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Masters Degrees (Institute Of Education)

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The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement

The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities). Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the abilities and qualifications acquired in the bachelor studies, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of musical education concepts, especially those in the field of Jazz and Popular Music. This also extends to include their own individual artistic work and consequently these varied aspects are brought into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master’s project and Laboratories for Music Research).

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which students from different backgrounds and origins encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into a public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process, a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives that are to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

With the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research of educational concepts. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and serves to verify the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website. A Lesson Demonstration Examination is an integral part of both the degree and the Master's examination and contains the following specifications:

MA Lesson Demonstration Examination:
The Lesson Demonstration Examinations certify the necessary level in expertise for teaching practice. They are permitted to cover the following areas: Preliminary Lesson Demonstration MAS (single or group lessons), ensemble lessons, music theory, aural training, music history, and possibly other scientific areas as well. The performance requirements and objectives for the students in the course of the respective Lesson Demonstration examination are determined and then publicly published. The Examination Board has to advise and decide on the guidelines for defined assessment criteria (Please refer to the detailed information in the core application for further details: Chapter 3.7.4, Auditing and Examination Methods).

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination, which includes a lesson demonstration examination, and an external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master's thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As music educators and musicians, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and social competence to pursue teaching and research activities at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities), and to compete in the current international professional reality. In addition to their core activities as music educators in the field of music education institutions, they can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation for all ages and target groups. As performers and creative musicians they can also work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc..

In addition to their expertise in the areas of music education, artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as project management and public relations as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for organisational, pedagogical, advisory and executive activities in cultural enterprises and media (e.g. concert venues, orchestras, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, administration of music education institutions, radio, print media, etc.).

Awarding of the degree “Masters of Arts in Music Education”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music Education" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

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All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

- to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
- to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
- to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning. It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.
You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III

This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:
Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

This course has resulted from an initiative by the professional body for physics, the Institute of Physics, in response to current and future needs for specialist physics teachers in secondary schools who may wish to offer mathematics as a second subject. The PGCE is a full time, one year, postgraduate course, carrying 60 Masters Level credits.

Potential students will be graduates of physics or engineering who may be recent graduates or ‘career changers’ of different ages. The normal entry requirement is a bachelor’s degree from a recognised University, at upper second-class honours or above and one where physics topics form at least 50% of the degree content.

This qualification aims to produce reflective, confident and competent teachers of physics and mathematics who are able to be effective at planning, teaching and assessing these subjects in secondary schools and contribute to the whole school community.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go
on to work as teachers.

We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list. The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006.

We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement:

The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists' agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the qualifications acquired in the bachelor's program, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of their individual artistic concepts, and bring them into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master's Project, Laboratories for Music Research). This in turn contributes to a continually relevant, multifaceted and intercultural development of the arts.

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which artists from different origins and genres encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

In MA 1st Programme Stage, with the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination and external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master’s thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As musicians and music makers, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and the social competence to compete in the current international professional reality. As performers and creative musicians they can work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc.. Graduates can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation, especially in the context of teaching and research activities in the field of higher education

In addition to their expertise in the field of artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as music management as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for leading activities in the field of artistic projects, in arts and cultural management and in the work fields of the creative and media sectors.

Awarding of the degree “Master of Arts in Music”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

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Professionals in construction management are at the heart of the delivery phase of buildings and infrastructure in every economy, and play an essential part in the realisation of the physical development aspiration of clients. Read more
Professionals in construction management are at the heart of the delivery phase of buildings and infrastructure in every economy, and play an essential part in the realisation of the physical development aspiration of clients.

Society continues to value and shape the built environment resulting in both public and private investment in construction assets and the successful completion of construction projects. As these projects become more socially and technically complex in a changing world dominated by a concern for sustainability, there has been a growing challenge to develop existing and new skills and expertise in construction management. This challenge is not only national but global as the need for construction management skills continues to grow internationally. Indeed, our student cohorts reflect this global challenge with students from across multiple continents.

This particular programme benefits from being rooted in a long 40 year history of delivery. It has evolved and aligned itself with the challenge above to reinforce it as one of the most long-standing and successful Construction Management Masters programmes of its kind. The programme has and continues to be the flagship of our postgraduate programmes and is heavily subscribed and endorsed by the global construction management community.

The programme is designed for recent graduates from construction and related disciplines and introduces the fundamentals and challenges to contemporary construction management. It is also ideally suited to those who have a strong technical background and need to complement it with requisite management know-how for developing their national and international careers in the construction sector.

Students on the programme significantly benefit from the programmes strong connection with the expertise of the UK’s longest-established research group ‘Construction Technology and Organisation’ and the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

Accreditation of the programme is provided by the UK’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Key facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- Fully accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-management/

Programme modules

Semester one, compulsory modules
- ICT for Construction Projects
This module introduces managers to a wide range of tools and technologies appropriate for their role and projects. The module covers a range of topics including project information flows, e-business, database technologies, emerging technologies, building information modelling technologies, groupware and collaborative systems.

- Research and Communication
The aims of this module are to provide the student with an overview of sources of information in construction; to explain to students how to conduct a literature review and introduce students to the principal methods of investigation in construction research; and provide an opportunity for each student to develop professional and academic skills in oral and written communication.

- Principles of Design and Construction
This module teaches students the fundamental principles of managing a project during the design and construction phases. The module develops knowledge and understanding of the role and principles of the estimating, tendering and planning of construction projects and the importance of health and safety in relation to design and construction activities.

- Principles of Project Management
Students will gain an understanding of construction project management principles and theory. Specific areas covered include management responsibility for running construction projects; contemporary issues facing the construction industry; cultural complexity and the impact of behaviour and motivation on performance; and applying appropriate project management techniques for the different project phases.

- Postgraduate Research Project
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Construction Management.

Option Module (part-time students only)
- Management and Professional Development 1
The aim of this module is to enable students to plan, develop and demonstrate progress against a suitable professional development framework, such that they become equipped with a range of transferable management and professional development skills.

Option Modules One
Choose two from:
- Design Management
This module introduces various Design Management techniques and approaches. These include process mapping techniques for design; ways to analyse and optimise the design process; and students will gain an understanding of the internal workings of a design office and their relationship with the construction team.

- Sustainability in the Built Environment
Students will gain an understanding of sustainability issues that relate to the built environment; ways in which these issues can be managed and effective communication of both strategic and technical information.

- Management of Construction Processes
This module introduces students to cutting edge contemporary management concepts and innovations; complexities of setting up and managing logistics on large construction sites; and essential project management techniques such as risk management.

- Federated 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)
The creation, deployment and use of aggregated and integrated models are key goals of collaboration through BIM. This module aims to deliver hands-on practical skills on the use of BIM technologies (i.e. design software and collaboration tools) for real-time co-creation and data sharing of federated/aggregated 3D BIM models. The concept of shared situational awareness within design teams/processes will be explored.

Option Modules Two
Choose two from:
- Strategic Management in Construction
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of strategic management and the tools for formulating and implementing strategies within the construction sector. The application of strategic management tools to develop appropriate change strategies will be explored and fundamental skills in communication, negotiation and leadership will be developed.

- People and Teams
Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment. Students will also be able to analyse current theoretical approaches to people management, appreciate importance of ethics and cultural issues and evaluate the key factors driving HRM systems.

- Procurement and Contract Procedure
This module aims to develop students understanding of procurement methods, different forms of contract and contract practice. The module is designed to give students key practical skills including advising clients on appropriate procurement and tendering methods; selecting the most appropriate form of construction contract; and manage a construction contract effectively.

- Business Economics and Finance
Students will gain a sound understanding of macro, meso and micro economics and types, sources and management of finance relating to construction organisations and projects. This will allow students to analyse the policies and operations of construction organisations and projects from an economic perspective to determine likely performance consequences and analyse corporate financial data for investment prospects and business management decisions.

Careers and further study

Graduates are sought after by a wide range of companies including Arup, Atkins, Bauer Technologies, Carillion plc, Eurovia Group, Kier Group, Morgan Sindall, Skanska and Vinci Construction. Many of these organisations engage with the University in both collaborative research and in delivering lectures on the courses. This provides an ideal opportunity for students to engage in discussions about employment opportunities.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-management/

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Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme. Read more
Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme.

Society continues to value and shape the built environment resulting in both public and private investment in construction assets and the successful completion of construction projects. As these projects become more socially and technically complex in a changing world dominated by a concern for sustainability, there has been a growing challenge to develop existing and new skills and expertise in construction project management. This challenge is not only national but global as the need for construction project management skills continues to grow internationally. Indeed, our student cohorts reflect this global challenge with students from across multiple continents.

We have been running programmes in MSc Construction Project Management for nearly 20 years. This arose from the need to extend the managerial remit to those activities that fall outside the construction phase to include areas such as financing, design and hand-over. The programme is therefore tailored for construction professionals looking for a more holistic perspective of construction project processes and the challenge of project management in complex building and infrastructure projects.

Accreditation of the programme is provided by the UK’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Core study areas include: Building Information Modelling, Design Management and Sustainability in the Built Environment.

Key facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- Fully accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

Programme modules

- ICT for Construction Projects
This module introduces managers to a wide range of tools and technologies appropriate for their role and projects. The module covers a range of topics including project information flows, e-business, database technologies, emerging technologies, building information modelling technologies, groupware and collaborative systems.

- Research and Communication
The aims of this module are to provide the student with an overview of sources of information in construction; to explain to students how to conduct a literature review and introduce students to the principal methods of investigation in construction research; and provide an opportunity for each student to develop professional and academic skills in oral and written communication.

- Principles of Design and Construction
This module teaches students the fundamental principles of managing a project during the design and construction phases. The module develops knowledge and understanding of the role and principles of the estimating, tendering and planning of construction projects and the importance of health and safety in relation to design and construction activities.

- Principles of Project Management
Students will gain an understanding of construction project management principles and theory. Specific areas covered include management responsibility for running construction projects; contemporary issues facing the construction industry; cultural complexity and the impact of behaviour and motivation on performance; and applying appropriate project management techniques for the different project phases.

- Design Management
This module introduces various Design Management techniques and approaches. These include process mapping techniques for design; ways to analyse and optimise the design process; and students will gain an understanding of the internal workings of a design office and their relationship with the construction team.

- Sustainability and the Built Environment
Students will gain an understanding of sustainability issues that relate to the built environment; ways in which these issues can be managed and effective communication of both strategic and technical information.

- Management of Construction Processes
This module introduces students to cutting edge contemporary management concepts and innovations; complexities of setting up and managing logistics on large construction sites; and essential project management techniques such as risk management.

- Postgraduate Research Project
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Construction Project Management.

Option Module (part-time students only)
- Management and Professional Development 1
The aim of this module is to enable students to plan, develop and demonstrate progress against a suitable professional development framework, such that they become equipped with a range of transferable management and professional development skills.

Option Modules One
Choose one from
- Strategic Management in Construction
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of strategic management and the tools for formulating and implementing strategies within the construction sector. The application of strategic management tools to develop appropriate change strategies will be explored and fundamental skills in communication, negotiation and leadership will be developed.

- People and Teams
Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment. Students will also be able to analyse current theoretical approaches to people management, appreciate importance of ethics and cultural issues and evaluate the key factors driving HRM systems.

- Procurement and Contract Procedure
This module aims to develop students understanding of procurement methods, different forms of contract and contract practice. The module is designed to give students key practical skills including advising clients on appropriate procurement and tendering methods; selecting the most appropriate form of construction contract; and manage a construction contract effectively.

- Business Economics and Finance
Students will gain a sound understanding of macro, meso and micro economics and types, sources and management of finance relating to construction organisations and projects. This will allow students to analyse the policies and operations of construction organisations and projects from an economic perspective to determine likely performance consequences and analyse corporate financial data for investment prospects and business management decisions.

- Federated 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)
The creation, deployment and use of aggregated and integrated models are key goals of collaboration through BIM. This module aims to deliver hands-on practical skills on the use of BIM technologies (i.e. design software and collaboration tools) for real-time co-creation and data sharing of federated/aggregated 3D BIM models. The concept of shared situational awareness within design teams/processes will be explored.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for a variety of organisations nationally and internationally. These include Arup, Atkins, BAM Nuttall Ltd, Balfour Beatty, Kier Group, Morgan Sindall, Skanska and Transport for London. Many of these organisations engage with the University in both collaborative research and in delivering lectures on the courses. This provides an ideal opportunity for students to engage in discussions about employment opportunities.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.
The course is also accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

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Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Read more
Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Hussey who first introduced and devised the study of Byzantine History in the University of London in 1950; throughout her long academic career she instilled ‘the principles of scholarship and demonstrated the perfect balance between historical detail and the wider implication of the subject’.

Her legacy was continued by Julian Chrysostomides, who taught the next generations of undergraduate and postgraduate students, and in 1987, together with Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith and Dr Athanasios Angelou, established the taught MA degree course in Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway. This programme centred on the middle and later period of Byzantine history, placing particular emphasis on Byzantine sources and Greek Palaeography. This initiative was joined by King’s College London (KCL) under Professor Averil Cameron and Professor Charlotte Roueché, whose interests centred in Late Antiquity and early Byzantium; thus, the University of London federal MA course in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (MA LABS) took its original form.

Since October 2009 the MA LABS has been offered as part of the intercollegiate arrangements among Royal Holloway, King's College London and University College London (UCL). In choosing where to register, students should note that they will normally be expected to undertake their MA dissertation at their home College; they should therefore aim to register at the College where staff interests are closest to their own. The MA LABS at Royal Holloway is taught by members of staff of the Hellenic Institute, a research centre for the diachronic and interdisciplinary study of Hellenism, based in the History Department.

Since its establishment a large number of students have successfully pursued this MA course, the majority of whom continued their research on a doctoral level. Today graduates of the programme hold research and teaching posts in universities in Britain and abroad, testifying to its success in meeting its aims.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/malateantiquebyzantinestudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royal Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre; and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History. It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic tradition across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period, to the modern world.

- We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding antiquity and the medieval age

- the reading and understanding of ancient and medieval texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient and medieval authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying classical antiquity and the Byzantine world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers and university lecturers, teachers in secondary education, librarians, archivists, book conservators, and editors of history journals. A number of our graduates hold teaching posts and research fellowships at the Universities of London, Cyprus, Patras and the Peloponnese, the Institute for Byzantine Research of the Hellenic National Research Foundation, and are employed by the Library of the Greek Parliament and the Department of Book Conservation of the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece.

The majority of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Byzantine Literature and History, and Greek Palaeography at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The UCL Institute of Education is a leading centre for teacher education in Europe and one of the largest teacher training providers in London. Read more
The UCL Institute of Education is a leading centre for teacher education in Europe and one of the largest teacher training providers in London. We have a wide range of teacher training programmes for those wanting to qualify to teach in primary and secondary schools, and in further and adult education colleges.
The School Direct Tuition Fee route is a pathway into teaching at both primary and secondary levels. Participating schools, or clusters of schools that join together, are allocated a set number of student-teacher places. Trainees pay a course fee on this route and will join other student teachers on one of the established PGCE courses at UCL Institute of Education (IOE), whilst undertaking their teaching experience in the host school or cluster.

Biology

Study Secondary Biology at UCL Institute of Education - http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/science-biology-school-direct-pgce

Students will acquire a critical understanding of current debates and issues relating to science education and, particularly biology, and we will guide and support them in developing their subject knowledge. Students will also have the opportunity to teach outside the classroom in a variety of London venues such as Kew Gardens.

Bursaries (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding) of £15,000-£20,000 are available to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the Biology programme.
Those with three years of work experience (in any sector) may wish to consider the School Direct Salaried route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/biology-school-direct-salaried). Alternatively, we also offer this course through the PGCE route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/biology-pgce).

All of our programmes are modular and you can use IOE PGCE credits to contribute towards a Masters qualification in education. The IOE was recognised by Ofsted as ‘Outstanding’ across every programme.
The UCL Institute of Education offers a wide range of routes into teaching. To find out more, please visit our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees

Chemistry

Study Secondary Chemistry at the UCL Institute of Education - http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/chemistry-pgce

The Chemistry Secondary PGCE will help students to develop the professional skills and knowledge needed to teach all aspects of science to pupils at least up to age 16, as well as chemistry to pupils aged up to 18. The IOE was recognised by Ofsted as ‘Outstanding’ across every programme.

Students will acquire a critical understanding of current debates and issues relating to science education, particularly chemistry, and we will guide and support them in developing their subject knowledge. Students will also have the opportunity to teach outside the classroom in a variety of London venues as well as to take part in a short field visit.

Bursaries (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding) of £20,000-£25,000 are available to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the Chemistry programme.
We also offer this course through the School Direct Tuition Fee route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/chemistry-school-direct-pgce-1) in partnership with a number of schools. Alternatively, those with three years of work experience (in any sector) may wish to consider the School Direct Salaried route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/chemistry-school-direct-salaried).

Physics

Study Secondary Physics at UCL Institute of Education - http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/science-physics-school-direct-pgce

Students will get help in developing the professional skills and knowledge needed to teach all aspects of science to pupils at least up to age 16, as well as physics to pupils aged up to 18. The UCL Institute of Education (IOE) is committed to creative approaches to teaching science, and students will be encouraged to develop resources during the programme. They will also acquire a critical understanding of current debates and issues relating to science education, particularly physics, and we will guide and support students in developing their subject knowledge.

Bursaries (https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/bursaries-and-funding) of £9,000-£30,000 are available to students who meet the eligibility criteria for the Physics programme.
Those with three years of work experience (in any sector)may wish to consider the School Direct Salaried route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/physics-school-direct-salaried). Alternatively, we also offer this course through the PGCE route (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/physics-pgce).

All of our programmes are modular and you can use IOE PGCE credits to contribute towards a Masters qualification in education. The IOE was recognised by Ofsted as ‘Outstanding’ across every programme.

The UCL Institute of Education offers a wide range of routes into teaching. To find out more, please visit our website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees

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Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Read more
Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in:
-Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data.
-Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.
-Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge.
-Reporting results in a clear and logical manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The six study lines are as follows:
Aerosol Physics
Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the most recent theoretical concepts, measurement techniques and computational methods applied in aerosol research.

Geophysics of the Hydrosphere
Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes.

Meteorology
Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example. As a graduate of the meteorology line, you will be an expert in atmospheric phenomena who can produce valuable new information and share your knowledge.

Biogeochemical Cycles
Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Remote Sensing
Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry. As a graduate of the remote sensing line you will have broad expertise in the operational principles of remote sensing instruments as well as methods of data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Atmospheric Chemistry and Analysis
Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods. As a graduate of this line you will have understanding of the chemical processes of the atmosphere and the latest environmental analytical methods, so you will have vital skills for environmental research.

Programme Structure

The basic degree in the Programme is the Master of Science (MSc). The scope of the degree is 120 credits (ECTS). As a prerequisite you will need to have a relevant Bachelor’s degree. The possible major subjects are Physics, Meteorology, Geophysics, Chemistry, and Forest Ecology. The programme is designed to be completed in two years. Studies in ATM-MP consist of various courses and project work: lecture courses, seminars, laboratory work and intensive courses.

Your first year of studies will consist mainly of lecture courses. During the second year, you must also participate in the seminar course and give a presentation yourself. There is also a project course, which may contain laboratory work, data analysis, or theoretical or model studies. You will have to prepare a short, written report of the project. There are also several summer and winter schools as well as field courses for students in the Programme. Many of the courses take place at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. The intensive courses typically last 5–12 days and include a concise daily programme with lectures, exercises and group work.

Career Prospects

There is a global need for experts with multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and environmental issues. Governmental environmental agencies need people who are able to interpret new scientific results as a basis for future legislation. Industry, transportation and businesses need to be able to adapt to new regulations.

As a Master of Science graduating from the Programme you will have a strong background of working with environmental issues. You will have the ability to find innovative solutions to complex problems in the field of environmental sciences, climate change and weather forecasting. Graduates of the Programme have found employment in Meteorological Institutes and Environmental Administration in Finland and other countries, companies manufacturing instrumentation for atmospheric and environmental measurements and analysis, and consultancy companies. The Master's degree in ATM-MP also gives you a good background if you intend to proceed to doctoral level studies.

Internationalization

The Programme offers an international study environment with more than 30% of the students and teaching staff coming from abroad.

The ATM-MP is part of a Nordic Nordplus network in Atmosphere-Biosphere Studies, which gives you good opportunities to take courses currently in fourteen Nordic and Baltic universities. There are also several Erasmus agreements with European universities. The PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX) project provides you with opportunities to carry out part of your studies especially in China and Russia.

Research Focus

All the units teaching in the Programme belong to the National Centre of Excellence (FCoE) in Atmospheric Science – From Molecular and Biological processes to the Global Climate (ATM), which is a multidisciplinary team of the Departments of Physics, Forest Sciences and Chemistry at the University of Helsinki, the Department of Applied Physics at the University of Eastern Finland (Kuopio) and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

The main objective of FCoE ATM is to quantify the feedbacks between the atmosphere and biosphere in a changing climate. The main focus of the research is on investigating the following topics:
1. Understanding the climatic feedbacks and forcing mechanisms related to aerosols, clouds, precipitation and biogeochemical cycles.
2. Developing, refining and utilising the newest measurement and modelling techniques, from quantum chemistry to observations and models of global earth systems.
3. Creating a comprehensive understanding of the role of atmospheric clusters and aerosol particles in regional and global biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and their linkages to atmospheric chemistry.
4. Integrating the results in the context of understanding regional and global Earth systems.

In addition to the research focus of FCoE, current research in hydrospheric geophysics at Helsinki University has an emphasis on cryology, with a focus on the effect of aerosols on Indian glaciers, the impact of climate change on the Arctic environment, the dynamics of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard, and the winter season in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea.

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Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.
-Regional policy of data-intensive economics.
-The political ecology and management of natural resources and land use.
-Globalisation.

In geoinformatics:
-Spatial data analysis, new information sources.
-Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications.
-Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research.

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This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy. Read more
This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy.

Modules are taught by world-leading experts in the field who have designed some of the world’s most innovative low energy buildings. These design experiences provide unique case study material which students find exciting and invaluable for their own research and design work.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by CIBSE and the Energy Institute and benefits from its links with the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

Programme modules

- Building Energy Consumption [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the impact that climate, people, equipment selection and design have on energy consumption on a range of building sizes from domestic to large commercial.

- Renewable Energy and Low Carbon Technologies [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of renewable energy and low carbon technologies and their integration into buildings, and to be given a perspective on the potential benefits and applications of these technologies.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Airflow Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building airflow and ventilation modelling with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Lighting Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of lighting modelling in buildings with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the application of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow, thermal and daylight modelling software as well as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Hulley and Kirkwood and SE Controls. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the CIBSE and Energy Institute.
The 'SE Controls prize for best overall performance' is awarded to the student graduating from this course with the highest overall mark. This presentation is made on graduation day.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

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This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. Read more
This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. With energy consumption within the design and operation of buildings becoming an ever increasingly important factor this programme is designed to combine building services engineering knowledge with specific energy considerations in their design.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the Energy Institute and CIBSE. CIBSE has praised the programme as ‘one of the leading MSc courses of its kind in the UK’.

Areas studied include low energy building design, designing for suitable indoor air quality and thermal comfort, state-of-the-art control systems, and the design of building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide students from related engineering backgrounds with an understanding of the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow and thermodynamics for application to buildings and their engineering systems.

- Thermal Comfort & Indoor Air Quality [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles and practice involved in the design of indoor environments, with respect to occupant thermal comfort and air quality.

- Building Thermal Loads & Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles of building thermal load analysis and required systems for medium to large buildings.

- Building Energy Supply Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to be provided with a practical foundation in system design and analysis, by developing the students' understanding of thermal plant in buildings including air conditioning systems and systems for heat recovery.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow and thermal modelling software as wells as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Cundall, Foster & Partners, and Atkins. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

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Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within the construction sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. For example, prominent companies in the industry are represented in our Professional Liaison Group.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years. There are two entry points: September and January.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/project-management-in-the-built-environment/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a whole range of management skills and knowledge including project finance, technology, law and contract by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. They are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.
- There are four intensive study weeks during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Many have originally studied subjects outside the realm of the built environment such as law, psychology, architecture and geography, and others have been or still are (in the case of our open-learning students) employed in project management roles. As a result, there are great opportunities to share experiences, to gain a better understanding of the industry and the range of challenges that project managers face and also to benefit from the many different approaches to problem solving that is a feature of such a diverse group of students.

- Our graduates span the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, India and USA.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, approximately 80% of our research, with our colleagues in other Built Environment areas, was judged to be of ‘international’ quality, with approximately 40% rated as ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Communication with distance-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations.

Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture.

This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work.

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage/li>
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

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The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings. Read more
The Master of Education is designed for educators who shall be admitted on the basis of their prior qualifications and who, in most cases, are working in educational roles across diverse settings.
Educators are provided with the opportunity to further their qualifications through professional development. This coursework program aligns with the requirements and specifications of the Australian Quality Framework (AQF) and provides three major areas of expertise relevant to professional educators. The Master of Education does not lead to teacher registration.
The flexible 18 month Master of Education coursework program entails four core subjects, including an enquiry-based project, and provides the opportunity to specialise in up to two majors.

Global Contexts Major

The Global Contexts major has been designed for professionals who are seeking to develop a strategic approach to global practices and strategies. It has been developed in response to the steady growth in globalisation and changing international employment relationships.
Studying this major will expand and upgrade your expertise in globalisation and transnational education. Interested parties include: international and national school employees, managerial and non-managerial global careerists, international human resource management staff, professional managers, self-initiated expatriates, cross cultural team members, foreign hires (third country nationals, and mobility managers).
If you undertake our Global Contexts major you will:
*Examine the phenomenon of ‘development’ in Asia- Pacific contexts through an anthropological lens
*Acquire the ability to assess the social and cultural impacts of globalisation and transnationalism, natural resource development and the introduction of new technologies
*Understand the international, national, and relevant state frameworks, statements, policies, curriculum initiatives and resources as regards education for sustainability
*Evaluate educational curriculum and teaching practices in relevant professional settings.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Education, graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate advanced knowledge of recent developments, discourses and debates in the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Demonstrate knowledge of research or inquiry principles applicable to the field, or a sub-field, of Education and/or area of professional practice
*Investigate, analyse, synthesise and evaluate complex information, problems, concepts and theories, at an advanced level, and critically reflect on theory in relation to different bodies of knowledge or practice
*Justify, interpret and present theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences
*Demonstrate advanced speaking, reading, writing, listening, collaborating and advocacy skills for Educational leadership in a field or sub field of Education
*Design, plan and ethically execute a substantial research and/or inquiry-based project with creativity and initiative and a high level of autonomy and accountability in the field or a sub-field of Education.

Award title

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd)

Course pre-requisites

Completion of:
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years professional work experience in education; or
*An AQF level 7 Bachelor Degree in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate in education from one of the following JCU courses: Graduate Certificate of Education for Sustainability; Graduate Certificate in Research Methods [Education]; Graduate Certificate in Career Development; Graduate Certificate in Catholic Education; Graduate Certificate in Education (Academic Practice); or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Diploma in education, or
*An AQF level 8 Bachelor Honours Degree in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position; or
*An AQF level 8 Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in a discipline other than education, with a minimum 2 years experience working as a professional educator in a management, leadership or supervisory position;or
Other qualifications recognised by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Division of Tropical Environments and Societies as equivalent to the above.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2– Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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