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Masters Degrees (Information Communication)

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Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas. Read more

Program Areas

Students in this graduate program have a core set of requirements in theory and method courses, which provide foundations in three research areas: Communication and Culture, Organizational and Interpersonal Communication, and Rhetoric and Political Discourse. In addition, students complete their plans of study, with elective courses from among any graduate courses in the department (see link below) or outside of the department, with the approval of their academic advisors.

Visit the website https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/

COMMUNICATION STUDIES (COM)

COM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies. One hour.
The primary goal is to orient new graduate students to the expectations and procedures of graduate study in the department. Topics covered include developing the plan of study, thesis prospectus, comprehensive examination, and choosing advisors and committees.

COM 501 Introduction to Teaching Public Speaking. No hours.
The primary goal of this course is to facilitate the instruction of COM 123 Public Speaking. Students enrolled in this course will provide lesson plans for their classes and discuss options for improving classroom learning.

COM 513 Communication and Diversity. Three hours.
Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 515 African American Rhetoric. Three hours.
A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community.

COM 521 Political Communication. Three hours.
An exploration of rhetorical, media, and cross-disciplinary theories and literature related to political communication as expressed in campaigns and institutional governance.

COM 525 Gender and Political Communication. Three hours.
Study of the impact of gender on political communication activities. Topics include gender differences in political messages and voter orientation, masculine ideals of leadership, women’s roles and advancement in the political sphere, and media representations.

COM 536 Independent Study. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission.
Students who want to count this course toward their Plans of Study must complete the official request form and submit it for the approval of their faculty advisor and the Graduate Program Director.

COM 541 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A survey of major contributions to rhetorical theory from the 20th century up to the present.

COM 545 Classical Rhetorical Theory. Three hours.
A systematic inquiry into the development of Greek and Roman rhetorical theory during the classical period (ca. 480 B.C.E.–400 C.E.).

COM 548 Seminar in Rhetorical Criticism. Three hours.
An examination of various methodological perspectives of rhetorical criticism. Specifically, the course aims to familiarize students with both traditional and alternative critical methods and to encourage students to perceive the rhetorical dimensions of all manner of public discourse, ranging from speeches, advertising, film, popular music to discursive forms in new media and the Internet.

COM 560 Group Leadership. Three hours.
An advanced study of small-group behavior, examining in detail theories of leadership as they relate to problem solving in group situations.

COM 550 Qualitative Research Methods. Three hours.
An introduction to qualitative research methods in communication, including data collection and analysis. The goals of the course are to provide exposure to a broad array of qualitative methods, help students learn to use some of these methods, and to help them to understand the role of research in our field. The course is designed to help student actually conduct research, resulting in two conference-worthy papers.

COM 555 Conflict and Negotiation. Three hours.
Negotiation is fundamentally a communicative activity. The main objective of this course is to understand processes of formal conflict management in mixed motive settings. Students will apply negotiation theory and skills to simulated negotiation cases that include buyer-seller transactions, negotiating through an agent or mediator, salary negotiations, deal making, resolution of workplace disputes, multiparty negotiations, international and intercultural negotiations, and ethical decision making and communication in negotiation. The skills and theory introduced in this course will help students manage integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process to achieve individual and collective goals.

COM 561 Human Communication Theory. Three hours.
A detailed review of selected theories of speech communication with a focus on the critical examination of the foundation of social scientific theories.

COM 562 Theories of Persuasion. Three hours.
A critical review of social-influence theories in the area of persuasion and human action.

COM 563 Relational Communication. Three hours.
Prerequisite: COM 220 or permission of the instructor.
Focused investigation of to communication in close personal relationships, with primary emphasis on contemporary concepts and theories of romantic relationships and friendships.

COM 565 Intercultural Communication. Three hours.
Survey and analysis of major concepts, theories, and research dealing with communication between people of different cultural backgrounds in multicultural and international settings.

COM 567 Seminar: Public Address. Three hours.
A topical consideration of individual case studies from public discourse, designed to probe problems of the nature of the audience, the ethics of persuasion, and the power of public advocacy in mass society. Topics may vary.

COM 569 Communication and Gender. Three hours.
Explores the role of communication in the construction of gender. Covers feminist theoretical approaches in communication and other disciplines, the intersections of gender with other marginalities, and the role of gender in various communication contexts. Approved as a communication and cultural diversity elective.

COM 571 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Three hours.
An introductory examination of historical and contemporary issues in organizational communication scholarship from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives.

COM 572 Organizational Assessment and Intervention. Three hours.
Examines the theoretical issues inherent in the study of organizational communication, the primary factors requiring assessment and intervention, the impact of on-going changes and new information techniques, current challenges facing the organizational consultant, and the practical application of communication processes for improving organizations.

COM 575 Technology, Culture, and Human Communication. Three hours.
Study of the complexity of technologically-mediated communication across cultures. This course combines literature and concepts from intercultural communication with human communication and technology and addresses the challenges of interacting with others via technology, working in global virtual teams and organizations, and participating as a citizen and consumer in the technology age.

COM 590 Internship in Communication Studies. One to three hours.
Prerequisite: Written permission from the graduate program director.
Proposal for supervised field experience in communication studies must be submitted and approved.

COM 595 Special Topics. Three hours. Topics vary by instructor.

COM 598 Professional Project. Three hours.

COM 599 Thesis Research. One to three hours.

Career Options

A Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies can offer many career options. Communication skills — oral, written, electronic — are now recognized as critical aspects in all major professions in the United States. Both in education and in the work force, there is a growing need for those who not only understand how human communication functions in its various forms, but also can analyze and advise others on ways to improve human communication. Graduates typically pursue one of three career paths: teaching public speaking, working in professional communication positions, or continuing with advanced academic study, such as in doctoral or law degree programs.

Find out how to apply here - https://comstudies.ua.edu/graduate-program/admissions/

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This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication. Read more

This course involves combining communication studies, applied linguistics, international management and intercultural communication.

Economic globalisation and rapid developments in ICT mean that many organisations now operate on an international scale, or at the very least interact with consumers, clients and/or partner organisations in other countries. Even ‘local’ companies and organisations may have a multicultural workforce, or offer their services or products abroad. As a result, communication has become increasingly international and intercultural.

Organisations seek to create communication strategies that support their overall strategy and objectives. In doing so, they need to interact with stakeholders who may have a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These stakeholders may include employees, customers, suppliers, financial backers or even local governments. In the Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you’ll learn about the all factors, including cultural and linguistic ones, that play a role in communication and need to be taken into account in order to create effective communication strategies.

In your future career as a business executive or communication specialist, you’ll need to be able to assess the quality, reliability and validity of the research that informs your practical decisions ‘on the job’. In other words, you’ll need to be able to judge whether existing research – as well as your own – complies with the ground rules of academic rigor. The programme therefore places emphasis not only on training your research skills but also on developing your awareness of what ‘good research’ entails.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Why study International Business Communication at Radboud University?

- This is one of very few programmes in Europe (and the only programme in the Netherlands) that also focuses on the cultural and linguistic dimensions of international business communication.

- The specialisation deals with theory and insights that are relevant to achieving effective communication in various organisational contexts; from interpersonal communication in a meeting with (multicultural) colleagues, to marketing communication aimed at reaching international target audiences.

- Students do a (group) internship in which they work towards solving a particular communication issue or answering a specific communication question for a company or organisation. This provides hands-on experience in a relevant organisational setting.

- This specialisation attracts students from different countries and because admission to the programme is selective (max. 50 students per year), you’ll be part of a small group of highly motivated Dutch and international students. This means that to a certain extent, your learning environment is international as well.

- Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their knowledge about current developments in business, management and organisational communication.

- Although the main focus is on international communication in larger, multinational companies, graduates of this programme will be able to apply what they’ve learned in a variety of organisations – for profit, non-profit or governmental institutes.

Language(s) and management perspective

Languages form the heart of communication and that is why this Master’s specialisation is taught within Radboud University’s Faculty of Arts. The programme places a strong focus on the role that languages play in effective corporate communication. Of course, the languages used are not the only factor to consider in a multicultural environment - which is why you will be encouraged to also consider communication issues and strategy from an international management perspective.

In short, you’ll explore the impact of globalisation on business communication, the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in corporate communication, and the human and operational consequences of organisations’ language policy or strategies. In doing so, you’ll also come to understand how such issues can shape and affect an organisation’s performance.

Career prospects

With a Master’s specialisation in International Business Communication, you could pursue a career in government, semi-government, business or academia. For example, our graduates work as internal or external communication managers or press spokespeople in companies, government departments, health institutions or non-profit organisations. Many work in marketing communications at multinational companies, as communication trainers for consultancies, as social media managers or as PR consultants.

- International perspectives

Since the programme focuses on communication in international contexts, and on communication with international target groups, a sizable number of graduates have found jobs outside the Netherlands or with international organisations operating from the Netherlands.

- Wide range of communication functions

Job openings for our graduates can cover a wide range of communication functions, organisational types and (business) sectors. This is because organisations have increasingly come to realise that effective communication is essential to all organisational functions (e.g. marketing, PR, HRM, R&D, finance), and have made a real effort over the past decades to professionalise communications, making (international) business communication an increasingly important discipline.

Our approach to this field

Corporate communication involves orchestrating internal and external communication instruments to support an organisation’s core activities and to manage its relationship with different types of stakeholders. Due to the internationalisation of markets and businesses, corporate communication has gone global in recent years. Organisations that operate internationally need to take different cultures and language backgrounds into account when designing their communication. Culture and language(s) may affect international communication at three levels:

- The management level: e.g. when CEOs communicate with internal or external audiences

- The organisational level: e.g. when a company communicates about its Corporate Social Responsibility policy

- The marketing level: e.g. when products or services are promoted to an international audience in (corporate) advertising.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ibc

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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This programme is a specialization of the MA degree in Communication and Information Sciences. As a student of Information Science, you learn to transfer data into accessible and intelligible information. Read more
This programme is a specialization of the MA degree in Communication and Information Sciences.

As a student of Information Science, you learn to transfer data into accessible and intelligible information. You will do research in the domain of language, text and computer-mediated communication.

In this programme, you will analyse information and communication processes between individuals and within organizations. One question is crucial: what options do new technological developments offer to improve information and communication processes?

The Master's programme builds on the knowledge, insights and skills that you have acquired in your Bachelor's degree. You will learn to carry out research independently and handle information in a professional manner. In addition to courses, you will do an internship. You will finish the degree with an independent research project and a Master's thesis.

All courses are taught in English. Deficiency programs are partly taught in Dutch.

Job perspectives

As a graduate, you can work as a web developer, software-engineer, IT-consultant, application developer, researcher or teacher. You have a wide choice of places to work: it goes without saying that you could find a function in a large IT firm, but virtually any other company or organization with an IT department has a need for Information Science specialists. It is also possible to start your own company or become a researcher.

Our former students work in large information technology companies or in information technology departments of companies and governments. Some of them successfully started their own company. Others began an international academic career and have obtained a PhD degree.

Job examples

- Computational linguist
- Information analyst
- Software developer
- Web designer
- IT Consultant
- IT Manager
- Researcher in natural language processing

As student of Information Science you will develop a solid theoretical and practical foundation for carrying out this kind of research. The knowledge you will gain matches well with current job requirements for researchers in the field of Information Science.

Research in Information Science concentrates in Groningen on development, use and evaluation of language and web technology. Good examples are automated search and analysis of information in traditional and new media, dialectology, corpus annotation,gamification, and syntactic and semantic analysis of text. This research is coordinated by the Computational Linguistics group of the Center for Language and Cognition Groningen (CLCG).

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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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The one year MSc program offers four tracks. Business Communication and Digital Media. Communication Design. New Media Design. Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence. Read more

The one year MSc program offers four tracks:

  • Business Communication and Digital Media
  • Communication Design
  • New Media Design
  • Cognitive Science and Artificial Intelligence

Besides the 1 year Master, also a two- year Master is offered:

  • Research Master in Language and Communication

The MSc in Communication and Information Sciences offers a unique program in which you learn about how people acquire and transfer information and how new means of communication can be used creatively and innovatively. The approach taken at Tilburg University is unique in the sense that the broad concept of communication is examined from many perspectives, including those of linguistics, cognitive and social psychology, computational modeling and document design.

This program is intended for highly talented and motivated students with a keen sense of intellectual curiosity and intellectual ambition. In this Master’s program, you will encounter state-of-the-art research in the broad interdisciplinary field of communication. The point of departure is natural communication: how is information transferred from one person to another? For what purpose? You will participate in a wide range of courses such as communication strategies, non-verbal communication and computer vision. This unique combination of approaches and research traditions will enable you to work as a communication expert, and answer questions such as:

•What is the best way to present information to an audience?

•How do people communicate within an organization?

•How can you influence people's behavior through language?

You take a particular interest in language and you are seeking to broaden and deepen your academic knowledge. You are interested in the many different aspects of communication such as the effect that words can have, how people produce language, and linguistic phenomena such as metaphors, and the stories behind them.

This one-year MSc program offers four different specializations: Business Communication & Digital Media, Communication Design, New Media Design and Cognitive Science & Artificial Intelligence.  

Career Prospects Communication and Information Sciences

After completing your MSc program in Communication and Information Sciences, a broad range of career paths in business, research and education will be open to you. You will be able to analyze and consult on internal and external communications. With a Master's degree, you can start your career as a scientific researcher in this field. And remember that these opportunities are worldwide because your studies are internationally-oriented.



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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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Postgraduate study for the Part-time MA Strategic Communication at Lancashire Business School will suit people who want to develop their career in strategic communication, corporate communication, public relations or internal communication. Read more
Postgraduate study for the Part-time MA Strategic Communication at Lancashire Business School will suit people who want to develop their career in strategic communication, corporate communication, public relations or internal communication.

Communicate strategically

Effective and efficient communication is a core requirement for the success of organisations in all sectors and in all nations. However, it continues to be a challenging goal for many organisations. The MA Strategic Communication responds to the growing world-wide demand for independent thinking communication strategists with the knowledge and skills to enable organisations to communicate effectively in dynamic, diverse environments. It is for people who appreciate that communication practice needs to evolve away from a media savvy tactical focus on press, publicity and information provision to a business savvy strategic focus on relationship management and organisational positioning. Graduates will be able to help organisations manage their stakeholder relationships through innovative strategic communication.

Develop professionally

This course is designed for graduates who aim to start, or develop, a career in strategic communication, internal communication, public relations, or corporate communication management. This course will not only add value to your CV but will also benefit your future employers. Participants have become communication professionals in private enterprise, government, or not-for-profit organisations. They join in-house communication teams and communication consultancies.

Stretch intellectually

This course is for people who want to develop their capacity to think strategically and are ready for a new and personally stretching intellectual challenge. Subjects studied include principles of strategic communication and the impact of technology on communication. You will study rhetoric as the art of speech, and theories and concepts relating to internal communication. The course covers aspects of the management of strategic communication and research methods.

The MA Strategic Communication course team is based in the Division of Applied Communication. The team members are keen, enthusiastic about their subjects and committed to engaging students in the study of communication concepts and theory. The team value the maxim that 'there's nothing as practical as a good theory' and are committed to enable you to develop insight into how theory can be applied to improve communication practice. Our team has international experience in communication practice and an active research culture. They contribute to books, journals and conferences on a range of communication topics.

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Organisations operate within increasingly unpredictable, competitive, constrained and demanding environments. Information is crucial to their success as it is required for decision making at all levels. Read more

Course Description

Organisations operate within increasingly unpredictable, competitive, constrained and demanding environments. Information is crucial to their success as it is required for decision making at all levels. Consequently there is a need to understand the strategic importance of information and develop agile, effective and secure ways to exploit it to its full potential. To do this, effective information capability management must be developed throughout the organisation so that the right information is available to the right people at the right time in an effective, efficient and secure manner.

An appropriate infrastructure is required to enable effective information capability management to address strategic business needs. This is dependent on joined-up systems of processes, technology and appropriately skilled, competent and motivated people focused on delivering clearly understood business benefit. The Information Capability Management (ICM) MSc has been developed to address these important issues.

Overview

Skilled professionals are needed to enable organisations to realise the strategic benefits that successfully exploiting information can provide. Success in business of all types and in all sectors, both public and private, is dependant on:

•Understanding the value of information as a strategic asset
•Developing agile, effective and efficient systems that make this information available.
•Countering cyber threats with appropriate cyber security.

The internationally recognised Information Capability Management course successfully supports the development of these professionals. Students from Government departments, industry and other organisations within the UK and internationally come together to study and discuss issues and develop skills that will enable solutions now and in the future.

Key goals of the course are to provide students with postgraduate level education in order to:

•Develop in individuals an awareness of the management, user and supplier communities
•Recognise the stakeholder roles, needs and expectations within these communities
•Enable effective communication and a shared understanding between these stakeholders in order to meet capability objectives
•Master the principles and practice that underlie the delivery of effective, efficient and secure systems in various business spaces that exploit information in order to provide strategic benefit

Start date: Full Time: September / Part Time: January

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

Course overview

MSc students must complete a taught phase consisting of twelve modules, followed by an individual dissertation in a relevant topic.

PgDip students are required to undertake the same taught phase as the MSc, but without the individual dissertation.

PgCert students must complete the core module (Foundations of Information Systems) together with five other modules.

Modules

Qualifications achieved by completing:
PgCert: Foundations of Information Systems and any five other modules
PgDip: All modules
MSc: All modules and the dissertation.

Core:
- Cyber Security and Information Assurance
- Dissertation
- Emerging Technology Monitoring
- Foundations of Information Systems
- Information Storage and Retrieval
- Methods and Tools for Information Systems Development
- Organisation Development
- Professional Issues
- Programme and Project Management for Information Systems
- Software Engineering (IS)
- Strategic Application of Information Systems
- Systems Architecture
- Data-led Decision Support
- Data Modelling, Storage and Management

Individual Project

The Individual Project is the opportunity for a student to utilise and demonstrate their understanding of the taught phase of the course by applying their learning to a real world problem. It is also an opportunity to develop skills and achieve a greater level of understanding in a specific area or areas of relevance to the course. Students are allocated a supervisor and have access to subject matter experts to support them in the project phase.

Assessment

Spread throughout the programme and includes coursework, group presentations and examinations during the taught phase and for the MSc a research based dissertation.

Career opportunities

Takes you on to further senior career opportunities and to become one of the next generation of senior professionals delivering business benefit through exploitation of information with skills in appropriate areas including business analysis, strategy development and implementation, information assurance, cyber security, organisational development and strategic application of information systems.

For further information

On this course, please visit our course webpage http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/Courses/Masters/Information-Capability-Management

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The course will enable you to obtain a professional qualification accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and recognised by the profession worldwide. Read more
The course will enable you to obtain a professional qualification accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) and recognised by the profession worldwide.

This course brings together a mixture of theory and practice that replicates activities found in the workplace. It attaches strong importance to producing creative and reflective practitioners and prepares students for a wide range of employment opportunities, ranging from traditional librarianship to information management and research. A variety of research methods and techniques are taught and our students are equipped with a broad range of managerial, professional and technological knowledge and skills.

The MSc Library and Information Studies is available to study full-time or by distance learning. It also offers a four-week placement opportunity for full-time students. We are part of iSchool - the world's leading group of Information Science departments

Visit the website http://www.rgu.ac.uk/information-communication-and-media/information-communication-and-media-study-options/postgraduate/information-and-library-studies

On-campus - Full-time or Part-time

Full-time study on campus is completed in 12 months or part-time over 3 years. The course consists of the taught (Diploma) element and the Dissertation element. The taught part is composed of eight modules (each worth 15 credits) and once you have passed all of them you will be eligible for the Postgraduate Diploma. You can then proceed to the dissertation stage (worth 60 credits). Once it is successfully completed you are eligible for the MSc (a total of 180 credits).

Distance learning - Part-time

Study is online through the University's virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle, which offers the opportunity to interact with tutors and fellow students from around the world. All the modules can be also taken on a free-standing basis through the Postgraduate Professional Studies Programme and may contribute to your own Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Stage 1

•Information Studies
•Managing Library Services
•Knowledge Organisation

Exit Award: PgCert Information and Library Studies

Stage 2

•Digital Age
•Cataloguing and Classification
•Professional Fieldwork Placement
•Research Methods

Exit Award: PgDip Information and Library Studies

Stage 3

•Dissertation

Award: MSc Information and Library Studies

In Semester 2, you will present a written research proposal for submission. This will normally form the basis for the Masters level dissertation. You will work independently but under tutorial supervision, to undertake the research and prepare the dissertation.

Full-time Study

In full time mode, you will learn through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshop sessions. These comprise of a mix of group study, discussion, simulation and presentations of findings by teams and individuals. You will work as an individual and also as part of a team on case studies, team activities, presentations and discussions.

Access to our virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle, is also provided giving you access from home to learning materials (including videos, e-books and journals).

Part-time Study

Our part-time delivery mode combines aspects of distance learning and on-campus delivery. You will benefit from the support of the virtual learning environment but also face-to-face interaction with tutors and classmates.

Distance Learning

Our supported distance learning mode of delivery allows you to study online from any location and is designed to fit in around your work commitments. You will be taught and supported by experienced industry professionals who will recreate the same challenging interactive format of the on-campus courses for those studying at a distance.

Our virtual learning environment, CampusMoodle offers students flexibility of where and when they can study, offering full and open access to tutors and other class members. Students have the benefit of being part of a group of learners with the invaluable opportunity to participate in active, group-related learning within a supportive online community setting. The online campus provides students with lectures and course materials and it also includes:
•Virtual tutorials
•Live chat
•Discussion forums - student and tutor led
•Up-to-date web technology for delivery methods
•User friendly material
•Access to our online library

As online learners, students are part of a 'virtual cohort' and the communication and interaction amongst members of the cohort is a significant aspect of the learning process.

Careers

The information industry continues to expand, providing a wide range of opportunities for graduates equipped with a broad range of managerial, professional and technological knowledge and skills. This course prepares the student to work in or enhance their career in all aspects of the information sector. Our graduates now work in all parts of the information and library sectors, ranging from traditional librarianship to information management and research.

The job market is changing too, with fluctuations in the demand for librarians in public and academic libraries paralleled by a continual expansion in the number of librarians and information scientists in specialised information services in both the public and privately funded sectors. There are also many opportunities arising from developments in networking and multimedia information services within commercial and educational establishments. Here is what some of our recent graduates are doing now:
• Systems Librarian, Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland
• Online Information Relationships Manager, Thomson Reuters, London
• Library Media Centre Specialist, International School of Aberdeen
• Head librarian, Western International School, Shanghai
• Senior Information Researcher, U.S. Embassy to Italy, Rome
• School librarian, The Wordsley School, West Midlands
• Group Information & Research Analyst, Acergy Group, Houston Texas
• East Asian Studies Librarian, University of Edinburgh

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields. Read more

The MSc in Information Science is an ideal career development programme for librarians, archivists and other information professionals who wish to update their management skills and experience in the use of information technology, the internet and digital media, or for those from a computer-oriented background who wish to specialise in information fields.

About this degree

The programme includes both practical and theoretical work through which students develop a deeper understanding of not just the technologies themselves but also the implications of applying and managing these technologies in varied information environments. The wide range of optional modules allows students to tailor the programme to fit their individual career specialisms and needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, consisting of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study over 2-5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate - any four of the modules available (60 credits), full-time 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years - is offered but does not carry CILIP accreditation.

Core modules

  • Systems Management
  • Internet Technologies
  • Database Systems Analysis and Design
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Fundamentals of Information Science

Optional modules (indicative list)

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Individual Approved Study
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects
  • Management
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

The list above only indicates commonly chosen options. In principle, students may apply to take any module offered within the department, or in other departments, with the tutors' permission.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project on a specific aspect of information technology and its application, which culminates in a dissertation of c. 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, computer laboratory practicals and classroom practicals, with a strong emphasis on informal teaching, discussion, and the acquisition of practical skills. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, reports, examination, and practical projects such as website design and data modelling.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Information Science MSc

Careers

The MSc in Information Science prepares students for management roles in the information industries with an emphasis on technology, for example: information systems manager, systems librarian, web manager, information architect, knowledge manager, data manager, or indeed any information management role. Our graduates find work all over the world with electronic systems for managing, retrieving, distributing and archiving information.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Digital Delivery Co-ordinator, Macmillan
  • Engineer, Formosa Soft
  • Research Services Librarian, Slaughter and May
  • Technology Auditor, The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS)
  • Executive Director, Open Planets Foundation

Employability

This programme challenges students to think more deeply about the implications of using information technology of all kinds in the workplace, and to consider better ways of designing, specifying, implementing and managing systems in order to promote organisational success. Understanding these issues and having the skills to develop and manage practical solutions equips our students to succeed individually and to help their organisations succeed. Our students achieve a high employability rate on graduating, and rise in organisations as their skills are recognised. Many past students now occupy senior positions in the information world in government, commerce, industry and academia.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Information Studies combines the best of traditional library and archive studies with the latest developments in internet technologies and electronic communication and publishing.

It brings together an outstanding team of researchers, teachers, students, practitioners and information industry leaders to help you understand, develop and shape the emerging information environment while elucidating and building on the historical developments that have created it.

Students benefit from UCL's central London location, close to many major libraries and repositories and information centres, including the British Library and many specialist collections, giving ready access to an unsurpassed range of materials.

Accreditation

Both the MSc and PG Diploma programmes are recognised and accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), for professional qualifications purposes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Master the management of information. Become an expert in managing information in a world driven by big data. Government departments, businesses, libraries, museums and archives all need people who can identify relevant information, retrieve it, organise it and make sure people can access it. Read more

Master the management of information

Become an expert in managing information in a world driven by big data. Government departments, businesses, libraries, museums and archives all need people who can identify relevant information, retrieve it, organise it and make sure people can access it.

Get the professional skills you need to understand and manage information in today's fast-changing world. Learn about information storage and retrieval, while gaining skills in management and communication, information technology and research methods.

You'll gain a thorough, technology-focused and research-based education in information organisation, oriented to the needs of New Zealand information professionals.

Study anywhere

You can study online from anywhere in New Zealand. Some courses are also available on campus in Wellington and Auckland.

Study full time and complete your Master's in two years, or study part time over three or four years so you can continue working.

Specialise

You can choose to specialise in either Library Science (LIBS) or in Archives and Records Management (ARCR) and this will be stated on your qualification. You don't have to specialise, or you can choose to specialise in both areas, which will take a little longer.

International connections and options–WISE

You'll benefit from the School of Information Management's membership of the WISE (Web-based Information Science) Consortium. This links top schools of library and information studies from the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Online courses are made available to other members and you can choose to do up to two of these in your qualification.

Diploma, certificate and single course options

Depending on your goals, you can opt for a shorter postgraduate Information Studies qualification by doing the Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma. These are valuable programmes in themselves, or you can use them as stepping stones towards the Master's degree.

You can also study most courses in the MIS programme individually. This is useful for targeted professional development and you will receive a certificate of proficiency in that one subject area.

Bicultural awareness

Develop your awareness of the Treaty of Waitangi and biculturalism during your studies. You'll gain an understanding of Māori culture and language and a knowledge of Māori taonga, or artefacts, in libraries, archives and museums.

What you'll study

The MIS will give you the broad skills and knowledge you need to work in many information professions. Your studies will include:

  1. Six core courses—you'll learn about different information professions, services and databases, and explore information policy and access issues. You'll also find out how to carry out research in information management.
  2. A research project—you'll do your own investigation into an information management problem.
  3. Four other courses—choose from a wide variety of courses according to your interests and career goals in subjects like Māori information sources, managing archives, and digital technologies. These courses change regularly to include fast-developing subjects.

For the diploma programme, you need to do five core courses and three more courses of your choice. Certificate students do two core courses and choose a further two.

How you'll learn

Information Studies courses are available in a variety of formats. All classes are available online and some are available in person. Some classes require you attend via internet conferencing (iConferencing) or seminar and some can be downloaded and viewed at a time convenient to you.

Classes are held on weekday evenings or on Saturdays. Some classes for core courses or large courses are held in Wellington or Auckland and you can attend on campus or online.

Study materials are delivered through Blackboard—Victoria's web-based learning environment.

Workload

You can study full time or part time. If you are studying full-time you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working full-time.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Careers

Many employers in the information field are now looking for graduates with Master's-level education. Go on to work as a records manager, librarian, web content manager, archivist, knowledge manager or information manager.

Professional recognition

The Master of Information Studies is recognised by these local and international professional bodies:



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With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services. Read more
With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Information Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to curious students who enjoy analysing, understanding, communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information architecture and technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MSc Information Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation: data, information, metadata, database structure, analysis, data visualisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips yous with a deep understanding of information and documentation, and its relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on technology, ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of their studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present their work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MSc in Information Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be as lectures, seminars, group work, discussion, practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of 8 taught modules, you can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)

Career prospects

MSc Information Science graduates have an excellent record of establishing successful careers in:
-Academic and special libraries
-Research data management
-Data analysis
-Scientific,healthcare, business or media information services;
-Content and records management
-Social media management
-Information architecture
-Information literacy training.

The course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Geographic Information and Climate Change at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Geographic Information and Climate Change at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change course provides cross-disciplinary training in the scientific basis of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Satellite Remote Sensing and Earth System Modelling alongside aspects of climate change.

The Geographic Information and Climate Change course places particular emphasis on the technical aspects of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Earth Observation as well as the past, present and future global and regional environmental and climatic change.

Graduates from the Geographic Information and Climate Change course will develop hands-on technical knowledge in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing together with a broad knowledge of the current scientific issues underpinning climate change, and the practical problem solving, ICT and communication skills required for a successful career in either industry or regulating bodies.

It is envisaged that graduates from the MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change course will enter careers in utilities, county councils, the environmental service industry or regulating body, or indeed be well prepared for a future career in academia.

Key Features

Students of the Geographic Information and Climate Change programme will benefit from exceptional computing facilities that include fifteen dual-processor workstations for Earth Observation, a 20-node multiprocessor Beowulf cluster, and the Department’s IBM ‘Blue Ice’ supercomputer, used mainly for climate and glaciological modelling.

Graduates from the MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change course will have broad knowledge of the current scientific issues underpinning climatic change and environmental and ecosystem dynamics, and the practical problem solving, ICT and communication skills required for a successful career in the environmental service industry, regulating bodies or academia.

Aims:

To provide advanced training in understanding the scientific issues associated with environmental dynamics and climatic change,

To provide graduates entering the environmental service industry or a regulating body with the required practical problem solving, ICT and communication skills; as well as a basic knowledge of current climate policy and environmental management,

To provide graduates continuing their academic career with the required subject specific and transferable skills.

Modules

Please Visit our website for a full description of modules for the Geographic Information and Climate Change MSc.

Fieldwork

The Stackpole residential field course introduces students taking the “Principles of Environmental Dynamics” to some of the major themes of the module: environmental systems, sea-level change and human impact on the environment, in a congenial setting in Pembrokeshire. The environmental issues facing the Stackpole Estate are discussed and placed into a historical perspective through lectures and the analysis of long term environmental records.

Research

We aim to be one of the foremost international centres for research in human and physical geography, and to provide our students with excellent teaching and superb facilities in a friendly atmosphere.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Geography at Swansea University is ranked joint 9th in the UK for research impact and 11th in the UK for research environment.

Research groups include:

Environmental Dynamics

Glaciology

Global Environmental Modelling and Earth Observation

Migration, Boundaries and Identity

Social Theory and Urban Space

Facilities

The Department of Geography is well-resourced to support research: there are two dedicated computer laboratories: One of 24 computers in conjunction with Library and Information Services (LIS) providing general IT software and programmes dedicated to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing; One of 10 high-performance Linux workstations delivering software tools for advanced GIS and remote sensing applications.

We have specialist laboratory suites for: stable-isotope ratio analysis; tree ring analysis; extraction and identification of organic compounds; pollen extraction and analysis; rainfall simulation; tephra analysis; soil and sediment characterisation.

In addition, we have recently spent £1.8million on state-of-the-art teaching spaces, including IT facilities, laboratories and flexible teaching spaces.

Student profiles

“I chose to study MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change at Swansea as I had already enjoyed my undergraduate degree here. I really enjoyed that the course is quite full on, with a lot of independent work but a willingness from lecturers to help with any issues you have. Anyone considering this course I would advise to come to the university and speak with the lecturers about the potential interests they have. You get out what you put in. I want to go into a field that requires some expertise, although I feel as though I will need more experience once in or looking for a job, Swansea has provided the stepping stone for my future career. The lecturers helped me because they take a back seat, but I understand that they are there to support me when I need it. They have allowed me to be independent.”

Alice Nolan, MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change

After completing his MSc in Geographic Information and Climate Change, Thomas went on to earn a position at the Associated British Ports Marine Environmental Research. He said of his time at Swansea – “I chose MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change at Swansea University because of the funding Available (Access to Master's Scheme) and specific course content (Climate Change and GIS modules). I enjoyed studying topics in greater depth than at undergraduate level, and the opportunity to undertake my dissertation in partnership with an external organisation. The lecturers were highly approachable throughout the course, and were always available for advice outside of lectures and seminars. Studying at Master's level in Swansea provided the opportunity to build upon the knowledge and skills I acquired as an undergraduate. For example, completing my Master's dissertation in partnership with an external company enabled development of my communication and organisational skills, as well as my ability to synthesize research. These skills have been vital for development of my career in the marine consulting sector.”

Thomas Perks, MSc Geographic Information and Climate Change



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