworks for tangible and intangible cultural heritages. Students will explore the social roles of cultural heritage in relation to community, identity and memory and examine the political, legal and economic context in which heritage institutions exist. Heritage will be debated in the context of conservation, tourism and sustainability.
Managing Cultural Heritage in Context (double unit running through two terms):
This module will draw on case studies and seminars from international heritage organisations including World Heritage Sites. Students will participate in student-led seminars in which each student will develop a case study including consideration of education and outreach in cultural heritage. It includes management of cultural heritage including strategic planning, financial management, people, collection and site management and disaster preparedness. A project-based placement (or equivalent) provides a professional practice element.
Dissertation or Analytical Case Study Report:
The programme concludes with a choice of modules. Students wanting to work in the profession may choose to prepare detailed and fully justified analytical case study report in a country or site of their choice. Students wishing to continue to explore theoretical issues in this complex subject or plan to pursue a career in other contexts, including taking a higher level degree, may choose the Dissertation module

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The Master of Museum and Heritage Studies is designed to equip graduates with professional knowledge and practical experience consistent with pathways to employment in museums and the growing area of local and global heritage. Read more
The Master of Museum and Heritage Studies is designed to equip graduates with professional knowledge and practical experience consistent with pathways to employment in museums and the growing area of local and global heritage. Now is an especially important time for research, teaching and debate within the discipline, as the museums and heritage industries are in a period of dynamic change and growth around the world. If you are considering further study and an academic career, there is also a pathway to further research in a higher degree such as a PhD.

The program explores collections, cultural processes and strategies that societies use to conserve, communicate and engage with museums and heritage, both tangible (for example, artefacts, buildings, landscapes and monuments) and intangible (for example, memories, cultural practices, crafts, drama, songs and skills). It examines how objects and heritage places are contested, managed and conserved both in the past and today. The program is concerned with the material objects, cultural practices, events and performances through which meaning is constructed in museums and at heritage sites. It is interested in how the public engages with museums and heritage, including sites of trauma, commemoration and memorialisation, and how museums and heritage sites have become important components of economic and urban development strategies in many cities and regions around the world.

Your learning experience in the Master of Museum and Heritage Studies will be enriched by access to the wealth of resources offered by the University museum collections and their curatorial staff. In addition, the program fosters strong connections with academic and professional networks such as the International Council of Museums and Museums Australia.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The Cultural Heritage Studies program offers an interdepartmental and interdisciplinary MA program intended to educate individuals who wish to become heritage experts and practitioners. Read more

Course Description

The Cultural Heritage Studies program offers an interdepartmental and interdisciplinary MA program intended to educate individuals who wish to become heritage experts and practitioners. It is focused on developing aptitudes for the critical assessment of tangible and intangible cultural heritage as well as environmental heritage connected to human-nature interactions.

The program presents a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches with a strong emphasis on practical knowledge and skills. It offers two streams: Academic Research and Protection of Cultural Heritage and Cultural Heritage Management and Policy.
The program attracts students from a variety of related fields such as history, art history and management, archaeology, ethnography, anthropology, architecture, landscape design, monument protection, environmental science, and management studies.

DEPARTMENT OF MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The department provides intellectually challenging comparative and multidisciplinary postgraduate education on all aspects of the history and culture of the period between 300 and 1600 C.E. International faculty members cover Central and Western Europe as well as the Byzantine, Slavic, Jewish, Arab, and Ottoman worlds.

CAREER PATH

Graduates find employment in education and research, cultural institutions including museums and archives, as well as business and international organizations. Master’s students often continue their studies on the doctoral level at CEU and other international universities.

SCHOLARSHIPS

CEU is committed to attracting talented students and scholars from around the world. In 2014-2015, we provided generous funding to 80% of master’s and 92% of doctoral students, for which applicants from any country are eligible to apply.

For more information, see the contact information page: http://bit.ly/2iVly1w

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Choreomundus is an Erasmus Mundus programme that investigates dance and other movement systems (ritual practices, martial arts, games and physical theatre) as intangible cultural heritage. Read more

Summary

Choreomundus is an Erasmus Mundus programme that investigates dance and other movement systems (ritual practices, martial arts, games and physical theatre) as intangible cultural heritage.

It is offered by a consortium of four universities (in Norway, France, Hungary and the UK) recognised for their leadership in the development of innovative curricula for the analysis of dance. The Choreomundus programme will help you make sense of intangible heritage within the post-colonial culturally diverse world of the 21st century. The programme will help you develop an appreciation of dance that is comparative, cross-cultural, applied and embodied.

The universities that participate in this programme are Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (NTNU) as the coordinating institution Plaise Pascal University (UBP), Clermont-Ferrand, France, Scientific University of Szeged, Hungary (SZTE), University of Roehampton, London, UK (URL), in connection with their groundbreaking Masters in ethnochoreology/dance anthropology, led respectively by Professors Egil Bakka, Georgiana Wierre-Gore, László Felföldi, and Andrée Grau.

The Department is home to the internationally-recognised Centre for Dance Research, which foregrounds the research of dance as cultural and artistic expression beyond, and including, theatre performance. Through seminars, forums and conferences involving staff and international invited guests, the centre supports a compelling research culture.

We also have excellent links with dance companies and creative organisations. In easy reach of London’s vibrant dance scene, the campus has superb studios and a state-of-the-art theatre for dance students.

Content

In the first semester all students start in Norway for an induction and an intensive course. For the rest of the first academic year, they are divided between NTNU Trondheim and UBP Clermont-Ferrand, and then spend their third semester in Hungary, and the fourth and final semester at the University of Roehampton. Students who successfully complete the programme will be awarded a joint Masters degree from all four universities.

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The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector. Read more

Introduction

The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector.
The course offers an ideal balance between the practical and intellectual elements of heritage and heritage policy. Students both explore cultural, natural, tangible and intangible heritage through the lens of environmental history, whilst also developing a strong practical skills-base.

The course provides
- a foundation in the concepts, ideas, theory, practice and application of heritage and heritage policy
- skills in the principal subject areas contributing to the study of cultural and natural heritage
- advanced study in the main subject areas of candidates’ primary disciplines
- training in appropriate quantitative and qualitative research, interpretative and presentational methodologies.

Students have the opportunity to work with members of staff on a one to one basis, and experience the Scottish cultural and natural environments first-hand on a number of field trips designed to enhance class based teaching. The course of study prepares students in the concepts and ideas of the field and in one year enables them to investigate issues such as:
- Protected Spaces/Legislative Framework
- Designation; Heritage, Identity and Place
- ‘The Highlands and the Roots of Green Consciousness’
- World Heritage and National Parks
- Public Relations and Marketing and Interpretation Media
- and apply their skills in an individual research project.

Placement opportunities will be available in a range of venues across the sector. These will include heritage attractions and outdoor centres, museums, galleries and libraries, NGOs, and private sector industry partners.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Catherine Mills

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Depending on module content, delivery is by weekly, three-hour seminar or workshop and/or field visit/class. Assessment for both 30-credit core modules and 15-credit options is 100% coursework including assessed oral presentations, plus a 15,000-word traditional dissertation (100% of final grade) or work-based project portfolio (70% of the final grade) and a 5,000-word critical essay (30% of final grade)

Employability

This course is designed to produce graduates with advanced skills for careers in the Cultural and Natural Heritage sectors, particularly in cultural heritage resource management and curation, interpretation and presentation of heritage, promotion and marketing of heritage, and sustainable tourism. Typical careers would include management roles within NGOs working in the cultural and natural heritage sectors, National Parks authorities, local and national government agencies, and heritage-focused charities (especially historic and built environment), senior education, interpretation and marketing roles in similar bodies. It is also designed to provide an advanced-level academic qualification for those already employed within the sector seeking professional development opportunities for the step into middle and upper management roles.

Industry connections

Projects with OLP Dunblane museum and Innerpeffrey library.

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The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. Read more
The new African Studies degrees at UCL draw on world-leading research and expertise from across the university relating to the study of Africa. The African Studies with Heritage MA draws on UCL's expertise in archaeology, anthropology and heritage studies to provide an essential background to African pasts and provides a critical framework for assessing the management and protection of heritage resources in Africa.

Degree information

The degree pathways share a common core, comprising modules on the continent’s political and economic past and present, together with training in research methods. In addition, the Heritage pathway offers a range of optional modules drawn from the Departments of Anthropology, Archaeology and Geography, and includes research into museums and sites, intangible heritage, local community histories, archaeology, and the presentation and preservation of cultural materials.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules:
-Africa: Dialogues of Past and Present
-Debating Africa's Future
-Research Methods in African Studies

Optional modules - students choose three from a range of options including the following:
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeology and Education
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Critical Perspectives of Cultural Heritage
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Historical Geographies of the African Diaspora in Britain
-Managing Archaeological Sites
-Managing Museums
-Museum and Site Interpretation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars and guided independent research. Assessment is through essays, portfolio, research proposal and examination.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to take up positions with national and international policy-making bodies, non-governmental development organisations, within national ministries and in the heritage/museums sector.

Employability
Students will develop skills in research and research ethics, thematic debate, archival work, ethnographic field techniques, presentation, and knowledge of key heritage issues (including resource management, African material culture and conservation issues).

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a unique teaching and learning environment in which to study the continent of Africa. More than 35 permanent members of UCL academic staff focus their research primarily on Africa and their field activities span the continent.

African Studies marks the first time existing expertise on Africa at UCL has been combined to offer an interdisciplinary degree.

The programme interweaves the study of the pre-colonial past, the colonial era, and the post-colonial present, with an eye to the future. Modules are arranged thematically around ‘debates’, with lectures presenting a long-term view of issues to frame subsequent seminar discussions.

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This unique programme has been designed for students wishing to combine an interest in music and related cultural performance with advocacy and social development practice. Read more
This unique programme has been designed for students wishing to combine an interest in music and related cultural performance with advocacy and social development practice. Students will build critical understanding of how music’s agentive and imaginative capacities act in different contexts - e.g. human rights, forced migration, health, and environmental justice - to communicate needs and interests, and to mobilize action.

Students will have the opportunity to build the programme around their specific interests by drawing on optional courses from a range of disciplines, while also developing an understanding of the musical practices of Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

The programme is particularly suitable for students wishing to deepen their understanding of social and cultural theory and to develop applied research skills. It appeals to those wishing to develop a career in the international NGO sector, in arts-based public sector programmes (e.g. UNESCO) and in arts policy. Students interested in research may proceed to MPhil/PhD in ethnomusicology or allied disciplines.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/music/programmes/ma-music-in-development/

Structure

Programme Specification -

The MA Music in Development programme involves taking three courses and writing a 11,000-word dissertation. In addition to these formal elements, students are expected to attend regular postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities.

Course Detail:
The four formal elements of the MA Music in Development programme are:

- The full unit core course Music in Development: Taught as a weekly two-hour lecture with additional tutorials. Part-time students must take this in their first year.

- The Dissertation in Music: A special study 11,000 words in length on a topic agreed with the candidate's supervisor. Part-time students normally take this in their final year.

Teaching & Learning

The aim of the programme is to develop:

1. critical understanding of music as a culturally embedded system that has wide-ranging application as a communication tool and process in a variety of development contexts;

2. a critical understanding of relevant theories in Ethnomusicology and allied disciplines, such as Development Studies and Anthropology;

3. a critical understanding of participatory research methodologies and applications;

4. the development of workshop modelling and management skills aimed at linking musical performances and meanings to social action and advocacy work; and

5. a critical knowledge of the musical practices, meanings and performance contexts from select regions of the world.

The programme is designed to prepare students for entry into a range of professional sectors, namely International Development, Social Music Therapies, Cultural Research and Policy, Sound and Audio-Visual Archiving, Media for Development, and documentation and research for the UNESCO Intangible Heritage Programme.

Employment

An MA in Music in Development from SOAS gives students greater intercultural awareness and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. Read more
This MA provides a broad academic and professional training in all aspects of museum work, and encourages students to reflect on the concept of the museum and its associated practices. The programme looks at all types of museum, from art galleries to science museums, without concentrating on any particular kind.

Degree information

Students are equipped with a range of skills that they can apply in any museum and develop critically aware perspectives on professional practice and research processes. The programme's main aim is to provide an in-depth understanding of approaches to the research, documentation, communication, interpretation, presentation and preservation of curated materials in museums, while responding to their audiences and communities.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), work placement (15 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-The Museum: Critical Perspectives
-Managing Museums
-Collections Management and Care
-Museum Communication

Optional modules - students also choose further options to the value of 30 credits from the following:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Collections Curatorship
-Cultural Heritage, Globalisation and Development
-Cultural Memory
-Exhibition Project
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Oral History from Creation to Curation

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a museological topic which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars, practical workshops, museum visits and guest speakers. Students are required to undertake a work placement for a total of 20 days. Assessment is through coursework assignments, projects, essays, field reports, portfolio and the dissertation.

Placement
Students are required to undertake a 20 days' work in a museum (or similar institution). This usually takes place one day per week during term-time, although other arrangements may be possible. Students write an assessed 2,500 word report at the end of the placement reflecting on their experience.

Recent placements have included: Brent Museum, the British Museum, Croydon Museum, Event Communications, the Freud Museum, Hackney Museum, London Transport Museum, the Museum of London, RAF Museums, the Royal Academy, Royal Botanical Gardens, Royal Historical Palaces, St Paul's Cathedral, Tate Britain, UCL Museums & Collections.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone to do complete a PhD while others have pursued a career in professional organisations associated with the museum and/or heritage sector. 90% of UK graduates from this degree take up employment in the museum sector within six months.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Officer, Imperial War Museum
-Archivist, Madame Tussauds
-Assistant Curator, Victoria and Albert Museum
-Cataloguer, Historic Royal Palaces
-Museum Assistant, British Museum

Employability
The MA in Museum Studies facilitates the development of both practical skills relevant to a professional career in the museum and galleries sector and a solid understanding of, and critical engagement with, theoretical issues involved in contemporary museum practice. Core practical skills include collections care procedures, packing and storing objects, documentation, collections-based research, exhibition production, and display evaluation. A museum-based placement and optional modules can be chosen to enable students to focus on specific additional areas of theory and practice. Thansferable skills include independent research, writing and communication skills, interpersonal skills, use of IT, time management and group working.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study in related fields such as museum studies, heritage studies and conservation.

Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's main library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

London's many museums and galleries are a wonderful source of discussion and material for this degree, but in particular UCL's own important museums and collections are drawn upon for teaching, including those of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the Art Museum, and the Grant Museum of Zoology. Students have access to MA degree programmes taught in other UCL departments. Please note that students need to contact the relevant programme coordinators to register their interest since there are only limited spaces available.

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UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research. Read more
UCL is a world-leading centre for research and teaching in the archaeology of Egypt and the Near East. The programme is ideally suited to students seeking to combine advanced study of these regions with new technical and interpretative skills, and offers an ideal grounding for doctoral research.

Degree information

UCL’s wide range of archaeological expertise provides a unique opportunity to study Egypt and the Near East in a truly comparative context, and for students to develop a programme and research dissertation tailored to individual interests. These may include the application of new skills in archaeological science, exploring new theoretical perspectives, or the significance of archaeology for the wider cultural heritage of these regions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), two or three optional modules (45 credits), and a dissertation.

Core modules - all students must take the following:
-Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: A Comparative Approach
-Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules
-Ancient Cyprus: Colonisations, Copper and City-States (by arrangement with King's College London)
-Archaeologies of Asia
-Aegean Prehistory: major themes and debates
-Beyond Chiefdoms: Archaeologies of African Political Complexity
-Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approached
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Introductory Akkadian (by arrangement with SOAS)
-Mediterranean Dynamics
-Mediterranean Prehistory
-Middle Egyptian Language
-Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
-The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The emergence of villages and urban societies
-Subject to approval a third module can be taken from the overall options available at the Institute of Archaeology or more widely within UCL and the University of London.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, with guidance from an assigned supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Teaching at the Institute of Archaeology is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars to support student interaction, and examination is primarily through module-based essays and the individual dissertation. Depending on the options taken, teaching may also include object handling, museum work, and laboratory practicals.

Careers

The first cohort of students on the Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East MA is due to graduate in 2018, therefore no specific career destinations are currently available.

Previous UCL graduates in these areas have regularly gone on to undertake doctoral research, or found employment in related areas of the public, museum and heritage sector.

Employability
In addition to receiving advanced training in their chosen subject areas, students will have the opportunity to acquire a strong combination of general research skills, communication skills, skills in teamwork and networking and overall personal effectiveness.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Your instructors on this degree will be world-class scholars whose research is at the cutting-edge of their disciplines. Students will also benefit from the first-class institutions located within walking distance of the Institute of Archaeology, including the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, the British Museum, and the Egypt Exploration Society, and from the institute’s own collections, including the Petrie Palestinian Collection.

Egyptian and Near Eastern Archaeology at UCL are embedded in the vibrant research environment of the Bloomsbury Campus, in the centre of one of the most exciting cities in the world. Our institute includes over twenty researchers with regional expertise in these areas, including both prehistory and the historical periods.

With its international staff and student body, the Institute of Archaeology (IoA) is well known for its welcoming atmosphere, challenging intellectual climate, and supportive feedback structure. It is regularly rated in first place among UK archaeology departments for student experience.

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The only Anglophone university in Canada to offer comprehensive folklore programs at all levels, Memorial is also a vital part of its community - one steeped in unique lifestyles and traditions, and where the study and celebration of culture and heritage is considered crucial. Read more
The only Anglophone university in Canada to offer comprehensive folklore programs at all levels, Memorial is also a vital part of its community - one steeped in unique lifestyles and traditions, and where the study and celebration of culture and heritage is considered crucial. This provides folklorists with rich opportunities for innovative community partnerships and learning experiences.

In the 40 years since its creation, Memorial's Department of Folklore has built an international reputation as a thriving, imaginative, eclectic, and highly professional department. Ethnographic field research practices are fundamental to folklore studies. Excellent library and archive services are also available to graduate students, including the Folklore and Language Archive, the Centre for Material Culture Studies, and the Research Centre for the Study of Music, Media, and Place.

Training in folklore studies offers valuable preparation for careers in a variety of cultural enterprises, particularly those involving intangible cultural heritage. Graduates of our program teach at universities and colleges in many parts of North America and Europe, not only in folklore departments but also as interdisciplinary appointments in fields such as communications, dance ethnography, English, French, and women's studies. Not all have followed academic careers; our graduates have also gone on to work in museums, archives, print and broadcast media, public sector folklore, and arts administration.

The MA program includes three options: 1) courses and comprehensive exam, 2) courses and thesis, and 3) courses and co-op education work term. The MA can normally be completed in two years of full-time study.

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