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Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. Read more
Development Studies is an important research and teaching area within the Social Policy field at LSBU. 75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded the quality rating of 3* out of 4* for 'environment' - quality that is defined as conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability (Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014).

The MSc Development Studies course is interdisciplinary and innovatory. It is designed for those who wish to pursue careers with governments, non-governmental organisations, international agencies, public and private organisations and enterprises. It provides a thorough grounding in the development field, and its emphasis on research enables students to specialise in their particular areas of interest.

The MSc Development Studies is led by Professor John Taylor: an internationally renowned expert in social development and poverty reduction. Professor Taylor has undertaken research for the UK's Department of International Development, the World Bank, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNICEF, national and international NGOs.

See the current research projects tied to the International Development, Emergencies and Refugee Studies (IDEARS) Research Group:
http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/research/research-interests/sites/international-development-emergencies-refugee-studies-group

Through the use of case studies you'll analyse a range of issues, crucial for Development policy and practice, such as:
- Globalisation: markets, trade and the global economy;
- Trade and Aid: the role of international institutions and agencies;
- Strategies for Industrialisation: economic growth and human development;
- Social Development: livelihoods, poverty and poverty reduction;
- Developing the Rural Sector: Agrarian Policies, migration and urbanisation;
- Environmental policies and sustainable development;
- Political empowerment, participation, and human rights.

The MSc develops the skills required to undertake development research, focusing on appropriate methodologies, data collection, policy and project design and implementation. A research dissertation forms a central part of your work on the course.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/development-studies-msc

Modules

- Contemporary issues in development
The module aims to provide a comprehensive and detailed introduction to the contemporary challenges facing developing countries in the coming years. Topics vary from one year to the next, but currently the focus is on issues of poverty and poverty reduction; aid and its effectiveness; debt and debt servicing; governance and transparency; the environmental impact of development; patterns of inequality; the impact of urbanisation; and more generally, on changing economic relations within the world economy following the 2008-9 global crisis and subsequent events. The module also assesses the main developing strategies followed by selected middle and low-income countries, with detailed case studies drawn from Asia, Africa and Latin America. It also examines these topics from a gender perspective.

- Human development in a globalised world
This module focuses initially on the roles and inter-relations between corporations, governments, international agencies, multilateral institutions, corporations and non-governmental organisations in the global economy. It then goes on to examine these inter-relations in relation to the shifting power relations in the global economy. It aims in particular to examine the relations between growth, capacities for improving human capital, infrastructure development, livelihoods improvement and poverty reduction. The conclusions of the module feed into the case studies analysed in the Semester Two Economies in Transition module.

- Research methods for development
A series of lectures introduces students to the main epistemological approaches to research and key research strategies, and focuses on mixed-methods research (MMR). In parallel, students will participate in tutor-led workshops to develop data summary and analysis skills with specific computer-based packages.

- Economies in transition: strategies for industrialisation
The Module Analyses and assesses the main development strategies implemented by developing countries in recent years, focusing on case studies from Africa, Latin America and Asia, outlining their key achievements and problem areas. This analysis then forms the basis for examining the possibilities for and outcomes of different types of industrialisation in the coming years, within a global context. The module combines detailed case study examples from particular types of industrialising economy, including examples from the rural, services, and raw material extractive sectors.

- Forced migration and resettlement
The module introduces the key concepts in Forced Migration and Development and different categories of forced migrants--asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, oustees and disaster victims. It examines the multiple and complex nature of Forced Migration, evaluates the responses of the international, inter-governmental, non-governmental and governmental responses to the short-medium and long-term needs of forced migrants and the poor sections of the host population. It critically analyses and evaluates the positive and negative impacts of forced migrants on host commmoduleies. How forced migrants (re)-construct their commmoduleies and livelihoods in countries of asylum and places of destination, as well in countries and places of origin in the context of post-conflict reconstruction are also examined in detail.

- Human rights in the developing world

- Research dissertation (triple module)

The MSc also offers a series of workshops in project design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, providing these essential skills for student's Development careers

Employability

A humanities masters has the real advantage of opening up careers in a number of professions such as teaching, social work, administration and higher level education. Graduates have forged exciting careers in research-related work, public relations, advertising, retail, management and media-related work.

Previous students have entered careers in many fields working for international organisations such as the United Nations and its constituent organisations, the World Bank, the International Labour Organisation and the World Health Organisation. Many students take up posts in their home countries within government, non-government and civil society organisations, or with non-governmental development organisations in the UK, in addition to teaching posts in universities and colleges specialising in Development research and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The MSc has excellent relations with Development Agencies and NGO working in the development field. Students from these organisations are regularly enrolled on the course and members of these organisations gave regular presentations to MSc students.

Research in the Development field

Recent and current research by staff includes projects funded by the World Health Organisation, the World Bank, the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Programme, the UK Department for International Development, and the Economic and Social Research Council.

In recent years, staff members have conducted research in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, East Timor, Eritrea, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia. Staff teaching on the MSc regularly publish books and articles both on development issues, and on the countries in which they have expertise.

Teaching and learning

- Study hours
Class contact time is typically 12 hours per week on the full-time mode of the MSc, and six hours on the part-time mode plus individual tutorial and independent study. This accumulates to typically two days a week, afternoons and evenings typically two evenings a week.

All staff members teaching on the course have considerable experience of working and conducting research in developing countries. They have all published work on Development issues and are well known in their respective fields.

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The MSc in Architectural Project Management is delivered jointly by Heriot-Watt University and the University of Edinburgh. Read more

Programme Background

The MSc in Architectural Project Management is delivered jointly by Heriot-Watt University and the University of Edinburgh:

It draws from the expertise in Architecture and Construction Project Management from both institutions to create a programme providing a unique overview and insight into design and management of construction projects. It has been designed for those who have a construction project background and who wish to learn more about design aspects, or those who have a design background and who wish to gain an understanding of project management.

The programme provides students with the opportunity to understand key factors that have influenced contemporary design and its practice, the process of design generation and its constraints in terms of shape and character of urban development and the need to develop in a sustainable manner given the conflicting demands of industrialisation and emergent building technology.

The concepts, practices and strategic issues related to construction project management are examined so as to provide an understanding of how project management professionals can add value and provide a service to their clients. The courses will develop understanding of issues related to management of clients and other stakeholders involved in the delivery of a project within the overarching constraints of time, quality, costs, sustainability and safety management. The suite of courses provides the student with the necessary knowledge to contribute effectively as a lead consultant delivering project management services to clients.

Our Students

The programme is aimed at professionals from all backgrounds currently working in the construction industry, recognising that Postgraduate study for graduates in early or mid-career is often difficult. Therefore the programme is offered by attendance-free distance learning, allowing students a considerable degree of flexibility. Students can study at a pace to suit their work or personal commitments and it is also possible to take a break in study between courses. Students receive comprehensive materials for each course through an online Virtual Learning Environment.

Programme Content

Students study three core courses and choose five from a range of optional courses. MSc students must also complete a research dissertation. Assignments and examinations are used to assess courses. Where an examination is set for a course, arrangements can be made for distance learning students to sit these at a number of centres throughout the world.

Course Choice

Students study the following three core courses at the University of Edinburgh:

· Design Values and Architecture
· Architecture and Sustainability
· Architecture, Construction and Industrialisation

Students study the following four mandatory courses at Heriot-Watt University:

· Value and Risk Management
· Contracts and Procurement
· Project Management: Theory and Practice
· Project Management: Strategic Issues

They then choose an additional course from a range of options including:

· Construction Financial Management
· People and Organisational Management in the Built Environment

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The rapid globalisation of the sports market, the influence of technology on product research and development and new business models, foreign direct investment in the sports industry supply chain, and the provision of sport related goods and services for increasingly sophisticated and diverse market segments are all contributing to the continued growth of the sports industry. Read more
The rapid globalisation of the sports market, the influence of technology on product research and development and new business models, foreign direct investment in the sports industry supply chain, and the provision of sport related goods and services for increasingly sophisticated and diverse market segments are all contributing to the continued growth of the sports industry.

Rapid growth in the volume and variety of sports publications, sports-related internet sites, and enhanced mass media exposure of sports events and activities is resulting in an increase in the need for individuals with a knowledge of sport communications/media.

Global industrialisation, urbanisation and lifestyle and demographic changes mean that governments and public agencies worldwide are likely to increasingly use sport as a tool for social policy and economic and social development. The management and administration of these programmes and interventions require specific knowledge and management skills.

These developments ensure that the sports industry continues to be a significant and diverse industry in the future, sustaining exciting and satisfying career opportunities for years to come. On this course you gain:
-Employability skills through initiatives like our SHU leadership award to give you the edge in the jobs market.
-A well-developed international/global perspective on the sports industry.
-The conceptual abilities to make sense of complexity and identify innovative and creative solutions.

It is suitable for you if:
-You have a sport or business and management related degree.
-You have management experience and an interest in sport or leisure.

The course builds on existing study or industry experience to develop the knowledge and skills required for personal and professional development. It equips you for a career in sport management by giving you an in-depth understanding of core aspects of business and finance and building soft skills such as leadership and team working, all underpinned by the latest research in sport management.

Your studies are made up of eight assessed modules, which include an industry-based research project in which you work with sport organisations to develop solutions to problems or explore potential market opportunities. Recent clients include: Manchester City FC; The International Cricket Council; The Singapore Sports Council; Badminton England; UFC (Ultimate Fight Championship); Sheffield United FC; Sheffield Wednesday FC.

You also have the option to complete a 12 week work placement, where you receive support and advice from a placement mentor. We use our network of local, regional, national and international employers to help secure you a challenging and fulfilling placement. Our teaching team includes staff with substantial industry, research and consultancy experience, many of whom work in the University’s internationally renowned Sport Industry Research Centre.

Sheffield Hallam are a Skills Development Partner of the Chartered Institute for Managing Sport and Physical Activity.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mscpgdippgcert-sport-business-management

Course structure

Full time – 1 year – two days a week with four taught modules each semester followed by a project.
Part time – typically 2 years – tailored to your needs where possible and normally one day a week.
Starts September or January.

The course is made up of eight core modules, plus a research or work-based learning project. Modules provide a broad grounding across management disciplines in sport business. Most teaching is in small groups of typically less than 20 people, allowing for close interaction between students and academic staff.
Core modules
-Researching sport management (15 credits)
-International sports marketing and the media (15 credits)
-Global economics of sport (15 credits)
-International sports strategy (15 credits)
-Managing people in sport organisations (15 credits)
-Sport business consultancy (15 credits)
-International sport event management (15 credits)
-Financial skills for business decisions (15 credits)

Optional modules
Choose one from:
-Research project (60 credits)
-Work based learning project (60 credits)

Course support
Before you start the course, we supply you with an induction pack that includes a reading list to introduce you to the general management and specialist modules. We also run an induction programme to prepare you for the course. During the induction we assess your existing study, IT and language (for international students) skills. This assessment leads to an individual learning plan to improve and develop your skills. We also provide language tuition as needed, if your first language is not English. Dissertation workshops help you to prepare for your dissertation.

Assessment: coursework assignments, essays, management projects, problem solving exercises, group work, project, phase tests.

Other admission requirements

Our aim is to ensure you can achieve success on this masters course, but please contact us if you wish to discuss your own concerns. Through accreditation of prior learning (APL), students may claim entry with credit or exemptions on the basis of their existing qualifications, knowledge and experience. If English is not your first language you will need an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills, or a recognised equivalent. If your level of English language is currently below IELTS 6.0 we recommend you consider an appropriate Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve the required level of English.

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The MA in International History offers an intellectually stimulating approach to the subject through a theoretically based programme that aims to provide an understanding of global historical developments in the twentieth and emerging twenty-first centuries. Read more
The MA in International History offers an intellectually stimulating approach to the subject through a theoretically based programme that aims to provide an understanding of global historical developments in the twentieth and emerging twenty-first centuries.

The course offers a broad international perspective on relationships and events between and amongst states over time, and ways of integrating specific national or regional approaches with aspects of world history. Rapid changes in communications, science & technology, urbanisation and industrialisation have brought dramatic changes, making it an exciting time to study history, particularly with an international perspective.

Course content

Core Modules
-International Relations in the Modern Era
-Diplomacy in a Global World
-Concepts in International History
-The Dissertation

Option Modules
-International Security
-Money, Trade and Development
-Foreign Policy Analysis

Graduate destinations

The award will equip you with practical and academic skills attractive to employers. These include independent judgement, self-reflection and critical debate. You may choose to use the specialist knowledge you acquire, to work in education, national foreign or defence ministries, armed forces and security services or in one of the many international or regional institutions or other internationally oriented organisations of many sorts. Alternatively you may wish to continue with an academic career, or simply satisfy a desire to understand the modern world.

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This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Read more

About the course

This course looks at the economic, political, social and cultural changes that were seen throughout the world between c.1500 and c.1800. Events such as the British civil wars, the settling of the ‘New World’, the early stages of industrialisation, and the French Revolution transformed the way people thought and lived. This MA allows you to explore this momentous period with a group of internationally renowned scholars.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Early Modernities; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Microhistory and the History of Everyday Life; Burying the White Gods: Indigenous People in the Early Modern Colonial World; The Early Modern Body: Identity, Politics and Embodiment, c1640-1800; Eighteenth-century Print Culture; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Modern Europe.

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This programme is designed for a wide range of people involved in conceptualising or administering policies for a sustainable and substantial level of development in the world's poorer countries. Read more
This programme is designed for a wide range of people involved in conceptualising or administering policies for a sustainable and substantial level of development in the world's poorer countries. It is especially suitable for those already involved in planning development strategies, those currently working for non-governmental organisations in the development field or anyone planning for a career in development.

The programme combines an intellectual and academic approach with policy-oriented and empirical studies of development, addressing three interrelated but separate facets of the development process:
-Analysing what development means.
-Studying the processes of planning (external aid, regional disparities, environmental factors, poverty and industrialisation).
-Examining how development policies may be delivered and administered, analysing the importance of effective political and bureaucratic structures, and evaluating the contributions of NGOs and other external bodies.

Programme structure

The MSc programme comprises six 12-week taught units and six assessed essays, followed by a dissertation.

Core units
-Conflict, Security and Development
-International Political Economy
-Theories of Development

Optional units - You will choose three optional units from those offered by the School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies. Options vary each year but may include:
-Small Business Development
-Gender and Development
-Managing and Evaluating Development
-Development Skills in Practice
-Environmental Politics
-Faith and Development
-International Development Organisations
-Foreign Policy Analysis
-Military and militarisation
-International Human Rights
-Sino-US relations in global politics
-Politics of Genocide
-East Asia, Europe and Global Integration
-Care, Labour and Gender
-China's International Relations
-European Security
-Religion and Politics in the West
-Understanding Risk
-The Politics of Insecurity
-Theories of Violence

A full list of possible units is available on the SPAIS website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/spais/prospective/prospectivepgt/msc-unit-guides/

Third term
Independent study for dissertation.

Careers

Bristol graduates are in high demand and have an excellent record of employment following graduation. Students of our MSc programmes go on to pursue varied and interesting careers.

Many sectors - such as the civil service, NGOs and charity work - require an MSc and some volunteer/internship experience. Graduates from our programmes have gone on to work for Refugee UK, Shelter, Barnardos, Oxfam, Amnesty International, government departments and the European Parliament, among others.

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The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. It examines a variety of issues such as:
- the development of psychiatry since its birth in the 19th century
- the rise of regulation for drugs and medicines
- the impact of warfare on medical technologies
- the challenges faced by those seeking to transform the health of British children

The degree is suitable for those from humanities, social science and health science backgrounds as well as those who have worked in the health professions.

The MSc Health History is organised around the expertise of staff in the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare (CSHHH) Glasgow. The CSHHH is a research collaboration between historians of medicine and of health and healthcare at Glasgow Caledonian and Strathclyde universities.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/healthhistory/

You’ll study

Modules can be built into a Masters degree. This can form the basis for future doctoral research funded by:
- the Wellcome Trust
- the Arts & Humanities Research Council
- the Economic & Social Research Council

Compulsory modules:
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 1
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 2

Option classes:
Choose four from:
- Health & Healthcare in the Long 19th Century
- Pharmaceuticals, Ethics & Health, 1800 to 1980
- Governing Highs & Health: History & the Control of Drugs, c1800 to c1945
- Work & Occupational Health in the 20th Century: Comparative Perspectives
- Food & Health in the West during the 20th Century
- The Politics of Health in 20th-century Britain
- Child Health & Industrialisation, c1750 to 1870
- Medicine & Warfare, 1800 to 2000

- Dissertation
MSc students also write a dissertation of 10,000 words. You’ll research a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a member of the programme staff. You’ll be able to use the extensive archive holdings relating to the history of medicine and of health and healthcare available in Glasgow and elsewhere in Central Scotland.

- Seminars
The CSHHH Glasgow seminar series is designed to showcase the latest research from across the subject area at the centre. All students on the MSc are expected to attend these sessions.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. Read more
Development Studies is a dynamic field concerned with processes of change in the South - social and economic, political and cultural - and the major policy challenges they present to efforts to overcome poverty and insecurity. At SOAS, we seek not only to understand the major drivers of development, but also to critically evaluate them with a view towards informing more just and equitable approaches.

Course detail

This programme will provide you with a solid interdisciplinary social science formation in development theory and practice and will develop your capacity for independent and critical analysis. The emphasis on transferable analytical skills has been of great benefit to the many graduates who have returned to, or taken up, professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and NGOs.

You will also have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

Studying at SOAS University of London enhances your learning experience by giving you a global perspective on issues such as: neoliberalism and its critiques, industrialisation, labour and capital, state failure, poverty and insecurity, gender and class analysis, and commodity chains and trade.

You will join a worldwide network of people who are passionate about thinking about and working towards development and equality for all.

Expert at where the world is changing

Many of our staff come from development practitioner backgrounds and this informs what we teach. We are all engaged in field research, which routinely sends us to places where development policies and approaches touch people’s lives in direct ways, and we draw on this experience in the classroom.

We regularly engage in a wide range of research with international development institutions, including United Nations agencies and NGOs, on crucial topics such as labour, violence, neoliberalism, peace and development, migration, development policy, aid and poverty reduction.

Format and assessment

The MSc Development Studies has four components: two compulsory modules (Political Economy of Development and Theory, and Policy and Practice of Development); one full-module option or two half-module options; and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Please see Postgraduate Modules for details on core and optional modules taught within the Department. For a full list of modules offered, please see the Postgraduate Handbook, available on the Development Studies homepage (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/).

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

Careers

A postgraduate degree from the Department of Development Studies at SOAS will further develop your understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised, with an emphasis on transferable analytical skill. These skills have been of great benefit to the many graduates who have taken up professional careers in development in international organisations, government agencies and non-government organisations. This, in addition to your detailed subject knowledge, will also equip you with a set of other specific skills, including: critical skills; the ability to research extensively; a high level of cultural awareness; and the ability to solve problems.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Read more
This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Students will study the core concepts of these sub-disciplines such as: state; civil society; social closure; class; bureaucracy; patrimonialism; hegemony; late-industrialisation; product cycle; developmental state; rent-seeking; good governance; and globalization. They will also be exposed to the principal analytical perspectives of political science such as historical institutionalism, rational choice theory and Marxism. These intellectual foundations will enable students to gain a better understanding of the shaping factors behind phenomena such as: state collapse and criminalisation in Africa; cronyism in Southeast Asia and Latin America; religious fundamentalism in South Asia; economic take-off in East Asia; linguistic nationalism in Central Asia; the ‘third wave’ of democratisation; global financial instability; and the relationship between the Washington Institutions and the South. Students will also come to understand the usefulness of cross-regional comparison by seeing how the study of one region can illuminate similar issues elsewhere, despite differing cultural contexts.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 214kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/file51882.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

- Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field. Read more

Programme description

Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field.

This programme provides an introduction to Book History as a concept and provides a general overview of the key developments in the field, tracing the movement from scribal culture to hand printing, from industrialisation to new technologies.

You will be taught by leading international experts, combining traditional bibliography, special collections training and advanced theoretical approaches, to advance your knowledge and practical skills.

As well as the major manuscript and printed collections held by the University, you will have access to the National Library of Scotland (which holds one of the most important collections for the study of bibliography in Europe).

Programme structure

Over two semesters, you will complete two compulsory and two option courses, along with a course in research methods, followed by an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Cultures of the Book
Working with Collections
Option courses may include:

Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Expanding the Book: Image and Literacy in Valois France
Print Culture and the Enlightenment: Edinburgh and London, 1710-1814
Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
Digital Humanities for Literary Studies
Shakespeare Adapted
Poor Things: Capitalism, Reification and 20th Century Literature
Modernism: Text, Image, Object

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

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If you have a passion for history and are looking for an intellectual challenge, this fascinating MA course could be what you are looking for. Read more
If you have a passion for history and are looking for an intellectual challenge, this fascinating MA course could be what you are looking for. It explores aspects of British and Irish local and regional history between 1750 and 1950, introducing the key themes of Poverty and welfare, Crime, Police and Penal Policy, The role of families, Urban History, Religion and Industrialisation. Using our world-class collection of online primary source materials, you will be encouraged to produce an independent research project on a topic of your choice.

Key features of the course

•Develops your ability to present a sustained argument in clear, logical prose
•Builds your skills of analysis, critical thinking and practical research
•Provides a firm foundation for further research studies
•Applicable to a wide range of careers.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• MA History part 1 (A825)
• MA History part 2 (A826)

You must pass A825 before studying A826.

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

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This programme gives you the chance to specialise in literature produced during one of the most exciting periods of British literary and political history, when political change and social forces such as industrialisation and urbanisation led to some remarkable literary responses. Read more

Overview

This programme gives you the chance to specialise in literature produced during one of the most exciting periods of British literary and political history, when political change and social forces such as industrialisation and urbanisation led to some remarkable literary responses.

The Romantic pathway will explore key texts from the period, and related themes such as imagination, sympathy, gender, national identities, ecology, and revolutionary politics. You may choose to take up to two modules from different periods to expand your approach. A core module will allow you to develop your research skills, preparing you for your research project / dissertation as well as for further research or a range of different careers.

With a wealth of library resources and tutors whose teaching is informed by their world-leading research, this programme offers a great opportunity to explore literature and culture in a period when the face of Britain changed forever.

You’ll learn in a supportive yet stimulating environment with access to excellent resources for your research. The world-class Brotherton Library has extensive holdings to support the study of literature, and our Special Collections are full of archive and manuscript material. The University Library offers full training to help you make the most of them, equipping you with valuable skills in the process.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

From the beginning of the programme you’ll take a core module which will improve your knowledge of research methods, helping you prepare for the rest of your studies. You’ll also take the first of your three optional modules – at least one optional module must be specific to the Romantic pathway, but you can choose one or two from across the School of English to broaden your approach.

You’ll take two other optional modules in the following semester as you develop your knowledge and skills in topic areas that interest you. By the end of the programme in September, you’ll be ready to submit your research project / dissertation – an independent piece of research on a literary topic of your choice within the period, which will allow you to showcase the skills you’ve gained.

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The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South. Read more
The Urban Development Planning MSc explores international practices in urban development policy, planning and management that address contemporary spatial, socio-economic and political transformations in cities of the Global South.

Degree information

This MSc aims to equip participants to work effectively as development practitioners in urban contexts through a deeper understanding of the processes that generate urban change. The programme aims to enhance their diagnostic and strategic capacities to respond to such change within the framework of socially just urban governance.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time nine months, is offered.

Core modules
-The City and its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management: Strategic Action in Theory and Practice
-Practice in Urban Development Planning

Optional modules - please note, not all optional modules may be available.
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-An Introduction to Public Economics and Public Policy
-Critical Urbanism Studio I - Learning from Informality: Case studies and alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio II - Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Food and the City
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
-Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Food Production
-Managing the City Economy
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Participatory Processes: Building for Development
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Social Diversity, Inequality and Poverty
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, group work, workshops and field trips. Field trips so far have taken place in Egypt, Ghana, India, Thailand, and Tanzania. Student performance is assessed through essays, coursework, team project reports, written examinations, the overseas field trip and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Careers

This MSc is widely recognised by international organisations and agencies (such as UN agencies and the World Bank) and bilateral aid organisations from different countries. Graduate destinations range from UK-based organisations in the public, private and community sectors to governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations which operate in a development capacity in the South. Graduates have also been employed by international NGOs and aid and development agencies. Some graduates return to their home countries and engage in the practice, teaching or research of urban development practice; other graduates have successfully sought employment in international development organisations away from their own countries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Investment Banker, Standard Bank
-Assistant Researcher, Institute for Urban Studies, Hangzhou Normal University and studying BSc Economics, The University of London
-Research Assistant, Erzurum Technical University
-Regional Programme Assistant, Merlin
-Shelter Co-Ordinator, Save the Children

Employability
The programme aims to help students:
-Prepare balanced, critical and comparative analysis and argument based on theory and empirical evidence.
-Undertake a comprehensive diagnosis of the problems and opportunities in urban development in specific contexts.
-Formulate systematic and reasoned proposals that address the multi-dimensional complexity of various urban development situations, including organisational and institutional development.
-Build presentation, advocacy and negotiation skills.
-Develop research skills including interviewing, conceptual framework formulation, and the abilitiy to analyse a range of information sources.
-Enhance their teamwork skills.
-Operate professionally in an unfamiliar environment within the context of a developing country.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme argues that planning is key to dealing with urban problems and opportunities presented by rapid urbanisation in the Global South, but that its potential cannot be harnessed without a critical understanding of the processes that generate urban change in specific contexts.

The programme seeks to equip students with the capacity to develop critical diagnoses of urban issues, as a basis for developing propositional responses within the framework of socially, spatially and environmentally just urban governance.

The programme promotes a deeper understanding of community-led and partnership-based urban development planning. Students also benefit from the Development Planning Unit's longstanding and geographically exhaustive alumni and partner network.

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This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Read more
This MSc offers a critical approach to 'people-centred' development, addressing the challenges for equitable citizenship in the context of social diversity and globalisation, particularly in urban contexts. Participants engage in a critical analysis of the theory and practice of social development alongside gaining the skills required to be a reflective social development practitioner.

Degree information

The programme objectives are to give participants a solid grounding in social analysis skills and perspectives, rooted in social theory around identity, inequality, and social change processes. Students learn how development interventions can best support the citizenship claims of diverse groups of women and men, and girls and boys living in the Global South, and consider the role of the social development practitioner in this endeavour.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), either one or two optional modules (totalling 30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (full-time nine months) is offered, comprising three core modules (90 credits) and one or two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules - all three of the following:
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-Social Diversity, Inequality, and Poverty
-Social Development in Practice

Optional modules - one or two optional modules, totalling 30 credits, usually including the following, among others:
-NGOs and Social Transformation
-Communication, Technologies and Social Power
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-Participatory Processes: Building for Development
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio I and II
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Housing Policies: Practical Dimensions and Alternative Options
-Neo-Structuralism and the Developmental State
-Political Economy of Development: Land, Food and Agriculture
-Political Economy of Development: Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-The City and Its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Managing the City Economy

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project related to the main themes of the programme, culminating in a dissertation report of 10,000 words (60 credits). Topics may be chosen to enhance career development or for their inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical classroom exercises, and fieldwork within the UK and abroad. Student performance is assessed through coursework, examinations, and a dissertation report as well as an assessment of practical work, including the international fieldwork group report.

Fieldwork
The programme incorporates group fieldwork in London and in a selected country of the Global South. The cost of flights, visas, necessary vaccinations, accommodation, and fieldwork-related travel and facilitations costs, are incorporated within the programme fees. Meals and other expenditure must be covered by the student.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's programme are likely to find employment as officers for local and international NGOs, as officers for international organisations, as officers in local or national government departments and as consultants. Some graduates pursue an academic career, either through doctoral studies or through teaching and research in a number of prestigious universities.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Head of Strategy Funding, Global Witness
-Researcher, Chinese Federation of Trade Unions
-Development Consultant, World Bank Group
-Corporate Responsibility Manager, Odebrecht
-Project Co-Ordinator, Thamani Youth of Kenya

Employability
Graduates of this programme are able to link theory to practice, critically reflect, and negotiate complex social relations as well as facilitate social processes in a context of diversity - all key transferable skills in the job market. Graduates have secured jobs in a variety of sectors and countries and built fulfilling careers in social development.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The programme introduces students to critical, analytical and practical skills that will be of use in their future careers, whether as academics, social development practitioners or advocates for the need to place the 'social' at the centre of development. Students have an opportunity to critically examine relevant bodies of knowledge, current debates and field experience in primarily urban contexts, and to consider the challenges of making development policy, planning and practice more socially responsive.

Students on this MSc benefit from the strong practical component, which includes fieldwork assignments in London and an international field trip to a city in the Global South. This trip provides the opportunity to develop practical skills, use tools for participatory action research, and reflect on the roles and responsibilities of social development practitioners.

The practice-based components of the programme also provide students with the opportunity to network with organisations and professionals working in the social development sector. In a complementary series of careers sessions, students can network with Development Planning Unit alumni and partners who are working in relevant fields.

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The production, reproduction and transformation of urban space via socially, economically, and environmentally just methods presents a complex challenge for professionals. Read more
The production, reproduction and transformation of urban space via socially, economically, and environmentally just methods presents a complex challenge for professionals. This MSc combines cultural, social, economic, political and spatial analysis to recalibrate the urban design project, presenting a holistic response in which informality and marginality are central features.

Degree information

The programme will equip students with a political economy understanding of space; a comprehension of the needs, abilities, aspirations and forms of resistance of urban dwellers; the ability to respond with strategically co-ordinated proposals to leverage local abilities to meet local needs; and an ability to critically engage with the practice of urban design and architecture in developmental processes – particularly in the Global South.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a development and planning report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
-Participatory Process: Building for Development
-The BUDD Studio: Building and Urban Design Practice

Optional modules
-Critical Urbanism Studio I. Learning from Informality: Case studies and alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio II: Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Housing Policy, Programme and Project Alternatives
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-The City and its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management: Strategic Action in Theory and Practice
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Food and the City
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-NGOs and Social Transformation

Please note, the availability of some modules may be dependent on student numbers.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of weekly lectures, seminar presentations, group exercises and workshops. The BUDD studio includes a fieldwork project in an urban reality of the global south, developed in partnership with local organisations, networks of communities, slum dweller federations, universities and governments alike. Students are encouraged to explore different tools, concepts and ideas throughout the programme and test these during the field project. Assessment is through coursework, design work, written examinations and the 10,000-word report.

Careers

The programme enables graduates to work in NGOs and local government – facilitating community organisations and households to improve their living conditions. Graduate destinations range from UK-based organisations in the public, private and community sectors, to governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations, which operate in a development capacity in the South. Recent graduates have also been employed by international NGOs and aid and development agencies and architectural and design practices. Some graduates return to their home countries and engage in urban design and architecture practice, teaching, or research of urban development there; others have successfully sought employment away from their own countries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Architectural Assistant, Foster + Partners
-Architectural Designer, Thinking Development
-Research Assistant/PhD in Development Planning, UCL
-Urban Designer/Visual Designer, Nanjing Yangtze River Urban Architectural Design Co. Ltd
-Project Manager, Home Office

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary faculty of the built environment, bringing together dozens of scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

The Development Planning Unit is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management responses to the economic, social and environmental development of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies as well as by national and provincial governments.

The Building and Urban Design in Development (BUDD) programme in particular reflects on the necessity of design practices to contribute to changing the mainstream paradigm of working with the urban poor, with communities and the city itself.

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