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This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. Read more
This course examines contemporary and established analytical and conceptual frameworks relating to poverty, conflict analysis and the reconstruction of conflict and disaster-affected societies. It looks at policies and practices, by which individuals, communities and organisations seek to reduce poverty, understand conflict and initiate humanitarian interventions.

Aims

-Provide you with an opportunity to deepen your critical understanding of key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty analysis and reduction, conflict analysis and reconstruction
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, conflict and reconstruction and make judgements about related policies and their implementation
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development and poverty reduction
-Develop professionally-oriented skills related to formulating, investigating and implementing different practical approaches to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, conflict and reconstruction
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, conflict and reconstruction, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, the Global Development Institute has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. Read more
The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people and the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels present the world with its greatest moral challenge. The challenge of understanding and tackling the problems of poverty and inequality is therefore an urgent one. This course is designed to help you engage with this challenge in a critical and constructive way, by offering high-level academic training in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Aims

-Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
-Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
-Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
-Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
-Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
-Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.

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As a result of dramatic economic and social changes over recent years, the study of inequality has rapidly developed as one of the most important areas of inter-disciplinary social scientific study. Read more

About the MSc programme

As a result of dramatic economic and social changes over recent years, the study of inequality has rapidly developed as one of the most important areas of inter-disciplinary social scientific study. Associated with the LSE's International Inequalities Institute, the MSc Inequalities and Social Science offers a comprehensive and wide-ranging programme, providing an introduction to a range of interdisciplinary approaches to the social scientific analysis of inequality.

The programme will enable you to develop theoretical awareness of different conceptions of the meaning of inequality and its various dimensions in a fully international context. It will introduce you to the political economy of inequality and the role of political institutions in combating inequality, as well as different methods for the measurement of inequality, both quantitative and qualitative. It will provide you with the skills to go onto conducting research in the area of inequalities.

You will take a compulsory course in Social Scientific Analysis of Inequalities, at least one methods course and optional courses to the value of three units. You will also complete a dissertation of 10,000 words on a subject of interest related to the courses.

Graduate destinations

This is a new programme and we expect students to go into a wide variety of fields who are interested in addressing inequalities, including government, NGOs, politics, public administration, the social and health services, advertising, journalism, other areas of the media, law, publishing, industry, personnel and management.

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This programme offers a unique opportunity for you to gain knowledge about a wide range of equality issues and to think across the dimensions of inequality. Read more
This programme offers a unique opportunity for you to gain knowledge about a wide range of equality issues and to think across the dimensions of inequality.

Why this programme

-The programme responds to radical changes in approaches to equalities and human rights in Scotland, the UK and beyond.
-Taught by a team of specialists from a range of areas of inequality, including gender, racism, sexuality, disability and faith, the programme looks at what equality and human rights mean and what practical steps can be taken to achieve them.
-You will examine the major causes of inequality today and how the idea that certain groups are less equal than others emerged. You will also study what sustains that idea and how these groups are interrelated.
-If you are interested in going on to study for a PhD, there is a closely-related MRes in Equality and Human Rights which combines a grounding in the subject with advanced research training.

Programme structure

You will take two core and four optional courses, as well as submit a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation.

Core courses
-Equality and human rights
-Methods of social research

Optional courses
-Class and stratification
-Religion in society
-Sexualities and society
-The disabling society

Career prospects

This programme will provide useful background knowledge for careers in areas involving the negotiation of equality and implementation of human rights. This would include work with non-governmental organisations, equality and diversity groups, charities and government.

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Our MSc Emerging Economies and Inclusive Development programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy in particular. Read more
Our MSc Emerging Economies and Inclusive Development programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy in particular. Subjects covered include development theory, political economy, geography and social policy. You may also focus on particular countries and regions.

Key benefits

- Our programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy.

- As an interdisciplinary programme, our MSc enables you to study emerging economies and inclusive development by drawing on a variety of different disciplinary perspectives.

- You may take a wide range of optional taught modules drawing on expertise across King’s with particular emphasis on its Global Institutes.

- We accept students from a wide range of academic backgrounds and mid-career professionals.

- Our unrivalled location in the heart of London brings outstanding advantages. You enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities and wide-ranging access to library and archival resources.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/emerging-economies-and-inclusive-development-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme provides you with high-quality post-graduate teaching and research training in the analysis of emerging economies based at King’s International Development Institute. It also draws on social scientific expertise located across other departments in the Faculties of Social Sciences & Public Policy and Arts & Humanities.

We offer a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy. These include reviewing economic development theory to ask whether these countries offer a new model or models of development, looking at strategies that emerging economies have adopted to promote development, how inclusive and sustainable or enduring these new strategies are, how emerging markets solve difficult problems of promoting growth over the longer term, including development and diffusion of technology, managing trade and financial flows, balancing the role of the state and the market, and dealing with problems of institutional underdevelopment and weak systems of law and accountability.

- Course purpose -

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and other OECD countries and also in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

- Course format and assessment -

A mixture of coure and optional modules as well as a compulsory dissertation.

The majority of International Development Institute modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay; other optional modules may differ. The dissertation module is assessed by a 10-12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and other OECD countries and also in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. Read more
Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. All of these issues require professionals with the practical skills and analytical capacity to build resilience at a national and community level.

Delivered by specialists from the humanities, social sciences, medicine, business and economics, education and law, the course offers a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable development with four streams: Democracy, justice and governance; Gender, conflict and society; Crisis, change and management; and Sustainable resource management.

The course offers an applied approach to the theory and practice of international development. It offers project management, leadership skills development and rigorous research training within its interdisciplinary core curriculum. Foundation theory and practice units address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

You can tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Graduate employment opportunities may include human rights advocacy, aid agencies in government and non-government sectors, the Fair Trade business sector, community organisations, and international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank.

As part of your studies, you will be able to acquire practical experience through fieldwork and internship opportunities at sites of significant development practice in countries such as South Africa, Vietnam, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Fiji. For instance, the South Africa Student Placement Program provides Monash students with an amazing opportunity to gain first-hand experience of international and community development work, through placements with Oxfam and its partner organisations in South Africa. Options to include language extension in individual programs are also available.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-development-practice-a6006?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for international development practice, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise. All students complete Part B. Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for international development practice
These studies will introduce you to international development studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international development theory, practice and research to address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

PART C. Advanced expertise
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should you wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course you should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/arts

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/international-development-practice-a6006?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
Our MSc Emerging Economies and Inclusive Development programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy in particular. Read more
Our MSc Emerging Economies and Inclusive Development programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy in particular. Subjects covered include development theory, political economy, geography and social policy. You may also focus on particular countries and regions.

Key benefits

- Our programme offers you a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy.

- As an interdisciplinary programme, our MSc enables you to study emerging economies and inclusive development by drawing on a variety of different disciplinary perspectives.

- You may take a wide range of optional taught modules drawing on expertise across King’s with particular emphasis on its Global Institutes.

- We accept students from a wide range of academic backgrounds and mid-career professionals.

- Our unrivalled location in the heart of London brings outstanding advantages. You enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities and wide-ranging access to library and archival resources.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/emerging-economies-and-inclusive-development-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme provides you with high-quality post-graduate teaching and research training in the analysis of emerging economies based at King’s International Development Institute. It also draws on social scientific expertise located across other departments in the Faculties of Social Sciences & Public Policy and Arts & Humanities.

We offer a distinctive approach to the study of development by focusing on emerging economies with an emphasis on issues of poverty reduction, inequality and social policy. These include reviewing economic development theory to ask whether these countries offer a new model or models of development, looking at strategies that emerging economies have adopted to promote development, how inclusive and sustainable or enduring these new strategies are, how emerging markets solve difficult problems of promoting growth over the longer term, including development and diffusion of technology, managing trade and financial flows, balancing the role of the state and the market, and dealing with problems of institutional underdevelopment and weak systems of law and accountability.

- Course purpose -

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and other OECD countries and also in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

- Course format and assessment -

A mixture of coure and optional modules as well as a compulsory dissertation.

The majority of International Development Institute modules are assessed by a 4,000-word essay; other optional modules may differ. The dissertation module is assessed by a 10-12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Our programme provides you with high-quality graduate research training for seeking employment in the development sector in the UK and other OECD countries and also in emerging economies, consultancy organisations, private sector companies with global operations and government offices. It is ideal if you are an international student seeking specialist training and/or government employment.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MA in Law, Development and Globalisation allows students to study the relationships between law and development in the context of a globalising world. Read more
The MA in Law, Development and Globalisation allows students to study the relationships between law and development in the context of a globalising world. It gives students the opportunity to study the complex relationship between these processes and legal systems in an international and comparative context, with the opportunity to focus on a broad range of areas including: imperialism, inequality, finance and commerce. All SOAS modules are designed not only to introduce students to the general fields of law, but also to provide an understanding of how generic legal structures and processes may operate in non-Western social and cultural settings. All teachers on modules offered at SOAS are experts in their designated field. Many have years of experience advising governments, international organisations or non-governmental organisation, and many also have been or continue to be legal practitioners.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/ma/malawdevglob/

Structure

To facilitate the study of law, all MA students are required to attend a two-week Preliminary Law, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methods in the September before beginning the MA programme.

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units including the dissertation. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised MA are required to take at least two (2.0) of the three (3.0) taught units within their chosen specialism. The third unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules List or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Globalisation specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
Law and Development in Africa - 15PLAC160 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):

Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
Water Law: Justice and Governance - 15PLAH044 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
Dissertation in Law - 15PLAC999 - (1 Unit)

The Department

Key facts:
- LLB (QLD), BA (joint honours), LLM, MA & research degrees

- unique focus on both the developed and developing world

- research and teaching strengths in comparative, regional, international & global law

School of Law in UK top 5 for proportion of publications judged to be 'world-leading':
18 December 2014: the School was also graded in the top 20 nationally for its research environment. Find out more...

Our strengths:
We have unrivalled expertise in comparative law (China, Africa, South/South-East Asia, the Middle East), complemented by specialists in international and transnational law, human rights, transnational commercial law, environmental law and socio-legal method.

Facts and figures

- We are introducing student exchange programmes with leading universities in the US and China

- We achieve one of the highest percentages of training contracts with Magic Circle Law firms awarded to UK Law Schools

Teaching:
- 91% satisfaction for teaching (National Student Survey 2012/13): 96% of law students agreed that our staff are good at explaining things and 91% said their course was ‘intellectually stimulating’

- Excellent staff/student ratio

- Ranked 10th in UK (Guardian University Guide 2015)

Research:
- Thriving research culture with a packed schedule of seminars and conferences across our research centres and specialisms

- Close links with the internationally-renowned Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) and the Van Vollenhoven Institute, Leiden University

- Each year a number of distinguished Lawyers join SOAS as Research Fellows

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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‘Development’ has come to represent the political relationship between rich and poor countries following the end of colonialism. This programme offers a critical approach to development through the lens of anthropology. Read more
‘Development’ has come to represent the political relationship between rich and poor countries following the end of colonialism. This programme offers a critical approach to development through the lens of anthropology. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-development-rights/

It explores the historical role of anthropological engagement in development, and provides the opportunity to rethink concepts, policies and practices underwriting global inequality.

Offering a critical exploration of the concept of rights (human, indigenous, or gender, for example) and how it is mobilised to make various kinds of claims, the degree presents diverse perspectives on how we might address global inequality.

The Masters includes half a day a week spent on a placement with a London-based development-related organisation, which you will negotiate. This is an ideal way to build work experience and for critical reflection on some of the issues raised in the classroom.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Gavin Weston

Modules & Structure

You take:

-Three core modules that will enable you to explore the theoretical concepts underpinning development, the history of development and its institutions
-Option modules to the value of 30 credits
-Dissertation

Assessment

Dissertation; reports; take-home papers.

Skills

This MA will enable you to develop skills in project design and implementation, critical analysis, and report writing.

Careers

Our graduates have pursued research degrees, either at Goldsmiths or elsewhere, and have taken up employment in charities as well as NGOs and GOs, professional organisations, education and journalism.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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Global Ethics & Human Values allows you to study the urgent ethical issues of our globalising world including climate change, war, terrorism, poverty, inequality, trade, justice and human rights. Read more
Global Ethics & Human Values allows you to study the urgent ethical issues of our globalising world including climate change, war, terrorism, poverty, inequality, trade, justice and human rights. Based in the heart of London close to government, the Royal Courts of Justice, multinational corporate HQs and international NGOs.

Key benefits

- The most wide-ranging and philosophical programme in its field covering the urgent ethical issues of our globalising world including climate change, war, terrorism, poverty, inequality, trade, justice and human rights.
Taught by distinguished academic staff at the School of Law at King's, their areas of expertise include a very wide range of topics in ethics and political philosophy.

- Based in the vibrant heart of London, close to the Houses of Parliament, the Royal Courts of Justice, multinational corporate headquarters and international NGOs.

- Open to students from law, the humanities and social sciences, as well as those with relevant work experience.

- Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/global-ethics-and-human-values-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

You will study three core modules and choose three optional modules. The core topics are: ethics; contemporary political philosophy; and ideological conflict. The optional modules may vary year to year. It is currently planned to offer: human responsibility for the world and its future; conflict: its origins, ethics and containment; human rights; international justice; citizenship; and the ethics of culture.

- Course purpose -

The programme seeks to encourage and develop your own thinking about the complex theoretical and practical issues you will study. It does this by providing you with the analytic skills which will enable you to address those issues with philosophical rigour. It draws extensively on different branches of philosophy, politics and international relations and requires you to become familiar with a wide range of the ideas, concepts and problems within those areas.

- Course format and assessment -

There are two teaching days each week. All modules are run as seminars, with a mixture of formal presentation by the instructor and active discussion among members of the seminar. Instructors are also available outside of seminars, and during the dissertation phase students will have personal guidance from a specific instructor. Assessment for first term modules is by exam, and for second term modules by essay.

Career prospects

This programme has broadened students' awareness of global issues; a number have gone on to do research degrees and work for governmental and non-governmental organisations.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more
This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

Degree information

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules - all three of the following:
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
-Social Development in Practice

Optional modules - one or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Communication, Technologies and Social Power
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Participatory Processes: Building for Development
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
-Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Managing the City Economy

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork
The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South. The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Strategy Funding, Global Witness
-Researcher, Chinese Federation of Trade Unions
-Development Consultant, World Bank Group
-Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
-Project Co-Ordinator, Thamani Youth of Kenya

Employability
Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.

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This programme will develop your critical analysis of key issues within health and medicine, health policy and health planning from a social science perspective. Read more
This programme will develop your critical analysis of key issues within health and medicine, health policy and health planning from a social science perspective.

Why this programme

-You will be able to locate health and its determinants, and discuss the role of equality and inequality, category and location and their influence on health.
-You will examine health issues that arise for different population groups and across national boundaries, including social and cultural constructions of health, disability and chronic illness, and global and national health policies.
-You will make a critical analysis of health and its determinants and develop a deep understanding of the influence and role of equality/inequality, demographics and location on health.
-The University is a leading centre of applied and policy related research. This programme brings together expertise in inequalities in health, health and well-being, disability, drugs and addictions, urban health, health economics and the history of medicine.
-You will study quantitative and qualitative social science research methods, using at least one of these in the completion of an original piece of social research.
-You will be taught by experts from the following world-leading centres based at the University: the Institute for Health and Wellbeing, MRC Social & Public Health Sciences Unit, Strathclyde Centre for Disability Research, Centre for the History of Medicine, Policy Scotland and Centre for Public Policy for Regions.
-The degree is fully interdisciplinary in its structure and content, and is designed to allow you to focus your learning around the global health issues that interest you most.

Programme structure

You will take 3 core and 3 optional courses, as well as complete a dissertation. Teaching will be via lectures, seminars and tutorials. There is also the possibility to take part in project and team work in the UK.

Core courses
-Health and culture
-Health in its social context
-Methods of social research

Optional courses
-Applied qualitative methods
-Cultural, social & biological determinants of mental health
-Developing and evaluating complex interventions
-Epidemiology, evidence and statistics for primary care
-Equality and human rights
-Globalisation and public health
-Health economics
-Health technology assessment: Policy and principles
-Health technology assessment in a global context
-Improving access to mental health care in the global context
-Mental health and disability: International law and policy
-Mental health promotion across the life-span
-Psychosocial approaches to public health
-Qualitative methods
-Social science statistics 1
-Social science statistics 2
-Studies in the history of medicine 1850-2000
-Studies in the history of medicine before 1850
-The disabling society
-Understanding health policy

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions as health care professionals, health care policy advisors and in public health care systems, the voluntary and third sector.

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