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Graduates in Civil Engineering work in the field of constructions and infrastructures. The subjects taught in the Master’s Degree Program aim at strengthening the basic preparation of the students, providing them, at the same time, with an adequately deepened knowledge of topics central to Civil Engineering. Read more

Mission and goals

Graduates in Civil Engineering work in the field of constructions and infrastructures. The subjects taught in the Master’s Degree Program aim at strengthening the basic preparation of the students, providing them, at the same time, with an adequately deepened knowledge of topics central to Civil Engineering. Students can choose their field of specialization in one of the following areas: Geotechnics, Hydraulics, Transportation infrastructures, Structures. Suggested study plans help students define their curriculum. Additionally, a General curriculum is also proposed, aimed at students preferring a wider spectrum formation in Civil Engineering.
The programme includes two tracks taught in English.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering/

Career opportunities

Engineers having obtained the Master’ degree can find career opportunities in the following areas:
1. companies involved in the design and maintainance of civil structures, plants and infrastructures;
2. universities and higher education research institutions;
3. public offices in charge of the design, planning, management and control of urban and land systems;
4. businesses, organizations, consortia and agencies responsible for managing and monitoring civil works and services;
5. service companies for studying the urban and land impact of infrastructures.

They can also work as self-employed professionals.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Civil_Engineering_02.pdf
Civil Engineers deal with structures (e.g. buildings, bridges, tunnels, dams) and infrastructures (such as roads, railways, airports, water supply systems, etc.). The two-year Master of Science in Civil Engineering provides students with a sound preparation on these topics, allowing them to choose a curriculum (or ‘track’) among the five available: General, Geotechnics, Hydraulics, Transport Infrastructures and Structures. The ‘General’ curriculum aims at training civil engineers with a broader range of expertise in the design, implementation and management of civil works of various kinds. ‘Geothecnics’ is devoted to the study of engineering problems involving geomaterials (i.e., soil and rock) and their interaction with civil structures (foundations, tunnels, retaining walls).
‘Hydraulics’ deals with problems concerning water storage, transportation and control (pipelines, sewers, river and coastal erosion control, reservoirs). ‘Transport Infrastructures’ covers various subjects of transportation engineering (road and railway design, airport and harbor design, modeling of transport fluxes). ‘Structures’ is devoted to the analysis and design of civil and industrial structures
(steel and concrete buildings, bridges, etc.). The tracks ‘Geotechnics’ and ‘Structures’ are taught in English.

Subjects

1st year subjects
- Common to the two curricula:
Numerical methods for Civil Engineering; Computational mechanics and Inelastic structural analysis; Theory of structures and Stability of structures; Dynamics of Structures; Advanced Structural design*; Reinforced and prestressed concrete structures*; Advanced computational mechanics*; Mechanics of materials and inelastic constitutive laws*; Fracture mechanics*

- Curriculum Geotechnics:
Groundwater Hydraulics; Engineering Seismology

- Curriculum Structures:
Steel structures*; Computational Structural Analysis*

2nd year subjects
- Common to the two curricula:
Foundations; Geotechnical Modelling and Design; Underground excavations; 1st year subjects marked by * may also be chosen;

- Curriculum Geotechnics:
Slope Stability

- Curriculum Structures:
Earthquake Resistant Design; Bridge Theory and Design; Structural rehabilitation; Precast structures; 1st year subjects marked by * may also be chosen

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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The programme links the fundamental disciplines of Civil Engineering (design and construction of civil and environmental structures and infrastructures)… Read more

Mission and Goals

The programme links the fundamental disciplines of Civil Engineering (design and construction of civil and environmental structures and infrastructures) with a broad overview of the most advanced Risk Management tools, with particular attention to forecasting and prevention issues concerning structures and infrastructures and soil, on which they are built or embedded, due to natural and anthropic causes.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

Career Opportunities

The graduate in Civil Engineering for Risk Mitigation deals with the design of structures and infrastructures, planning, control and management of town and land systems, evaluation of the environmental impact of structures and infrastructures as well as research in public and private institutes. He/she can therefore find employment with construction companies, design and consultancy companies and has access to Public Administration offices.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Civil_Eng__Risk_Mitigation.pdf
The Master of Science programme is aimed at providing knowledge and expertise in the field of structural and non-structural measures for the mitigation of natural and anthropic hazards. It offers a synthesis of fundamental and advanced civil engineering tools for Risk Management, integrated by competences in different areas (land use planning, economics and finance, communication, law, psychology). The graduate in C.E.R.M. deals with the design of structures and infrastructures, planning, control and management of town and land systems, and he/she is able to evaluate the environmental impact of structures and infrastructures. He/she can find employment in construction, design and consultancy companies and may have access to contests for positions in the Public Administration.
The programme is taught in English

Subjects

In the first year the following topics are proposed:
- Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
- Soil-Structure Interaction
- Tools for Risk Management
- Flood Risk
- Structural Analysis
- Fundamentals of Gis

In the second year students choose three thematic modules among the followings: Engineering Structures for the Environment; Geo-Engineering Techniques for Unstable Slopes; Emergency Plans for Hydro-Geological Risk; Structure Retrofitting for Seismic and Exceptional Loads; Transport management in emergency planning; Hazards from Industrial Sites: Process Analysis and Risk Assessment.

The final project is devoted to the solution of a field case.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/civil-engineering-for-risk-mitigation/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Read more
Computer science has a brilliant future! You could help to create new network solutions, build the future digital society, develop secure digital services, or be involved in a ground-breaking international software project. Perhaps you will develop algorithms for utilising genome data in medicine or optimise bus routes using positioning data. Do you wonder about all the things that can be automated? Or would you like to dig deeper and become a researcher?

In the Master’s programme in computer science you can become an expert in a wide range of fields. You will have access to the focus areas of research in computer science at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, distributed or networked systems, and software engineering. You will gain lasting professional skills for specialist, design, or managerial posts in the corporate world, or for research and doctoral education, since the Master’s programme in computer science gives you the aptitude for both independent working and multidisciplinary teamwork.

This education will give you:
-The ability to advance your knowledge in the different areas of computer science.
-The skill to seek, assess, and analyse scientific information in your own area of expertise, and apply the methods of the field in an ethical and sustainable way.
-The ability to act as expert in the field, and to develop the practices and methods of your field in cooperation with specialists from other fields.
-Oral and written communication skills in an international work environment.

The quality teaching within the computer science programme at the University of Helsinki has been highlighted repeatedly in national and international teaching assessments. The student-centred, in-depth learning gives you a solid basis for life-long learning. Studying at the leading research unit for computer science in Finland offers you constant interaction with current research and insight into the development patterns in the field.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

In future, we will increasingly be using intelligent tools, consisting of networked hardware, software, services, and data. They will work based on intelligent, learning algorithms, data streams carried by communication protocols, and global infrastructures.

Within the Algorithms sub-programme, you will study effective algorithms and their application within other disciplines and in corporate life. Future IT systems will contain more and more intelligent components, the function of which will be based on complex mathematical models created automatically with the aid of machine-learning methods. The problems to be solved are computationally challenging, and the ever increasing amounts of data will create their own challenges when it comes to the efficiency of the algorithms needed.

The Networking and services sub-programme educates you to become an expert and strategic leader in the design and management of new global infrastructures. The infrastructures include Internet technologies in fixed networks and mobile environments, as well as the information and service networks built on top of them. Focus areas include the theory, data security, and trust within distributed systems, interactive systems, and the adaptability of services in a changing environment.

The Software systems sub-programme introduces you to the design and implementation of advanced software. The development of a shared software framework or platform for several software products is very demanding both technically and from the development project viewpoint. Developing such software requires technical skills, but also team- and project work, quality assurance, and communication. Within this sub-programme, you can specialise in software engineering, software technology, or information management, and study the current research questions in these areas in depth.

Selection of the Major

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for computer science are:
-Algorithms
-Networking and services
-Software systems

You can select any of these programmes according to your preferences at the beginning of your studies. The sub-programme determines which courses you should take.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme comprises 120 credits, which can be completed in two years, in accordance with an approved personal study plan. The degree includes:
-80 credits of advanced courses, including shared courses within the programme, courses within the programme which support the thesis topic, the Master’s thesis (Pro gradu), 30 credits.
-40 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes. The other courses can include a work-orientation period.

Career Prospects

The employment outlook within the field is excellent. Masters of computer science find varied positions within the ICT field, both as employees and entrepreneurs. The nature of the education is also geared towards giving you an aptitude for managerial posts. All the sub-programmes provide the qualifications to find employment in a wide variety of jobs.

Software-system graduates often start their careers as software developers and designers, while network graduates often start with software at the infrastructure level (such as data communications, computation, or data entry). The skills learned in the algorithms sub-programme enable you to work on challenging tasks in various fields.

As a graduate you can find employment within small or large corporations as well as organisations in the private, public, or third sector. Due to the global nature of the field, you can find employment anywhere in the world. Taking modules from other education programmes will help you apply your computer science skills in other areas. Many jobs are based on these combinations.

Thanks to its strong scientific basis, the degree is also an excellent springboard to a doctoral programme.

Internationalization

There is a very international atmosphere within the programme, as nearly a third of the students come from abroad, and the advanced courses are instructed by international researchers.

In addition, the University of Helsinki and the Faculty of Science offer you many opportunities for international activities:
-Instruction in English within other education programmes.
-International tasks within the students’ organisations or union.
-Language courses at the Language Centre of the University of Helsinki.

You can also get information and counselling about independent international experience, such as:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeships abroad.

Computer science at the University of Helsinki is a popular exchange location, especially from Germany. Some 5-10 students come annually; exchange students have come from 14 countries in recent years. The students in the department have taken exchange periods in 16 countries in the past few years.

Research Focus

There are several multidisciplinary research projects under way at the Faculty of Science, which are being carried out in cooperation with the research institutes on the science campus and with other faculties, universities, and corporations. The role of computer science within these projects is to develop the basic methods of the discipline in strategic areas and to collaborate in depth with other disciplines.

The sub-programmes within the Master’s programme cover a considerable part of the strategic focus areas of computer science research at the University of Helsinki: algorithms, data analysis and machine learning, networking and services, software systems, bioinformatics, and data science.

Computer science is part of three Finnish Academy centres of excellence: for computational inference, inversion problems, and cancer genetics. These units represent the collaboration between computer science and other disciplines.

Computer science has coordinated the long-lived Algodan centre of excellence, which has been the basis for many current research groups.

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The Master of Science Programme (LM) in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production wants to provide students with a high level of advanced training, to enable them to operate in the areas the most qualified with reference to the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and related manufacturing. Read more

Aims and Basic Characteristics:

The Master of Science Programme (LM) in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production wants to provide students with a high level of advanced training, to enable them to operate in the areas the most qualified with reference to the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and related manufacturing.

The degree course aims at training a professional engineer with a thorough knowledge and understanding of the principles of systems engineering of transportation, logistics and production, in which to realize the acquired ability to conceive, plan, design and manage complex, innovative systems and processes, with particular attention to the related safety aspects.
The degree in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production will support the state exam for a license to practice in all the three areas of Engineering: Civil and Environmental, Industrial, and Information.

The typical professional fields for graduates in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics, and Production are those of the design and management of safety systems, with particular reference to the transport systems, the development of advanced innovative services, the management of logistics and production, in private and public enterprises, and public administration.

For any information, feel free to write to Prof. Nicola Sacco: safety_at_dime.unige.it

Job opportunities:

• engineering companies and/or large professional firms operating in the field of design, implementation, security management with reference of the transport systems and territorial
• public and private institutions that handle large lines infrastructure (railways, highways, ...)
• government (municipalities, provinces, regions, port authorities, ...)
• freelance
• research structures (universities, research centers, ...)

What Will You Study and Future Prospects:

The main goal is to enable M.Sc. graduates to operate in the various activities related to safety in transport systems, logistics, and production, but also of the territory where they are located.

The course provides notions about:

• the risk assessment of local systems, and in particular the planning, design and management of both safety (protection against accidental events) and security (protection than intentional events);
• the evaluation in terms of cost/benefits of different design alternatives for risk mitigation in transport, logistics, and production systems;
• the planning and management of the mobility of people and goods, through the knowledge of the fundamental elements of transport and logistic systems, as well as the criteria to define the physical characteristics of isolated infrastructures a network of infrastructures, with particular reference to the relevant functions and interdependencies;
• the design and safe management of transport, logistic, and production systems, with reference to either the systems as a whole, and to the relevant single components, such as infrastructures, facilities, vehicles, equipment;
• the development and use of advanced methods to manage and optimize the performance and safety of road, rail, air and sea infrastructure and transport services, as well as their interactions in an intermodal framework, by means of the design and implementation of monitoring, regulation, and control systems via the most advanced technologies related to their specific disciplines;
• the analysis and evaluation of the externalities of transport and logistic systems, with explicit reference to the particular safety aspect and issues characterizing each phase of the mobility of people and goods, even within the production plants connected, and their interaction with surrounding environment.

The course is articulated into two alternative curricula:

1. TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS: This curriculum concentrates on the problems related to design and manage the complex systems that realize a safe and effective mobility of passengers and freights.

2. INDUSTRIAL LOGISTICS AND PRODUCTION: This curriculum concentrates on the problems related to design and manage the complex systems that realize a safe and effective production plant internal logistics and management.

Entry Requirements:

Admission to the Master of Science in Safety Engineering for Transport, Logistics and Production is subject to the possession of specific curricular requirements and adequacy of personal preparation.

The access requirements are equivalent to those provided by the general educational objectives of all three-year university degree in classes of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Information Engineering, and Industrial Engineering. In fact, one of the following curricular requirements must be fulfilled:

• possession of a Bachelor, or a Master degree, or a five-year degree in classes of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Information Engineering, and Industrial Engineering, awarded by an Italian University, or equivalent qualifications;
• possession of a Bachelor, or a Master degree, or a five-year degree with at least 36 ECTS (“Base Courses”, e.g. Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Informatics) and at least 45 ECTS that pertain to the Engineering classes, awarded by an Italian University, or equivalent qualifications;

To access, a knowledge of English is required, at least equivalent at B1 European Level.

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This course is subject to approval. Cybersecurity is a fast developing and exciting subject. There is an unprecedented rise in cybercrime, cyber attacks and cyber threats to individuals, businesses and society. Read more
This course is subject to approval.

Cybersecurity is a fast developing and exciting subject. There is an unprecedented rise in cybercrime, cyber attacks and cyber threats to individuals, businesses and society. Resilient cybersecurity systems and infrastructures attempt to prevent attack and protect individuals and businesses from such attacks.

Course overview

This newly developed Cybersecurity course will provide you with the technical and organisational skills to make a difference to society by providing safe and secure digital environments, allowing the public, business and industry, and the economy to function safely.

As a student studying Cybersecurity, you'll contribute to the wellbeing of society by raising awareness of threats and attacks and designing systems, structures and networks to identify attacks and recover from them allowing business continuity.

The course has been designed to cover a wide range of relevant, interesting and current topics in the cybersecurity field. You'll study industry-specific topics and specialise in areas such as network security, cybersecurity in organisations, big data security and breach and incident response.

Our close links to industry and businesses in the North East, as well as the research expertise of our academics makes this course unique and ensures that the course structure is developed according to the needs of the employment sector. We work alongside the following companies: Net Defence, PWC, Northumbria Police, SAGE, Accenture and Sapphire.

This course will provide you with a thorough grounding in the creation of cybersecurity solutions for information security, systems security and network security. You’ll develop the skills to determine, establish and maintain cybersecurity infrastructures, and you’ll examine the underlying technologies of secure systems and their inherent risks and privacy issues. You’ll also learn how to select appropriate tools and techniques to address and manage risks, threats, vulnerabilities and potential attacks, in order to deliver cyber resilience.

You’ll cover topics such as digital forensic tools, network technologies, security procedures and defensive programming. You’ll also choose an optional module that covers a particular specialism such as big data security, user experience design or artificial intelligence for cybersecurity.

Throughout the course you’ll develop skills and knowledge that give you the confidence to apply cybersecurity tools and techniques; to be innovative in using cybersecurity skills; to solve cybersecurity problems, identify breaches and attacks; to create opportunities for information security management, risk management and business continuity; and to enable effective and efficient implementation of cybersecurity systems and infrastructures.

You’ll be taught by research active academics that have a wealth of experience, and the research produced underpins the teaching you'll receive.

The course is pending accreditation from the British Computer Society, the UK’s Chartered Institute for IT.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and supportive supervision. At Masters level, responsibility for learning lies as much with you as with your tutor.

Modules on this course include:
-Research Skills and Academic Literacy (15 Credits)
-Network Security (15 Credits)
-Cybersecurity in Organisations (15 Credits).
-Fundamentals of Cybersecurity (30 Credits)
-Breach and Incident Response (15 Credits)
-Principles of Cybersecurity and Cyber Resilience (15 Credits)
-Masters Project (60 Credits)

Optional Modules – (choose one module from the following)
-Big Data Security (15 Credits)
-Cybersecurity and User Experience Design (15 credits)
-Cybersecurity and Artificial Intelligence (15 credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, group work, research, discussion groups and seminars.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include written reports and research papers, practical assignments and the Masters project.

Facilities & location

The course is taught at the David Goldman Informatics Centre, based at the Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s, it looks out over the River Wear and is less than a mile from the seaside.

Sunderland offers one of the most modern and best equipped computing environments in the UK. The open-plan David Goldman Informatics Centre is equipped with over 300 computers, which are continuously upgraded and have attracted praise in an independent evaluation by the BCS.

Join an accredited Cisco Academy department and have access to laboratories fully equipped with Cisco networking equipment, including: routers, switches, terminals and specialist equipment for simulating frame relay and ISDN links.

Benefit from the Remote Global Cisco Academy and have access to our software whether you’re using the WiFi in our halls of residence or you’re at home.

We host high-performance computing platforms, including a Beowulf cluster and a grid distributed system, for concurrent processing of complex computational tasks. You can also access the equipment and licences for our own public mobile cellular network.
Access hundreds of PCs, Apple Macs, or the free WiFi zones across the campus and find the best place for you to study in our unique and vibrant learning space. The University is very diverse with a strong international presence and provides you with the opportunity to explore different cultures.

Study at a uniquely designed library and have access to more than 430,000 books, 9,000 electronic journal articles and benefit from a £1 million annual investment in new resources.

Employment & careers

Progress in some of the most attractive fields and industries as we prepare you for a range of cyber security jobs, including roles such as: information security manager, security analyst, security architect, security administrator, incident responder, security engineer, security auditor, security software developer and vulnerability assessor.

Graduates studying Cybersecurity have gone on to secure employment with a range of companies and organisations including: GCHQ, (ISC)2, Accenture, HPE, BT, PWC, SAGE, Sunderland City Council, Northumbria and Durham Police forces and the Cybersecurity Workforce Alliance.

Businesses and industries across the UK have identified a skills gap in Cybersecurity and there is a demand for cybersecurity professionals in the public and private sectors as well as in the not profit and education sectors. You'll benefit from the University’s close links with businesses and employers in the North East and join an industry-driven programme.

The cybersecurity provision is underpinned by strong collaboration with employers. The provision is further enhanced by the contribution from cybersecurity employers and external experts in a number of ways including a series of guest lectures, master classes and seminars.

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This course aims to prepare you for creative roles in the context of landscape and urbanism design practice and research. Read more
This course aims to prepare you for creative roles in the context of landscape and urbanism design practice and research. Our London location, local and European networks and an international perspective provide the focus for contemporary landscape and urbanism projects, including green and water infrastructures, resilient and adaptive city strategies and the detailed design of places for people.

Key features
-The course provides an innovative design education, with opportunities to participate in live projects such as European and local consultancy within the Landscape Interface Studio.
-Study visits, international workshops, external lectures, live projects, and visits to London shows, museums and institutions allow you to develop experience and knowledge to support your individual career ambitions.

What will you study?

Design projects reflect opportunities and challenges of contemporary landscape urbanism, at global and local scales. Themes include public realm, green and blue infrastructures, wellbeing, growth and transformation through time, climate change, biodiversity, city and identity, and zones of transition. Modules in research and theory support critical reflection, while study of materials and techniques supports appropriate technical knowledge and inquiry.

Workshops include: communication, learning through making, observation, mapping and consultation, building information modelling (BIM).

The course offers interdisciplinary postgraduate learning.

Assessment

Design projects and portfolio, landscape and urbanism manifesto, and an individual design research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Modules
-Landscape & Urbanism Design Portfolio 01
-Landscape and Urbanism Design Portfolio 02
-Landscape & Urbanism Theory, Research and Representation
-Landscape & Urbanism Professional Practice, Process & Making
-Masters Project

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Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Read more
Our Computer Science MPhil and PhD programme gives you an opportunity to make a unique contribution to computer science research. Your research will be supported by an experienced computer scientist within a research group and with the support of a team of advisers.

Research supervision is available under our six research areas, reflecting our strengths, capabilities and critical mass.

Advanced Model-Based Engineering and Reasoning (AMBER)

The AMBER group aims to equip systems and software engineering practitioners with effective methods and tools for developing the most demanding computer systems. We do this by means of models with well-founded semantics. Such model-based engineering can help to detect optimal, or defective, designs long before commitment is made to implementations on real hardware.

Digital Interaction Group (DIG)

The Digital Interaction Group (DIG) is the leading academic research centre for human-computer interaction (HCI) and ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) research outside of the USA. The group conducts research across a wide range of fundamental topics in HCI and Ubicomp, including:
-Interaction design methods, eg experience-centred and participatory design methods
-Interaction techniques and technologies
-Mobile and social computing
-Wearable computing
-Media computing
-Context-aware interaction
-Computational behaviour analysis

Applied research is conducted in partnership with the DIG’s many collaborators in domains including technology-enhanced learning, digital health, creative industries and sustainability. The group also hosts Newcastle University's cross-disciplinary EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics, which focusses on the use of digital technologies for innovation and delivery of community driven services. Each year the Centre awards 11 fully-funded four-year doctoral training studentships to Home/EU students.

Interdisciplinary Computing and Complex BioSystems (ICOS)

ICOS carries out research at the interface of computing science and complex biological systems. We seek to create the next generation of algorithms that provide innovative solutions to problems arising in natural or synthetic systems. We do this by leveraging our interdisciplinary expertise in machine intelligence, complex systems and computational biology and pursue collaborative activities with relevant stakeholders.

Scalable Computing

The Scalable Systems Group creates the enabling technology we need to deliver tomorrow's large-scale services. This includes work on:
-Scalable cloud computing
-Big data analytics
-Distributed algorithms
-Stochastic modelling
-Performance analysis
-Data provenance
-Concurrency
-Real-time simulation
-Video game technologies
-Green computing

Secure and Resilient Systems

The Secure and Resilient Systems group investigates fundamental concepts, development techniques, models, architectures and mechanisms that directly contribute to creating dependable and secure information systems, networks and infrastructures. We aim to target real-world challenges to the dependability and security of the next generation information systems, cyber-physical systems and critical infrastructures.

Teaching Innovation Group

The Teaching Innovation Group focusses on encouraging, fostering and pursuing innovation in teaching computing science. Through this group, your research will focus on pedagogy and you will apply your research to maximising the impact of innovative teaching practices, programmes and curricula in the School. Examples of innovation work within the group include:
-Teacher training and the national Computing at School initiative
-Outreach activities including visits to schools and hosting visits by schools
-Participation in national fora for teaching innovation
-Market research for new degree programmes
-Review of existing degree programmes
-Developing employability skills
-Maintaining links with industry
-Establishing teaching requirements for the move to Science Central

Research Excellence

Our research excellence in the School of Computing Science has been widely recognised through awards of large research grants. Recent examples include:
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data Doctoral Training Centre
-Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics
-Wellcome Trust and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Research Grant: a £10m project to look at novel treatment for epilepsy, confirming our track record in Systems Neuroscience and Neuroinformatics.

Accreditation

The School of Computing Science at Newcastle University is an accredited and a recognised Partner in the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science.

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This Master degree program is a joint initiative of University of Pisa - Department of Computer Science and Department of Information Engineering, and Sant´Anna School of Advanced Studies - Institute of Communication, Information and Perception Technologies. Read more
This Master degree program is a joint initiative of University of Pisa - Department of Computer Science and Department of Information Engineering, and Sant´Anna School of Advanced Studies - Institute of Communication, Information and Perception Technologies.

Objectives

The two-year Master Program in Computer Science and Networking has been designed to meet the growing demand for an emerging kind of professionals with expertise in both the information and the networking technologies.
This expertise is needed in the design and implementation of both innovative software-hardware distributed infrastructures and service-based distributed applications in several areas of industry, e-business, research, social and citizen services, public administration

Courses and laboratories

The two-year Master degree programme in Computer Science and Networking has a total number of credits (CFU) of 120, where a credit corresponds to 8 hours of lectures/laboratory and 17 hours of personal working activity. The program is organized in around 12 teaching courses (6 or 9 or 12 credits per teaching course), of which 9 major and 3 minor teaching courses, plus the Master Thesis (15 credits).

Major Courses

Algorithm Engineering, Advanced Programming, Distributed Systems Paradigms and Models, Fundamentals of Signals, Systems and Networks, High Performance Computing, Network Configuration and Management, Software Service Engineering, Teletraffic Engineering,

MInor Courses

- software technologies for platforms, systems, models, frameworks, tools, security, and applications in distributed contexts,
- communication technologies for optical and photonic infrastructures, and for network architectures, models, protocols and services,
- applied mathematics for architectures and applications modeling.

The organization of teaching courses and laboratories will allow each student to achieve the most suitable and effective working environment. In order to achieve the described goals for high qualification and working environment, the maximum number of admitted students per year is 42.

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Study the Network Security masters and learn how to recognising threats and vulnerabilities to your networks and mitigating these threats. Read more
Study the Network Security masters and learn how to recognising threats and vulnerabilities to your networks and mitigating these threats. You will design and implement secure network infrastructures working with security technologies, perimeter security, virtual private networking, routers and firewalls. You will gain the confidence to make appropriate design decisions based on complex customer requirements involving multiple technologies and implement those designs within tight time constraints. Accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS).

This course has several different available start dates and study methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
SEPTEMBER 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02239-1PTA-1718/Network_Security_(Part-time)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2017 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02239-1PTAB-1617/Network_Security_(January)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Full Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P01017-1FTAB-1718/Network_Security?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

JANUARY 2018 (Part Time) - http://www.gcu.ac.uk/ebe/study/courses/details/index.php/P02239-1PTAB-1718/Network_Security_(Part-time)?utm_source=ZZZZ&utm_medium=web&utm_campaign=courselisting

Programme Description

As networks expand globally their security is of prime importance to all, from large companies to individuals. The MSc Network Security programme, accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS), builds the theoretical and practical skills needed for a career in network security.

The programme provides you with the knowledge and skills needed to build secure networks. It is concerned with the design and implementation of secure network infrastructures. It will include study of security technologies, perimeter security, virtual private networking, and the design, installation, configuration and maintenance of routers and firewalls.

The programme also offers you the opportunity to develop excellent hands-on technical skills which are highly prized by industry. Graduates from the programme will be able to use this knowledge to make appropriate design decisions based on complex customer requirements involving multiple technologies and implement those designs within tight time constraints.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the BCS, the professional body for IT within the UK and a Chartered Engineering Institute.

The BCS develop and maintain standards in educational qualifications that provide an appropriate foundation for those who wish to follow a career in computing or information systems. The programme is recognised as a further learning element for the Chartered IT Professional (CITP), the BCS's own chartered qualification and, additionally, as meeting the academic qualifications required for a Chartered Engineer

On completion of this programme students will be well placed to take the Cisco CCNA Security and CCNP Security -Secure examinations.

Why Choose This Programme?

The programme includes material required for the Cisco Certified Security Professional (CCSP) qualification. Cisco is the largest supplier of network products in the world and the Cisco certification is recognised throughout the world. Successful completion of this programme will leave students well placed to achieve CCSP certification. Students who are unable to successfully complete all aspects of the Postgraduate Diploma may be eligible for a Postgraduate Certificate. The MSc programme follows on from the PgD and requires the student to research and prepare an individual Dissertation of a substantial nature.

Assessment

All modules include coursework and examinations. Practical computing forms a significant part of assessment. This is accomplished through coursework and practical tests.

Career Opportunities

From developing a security infrastructure to recognising threats and vulnerabilities to networks and mitigating these threats, graduates will be well placed to work in any of these roles.

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Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Applied Geographical Information Systems (Applied GIS) pathway aims to develop students in-depth knowledge of GIS-based methods for monitoring the social/human and natural environments. It will also help develop the student's understanding of the spatial interaction of social/human and environmental factors. Importantly, it seeks to increase the student's capability to extract social/human and/or environmental information from a variety of sources, such as remotely sensed data, and to undertake analysis and assessment using appropriate methods within a GIS framework.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation. Read more
Jointly run by the University of Salford and Manchester Metropolitan University, UNIGIS is a three year programme, with the first two years comprising taught units, and a final year to complete a dissertation.

The Geographical Information Systems (GIS) pathway aims to provide students with a broadly based postgraduate qualification in the field of GIS. Importantly, it offers students choice in the selection of their application area (with a range of units available). The pathway helps students to develop an in-depth knowledge of the issues involved in applying GIS to solving spatial problems with an understanding of the constraints imposed by the application area(s) and the interactions between data, methods, people, and technology.

The first year of study (equivalent to PgC in GIS) involves three core units:

Foundations of GIS -
This unit provides an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) from conceptual, theoretical, and practical perspectives. Students will learn about the different methods used in geographic encoding and spatial data modelling before employing such datasets in a software environment. The unit concludes with a review of contemporary issues in GIS. Key elements of the curriculum include: Origins of GIS; Representation, Modelling and Geovisualisation; Software Skills; GIS: Today and Tomorrow.

Spatial Data Infrastructures -
Spatial data is key to any GIS project. This unit investigates how spatial data is sourced and also aims to provide students with the requisite knowledge and practical skills to identify and evaluate, against recognised national and international quality standards, spatial data for use in GI-based projects. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Data; Data Standards and Infrastructures; Sourcing Spatial Data; Data Quality; Evaluating Fitness for Purpose.

Databases -
GIS are fundamentally information systems which provide specialist facilities for the creation, storage and manipulation of spatial and attribute data. Much of the functionality offered by GIS software is shared with conventional database software. Indeed, most GIS - at their core - have a conventional database management system (DBMS) around which spatial functionality has been wrapped. It is essential that GIS specialists have a thorough understanding of database theory, design and implementation. Key elements of the curriculum include: Why Databases?; Relational Databases; Critiquing Relational Databases; Implementation and Interrogation.

The second year of study (equivalent to the PgD in GIS) involves one core and two elective units:

Methods in GIS (core) -
The concepts, theories and methods behind the application of GIS are examined in detail. The unit explores research design, data analysis and interpretation and presentation. Special focus is given to methods of spatial analysis and their implementation using GIS software. Key elements of the curriculum include: Research Design; Qualitative and Quantitative Techniques; Fundamentals of Spatial Analysis; Recent Advances in Spatial Analysis.

Two elective units are chosen from:

Distributed GIS -
This unit discusses the most vibrant and rapidly developing area of geospatial technology. Desktop GIS packages are increasingly looking like the specialist packages for serious users that, in truth, they always were. Now, for the very large majority of people who really only want to look at the location of things, we can offer WebGIS systems that deliver what they need directly into their web-browsers. This unit explains the concepts and methods of Internet GIS, development and its applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: From Desktop to Distributed GI Services; Technologies in Distributed GIS; Building the GeoWeb; Tutorials.

Environmental Applications of GIS -
GIS and related technologies such as remote sensing have been widely employed in environmental applications for almost forty years. The advent of satellite remote sensing allowed reliable synoptic data to be available to scientists who have developed numerous models. This together with the decision-making tools and spatially-referenced framework of GIS offers significant support to researchers investigating different environmental phenomena. Data from remote sensing, GPS and other sources provide a valuable input into GIS models for environmental monitoring, modelling and prediction. This unit introduces case study examples of how GIS and related technologies can be used in environmental applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Applicability and benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving and Evaluation using techniques such as Terrain Analysis, Multicriteria Evaluation, Landscape Metrics etc.

Remote Sensing for GIS Applications -
This unit provides students with an introduction to the principles of remote sensing and explores its role in data gathering/information extraction for GIS applications. Key elements of the curriculum include: Principles of Remote Sensing; Satellite Systems; Quantitative Data; GIS Integration.

Social Applications of GIS -
Where an investigation into social, economic, political, and cultural characteristics and phenomena is required, GIS provides a powerful tool. For social applications such as crime mapping and healthcare resource management, GIS can be used effectively to help model, monitor and enable (spatial) decision making based on existing criteria. Social systems are often highly organised and complex - GIS allows this complexity to be effectively distilled into an abstraction representing the most causally related behaviour. This unit introduces case tudy examples of how GIS can be used in social applications and seeks to critically evaluate their potential value. Key elements of the curriculum include: Exemplars of GIS use in Social Applications, e.g. health, crime and urban transportation; Evaluation of the Benefits of GIS; Practical Problem Solving techniques.

Spatial Databases and Programming -
The importance of programming and GIS as part of a larger system, which involves spatial databases, software development and programme coding, has been increasingly realised in GIS practice. This unit aims to develop your geospatial skills in building enterprise oriented databases (e.g. geo-database and server) and creating application-oriented GIS models through programming. This unit also helps you to critically evaluate the issues and trends in enterprise GIS and GIS application development from the perspective of software engineering and geospatial technology. Key elements of the curriculum include: Spatial Databases; Design and Quality; Programming; Tutorials.

The final year of study (the MSc stage) requires the student to design and undertake a substantial and unique independent research project, to be presented as an academic dissertation (max. of 15,000 words).

Read less
In a world where established customs, systems and structures are increasingly unstable there is a need for a different kind of architectural thinking - one that identifies and exploits opportunities, and address the challenges of contemporary society. Read more

Introduction

In a world where established customs, systems and structures are increasingly unstable there is a need for a different kind of architectural thinking - one that identifies and exploits opportunities, and address the challenges of contemporary society. In this Course you'll explore the edges of the disciplinary boundaries of architecture, and test design approaches which respond to the burgeoning need for contemporary city design to focus not only on the traditional ‘hard’ infrastructures of buildings, transport and engineering, but also the softer infrastructures of social networks, organization and human interactions.

Content

In a world where established customs, systems and structures are increasingly under scrutiny, there is a need for a different type of architectural thinking – one that identifies and exploits opportunities and addresses the challenges of the 21st century.

MA Architecture: Cities and Innovation is part of the Spatial Practices programme. It is uniquely positioned at Central Saint Martins to draw on dynamic design thinking from a range of practices from fashion through performance design to product design. Research, analysis, proposition and intervention will enable you to develop new insights, solutions and methodologies for exploring the challenges of new forms of architecture within a rapidly changing environment.

The course capitalises on London's central position within both local and global networks. We see London as a ‘world laboratory’ - an ideal test bed for urban innovation in response to social, cultural and political change, where you can develop strategies and methodologies to expand and enable localised change and drive effective and sustainable development strategies.

High on our agenda are the needs of a broad range of participants in the human environment. You can play a crucial role in supporting communities and individuals to attain the benefits associated with development and physical change in the urban environment, but this requires a new approach. Through closer, collaborative engagement with local groups, you can empower communities to become active participants in the process of development; enabling and building cultural and social, as well as economic, capital.

The increasing complexity of global change, and the related socio-economic, cultural and environmental issues require that architects develop a broad skill set that can be described as 'context-led' architecture; seeking solutions that address local issues which arise from global agendas.

The skills that will allow you to engage with and guide innovation will be of greatest value. Whether in driving small scale transformations or enabling effective large-scale development, graduates of MA Architecture: Cities and Innovation will have the knowledge and awareness to recognise the potential of architecture and the skills to create sustainable transformations in the urban environment.

Structure

This 60 week course is structured over two consecutive academic years each of 30 weeks in its 'extended full-time mode'.

MA Architecture: Cities and Innovation is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 2 units:

Unit 1 (60 credits) lasts 20 weeks

Unit 2 (120 credits) runs for 10 weeks in the first year and 30 weeks in the second year.

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We’re proud to have worked with local experts and employers to ensure our graduates have all the skills industry demands. Gain advanced level skills in the design, implementation and support of information systems. Read more
We’re proud to have worked with local experts and employers to ensure our graduates have all the skills industry demands. Gain advanced level skills in the design, implementation and support of information systems. Explore infrastructure, application software and security measures.

Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-science

We’ll cover all aspects of technologies and user environments, along with the skills to create and manage IT solutions. This will include how to apply hardware and software technology to complex user requirements, and ensure their systems are secure. You’ll diagnose problems and respond to operational challenges.

You’ll gain practical experience in our advanced computing laboratories, setting up infrastructure and creating database applications, multimedia tools, browsers and server architecture.

Our course keeps you up-to-date with latest topics and developments in areas such as web applications and e-business engineering. Along the way you’ll acquire the research skills you need to prepare you for your dissertation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-science

There is currently a continued growth in demand for specialists in computer science and our course builds on the subject's core principles, with a specific focus on the issues involved in implementing and maintaining an information system, as well as its design and development.

This course aims to provide you with:
• the intellectual competencies to pursue personal career goals and aspirations within the IT industry
• the ability to design and implement an information system
• skills to respond to challenging situations, including problem diagnosis, and confidence in selecting appropriate solutions
• an awareness of the moral and ethical issues that an information system might impact on, and the ability to implement IT strategies to • conform with appropriate moral and ethical guideline constraints
• the ability to evaluate the security of existing information systems and to encapsulate appropriate secure controls with the design of such systems

It will cover relevant aspects of software development, design and the technical infrastructures of an information system. During your studies you will be expected to develop software applications to support databases, multimedia tools, browsers, servers and to set up the infrastructure to support them.

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:
• utilise an extensive, in-depth knowledge of the concepts and theory of information systems and their design
• communicate an awareness of current research and developments within the discipline, which you can evaluate and critically appraise
• recognise your obligations to function in a professional, moral and ethical way
• interact with others to manage the implications of ethical dilemmas that information systems and scenarios produce, and proactively formulate solutions
• exhibit an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of information systems design and implementation
• undertake the analysis of complex information systems scenarios even when the scenario is incomplete or contradictory, and communicate the outcome in a coherent, complete and useful form
• apply your knowledge of the discipline, both at a fundamental and leading-edge level to synthesise information which may be innovative
• act autonomously at a professional level when developing information system-based solutions, particularly when involving complex and unpredictable scenarios

Careers

You’ll learn how to lead teams, preparing you for management roles including; support expert, systems administrator or internet software developer. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your academic career and move up to our Computer Science PhD.

Core modules:

Developing Web Applications
e-Business Engineering
IT Infrastructures
Secure Systems
Research Methods
Postgraduate Major Project

Assessment

We’ll assess the application of your technical knowledge through written assignments, software projects, presentations, and a dissertation module.

Specialist facilities

In our computer science laboratories you’ll have access to a range of different desktops, servers and operating systems. You’ll have the additional advantage of free access to a range of software resources from the Microsoft Academic Alliance. Our Netlab gives you 24hr remote access to software.

Your faculty

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

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This programme is accredited by the British Computer Society and is designed primarily for students with a degree not in IT or computing, who wish to develop much sought after business-relevant IT knowledge and skills. Read more
This programme is accredited by the British Computer Society and is designed primarily for students with a degree not in IT or computing, who wish to develop much sought after business-relevant IT knowledge and skills.

About the programme

Business requires IT professionals who can design, deploy and utilise business-relevant IT-based systems and services. The programme helps to satisfy this demand, deepening your understanding of modern IT-based business systems and addressing related development, acquisition and deployment issues in modern organisations. This programme has UK and international appeal as it can broaden and deepen your expertise.

Your learning

The programme consists of a combination of core and specialisation-option modules (specialisations offered subject to demand).

Trimester 1 – Topics include modern database design, network-based technology infrastructure and object-oriented analysis and design methods for modern IT systems development.

Trimester 2 – You may follow technically-oriented specialisations including Oracle-based advanced database development, Java based application development, web technology development, data and network security, wireless networking and Internet of Things.

Alternatively you may follow business-oriented specialisations including eBusiness, mobile business, technology management, strategic and project management, digital marketing and modern business intelligence and analytics.

Technically-oriented specialisations will enable you to focus on developing technical skills such as database and network design and development, application development, web development, creating IT solutions, and designing IT infrastructures for organisations. Business-oriented specialisations will enable you to develop skills and strategies that will help organisations configure and manage appropriate IT-driven and business relevant solutions and infrastructures.

You can also complete your Masters dissertation whilst working in industry.

Our Careers Adviser says

UWS graduates enjoy careers at Agrekko, IBM, T-Mobile, CAP-Gemini, Amazon, Atos, Adobe Systems, HP, Dell and SMEs. Positions include IT Consultant, IT Systems Developer, e-Business Specialist, Database Developer, Oracle Database Specialist, and doctoral (PhD) researcher.

Professional recognition

The programme is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS).

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info.

Cutting-edge facilities

As you would expect, we offer access to high-quality computing and state-of-the-art software systems as well as tried and tested in demand technologies such as Oracle, CIW, Adobe, CISCO, SAP and Microsoft.

Research and collaboration

We have a proven track record in knowledge and technology transfer in the form of applied research, training and consultancy. More than 65% of our research outputs were rated as world-leading and internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014. We are proud that our research expertise informs teaching and our students are taught by academic staff who are at the forefront of their profession.

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