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Masters Degrees (Inequality)

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MSc International Development. Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way. Read more

MSc International Development: Poverty, Inequality and Development is designed to help you understand and tackle the problems of poverty and inequality in a critical and constructive way.

The current impoverishment of more than 1.4 billion people, plus the growing levels of inequality at national and international levels, present the world with its greatest moral challenge.

You will learn about the different conceptualisations and characteristics of poverty and inequality through high-level academic training from leading academics, in a vibrant and stimulating environment.

Informal enquiries, prior to application, are welcomed. Please contact Dr Nicholas Jepson, Deputy Programme Director (  ).

Aims

  • Provide critical insights into different theoretical and disciplinary perspectives on how poverty, inequality and development can be understood, measured and explained
  • Provide you with a thorough conceptual framework and the skills necessary to critically analyse key theoretical and practical issues relating to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Provide critical insights into the key strategies, policies and practices currently employed to promote development, equality and poverty reduction
  • Provide a wide range of options for advanced training in areas of specialist expertise relevant to poverty, inequality and development;
  • Develop advanced competencies in transferable areas, including developing reasoned arguments, gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources, undertaking both team-based and independent work to deadlines, and both written and verbal forms of communication
  • Assist you in developing your specialist area of expertise within the field of poverty, inequality and development, and applying your understanding and skills through supervised individual research culminating in a dissertation.

Special features

An overseas field visit is an integral part of the programme. The cost of the visit is covered by the course fee. Recent fieldtrip locations have included Uganda, Ghana, Sri Lanka and India.

Countries to be visited may change their immigration and visa regulations at short notice. We cannot guarantee that where visas are required for the field course, they will be granted. Planning will ensure that, in the unlikely event this occurs, affected students are not academically disadvantaged.

Teaching and learning

Part-time Study

Part-time students complete the full-time programme over 27 months. There are NO evening or weekend course units available on the part-time programme, therefore if you are considering taking a programme on a part-time basis, you should discuss the requirements with the Programme Director and seek approval from your employer to have the relevant time off. Timetabling information is normally available from late August from the Programme Administrator and you will have the opportunity to discuss course unit choices during induction week with the Programme Director.

Coursework and assessment

The taught elements of the programme, carrying 120 credits overall is continuously assessed by a variety of methods (project based reports, essays), involving largely individual submissions, but also elements of group work.

Participants must also complete a 12,000-15,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice approved by the Programme Directors. Students are encouraged to base their dissertations on topics of direct professional concern to themselves.

Facilities

The Arthur Lewis Building provides excellent resources including analytical laboratories, studio facilities, workshops, seminar rooms, an on-site cafe and dedicated computer clusters including GIS facilities.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course will prepare you for employment in a range of development-related fields, including research, policy and practice. A wide range of transferable skills will be developed, including analytical and professional skills. Many of our alumni have gone onto careers in public service, the NGO/charitable and private sectors at national and international levels, as policy officers, managers, consultants or development practitioners - while others have pursued further academic study leading to a PhD and academic careers. Since its foundation, GDI has trained over 7000 individuals from 170 different countries.



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This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Read more

This programme enables you to study development with a specific focus on poverty and inequality, both key aspects of current development policy discourse. Issues examined include: definitions and indicators of poverty, inequality and development; causes of poverty and inequality; poverty reduction strategies; cross-cutting issues such as gender and conflict; practical policy, programme and research skills. 

The International Development Department is well-regarded internationally by sponsors, donor agencies, governments and NGOs. Study with us to benefit from:

  • Expertise in key issues and skills valued by employers
  • A vibrant, welcoming community
  • Individual overseas fieldwork or study visit included in fees (on-campus programmes)
  • Flexible programmes and a wide choice of modules (part-time students also welcome)
  • A diverse and international student body
  • Strong support in study and English language skills

Each programme is taught by a team of multi-disciplinary specialists who work closely with students to address individual interests and concerns. Every student is allocated an academic tutor to support them in their academic progress throughout the year. The department has a long history of teaching students from across the world, and recent students have come from 99 different countries and a wide variety of professional and academic backgrounds.

Course details

Students will explore theories of development in historical context from (roughly) 1945 up to the present in the core compulsory module. The theories are then applied to contemporary development approaches and issues. Throughout, the emphasis is on you developing a critical understanding of the evolution of development theories over the last half century and its implications for present day thinking about development.

The relevance of sociological categories of class, religion, ethnicity and gender in both disaggregating levels of poverty and inequality, and in understanding the processes which foster poverty and inequality in development will be explored in one of the two modules which give this programme its particular identity and focus.

The aim of the other programme specific compulsory module is to examine different approaches to defining and measuring poverty and inequality, to understand the impact of global and national systems on poverty and inequality, to reflect on the potential and limitations of some useful analytical frameworks and methodologies, and to consider some interesting approaches to project and policy led development.

Learning and teaching

Teaching takes place over two ten-week terms, utilising a range of teaching and learning methods, including short lectures, problem solving, role play and group work.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Employability

The knowledge and skills gained in the programme will equip graduates for jobs in international, national and local government and non-governmental organizations, think tanks and consultancies.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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The Double Master's Programme in Demography and Social Inequality gives students the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of two top-ranking universities. Read more

The Double Master's Programme in Demography and Social Inequality gives students the opportunity to benefit from the expertise of two top-ranking universities. Participants on the programme spend one year studying at each university and graduate with two master's degrees: a Master of Science in Sociology and Social Research awarded by the University of Cologne and a Master of Science in Population Studies awarded by the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.

The international master's programme focuses on demographic change, population dynamics and the challenges faced by modern societies due to increasing life expectancy, decreasing birth rates and migration. Students will learn to apply advanced social research methods and data analysis tools to deal with current issues such as ageing, social inequality, family structures, integration and education. They will have the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of these topics and develop interdisciplinary research skills.

Pursuing both a German and a Dutch master's degree will provide graduates with outstanding employment opportunities on the European and international job market.

Please check the programme website for more information and the application section for details on the entry requirements and the selection process.



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At the local, national and global level, we are witnessing an intense period of social transformation and fragmentation. Within this context, there is growing political and policy recognition of the need to better understand and thereby address social inequalities. Read more

At the local, national and global level, we are witnessing an intense period of social transformation and fragmentation. Within this context, there is growing political and policy recognition of the need to better understand and thereby address social inequalities. The social sciences have an important role to play in mapping and understanding how inequalities arise and in tackling their causes and consequences. Innovative developments in the social sciences are offering new methodological, theoretical and empirical insights into entrenched and emerging inequalities of status, resource, outcome and opportunity. This has inspired us to create an interdisciplinary programme focusing on inequality in all its forms and its social, political and economic implications.

This Masters programme equips students with the necessary knowledge and skills to engage in and contribute towards work that tackles the realities and effects of social inequality. Capitalising on academic and applied expertise in the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the Leeds Inequalities Research Network, this programme harnesses leading analytical approaches combining qualitative, quantitative and data analytic methods (in close collaboration with the School of Geography).

In addition to offering an advanced understanding of rising material inequality, the programme encourages an intersectional approach to understanding socio-economic stratification and how this links with physical (dis) ability, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, class and age. It provides a stimulating intellectual environment and cutting edge methodological approaches to comparing and contrasting the formation and consequences of inequalities across a range of national and international contexts. Through an examination of geopolitical and socioeconomic shifts, such as urbanisation and globalisation, students are actively supported to critically interrogate the contemporary character and extent of social inequality.

Research insight

Whilst undertaking this programme, students will join a vibrant and dynamic research led teaching and learning environment in the School of Sociology and Social Policy. You will benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise and extra-curricular activities hosted by the School and its research centres including those in Disability Studies, Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and Research into Families, the Life Course and Generations. You will also access events through the Leeds Social Sciences Institute (LSSI), which fosters cross-departmental collaboration, learning and impact, Students will also benefit from workshops on global inequalities by academic leaders from across campus and research seminars with external speakers; along with career development opportunities and events. As such, students can take advantage of academic and applied expertise both within and beyond the University whilst also developing specialist knowledge and transferable skills for their future career development in the public, private or third sector.

Course content

The programme bridges disciplinary divides to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which social inequality manifests across diverse communities and contexts at the national and international level. It offers insight into the character, causes and consequences of social inequality, as well as forms of resistance and policy responses. It has a strong and innovative methodological focus, including traditional qualitative and quantitative approaches to the social analysis of inequality, as well as new approaches to data visualisation and analytics from across the social sciences. The programme uses a range of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars and workshops, complemented by a range of co-curricular activities partly facilitated through the Leeds Inequalities Research Network.

Course structure

The core modules of the programme introduce students to contemporary research on global inequalities of social difference and disadvantage, emphasizing a diversity of theoretical and research design strategies, including international evidence surrounding the shifting nature and extent of inequality. Students are able to tailor the programme according to their interests and needs by choosing from a specially selected range of optional modules, which address major social and economic inequalities across diverse social science subjects and substantive issues. As such, students can choose to develop in-depth specialist knowledge on a particular area and/or focus more generally on the social processes and arrangements that give rise to inequalities.

Compulsory modules

  • Inequalities: Exploring causes, Consequences and Interventions 30 credits
  • Geographic Data Analysis and Visualisation 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits

PLUS TWO OF THE BELOW:

  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Applied Population and Demographic Analysis

For more information on typical modules, read Inequalities and Social Science MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, workshops, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is crucial to this degree – it allows you to prepare for taught sessions, develop your research interests and build a range of skills. This is particularly the case for the dissertation/applied project module of this programme.

Supported through workshops and supervision, students develop their research dissertation or an applied project in partnership with external organisations. This offers students an exciting opportunity to gain experience of applying their knowledge and skills to policy and practice.

Assessment

Your core modules will be assessed using essays. Optional modules may use other forms of assessment that reflect the diversity of the topics you can study, including presentations, book and literature reviews, research proposals and reports among others.

Career opportunities

This programme prepares students for policy, research and applied careers across the private, public and third sectors. The interdisciplinary and dynamic nature of the programme equips students with the critical, analytical and methodological skills to deploy their specialist expertise in a clear, efficient and effective manner. You will develop transferable skills in research, analysis and communication, as well as in-depth knowledge that can be applied across a range of domains and contexts.

Due to the rigorous and applied nature of our teaching, graduates might pursue careers across a diverse range of organisational settings such as in government, NGOS, charities, think tanks, social enterprises and business. The programme also offers excellent development opportunities to pursue a career in social research or undertake research at PhD level.

Irrespective of your future career intentions, we offer tailored guidance and support through ESSL Faculty staff and the Leeds Careers Centre.



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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

The broad purpose of this programme is to give those working in the area of poverty reduction and development in developing and transitional countries, or those wishing to work in such areas, a firmer grounding in understanding poverty and inequality, promoting poverty reduction and analysing the performance of major poverty reducing programmes and policies.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select three optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

More information on: International Development MSc by distance learning

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme is most relevant for people who have worked in governments, non-governmental organisations (either international, regional, national or local) or on donor-funded projects, as well as for recent graduates wishing to work for such organizations, who have some experience of developing countries.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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About the MSc programme. The MSc Inequalities and Social Science is a comprehensive and wide-ranging programme, providing an introduction to a range of interdisciplinary approaches to the social scientific analysis of inequality. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Inequalities and Social Science is a comprehensive and wide-ranging programme, providing an introduction to a range of interdisciplinary approaches to the social scientific analysis of inequality.

As a result of dramatic economic and social changes over recent years, the study of inequality has rapidly developed as one of the most important areas of interdisciplinary social scientific study. This programme is associated with the LSE's International Inequalities Institute and includes expertise from leading academics in the Departments of Sociology, Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Government, Law, Social Policy, Media and Communications, Gender, and Statistics.

The programme will enable you to develop theoretical awareness of different conceptions of the meaning of inequality and its various dimensions in a fully international context. It will introduce you to the political economy of inequality and the role of political institutions in combating inequality, as well as different methods for the measurement of inequality, both quantitative and qualitative. It will provide you with the skills to go on to conduct research in the area of inequalities.

Graduate destinations

Students go into a wide variety of fields where inequalities are addressed, including government, NGOs, politics, public administration, the social and health services, advertising, journalism, other areas of the media, law, publishing, industry, personnel and management. Those supported by residential Atlantic Fellowships will already be working in fields where their work relates to inequalities in some form.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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This programme offers a unique opportunity for you to gain knowledge about a wide range of equality issues and to think across the dimensions of inequality. Read more

This programme offers a unique opportunity for you to gain knowledge about a wide range of equality issues and to think across the dimensions of inequality.

Why this programme

  • The programme responds to radical changes in approaches to equalities and human rights in Scotland, the UK and beyond.
  • Taught by a team of specialists from a range of areas of inequality, including gender, race, sexuality, disability and faith, the programme looks at what equality and human rights mean and what practical steps can be taken to achieve them.
  • You will examine the major causes of inequality today and how the idea that certain groups are less equal than others emerged. You will also study what sustains that idea and how these groups are interrelated.
  • If you are interested in going on to study for a PhD, there is a closely-related MRes in Equality and Human Rights which combines a grounding in the subject with advanced research training.

Programme structure

You will take two core and four optional courses, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses

  • Equality and human rights
  • Research design.

Optional courses may include

  • A public social science
  • Class and stratification
  • Gender relations
  • Improving health and social outcomes
  • Racism and modernity
  • Sexualities and society
  • The disabling society.

Career prospects

This programme will provide useful background knowledge for careers in areas involving the negotiation of equality and implementation of human rights. This would include work with non-governmental organisations, equality and diversity groups, charities and government.



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Thank you for your interest in the master's programmes of the WiSo-Faculty. On this webpages you will find all required information on the Master . Read more

Thank you for your interest in the master's programmes of the WiSo-Faculty.

On this webpages you will find all required information on the Master Sociology and Social Research - you will get a sneak peak into the programme structure as well as all facts about the admission criteria and the selection procedure.

In a nutshell

  • Standard period of study: 4 semesters, full-time
  • Start: Fall term
  • Degree title: Master of Science (M.Sc.)
  • Language: English
  • Fees: Only social fee
  • Application Deadline: June 15th 2018

Some examples of the questions Sociology and Social Research students look at

  • How does human decision-making produce societal consequences?
  • What are the links between ethnic diversity, trust, and conflicts?
  • What are the determinants of successful aging in modern societies?
  • How do families cope with the competing demands of modern everyday life?
  • How can we explain trends in social inequality with respect to educational attainment, income, and wealth?
  • How can we explain crime and delinquency and what are the (dis-)advantages of different prevention and intervention policies?
  • Which methods and assumptions allow me to make causal inferences based on non-experimental data?
  • When and how do I apply special methods of data analysis, such as social network analysis, meta-analysis, or factorial surveys?

"The Cologne Master in Sociology and Social Research focuses on advanced methods of data collection and analysis, thus providing an increasingly sought-after key qualification. This is done in a practical and research-oriented manner in relation to current topics such as ageing, the labour market, education, family, health, integration, crime and the economy." Clemens Kroneberg, Professor at the Institute of Sociology and Social Psychology

Only the best for your career

The M.Sc. Sociology and Social Research at the WiSo-faculty of the University of Cologne deepens the knowledge gained in your bachelor studies and makes you an expert in your respective area. For many managing positions of different industries and for certain professions in research and teaching, a master is indispensable.

Possible areas of employment for sociologists can be found within market and opinion research, national and international statistic agencies, in national and international associations that are concerned with social and economic policy, research institutions, the departments of media research within mass media corporations and personnel administration of corporations. Additionally, other areas of employment present in positions of local government e.g. in departments responsible for school-, family-, city- or environmental policy as well as provincial and federal agencies. Graduates possess skills that qualify for the upper grade of civil service and leading positions in social and market research as well as social planning.

Take your professional future into your own hands and benefit from the theoretical and methodical-oriented approach of the WiSo-Faculty, which combines research as well as teaching with practical experience.

Double degree option

In addition to our regular master’s programme, students have the option to study the Double Master’s Programme in Demography and Social Inequality in cooperation with the University of Groningen. Students of the international study programme spend one year at the WiSo Faculty and one year at the University of Groningen. After successful completion of the programme, they are awarded two degrees.

International partner universities

There is the possibility to apply for a semester abroad at one of the selected partner universities with a partnership agreement for the Master Sociology and Social Research. For further information please refer to the website of the International Relations Center (ZiB WiSo).



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Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. Read more

Want to improve the wellbeing of millions of people worldwide? This course will help you tackle the political, economic, cultural and ecological challenges leading to extreme poverty, poor health, fragile governance, inequality and environmental vulnerability. All of these issues require professionals with the practical skills and analytical capacity to build resilience at a national and community level.

Delivered by specialists from the humanities, social sciences, medicine, business and economics, education and law, the course offers a multi-disciplinary approach to sustainable development with four streams: Democracy, justice and governance; Gender, conflict and society; Crisis, change and management; and Sustainable resource management.

The course offers an applied approach to the theory and practice of international development. It offers project management, leadership skills development and rigorous research training within its interdisciplinary core curriculum. Foundation theory and practice units address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

You can tailor the course to suit your interests and career aspirations. Graduate employment opportunities may include human rights advocacy, aid agencies in government and non-government sectors, the Fair Trade business sector, community organisations, and international institutions such as the United Nations and the World Bank.

As part of your studies, you will be able to acquire practical experience through fieldwork and internship opportunities at sites of significant development practice in countries such as South Africa, Vietnam, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Fiji. For instance, the South Africa Student Placement Program provides Monash students with an amazing opportunity to gain first-hand experience of international and community development work, through placements with Oxfam and its partner organisations in South Africa. Options to include language extension in individual programs are also available.

Course structure

The course is structured in three parts. Part A. Foundations for international development practice, Part B. Core Master's study and Part C. Advanced expertise.  All students complete Part B.  Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A or Part C or a combination of the two.

[Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.]

PART A. Foundations for international development practice

These studies will introduce you to international development studies at advanced undergraduate or graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's core study

These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of international development theory, practice and research to address questions ranging from the causes of wealth disparity, and the growth of development thought and practice, to the impact of politics, economics, culture, history and natural resources on inequality.

PART C. Advanced expertise

The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework study where you select the units to suit your own interests. This option includes the opportunity to undertake an internship in the field.

The second option is a 24 point research thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a cognate discipline including humanities or social sciences, will receive credit for Part C, however, should you wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course you should consult with the course coordinator.



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The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Read more
The MSc in Human Resource Development (International Development) enables you to critically understand the role of human resource development (HRD) in enhancing performance within your own institutions and societies. Emphasis is placed on how HRD can support economic and social advancement by improving public services, and in building capabilities within individuals, organisations and communities to effectively cope with social change. The programme aims to develop students' critical appreciation of globalisation processes, policy initiatives and development management plans to support skills development, competitiveness and human capabilities, including development issues associated with eradicating gender inequalities, fostering human well being and maintaining sustainable livelihoods.

The course aims to develop your professional understanding of HRD strategies and development tools to support skill and knowledge acquisition, and build organization and community capabilities. A focus on developing human knowledge and skills enables you to appreciate how education supports skills development. Students also acquire knowledge of the role of International Organizations (through governments and MNCs) such as the World Bank and the UN in supporting education and development initiatives. There is a strong emphasis on acquiring cross cultural leadership knowledge, relevant for many social change and development projects in the public sector, or in the private sector, MNCs, NGOs or international organizations like the World Bank The objectives are that, by the end of the programme, participants will have:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development, education and HRD practices and policies

-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies

-Knowledge and understanding of comparative education policy and governance frameworks, for capacity building, the political economy of skills formation and how national HRD training systems affect organization, industrial and societal development, including gender national planning

-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural factors affecting the application of HRD theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries

-An understanding of HRD and development policies in diverse geographic regions and how they enhance human capabilities and support poverty reduction, empowerment, help eradicate gender inequality and advance human well being especially within transitional and developing country contexts

-A critical understanding of cutting edge international HRD policies including talent management, knowledge management, private sector management and entrepreneurship, corporate social responsibility (CSR), social justice and ethics, social capital, and strategies for managing inequality including gender and other differences

-Knowledge of leadership for development (lead4dev) and different HRD strategies for the building of leadership skills in the workplace/society, especially those from disadvantaged/marginalized groups including the poor and women

-An understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level, including gender national planning and empowerment

The programme is designed for individuals of any professional background in international organisations, public administration, transnational organisations and private sector companies who are involved in the HRD, leadership and capacity planning aspects of organisations in developing and transitional countries. These may include managers/leaders of HRD/training/learning, HRD and education in government administration; direct trainers, staff of training centres, staff involved in human development planning in governments; HRD and Leadership consultants involved in change projects, change consultants involved in community development; NGO managers and line managers concerned with the development of their staff.

Aims

You will gain:
-Knowledge and understanding of the linkage between international development and HRD practices and policies
-Knowledge of globalisation and cross-cultural actors affecting the application of HRD and education theories and methods in developing, transitional and newly industrialised countries
-Knowledge of education and HRD interventions and their role in building leadership skills and capacity
-Knowledge of how approaches to national human resource development (NHRD) affect organisation and societal performance in developing and transitional economies
-Knowledge of how new approaches to HRD strategies including private sector management and development, social capital, knowledge management, gender planning affect the context for competence and performance enhancement in organisations and societies
-Understanding of how to analyse and design HRD strategies at societal and organisational level
-Understanding of your own learning and leadership skills and how they may be improved

Special features

The course usually includes a field visit to a UK or overseas destination, enabling you to visit public sector organisations, companies and agencies to learn about HRD systems and practices. The cost of the visit is included in the course fee.

Career opportunities

Graduates acquire a range of skills and knowledge valuable in the global economy and relevant for a variety of professional careers in international development. Recent graduates have gained positions including: HRD consultants/managers/directors in Ministries of HRD or Ministries of Education and as NGO Leaders (Middle East, Thailand, Indonesia, Latin America); Knowledge Management Consultants (Middle East, Canada); university HRD and training directors (Middle East, Africa); leadership and capacity development advisors in the public sector (Africa, Asia), education and HRD leadership consultants (Pakistan, Middle East). Some go on to work for the UN or World Bank, for example, gender and HRD specialist, or capacity building advisers (Kazakhstan, India, USA, China) and development project leaders (Nigeria). Some students progress to PhD study and a career in academia.

The course is unique as it demonstrates understanding of institutional HRD practices within the context of globalisation, social change and economic development so graduates acquire relevant development, HRD, leadership and education knowledge for directing culture and social change.

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Explore pressing societal issues. Read more

Explore pressing societal issues

What glues a society together? How can trust and cooperation be promoted and conflict be avoided? What is the role of social networks, social norms and formal institutions in these processes? What causes inequality in general and inequality between men and women in the job market in particular? Why do immigrants have higher unemployment rates and lower-paid jobs? How do environments and institutions shape people’s values, attitudes and behaviours? And how do these individuals’ values, attitudes and behaviours shape society at large?

In the Master’s programme Sociology and Social Research, you will learn how to answer these questions. We will teach you to develop explanations for relevant social phenomena using state-of-the-art theory from Sociology, but also other disciplines such as Economics and Psychology. You will test these explanations using quantitative empirical research methods.

This programme is closely related to the research programme of the Department of Sociology and is embedded in the Interuniversity Centre for Social Science Theory and Methodology (ICS). The programme is recognised as a high quality programme and has been awarded high ratings by different organisations in the Netherlands. 

International orientation and individual development

The programme’s international character offers you global perspectives on sociological topics as well as a broad range of research opportunities. About 40% of our students come from abroad and prominent international scholars teach masterclasses. During your electives, you have the opportunity to follow courses or do an internship at another university or research institute in the Netherlands or abroad. You will be able to choose your thesis topic from a broad range of topics.

Programme objective

In this two-year Master’s programme, you will learn to operate as a highly qualified social science researcher. You will integrate social theory and state-of-the-art quantitative empirical research methods. You will have the opportunity to make choices that fit your goals, by choosing to do an internship and by selecting the topic of your thesis from a list of major sociological research questions, provided by our excellent researchers and lecturers who will be your supervisors. Interdisciplinary cooperation and methodical rigor are the basis for a creative addressing of today’s and future societal challenges, and these are the skills that you will acquire in the Master’s programme Sociology and Social Research. Your studies will prepare you for a career that requires strong research skills in the public or private sector, or as a PhD student.



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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development. Read more

Study from anywhere in the world with practitioners in government, civil society and the private sector, as well as with people new to development.

This programme is designed to provide students with an understanding of the evolution of thinking and practice in international development over the last fifty to sixty years.

Course details

The core module aims to familiarise students with key concepts (eg development and poverty) and theories (eg modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and the ‘crisis’ in development theory) and with the changing roles of international development organisations and states in promoting international development (eg through aid, trade and fiscal, monetary and social policies).

The emphasis throughout will be on encouraging students to reflect critically on what has worked well or not and why. Students will select five optional modules (at 20 credits each) based on their individual interests and career aspirations.

Specialist pathways

Learning and teaching

The programme is delivered online, using a web communications tools system (Canvas) and this web environment is where students are expected to take part in online discussions and group activities, guided by a tutor. All required reading is provided (either in hard copy or via our extensive electronic library, or via Internet links). Assessment takes the form of 2 items of assessment per module, plus a 10,000 to 15,000 word dissertation for the MSc.

Course structure

In delivering our distance learning programmes, we have drawn on lessons learned by academic institutions about how to provide effective distance learning and use a blended learning approach:

  • An intensive online induction programme is included to familiarise students with the web-based discussion boards, the online library facilities and the requirements of the programme
  • Required reading materials are provided in hard copy
  • Discussions and group activities take place within an online learning environment
  • Students benefit from interacting closely with each other and their tutors even while they are separated by continents and time zones (we have students in Africa, the Caribbean, the US, Eastern Europe, South East Asia and the UK)
  • Whilst discussion groups and access to the electronic library rely on the use of a computer, students are not tied to the computer for other reading materials
  • A short online research methods course is provided prior to starting the dissertation project
  • We pride ourselves on strong administrative, academic and pastoral support for students

Our distance learning courses use a variety of teaching and assessment methods: Hard copy teaching and reading materials

  • Textbooks and CDs / DVDs
  • Electronic access to the University’s extensive elibrary facility containing ejournals, ebooks and databases
  • Group online discussion activities (using Canvas, which is part of our 'virtual learning environment')
  • Dissertation
  • Individual reading and reflection

Each module takes six weeks to complete (with guided online discussions). The MSc does not include any face-to-face element.

The course is assumed to be part time, and students study one module at a time.

Course requirements

IDD has designed its distance learning courses to be accessible for a working professional person and we have kept the technical requirements to a minimum. However, before you commit to distance learning, we recommend that you consider the following:

IT equipment: To complete a distance learning course successfully, you will need:

  • Extended access to a computer with Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, a media player software and a CD-ROM drive.
  • Regular access to the Internet for visiting the web-based discussion boards, email and some online library research (whilst this is obviously easier with broadband, we have many students who participate successfully through a dial-up connection).

IT skills: You will find this course less challenging if you are already a confident Internet user, although we are available extensively to coach you through becoming familiar with the web-based discussion format and to address other IT questions.

Time: This course requires that you read a good deal and regularly check into the web-based discussions during the six 'live' weeks of discussion for each module. If you are forced to miss some of the discussions for work or personal reasons, this can be coped with, but if you are regularly out of touch you will find it hard to complete the assignments to the required standard. Writing the assignments is also time-consuming.

Employability

Career opportunities 

This programme tends to recruit studentswho are either currently working for, or plan to work for, ngos, aid donors,the public service sector, etc.

Alumni

Currently more than 3,800 IDD alumni have taken their knowledge and experience to over 148 countries around the globe and are working in a variety of jobs in the public, private and voluntary sector.

See what some of our alumni are doing now and what they thought about studying with us at IDD.



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Over six core modules, two electives and a dissertation, you explore and critique key concepts and models in public health theory, policy and practice. Read more

Over six core modules, two electives and a dissertation, you explore and critique key concepts and models in public health theory, policy and practice.

The course is interesting to

  • (public) health practitioners currently working in the UK or overseas: each year, the cohort has been made up of around 60% overseas students from all over the world alongside students from a range of public health organisations in the local area. If you currently work in a public health role you can gain academic credit for work based learning in the public health practice elective
  • practitioners not in a public health role, but working in organisations with a (potential) public health remit, for example local authorities, housing associations, schools, social services, criminal justice system, voluntary and community organisations
  • practitioners working with population groups who experience inequality, for example people with disabilities, older people, asylum seekers and refugees, people who are unemployed, people with mental health conditions, people with chronic illness, and who wish to explore these communities in a public health context.
  • students who have just completed their undergraduate studies in a related discipline. In the past we have had students from social work, education, sports science, food and nutrition, nursing and a range of professions allied to medicine.

You explore the links between policy, evidence and practice and you address key questions including

  • how is the health of individuals, groups and populations determined?
  • who is responsible for health and what is the role of the government?
  • how can health be promoted?
  • which skills are required for health promotion and developing the public health agenda?
  • what are the implications of emerging agendas?

The course builds on the growing importance of health promotion, public health, and health and community development on local, national and international levels.

You learn how successful management of public health requires development of critical approaches to theory, practice, and outcome measurement. We give you the knowledge and skills to be more effective in your role.

You develop knowledge in the 10 key public health competencies and standards needed to join the UK Voluntary Register for Public Health specialists. This registration allows you to work at a senior level in public health.

These include • strategic leadership for health • working with and for communities • developing health programmes and services • reducing inequalities.

Work experience

If you don’t already work in this sector, we work closely with local health organisations and may be able to provide you with access to work experience that will help you get the most out of your studies and improve your chances of find a job after the course.

International students are most welcome on this course. At Sheffield Hallam University we provide international students with a wealth of support, from pre-arrival right up to, and including, study support whilst you are studying here. Please see the International Experience Team webpage for more information.

Course structure

Full-time – 18 months (four modules a semester plus dissertation)

Part-time – typically three years (two modules a semester plus dissertation). Part-time students attend four hours a week on campus during the day. 

Design

Each of the modules is an independent module of study and can be taken alone. The core modules do, however, have a number of themes developed across them. These include

  • tackling inequalities in health
  • the relationship between policy, evidence and public health practice
  • local, national and international perspectives in health

Core modules

  • Health promotion principles, policy and practice
  • Inequality, health and poverty
  • Health, culture and public health development work
  • Public health evidence
  • Foundation of epidemiology A
  • Foundation of epidemiology B
  • Infectious diseases and long term conditions
  • Dissertation

Options

Choose one from

  • Public health nutrition
  • Public health practice

Assessment

Students are assessed using a variety of methods: reports, presentations, book reviews and essays and for all but three assessment tasks students are able to choose a public health topic and/or population group on which to focus their work. There are no examinations.

Employability

By successfully completing this course, you may find that it makes it easier to gain promotion, or enter jobs in public health departments of primary care trusts. Previous graduates have gained roles such as teenage pregnancy coordinator, health promotion specialist and five-a-day co-ordinator. Others have joined local authorities, the voluntary sector such as Agewell, and become Sure Start managers.

A number of graduates have remained in their roles as health visitors, public health nurses or midwives, working more strategically and in more depth. Overseas students have used the qualification to work successfully in their own countries. Some people have taken the course to work towards becoming a nurse consultant.

The course also provides an excellent foundation for further academic study including PhDs.



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