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The Aberystwyth MA in Fine Art and Art History provide you with an excellent opportunity to develop your artistic skills, understanding and technical aptitudes as you strive to pursue your art. Read more

About the course

The Aberystwyth MA in Fine Art and Art History provide you with an excellent opportunity to develop your artistic skills, understanding and technical aptitudes as you strive to pursue your art. In every area of this course, technical, stylistic, and conceptual experimentation is enthusiastically encouraged and you will be encouraged to contribute to the School’s academic knowledge of art history through your own research. You will also have the opportunity to submit articles for publication to contextualize your practice and develop your engagement with critical and public opinion. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014) it was found that 75% of publications were of an internationally recognised standard or higher.

One of the central strengths of this course is your personal development as an artist. You will be challenged to experiment, test hypotheses, and extend your field of action in preparation for exhibitions. You will develop a portfolio of work that is a creative and imaginative interpretation of subject matter demonstrating the acquisition and refinement of technological dexterity and stylistic sophistication. You will also benefit from gaining new insight into careers in fine art, defining concepts of the subject and the crucial importance of professional identity.

The course is a full-time programme, taught over one year, and is divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will study a number of core modules, together worth a total of 120 credits, whilst directing your own study in part two where you will explore and resolve your chosen artistic problem, culminating in the second of your two public exhibitions. This study is equivalent to a Master’s dissertation project and is worth 60 credits.

The subject of this final public exhibition will be agreed in consultation with your supervisor(s) and, in tackling it, you will be encouraged to develop and sustain a self-initiated programme of work. Subject to the satisfactory completion of the study modules and exhibition, the MA in Fine Art and Art History is awarded.

Upon graduation from the MA in Fine Art and Art History, you will have demonstrated artistic excellence, personal rigor and critical engagement with yours and others’ work, which will define you as an artist. You will be well-prepared for the realities – both creative and practical – of life as a professional artist.

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to develop your personal, creative, productive, and imaginative artistic abilities;
- If you wish to be stimulated by vigorous intellectual inquiry into Art;
- If you aim to pursue a career in Art or serious effort to exhibit your work in public and critical arenas;
- If you wish to develop a conceptual, practical and historical framework for your art.

Course content

Core modules:

Dissertation
Exhibition 1: Consolidation
Vocational Practice

Contact Time

Approximately 10-14 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course (Part 1) is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises and exhibitions. Successful completion of your exhibition (Part 2) leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Fine Art and Art History programme is designed to enhance your employability. Successful completion of this degree is in itself certain to do so by building your CV; but more significant is the hugely enhanced array of knowledge, abilities and skills with which you will graduate.

Your pursuit of personal development as an artist, coupled with increased critical faculties, will make you a strong candidate for any post where people and opinions meet. Likewise, the study skills, technical knowledge and hands-on experience of artistic processes will give you a tremendous advantage in employment within the Arts. Similarly, other modules will provide opportunities to gain experiences and transferable skills. By managing the practicalities of exhibition preparation, installation, and curation, you also gain direct experience in every aspect of events and venue management. Though the conditions may be subject-specific, the skills you will learn in the process are highly marketable.

Whether your chosen career path points you towards drawing, painting or print work, or towards criticism, collecting, art journalism, your Masters Degree in Fine Art and Art History from Aberystwyth University will signal to prospective employers your commitment to personal excellence, professional rigour and technical innovation.

Professional Independence

The course acknowledges the difficulty artists face in the transition from the requirements of a degree level course to the emerging independent direction required of professional practising artists. By playing an active, learning-based role in the operation of the School’s galleries, you will gain an insight into the work needed to sustain a busy gallery. You will stage public exhibitions in the School’s galleries and elsewhere, and part of the course’s assessment relates to your performance as a professional, exhibiting artist.

Studio work is designed to increase students’ technical possibilities, and the School is particularly well equipped in all areas of the graphic arts. The course seeks to assist the student by developing individual abilities and direction in a certain area of art practice to the highest standards possible. In addition to this subject-specific training, this MA is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of situations. Whether this is further study, personal artistic pursuits or employment, you will be better equipped to pursue success in your chosen field.

Your work in the Contemporary Context

This course does not operate in isolation, and you will examine your own work in the wider context of contemporary practice. As mentioned above, your assessed exhibitions will give you first-hand experience of the vital but often daunting rite of holding up your work for scrutiny by your tutors, peers, critics and the public. You will also encounter and engage with the debate in cultural theory regarding the interface between art practise, art theory and the concept of visual culture. By considering its implication for the study of fine art and art history, your course of study encourages you to improve your capacity for conducting a critical review of yours and others’ work through discussion, presentation and writing.

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A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. Read more
A pathway degree combines specialisation with flexibility. It is suited both to those of you who are beginning a journey towards a PhD in a particular field, and to those of you who wish to further develop undergraduate or personal interests. The pathways have emerged from clusters of excellence and expertise in the Department and relate directly to our Research Schools of Architectural History and Theory, British Art, Medieval Art and Medievalisms, Modern and Contemporary and Sculpture Studies. We therefore have concentrations of staff working in these areas, and related lectures, colloquia and site visits taking place.

The Modern and Contemporary Art pathway

If you select the Modern and Contemporary Art pathway you could choose options focusing on a wide range of works ranging from painting, sculpture and architecture, to photography, installation, performance and contemporary works engaging with new media and the digital. You will study works of art from geographically diverse regions, from the international rise of ‘pop art’ across the globe from the 1960s, to the arts of the Americas, and art from west and east Europe from the early twentieth century to the present day. As well you will be introduced to a range of formal, methodological and theoretical ways of thinking, writing and talking about the work of art in this period.

In order to complete the degree, at least two of your four option modules and your dissertation must be completed in Modern and Contemporary Art. Beyond this, the programme structure provides the flexibility for you to either specialise entirely in Modern and Contemporary Art, or to select up to two of your option modules from art history modules outside the field, or from modules offered by other humanities departments and interdisciplinary centres. Training will be offered in both general and pathway-specific research skills, which will prepare you for the development of a sustained independent research project for your dissertation, on which you will work closely with an academic supervisor who is expert in the field.

Degree Structure

Taken full-time, the one-year MA in History of Art (Modern and Contemporary Art) consists of:
-Autumn and Spring Terms: A core module focusing on Research Skills and Methods in History of Art, including pathway-specific sessions.
-Autumn Term: Two taught modules of your choice; an option is always offered on historiographical and theoretical approaches to art history.
-Spring Term: Two further modules of your choice.
-Summer Term and vacation: A dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words.

Taken part-time over two years, you would do one option in each of the Autumn and Spring terms, and work on your dissertation during the Summer terms and summer vacation.

Each option is taught by weekly two-hour seminars and assessement is in the form of a 4,000 word essay. Field-trips to view art and architecture are included in the programme, as appropriate.

The Research Skills and Methods in History of Art module, which is taught on a fortnightly basis across the Autumn and Spring Term, culminates in the production of a dissertation synopsis, on which the module is assessed.

The programme culminates in the production of a 15,000-20,000 dissertation, produced under the supervision of a member of staff. The work accounts for 50% of the final degree mark.

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This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. Read more
This MFA, described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world, subjects art-making to critical scrutiny. Artists on the programme strengthen the motivation, self-reflection and ambition of their practice and its leading ideas. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mfa-fine-art/

While on the programme you will continually engage with what it means to practise as an artist today and the position taken by an art-practice in relation to art's complex history and its currency in wider social and cultural processes.

Given the wide international breadth of artists on the programme and the open range of media welcomed in it, a primary concern in discussion is how a particular artist's work and ideas are understood in and across different social, artistic and intellectual contexts.

Our primary emphasis is on how artists look to shift prevalent expectations and whether their work does so – perhaps then transforming what art might be. We place a strong emphasis on student-centred learning, particularly in the studio seminars and personal tutorials based on your art-making, its key concerns and ideas and their mutual interdevelopment. A lecture programme will in addition contribute to your understanding of concerns relating to contemporary art in broader contexts.

The degree has been described as one of the most influential MFA programmes in the world.

Visit us

Why not visit one of our Postgraduate Art Open Days? You can also explore our exhibitions and events archive.

You can also view our programme activities and projects on art.gold, follow staff, student and alumni activity on Facebook, and get course announcements on Twitter.

Guest Research Student

If you are an international student and would like to study a 'tailor-made' programme (for up to a year), you may be interested in applying as a Guest Research Student.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Sadie Murdoch.

Structure

The programme is divided into two parts:

Year One (Diploma stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late July) or part-time for two years (until late July in both years). This year seeks to establish the core conecerns and ambitions of your art.

Year Two (MFA stage) can be taken either full-time for one year (until late August) or part-time for two years (until late July, and then until late August in the final year). This stage of the programme enables you to address your ambitions for your art with an awareness of how it is situated.

Applicants who are already in possession of 120 grade credits for postgraduate study from another programme are able to apply for direct entry into Year Two of the programme on either a full or part-time basis. You may also take advantage of an exit point at the end of Year One of the programme and graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art.

What you study

This two-stage programme is designed to subject the making of art work, the ideas and concepts involved, and the works of art themselves, to artistic and critical scrutiny. This will include individually directed research to review, consolidate and strengthen your individual position as an artist. Students accepted onto the programme work in media areas including painting, sculpture, printmaking, installation, performance, art writing, textiles, digital media and video. The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred learning – especially on your individual response to the divergent views you will experience in relation to your practice.

Among other qualities, you are expected to: contribute actively in tutorial and seminar discussions; to welcome and encourage sustained analysis of your practice by tutors and fellow students; to understand that the production of contemporary art takes place in a demanding and testing environment; and to take an independent path in developing your practice and its concerns.

Learning on the programme is primarily achieved through an appropriate combination of self-initiated and directed work in studio-practice and Critical Studies. Individual tutorials, seminars, lectures, workshops and research laboratories support this work. All parts of the programme are mandatory for all students. There are no optional modules on the programme. Modules and assessments are structured similarly on both parts of the programme.

Studio seminars

Seminars help you develop the confidence and ability to discuss your own work and the work of others, and to use the combined knowledge and experience of the group to assist in understanding and developing your own practice. This element of the programme is student-led with tutors responding to the needs and concerns of the participants. Studio seminars are organised by groups and take place weekly. Each student presents work for a seminar once in each term.

Tutorials and group tutorials

These develop your practice within contemporary art and current debate. You receive scheduled one-to-one tutorials with your Group Tutors and other staff from the study area. Two tutorials a term are scheduled with the core studio staff. In addition, you are expected to select a number of visiting tutors relevant to your practice for tutorials. These tutors are chosen in consultation with your Group Tutor, and cover a wide range of specialisms – discussion with them should further your understanding of your work in terms of the development of your practice. You are expected to write a report immediately after each tutorial summarising what took place and recording your considered responses to it.

Critical Studies

You are expected to identify and initiate the discussion of the critical concerns and interests of your practice. These concerns are developed through studio-based teaching and in discussions with your Critical Studies tutors, and developed further through the Critical Studies seminar and essay. For this reason, and in contrast to many other programmes, Critical Studies for the MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths does not offer a series of subjects taught and learnt through seminars, group reading and discussion, but bases the teaching and learning of Critical Studies primarily in relation to your own practice.

Lectures

These introduce and develop issues of critical significance in contemporary culture and fine art by presenting arguments and discursive frameworks for contemporary practice. Lectures run through the first two terms on a weekly basis. They provide an opportunity for you to critically engage with your own practice in terms of wider cultural debates with which they may be unfamiliar. The lectures also provide an occasion for all members of the postgraduate programmes to meet on a regular basis.

Taught workshops

Each workshop will comprise four staff-led discussion-based sessions on a philosophical, theoretical or historical topic relevant to contemporary art practice, and will involve texts to be read in advance. Each student takes two workshops during the first year (students may apply to substitute part of this requirement with structured independent study).

Collaborative seminars

Student-led collaborative seminars, supported by staff and teaching assistants around a topic of mutual interest, are held during the second year. These will involve engagement with the professional art community, may take place outside the college in collaboration with other institutions such as museums and galleries, and may culminate in an open event or publication.

Assessment

The three examination elements for both Year One and Year Two are: Collection of Tutorial Reports, Exhibition, and Critical Studies Essay. All three elements must be passed to successfully complete each part of the programme. Each element of examination has both progression and final points of assessment.

Skills & Careers

Graduates from the MFA in Fine Art Goldsmiths go on to success in a range of fields. As well as the many internationally reknown artists who have studied at Goldsmiths, others have gone onto become gallerists or curators or have entered the fields of art administration, education and other cultural industries.

The course at Goldsmiths enables you to focus on the development of your own skills and aspirations and to equip you with the resources to succeed in your chosen profession.

Other entry requirements

Requirement for part-time study: you need to have your own studio space in which to work over the four years of the programme.

You might also be considered for some programmes if you aren’t a graduate or your degree is in an unrelated field, but have relevant experience and can show that you have the ability to work at postgraduate level.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level. Read more
The MA in Fine Art enables artists to evaluate and develop their creative practice to the highest of standards. It develops theoretical awareness, critical thinking and independent arts practice to a professional level.

The course facilitates critical debate between artists working both within and across media areas including painting, photography, digital imaging, printmaking, sculpture, installation and site-specific art. Alongside their studio-based enquiry, students undertake related research into the broader context of contemporary art practices and theoretical debates.

The course offers access to comprehensive specialist resources with technical instruction and support. Students are continually mentored by research-active staff to position their practice within professional cultural environments, arts-related employment or higher-level academic research.

Both full time and part time students benefit from spacious and well-equipped facilities and external links with galleries, which have included the Milton Keynes Gallery, NN Contemporary (Northampton), Corby Cube Gallery and Rugby Museum and Art Gallery. The course often offers international study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

In addition to the course having very good links with regional galleries and arts organisations, students are encouraged to engage with external activities and events, both national and international. A group of MA Fine Art students recently attended a printmaking residency at the world-renowned Frans Masereel Centrum in Belgium.

Our teaching staff have a broad range of research interests reflecting the disciplines available on the course, and all staff are practicing artists who publish and exhibit both nationally and internationally. Visiting speakers have included the internationally known artists Richard Long, Marcus Harvey, Simon Callery, Ian Davenport, Mark Francis, Lisa Milroy, David Batchelor, Richard Deacon, Svetlana Fialova, Richard Patterson, Ian McKeever, Dan Hays and Richard Wilson along with innovative arts organisations such as Artangel.

Course content

Upon commencing the Masters programme, students undertake the module ‘Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies’ (20 credits). This provides a grounding in different research-based methods and methodologies in Fine Art.

During the first trimester students also undertake the 20 credit studio-based module ‘Fine Art Practice’ wherein students begin to critically re-appraise and position their creative practice. Full-time students will also be enrolled on ‘Interfacings,’ a 20 credit module that considers a set of theoretical debates, issues and contexts that are pertinent to an interdisciplinary approach to artistic practice.

During the second trimester students enrol on the 40 credit module ‘Fine Art Practice and Context.’ This module culminates in a public developmental exhibition of their work. Alongside this module, full-time students can opt to take either the project-based ‘Independent Study’ module or the 20 credit module ‘Creative Practice and Enterprise.’

The final stage of the MA Fine Art course entails the student producing and exhibiting a body of creative work or completing a 15-18,000 word dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-Fine Art Practice and Documentation
-Interfacings: Fine Art and Postmodern Practice
-Creative Practice and Enterprise
-Fine Art Practice and Context
-Independent Study in the Arts
-Research project
-Extended Fine Art Practice and Research Methodologies

Opportunities Abroad

International study trips, typically one European option (recent visits have been to France, Italy and Spain) and one long-haul destination (recent visits have been to India, Vietnam and the USA) each year.

Methods of Learning

The MA Fine Art course supports all learners’ experience and development through a breadth of regular tutorial approaches. Tutor and learner contact is additionally enriched through a host of visiting artists of international stature. Modes of teaching delivery encompass tutorials, group crits, research supervision, lectures and seminars.

Schedule

During the first and second trimester specific modules are delivered usually on Mondays 9:30-12:30 and 13:00 – 16:00.

Assessments

The course is assessed in both theory and practice by assignment, examination, portfolio submission and exhibition.

In addition to an ongoing series of formative assessment points, the MA Fine Art course has three formal assessment periods that occur at the end of each trimester in February, May and September respectively.

Facilities and Special Features

The Fine Art subject is enriched through a spectrum of professional specialist spaces including: Fine Art New Media Space, Photographic Studio, Photographic Dark Room, Wood Workshop, Metal Workshop, Plaster and Resin Workshop, Etching Printroom, Screen Printing Room (including laser cutting), The Drawing Lab (Drawing research space and life room), Canvas Preparation Room and bookable installation spaces.

Careers

The course prepares students for the professional cultural environment and higher research study. PhDs at the University of Northampton can be pursued through traditional or practice led methodologies and this course provides a comprehensive and relevant foundation.

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Why choose this course?. The Course aims to. Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment. Read more

Why choose this course?

The Course aims to:

  • Provide you with exciting and diverse opportunities to advance and develop your fine art practice, contextual awareness and theoretical knowledge/understanding within a supportive and creative environment.
  • Support you to acquire advanced specialist knowledge and practical experience of working with different contemporary fine art media and its conceptual and theoretical relevance, and importance, including (but not limited to); painting and sculpture, printmaking, conceptual and social practices, intervention, performance, film, video, photography (digital and analogue), sound art, new-media, digital-media and installation.
  • Enable you to develop an advanced level of fine art practice informed directly by a relevant theoretical and contextual framework and independently critically evaluate developments within your individual working practice.
  • Produce informed independent fine art practitioners who can adapt their knowledge, understanding and skills for a variety of professional contexts and enable you to gain advanced knowledge of presentational strategies within contemporary fine art.
  • Build advanced strategies for research through an in-depth exploration of different contemporary methodologies.

This course draws on the School’s considerable research reputation and professional expertise in the areas of painting, photography, performance, film and video, sculpture, installations, public art and print-making. This fascinating programme provides highly focused teaching, alongside a critical lecture series within an intellectually supportive environment.

You will be supported by some of the most dynamic artists and researchers in the School. You get the chance to benefit from field trips and gallery visits. Alongside the development of your creative studio work you will gain an understanding of key aspects of art history and theory, as well as an awareness of the social and institutional context within which artworks exist. On completion of the course, your practical work will be exhibited and publicised in a group MA exhibition.

What happens on the course?

Typical modules include:

  • Studio Practice
  • Theory and Contemporary Practice
  • Audience and Display
  • Studio Practice and its Methodologies
  • Master’s Project in Fine Art

Why Wolverhampton?

The Fine Art Course provides a studio intensive programme supported through theoretical and contextual lecture series, studio based seminar critique and individual tutorials. The ethos of the course is to provide students with the time and space to develop ideas and practice towards the final off-site MA exhibition; this includes the structure of personal research and the development of the critical and/or theoretical emphasis behind your work in order to understand the methodological framework of your working practice.

You will have time to reappraise and analyse previous work, develop new ideas in relation to your practice and it’s theoretical underpinning then consolidate those ideas practically. Finally you will bring those ideas and your work to resolution and focus towards the MA exhibition. The course provides students with the knowledge, ambition and structure in order to proceed towards their future career ambitions. Within the programme you will have the opportunity to develop your awareness of exhibition and the display of your work as well as the audiences for that work. The MA Fine Art course will support you in structuring an advanced independent practice, underpinned by sustained critical engagement. 

What our students think

Matthew Evans MA Fine Art

Matthew Evans completed his MA Fine Art with distinction and has since received several commissions for his innovative new approach; creating bespoke modern-day coat of arms, including a £10k commission for the The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham. He has also been selectedfor the New Art West Midlands 2013 Exhibition at Birmingham Art Gallery Museum which showcases the best of West Midland’s graduates.

"As a result of studying the MA course I have grown professionally as an artist. By adopting a ‘take a risk’ attitude I have been able to further refine my artistic practice and anchor it within the most critically interesting areas. By embracing the challenge of diversification, and enjoying the critical dialogue embedded within the course, I have resolved a number of sticking points, and identified areas for future development.

I chose to study my MA at the University of Wolverhampton as I felt I needed to breathe new life into my practise and relished the challenge of experiencing a new exciting creative environment. The artistic facilities on offer to students and the glowing reputations of the SAD staff and support technicians also played a key role in my decision.

What particularly impressed me about the course was not only the availability and approachability of the lecturers but the general sense of cohesion felt as a student. As well as extensive access to lecturers, and the intensively taught aspects of the course, there are many MA excursions that are incredibly beneficial.

As a positive side note, my affinity with the University has continued this September, with me becoming the Fine Art Artist in Residence for this year."

Other student comments:

“The MA has greatly expanded my knowledge of Fine Art.”

“I feel that I’m being supported in my work and that the best of my talent is being encouraged.”

“The lecturers are knowledgeable and enthusiastic and I’m grateful for both their input and the input of the other students”.

“I’m confident it’s setting me up with the right skills and knowledge to succeed in a career within the arts”.

“I’m glad that I made the decision to do the MA; it’s been a positive turning point in my life”.



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This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MFA program is dedicated to helping students understand both the making and theorizing of art against the background of the diverse intellectual environment of a major university, and within the context of local and international art communities. Read more
The MFA program is dedicated to helping students understand both the making and theorizing of art against the background of the diverse intellectual environment of a major university, and within the context of local and international art communities. The MFA degree is also the standard qualifying degree for teaching visual arts at the post secondary level. Most students are given the opportunity to teach foundation courses as Teaching Assistants, thus providing them valuable experience in visual arts instruction.

Students in the program may work in any area of contemporary art production including painting, drawing, printmaking, three-dimensional and installation work, photography, digital art, intermedia, video, performance, sound, or in any interdisciplinary form. The program does not include training in applied art, commercial art and design, graphic design, film or television.

Each MFA student receives his/her own private studio (approximately 250 square feet) and access to the department's extensive facilities including a state-of-the art Photo/Digital lab, Printmaking unit, and Workshop. MFAs participate in an intensive weekly studio seminar that is also a forum for critical discussions about leading issues in contemporary art, visual culture, and cultural theory. Students take additional academic coursework to enrich their particular focus, and present their Major Paper research and artwork to peers, faculty, and the public at their final oral presentation (occurring in the spring of their final year) and at a final critique (occurring during their graduation exhibition). Open Studios, interdepartmental critiques, and organised exhibitions showcase the students' art production and broaden their exposure to the local art scene and beyond.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Fine Arts
- Specialization: Visual Arts
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts

Research focus

Students in the program may work in any area of contemporary art production including painting, drawing, printmaking, three-dimensional and installation work, photography, digital art, intermedia, video, performance, sound, or in any interdisciplinary form. The program does not include training in applied art, commercial art and design, graphic design, film or television.

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants. You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression. Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Research led teaching

This course draws upon both the School of Humanities and Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design's (DJCAD) diverse, unique and internationally acclaimed research. In the RAE (Research Assessment Exercise) DJCAD was rated as the top institution in Scotland for research in art and design, and one of the best in the whole of the UK.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices. It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Students should have interdisciplinary backgrounds at undergraduate level, and have demonstrated work in both creative (e.g. studio) and academic areas. For example, you may have an honours degree in English, Film Studies or Philosophy and have engaged in creative practices such as photography, video, drawing, sculpture, or painting on your own. Other students may have dual honours degrees or have taken our Art, Philosophy and Contemporary Practices BA.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

The start date is September each year and the course lasts 12 months full-time.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities
Or

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market. Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

Read less
Covering the fundamentals for establishing a career in art, this MA in Fine Art features a highly practical repertoire of modules which will encourage you to direct your studies into areas of art which particularly fascinate you. Read more

About the course

Covering the fundamentals for establishing a career in art, this MA in Fine Art features a highly practical repertoire of modules which will encourage you to direct your studies into areas of art which particularly fascinate you. Technical, stylistic, and conceptual experimentation is enthusiastically encouraged throughout this MA scheme and undertaking this course will push you to develop your skills in your chosen medium, whether that is illustration, drawing, painting, photography, or interdisciplinary studies. Whatever your chosen career path, this MA in Fine Art will signal to prospective employers your commitment to personal excellence, professional rigour, and technical innovation.

Why study MA Fine Art at Aberystwyth University?

Throughout this course, you will become more confident as a creative practitioner of contemporary art and will be equipped with highly valuable skills, expertise, and critical capabilities that are appreciated in a wide range of employment contexts within the Arts and beyond.

24/7 studio access

Preparation for the creative and practical realities of life as a professional artist

A scheme that provides vocational training and experience in higher education teaching at undergraduate level

Opportunity to submit articles for publication and to develop your engagement with critical and public opinion

There are over 20,000 original artworks in Aberystwyth School of Art’s collection

Aberystwyth University is a top 50 university for research power and intensity – REF 2014

100% of Aberystwyth School of Art’s research was either world leading or internationally excellent in terms of research impact – REF 2014

75% of the School of Art’s publications were of an internationally recognised standard or higher – REF 2014

Opportunity to work closely with staff in a stimulating research environment

Opportunity to study within one of the UK’s up-and-coming Schools of Art and to develop as a confident artist in a comfortable environment

Course content and structure

The course can be studied either full-time or part-time. When studied full-time, the course is divided into two parts over three semesters. In Part One (September to May), you will study a number of core modules, together worth a total of 120 credits. Modules include Art and Visual Culture, Vocational Practice, Portfolio Development, and Exhibition 1. In Part Two, you will explore and resolve your chosen artistic problem (agreed in consultation with your supervisor), culminating in the second of your two public exhibitions. This study is equivalent to a Masters dissertation and is worth 60 credits.

The taught part of the course is delivered through lectures, seminars, and practical exercises. During semester three (June-September), you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Core modules:

Exhibition 1: Consolidation
Exhibition 2: Resolution
Vocational Practice

Contact Time

Approximately 10-14 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

In Part One, students are assessed via a mix of exhibitions, portfolios, essays, presentations, web-design production, and teaching experience projects. Successful completion of the Part 2 exhibition leads to the award of an MA.

Skills

Throughout this course you will develop a wide array of skills that will not only market you as a professional artist, but also as a mature individual with attractive skills and qualities for potential employers. This course will encourage you to:

Develop and sustain a self-initiated programme of work;
Increase your critical faculties;
Increase your technical possibilities, developing individual abilities in a certain area of art practice to the highest standards possible;
Develop your skills, knowledge, and hands on experience of artistic processes;
Develop a conceptual, practical and historical framework for your Art;
Play an active, learning based role in the operation of the School’s galleries;
Stage public exhibitions and perform as a professional, exhibiting artist;
Hold up your work against scrutiny from tutors, peers, critics, and the public;
Improve your capacity for conducting a critical review of yours and others’ work through discussion, presentation and writing;
Develop research and study skills;
Manage the practicalities of exhibition preparation, installation, and curation

Careers

The range of posts to which our graduates progress widens all the time. Our alumni have gone on to work:

- For designing companies
- In museums and galleries
- As art teachers
- On education programmes in galleries
- In gallery assistant posts
- Producing family-based learning activities in galleries and museums

Our graduates have also taken up exciting internships and traineeships with a variety of national and international organisations, progressed to further academic study (PHDs), and recent MA graduates were selected for the FBA Futures show held yearly at the Mall Galleries in London.

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The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice. Read more
The course is designed to enable you to strengthen your position as an artist with a move from undergraduate study or re-entry at postgraduate level characterised by an increased depth of research and increasingly sophisticated, critically reflexive, material practice.

The programme supports the development of your visual research process and enables a testing ground of methods, genres, concepts and contexts that challenge the boundaries and relationship between theory and practice.

Course content
The MA Fine Art is a broad, studio-based programme with an open and inclusive approach to fine art practice. The programme encourages both specialist and cross-disciplinary approaches enabling students to extend and deepen their knowledge and application of fine art practice.

The curriculum is structured on Practice as Research, through which specialist studio disciplines are developed within cultural, aesthetic and socio-political contexts supporting the creative exploration of ideas through practical skills, research methodologies, theoretical and analytical frameworks. This places individual practice at the centre of the programme. Studio-based modules run throughout the programme and maintain the dynamic interrelation between visual research, concepts and theory. Studio research can be developed within: painting, textiles, sculpture (including ceramics), printmaking and digital media.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time taught including dissertation £5670.00.

Part time - 30 credit module fee £945.00. Dissertation fee £1890.00

There is an Alumni Discount of 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees for 2017 are £12,360.00

Our facilities
Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

The Art department are situated in the dedicated artOne building comprising outstanding studio and workshop facilities. It is an exciting place to study, providing a dynamic and supportive learning environment for the production of original new art work.

The well-equipped workshops and studios provide environments for you to create experimental, inventive and ambitious work. The main studio space in the purpose built artOne building provides individual studio spaces for all students as well as bookable spaces for installation, performance and projection work. If you are doing studio practice modules, you will be allocated a personal studio base in which you can carry out your self-directed projects and art work.

All students also have access to workshop areas and technical support in the key disciplines of the Fine Art programmes. The workshops reflect the range of options across the various degree programmes. A distinctive aspect of the department is that of individualized working areas in the studio space.

Where this can take you
The course provides the opportunity to concentrate on a specific area of research.

Potential Careers

Professional artist
Art teacher, educator, or technician
Art administration and management in galleries and museums
Art therapy (with extra professional qualification) and art community work
Art journalism
Curator

Work placements
Recent students have worked on site-specific commissions, community arts projects, and work placements with local galleries and museums, residencies in schools, and even creating their own virtual gallery. The experience is invaluable in terms of working to time and budgetary constraints, and in dealing with the public.

Indicative modules
Distinctive features of the course:

Practice-based Fine Art research in Painting, Sculpture (including Ceramic), Textiles, Printmaking and/or New Media and technologies
Opportunities to work with nationally recognised arts researchers
Development of professional working practices
All students may leave with a fully functioning website for their own work (the emphasis being on the development of an existing site rather than building one from scratch)
Theory and Research Methodologies linked to practical studio work
Full time students offered studio space
Use of 'artOne' BA studio facilities for full and part time students in the summer period.
Optional modules:

The development of fully functioning websites for students' own work
Share in collaborative work through 'Practising Arts with New Technologies' module.

Teaching and Assessment
To gain an MA students need to complete four out of five modules plus the Independent Exhibition. This is an independent research project, and is largely practical, culminating in a professional context exhibition.

Read less
The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. These majors emphasize a combination of theory and practice relevant to their discipline. Faculty, comprised of artists and scholars, foster an environment of active engagement with material, critical and conceptual investigations in production and performance. The M.F.A. program allows graduate students to concentrate in their chosen disciplines and to synthesize their research into a unique and challenging Thesis Project. Exceptional facilities, integrated technical support, a lively community of arts and culture, and a commitment to academic and creative excellence are integral qualities of the Faculty of Fine Arts.

Course detail

Building on our reputation for excellent undergraduate education in Art Studio (theory and practice) and Art History/Museum Studies, the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Art offers students the opportunity to join a dynamic community of contemporary visual artists, historians, and scholars. As a smaller program with high caliber students, the MFA in Art encompasses material, critical, and conceptual investigations in contemporary art through an exceptional level of interaction with faculty, staff, and visiting artists. The MFA in Art is a two-year, full-time studio program of applied and academic study. The University of Lethbridge is committed to providing competitive financial support to all graduate students.

Located a short drive from Calgary, the United States border, and Canadian Rockies, Lethbridge is a growing city that enjoys a diverse geography of prairie, rolling hills, and an expansive natural river valley area. Lethbridge is home to numerous artist collectives, the Allied Arts Council, Trapdoor artist-run centre, and several contemporary art galleries including the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, Casa, Niche Gallery, Trianon Gallery, Parlour, and the nationally acclaimed Southern Alberta Art Gallery. Several sites for exhibitions are available to graduate students, including in the University of Lethbridge Penny Building, which provides a strong downtown presence.

The University of Lethbridge possesses one of the largest and most accessible art collections in Canada, fostering direct student access to 19th, 20th, and 21st century national and international artwork. A lively and extensive Visiting Speakers in the Arts Program enhances communication with national and international artists, writers, critics, and curators. MFA students are encouraged to augment their studio practice through interactions with our strong Art History/Museum Studies Program, and other graduate programs in the Faculty of Fine Arts (New Media, Music, and Drama). The University’s liberal arts focus offers opportunities to take courses and explore collaborations with the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences.

During the summer months, a unique studio residency is available to graduate students through the University of Lethbridge Gushul Studio Residency Program, located in the Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.

Located in the U of L Centre for the Arts, the Art Department is supported by excellent studio and resourced with a wide range of outstanding technical workshops and digital facilities. Students also have access to an extensive collection of HD and analog cameras, lighting kits, video, and sound equipment.

For more information, including admission requirements and tuition, visit the School of Graduate Studies http://www.uleth.ca/graduatestudies/

Areas of Study

Applications for the upcoming term will have available supervisors in the following areas:

- Drawing
- Installation and Spatial Art
- Painting
- Performance
- Photo Arts (analog and digital)
- Print Media
- Media Arts (sound, video, computer, electronics)
- Sculpture (traditional and experimental fabrication)
- Social Practice

Why study at the University of Lethbridge?

As a graduate student at the University of Lethbridge, you’ll find yourself at the centre of a student-focused environment that nurtures innovation, critical thinking and creativity.

The University of Lethbridge is one of Canada’s top-ranked universities and leading research institutions.

At the foundation of our graduate programs is a multidisciplinary and personalized experience. A collaborative environment is encouraged between faculty and students. This means you have flexibility in decisions regarding the research and learning path you take.

At the U of L, we are committed to helping every one of our students thrive. From aiding with financial support to one-on-one mentorship to individualized career advice, you’ll find support every step of the way.

When you graduate, you will have the confidence you need to succeed in whatever you do, whether that means pursuing further education, teaching in an academic setting or establishing a professional career.

We’re here to help as you find the answers to your questions. As Alberta’s Destination University, the U of L gives you room to think, create and explore, providing a university experience unlike any other.

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/apply

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/award-opportunities

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants.

You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression.

Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices.

It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market.

Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

Read less
Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Read more
Prepare for a career as a professional artist. Independently develop your practical work, research skills and critical thinking, with support from our experienced staff and visiting artists. Test out your ideas in a professional environment and gain invaluable experience of exhibiting, curation and collaboration.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/fine-art

Overview

Our Master’s course will allow you to investigate a range of approaches used in fine art, from painting, sculpture, and printmaking, to more contemporary media such as photography, video, digital media, installation, sound and performance.

You’ll spend much of your time working and researching independently - but you’ll also learn about recent theories, contexts and practices in lectures, seminars and one-to-one tutorials.

We’ll give you the chance to test out your ideas in a professional environment, and to pick up important transferable skills for your career through group and individual presentations and critiques, exhibiting, curation and critical writing.

Here at Cambridge School of Art, you’ll be supported by lecturers who are themselves experienced artists. So as well as having access to artists who are working across many disciplines at the forefront of contemporary art practice, you’ll receive invaluable advice and direction for your future career.

Teaching times: Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am-5pm (full-time); Wednesdays 10am-5pm in Year 1 and Tuesdays 10am-5pm in Year 2 (part-time).

Careers

As well as preparing you for work as a practising artist, you’ll pick up skills and knowledge that will equip you for other roles. Our past students now enjoy careers in further and higher education, museum and gallery management, public arts projects, artist in residence schemes and fellowships opportunities, both in the UK and abroad.

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Fine Art.

Our links with local art organisations, such as Aid & Abet, Changing Spaces, Wysing Arts Centre and Cambridge Artworks, will give you the chance to take part in professional exhibitions, portfolio reviews and live projects.

You’ll also have access to events such as Creative Front Futures, which will give you a taste of the different creative industries, and be able to take part in Fine Art Professional Practice and networking initiatives for both students and alumni.

Our Fine Art Research Unit (FARU) runs fortnightly lectures that will give you a chance to hear contemporary artists and staff talk about their work, and engage in debates about art practice. Recent speakers have included Phillip Allen, Juan Bolivar, Rebecca Fortnum, Danny Rolph, Hayley Newman, Günter Herbst, David Kefford, Cally Spooner, Tim Ellis, Andrew Grassie, Lilah Fowler, Jemima Brown, Caroline Wright and Matthew Derbyshire.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research
Acts and Discourses
Fine Art: Critical Practice
Master's Dissertation Art and Design
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

On most of our core modules, you’ll demonstrate your progress through visual research outcomes supported by a written evaluative statement, except for the Master’s Dissertation where you’ll submit a 6,000-word contextual essay.

Specialist facilities

You’ll have the chance to experiment with many different art forms, making use of our MA studios, printmaking and 3D/sculpture workshops, photography dark rooms, and computer suites for video production and digital imaging. You’ll also have access to three brand new Mac suites with Adobe Creative Suite software, plus high-quality 27-inch monitors.

If you're a full-time student, you'll have an individual studio space to work in. If you're part-time, you'll need your own external studio facility, but may be able to negotiate some temporary on-site space for specific projects. Whether you're full-time or part-time, you'll be based in our MA studios and we'll encourage you to make full use of them both during and outside of formal teaching times. You can also arrange to use the studios on weekday evenings and at weekends during term-time.

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Programme description. The curriculum of this programme is under review for the 2018/19 academic year. Programme structure and course availability is subject to change. Read more

Programme description

The curriculum of this programme is under review for the 2018/19 academic year. Programme structure and course availability is subject to change.

This programme encourages practices that are speculative and reflective, supporting work in a range of media. It is concerned with ways of learning that are experiential – embodied through and understood by the acquisition of a practice.

During the late 20th century, developments within visual art introduced new processes and situations, which resulted in an expanded concept of artistic practice.

Media-related disciplines supported by the programme include sculpture, painting and printmaking, photography, audio-visual and new media. The programme also encompasses approaches to practice that are non media-specific, including intermedia, time-based arts, performance, installation, public art and art writing.

Programme structure

You may complete the MA in one year, or continue on to the MFA. You will have access to a designated studio space and a wide range of studio equipment, technicians and resources, including printmaking, metal, wood, casting, painting, photography, reprographic and digital facilities.

Our students often work in groups across subject areas in the School of Art and collaborate throughout the year on critical, creative and curatorial projects. This gives you a unique opportunity to integrate the fields of art practice, art writing and curating, culminating in an exhibition of your own work or in a research project of your own design.

We regularly organise field trips and offer short residency and project opportunities with our local and international partners.

The programme also involves the theoretical study of this family of media and approaches, drawing on related fields and methods.

Facilities

Students on this programme will benefit from studio-based learning in Edinburgh College of Art's (ECA) historic Lauriston Place campus, along with the exhibitions and events associated with a vibrant art college. The art college experience will be complemented by the University's extensive range of student support facilities, its libraries, student societies, and student accommodation.

Our purpose-built studios are adaptable, serving both as working studios and project and exhibition spaces. Our workshops and foundry provide excellent accommodation for working in wood, metal, mould-making, casting and carving and there are facilities for working with sound, digital imaging and video editing.

The programme develops from a broad to a specialist understanding of the technical resources and validating contexts in which artists work today, drawing inspiration and nourishment from the experience of our international student cohort.

Career opportunities

This programme enables you to develop an ambitious art practice as well as providing you with the organisational and economic knowledge required to thrive as a self-employed artist. You will also be qualified to teach studio art in higher education and to work in the contemporary art sector.



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