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This MA will use the unique contributions of Shropshire to many areas of science. As those contributions include the theory of evolution, major geology advances and leading roles in the industrial use of iron and other materials, this focus will not restrict you as a student in any way. Read more
This MA will use the unique contributions of Shropshire to many areas of science. As those contributions include the theory of evolution, major geology advances and leading roles in the industrial use of iron and other materials, this focus will not restrict you as a student in any way. You will have the opportunity to explore any aspect of the history of science as you develop an understanding of how social factors have influenced scientific advances and how those, in turn, have impacted on society.

Why study History of Science at Shrewsbury?

Shropshire has had a strong influence on the development of science since the 19th century. Two of its most famous sons are Charles Darwin and William Penny-Brookes. Charles Darwin's theory of evolution has been highly influential in all areas of biology and beyond. Also known as the 'Father of the Modern Olympics', William Penny-Brookes promoted the use of exercise in prevention and treatment of illness. Apart from these two examples, Shropshire has had crucial roles in advances in many other areas, including geology, medicine and the industrial revolution. This Masters programme will cover scientific advances over the centuries, and within each module one section will cover Shropshire's unique contributions to the subject.

Features:

During this course, you will literally be following in the footsteps of many scientific giants – of which Charles Darwin was the greatest. You will be able to walk Darwin's thinking path while pondering how geology has shaped our evolution; sit in the library where Darwin was schooled in natural history; and reflect on one county's immense contribution to the world we know today.

Programme Structure:

The modules given below are the latest example of the curriculum available on this degree programme. Please note that programme structures and individual modules are subject to change from time to time for reasons which include curriculum enhancement, staff changes, student numbers, improvements in technology, changes to placements or regulatory or external body requirements.

The programme is modular with six taught modules – each worth 20 credits - and culminates in a 60-credit Dissertation. Modules are as follows:
- A Brief History of Time - a review of major advances in science over time – with a particular emphasis on building the research skills required for Level 7. Your literature searching, critical appraisal and writing skills will be developed through a series of group exercises.

- Darwin and Evolution - a look at how the evidence Darwin collected on the Beagle voyage persuaded him of the truth of evolution. You will discuss the influence of his family on his theory and also on the delay to publish. You will also follow the development of evolutionary theory – through the modern synthesis to molecular evolutionary studies.

- History of Medicine - in which you will learn about the important medical advances that have been made over the centuries. William Farr (the father of medical statistics) from Kenley was the first to use statistics effectively in epidemiology, demonstrating that the source of cholera was polluted water. Other important Shropshire medics include Henry Hickson (one of the fathers of anaesthesia) and Agnes Hunt (the first orthopaedic nurse and founder of the Shropshire Orthopaedic Hospital, which later moved to Oswestry and is now known as Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital).

- The Rocks of Ages - in which you will explore the unique rich geological heritage in a county that represents most of the rock types found throughout most of the geological period of time. You will also examine the work of the geological pioneers, such as Impey Murchison, and their contribution to our modern understanding of earth sciences.

- Iron and the Industrial Revolution - Shropshire's pioneering scientific and technological iron founding processes contributed directly to the development of modern metallurgy. In this module you will explore the inquisitiveness of the industrial pioneers such as Abraham Darby and their understanding of the natural environment that led to the birth of the industrial revolution.

- Dissertation - which aims to provide you with an opportunity to investigate systematically and in depth a topic of direct relevance to the programme of study and your personal interests; to enable you to draw on and contribute to the development of the growing body of knowledge in the broad history of science field; and to enable you to present the outcomes of personal research in the form of a substantial review paper and an academic research article suitable for publication in an appropriate research journal.

Assessment

We use a flexible mode of delivery, including three-day intensive modules and evening lectures to facilitate attendance from students in employment, both nationwide and internationally. Assessments vary between modules – but will be coursework only – and will include a review paper, a report case study, poster, or an oral presentation. Please contact us for further details.

The Dissertation is assessed by the production of a substantial review paper and an academic research article suitable for publication in an appropriate research journal.

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Our MA Interior Design course enables you to develop an individual approach to spatial design within a stimulating, creative and supportive environment. Read more
Our MA Interior Design course enables you to develop an individual approach to spatial design within a stimulating, creative and supportive environment.

This degree provides you with a launchpad to potential higher level interior design careers within a diverse range of subjects. These include museum and exhibition design, design for film, television and digital games and brand interpretation for retail, leisure or promotional events.

An emphasis on ecological issues and processes is also a prominent aspect of this course, and underpins all aspects of the course.

You'll explore your area of interest to an advanced level, through establishing new spatial paradigms that build on your existing knowledge. Our course combines theoretical and practical skills, and encourages engagement with industry at all levels.

In-depth research into design processes and technologies, along with related work placement opportunities, will prepare you for new career directions. Your project work will be supported by ongoing staff research into sustainability, architecture, design-related digital technologies, experiential environments and brand communication.

You'll be taught through tutorials, seminars, self-directed study in relation to your project proposal, work-in-progress reviews and visits or references to sites of local and international interest.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Tuesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

We've got extensive contacts across the range of interior design disciplines. Live projects, research analysis and feasibility studies will draw on our wide range of contacts and associations.

Connections include specialists in the related fields of audio-visual technologies, lighting design and interactive design.

Recent guest lecturers have included:
-David Callcott, CADA Design, retail and leisure design consultants (London and Hyderabad, India)
-Emma Vane, Production Designer for Atonement, the Harry Potter series, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Captain America: The First Avenger
-Finlay White, ModCell, sustainable construction
-Mick Pearce, award-winning international architect (Title: Bio-mimicry and the 3rd industrial revolution)
-Phil Hughes, Ralph Appelbaum Associates, museum and exhibition designers (London, New York, Beijing)
-Uwe R. Brückner, Atelier Brückner, exhibition design (Stuttgart, Germany).

Careers

Career opportunities exist within design or architectural consultancies in retail, leisure, exhibition, office, hotel, residential and cruise ship design, as well as in the fields of design management, interior or film-set design.

Our course has a strong ecological focus with opportunities for engaging with both the theoretical and practical aspects of real-world sustainability.

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Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the modern historians at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about modern history from the nineteenth century through to contemporary history. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity. Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the cultural and political history, visual culture and media studies, sports history, regional and international histories. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, Africa, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Modern History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms
Students may choose to take a skills module: these are mainly medieval/ancient languages (e.g. Old English, Old Norse, Latin, Greek), modern languages for reading (e.g. Academic French, Academic German), or research skills (e.g. palaeography). Students who take a skills module write a 60-credit dissertation instead of a 90-credit dissertation.

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in modern history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for modern history included: The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Interpretations of Terror and Genocide in Modern Europe; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9200&title=Modern+History&code=V1K707&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. Read more
Durham's MA in Social and Economic History at Durham provides training in research methods for historical topics in any aspect of social and economic history. The MA provides quantitative and qualitative research methods appropriate to a wide range of historical approaches. Accredited by the ESRC, this MA is part of our four year funding scheme offered by the North-East Doctoral Training Centre. Students can apply for 1+3 funding for this MA followed by a PhD in any aspect of social and economic history with expert supervision available within the Department – and with our partner institution in the NEDTC at Newcastle University. This includes African history, and aspects of governance, as well as traditional social and economic topics. For further information on funding see further below.

The MA programme is shared with the School of Applied Social Science and will help you to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of social and economic history and to master advanced understanding of the concepts and methods with which it may be interrogated. It seeks to equip you with a diverse portfolio of research techniques and approaches to enable you to undertake extended independent research in your dissertation, and to make your own contribution to the field. The skills provided by this MA are also transferrable to a wide range of careers.

Durham has a long tradition of economic and social history, on which this MA draws. The breadth of possible subjects for study mirrors the comprehensive and global nature of the department staff: from medieval Europe to modern-day Africa, and from north-east England to the global economy. Durham's History Department is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle. Students of social and economic history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library - especially the Sudan Archive - and Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: the landscape of industrial revolution and of post-industrial response, of globalisation and regional identity.

Course Structure

The MA in Social and Economic History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year.

Students take 30 credits of core modules from History: Archives and Sources (15 credits), and Critical Practice (15 credits); and 30 credits of core modules from the School of Applied Social Sciences: Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits) AND EITHER Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits). They write a 60-credit dissertation (15,000 words) supervised by a member of academic staff in the History Department. They also choose a 30-credit optional module in History; AND 30 credits of optional modules from Social Sciences: EITHER Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits) and Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits) OR Applied Stastics (30 credits).

The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Perspectives on Social Research (15 credits)
-*Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Fieldwork and Interpretation (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
* Applied Statistics (30 credits; OPTIONAL; runs across Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms)

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)
Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options included: Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages; The Wealth of Nations; Race in Modern America; 'Tribe' and Nation in Africa since 1800; Tradition, Change and Political Culture in Modern Britain; Gender, Nationalism and Modernity in East Asia; History, Knowledge and Visual Culture (a full list of MA option modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/). Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.
-*Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)
-*Quantitative Research Methods (15 credits; OPTIONAL)

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9202&title=Social+and+Economic+History+%28Research+Methods%29&code=V1KB07&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years: please contact the Department if you are interested in exploring this option further.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor. Social science modules are taught through lectures, seminars, workshops, and practical classes.

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Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Early Modern History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the early modernists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the early modern world from the mid-fifteenth century through to the early nineteenth. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of early modern scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Early Modern period, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle, and the surrounding area. Students of early modern history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of industrial revolution, of vernacular architecture and of early modern globalisation. Early Modern History at Durham is comprehensive and international in its reach, with specialists in the History of Medicine, consumer culture, print and information, court culture, ecclesiastical and intellectual history, and political thought. Area specialisms include the British Isles, Continental Europe, North America, China and the Steppe regions.

Course Structure

The MA in Early Modern History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:

Michaelmas Term (October-December)

Archives and Sources (15 credits)
Issues in Early Modern History (30 credits)
*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)

Critical Practice (15 credits)
Option module (30 credits)

Easter Term (April-June)

Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9199&title=Early+Modern+History&code=V1K607&type=MA&year=2016#essentials; a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Early Modern History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. Optional modules are taught in seminars and provide a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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September, January and May. Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study. Read more

Course start date

September, January and May

About the course

Masters degree / Postgraduate Diploma / Postgraduate Certificate / Single-module study

Seeking to deepen your understanding of Scotland’s history and heritage in the global context from the comfort of your home? This course will equip you with the skills you need, and offers access to cutting edge, innovative research in Scottish historical studies. Delivered in an interactive online environment, this course is designed to provide students who cannot attend a fulltime postgraduate degree course in Scottish History with an opportunity to develop research skills and an understanding of the major topics and historiography of Scottish History.

Why study Scottish History at Dundee?

This course builds upon the current expertise within the History programme at Dundee to provide an integrated programme of study including research skills, a critical understanding of the principal theories and concepts of Scottish History and historiography, and the chance through independent research to make a contribution to the development of Scottish history.

The central aim of this course is to examine the many different interpretations of Scottish history and you will be encouraged to think critically about the various ways in which historians have viewed the development of Scotland over the past five centuries and to consider some of the ways in which Scottish history has been portrayed in a popular context.

You will learn about:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History from the sixteenth century to the present
- How to use the main sources available to historians of Scotland
- The Union of 1603 and the Covenanters
- The Scottish Reformation: Politics and Society
- The Union of 1707
- Jacobite rising
- Scottish Identity and Culture
- The ‘Highland Question’: Clearance and Improvement
- Health and welfare in the Highlands
- The Industrial Revolution
- Landscape and Environment
- Scotland and Empire
- Tourism and Leisure

Who should study this course?

This course is aimed at:

- Anyone with a good undergraduate degree wishing to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of Scottish History. The University can consider applications from people with experience, but no first degree
- Graduates in History or related disciplines wishing to gain additional knowledge and skills to further their employment prospects
- History graduates considering PhD research

Individual modules can be taken as non-accredited modules for interest or personal development.

How you will be taught

The programme is delivered through online distance learning. You study from home and can be based anywhere in the world. You will have a tutor who is an expert in their field and will work through the modules with other students so you won’t feel isolated. Module authors and tutors include Dr Alan MacDonald, Professor Graeme Morton and Dr Patricia Whatley.

Modules run for 15 weeks, and pathways can take between 1 and 5 years. We suggest that students account for 15 hours per week of work for each module undertaken. Most of the student cohort will be studying part-time alongside employment and other commitments.

What you will study

There is one core module, worth 20 credits:

- Debates and Issues in Scottish History: Sources, Interpretations and Arguments

You will take 100 credits of optional modules from the following:

- Scottish National Identities since 1807
- Scottish Tourism, 1780-1930
- Health, Politics and Society in the Scottish Highlands, 1840-1945
- Scotland in the Age of Mary Queen of Scots
- War, Empire and Society: Scotland c 1870-1922
- Scotland: Land and People
- The Union of 1707

You can also take 40 credits worth of modules from the Centre for Archive and Information Studies

- Public History
- Scots Palaeography and Diplomatic
- Skills and Sources for Family and Local History in Scotland

Students can choose to graduate at 60 credits with a PG Cert, at 120 credits with a PG Dip or complete the Research Proposal and Dissertation module for the Masters. All modules are available in a standalone basis.

How you will be assessed

Coursework (100%) consisting of, per module:

- 55% Essay (4,000 words)
- 30% Assessed Tasks (2 short essays of c. 1000 words each)
- 15% Module Journal (c. 500 words every 2 weeks)

Tutors will provide regular support and feedback from the assessed tasks and module journal as the module progresses.

To complete the MLitt, students are also required to write an 18,000 word dissertation.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Developed with the Engineering Council, this online engineering degree is a highly flexible, part-time route to obtaining an engineering Masters degree without taking time off work. Read more
Developed with the Engineering Council, this online engineering degree is a highly flexible, part-time route to obtaining an engineering Masters degree without taking time off work.

Become a Chartered Engineer
Through the combination of the MSc Professional Engineering and work based learning you will achieve the academic qualifications and professional development required to apply for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Becoming a Chartered Engineer provides international recognition of your expertise to further advance your career and employability. It may increase your earning potential and provide you with a greater influence within your organisation and industry.

Learn from a university at the heart of UK engineering
Derby is located at the very centre of the UK and is home to engineering giants like Rolls Royce, Bombardier and Toyota. Coming from a city filled with engineering history and at the birth place of the industrial revolution, we know a thing or two about engineering.

Interactive and practical learning
This online learning degree is specifically designed by our expert online tutors and contains plenty of opportunities to interact with tutors and other students through online discussion forums, virtual class room sessions and more traditional forms of communication such as email and Skype.

Supported learning
In addition to our academic teams, you’ll be appointed a dedicated online learner advisor who will support you on any non-academic issues throughout your course.
You’ll also benefit from many other university support services such as student wellbeing, eLibrary and resource centre, IT support and careers and employment service.

When can I start?
Choose from three start dates – January, May or September. You can apply online to secure your place.
Visit our website to learn more.

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In the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Read more
In the first term, students on the course will be offered an intensive training programme consisting of classes, seminars, workshops, individual and group assignments. Each student will take a compulsory core readings course in Modern British history. This course will include weekly classes on major themes, historiography, and methods, based on key readings, so that students come to a foundational understanding of central themes in Modern British history.

Students will also choose two Options, one in Michaelmas Term and one in Lent Term, from a range of Options in British history and historiography.

From the first term students begin research for a 15-20,000-word dissertation, working closely with a supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpmbh

Course detail

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired:

1. a firm grasp of the historiographical debates in Modern British History;
2. research skills relevant to the specific area in which they will have written a dissertation;
3. the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field.

Format

1. Compulsory core option, Michaelmas Term, taken from the core course ‘Readings in Modern British History and Historiography’. The core course focuses on key debates in British political, social, cultural or economic history. The following fields will be covered: the industrial revolution; the language of the social order; faith and secularisation; democracy; liberalism; the impact of empire; gender history. Students will attend weekly classes on these major themes, based on key readings, in order to come to a foundational understanding of key themes in British history. The final essay, of a maximum of 4,000 words, will be assessed and worth 10% of the final MPhil mark.

2. One option in Michaelmas Term and one option in Lent Term. Weekly classes on broad but more specialized topics, such as ‘the long eighteenth century’, ‘class and social mobility in the long twentieth century’, ‘history and public policy’. Each of these modules will require an essay (maximum word length of 4,000) which will count for 10% of the final mark for the MPhil (so all three modules, including the core course essay, will count for 30% of the final degree mark). In addition, each Option will incorporate a presentation (unassessed) for each student.

3. Dissertation. Those who satisfactorily complete this programme of study will continue on to a research project, closely supervised by one of Cambridge’s outstanding group of historians of Modern Britain. The dissertation, of between 15,000 and 20,000 words, will be submitted by the middle of June. This dissertation is worth 70% of the final mark in the degree.

4. Research seminar. The students are asked to regularly attend at least one seminar offered by the Modern British history subject group (among which the Modern British history, Modern Cultural History, Irish history, British social and economic history) and to engage in the discussion.

5. Graduate training. Alongside regular presentations and debates with the Options, a graduate workshop or ‘training day’ will take place late in Lent Term at which students will present their work to other students and to the Faculty involved in the Modern British history MPhil. This workshop provides an excellent opportunity to exchange with other students as well as senior historians about their present work, their achievements and difficulties, and to learn a variety of presentation skills.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The sustainable extraction, supply, use and disposal/re-use of natural resources is increasingly critical to business, policymakers, and civil society around the world. Read more
The sustainable extraction, supply, use and disposal/re-use of natural resources is increasingly critical to business, policymakers, and civil society around the world. This new degree investigates the topics of a circular economy, resource efficiency, and sustainable resource management, and will qualify students with the skills and knowledge to become leaders in this field.

Degree information

The curriculum fully reflects the global nature of the subject. Students will gain in-depth expertise at the intersection of the environmental, social and economic aspects of the management and governance of sustainable resources from both public policy and industrial perspectives. Key concepts will comprise resource efficiency and circular economy, the resource nexus and supply chain security.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Introduction to Sustainable Resources: Challenges and principles
-Introduction to Resource Economics and Policy
-The Demand Drivers for Resource Use
-Tools for Assessing Sustainable Resources
-Future Resource Pathways and Visions

Optional modules
-International Commodity Trade
-Metrics, Modelling and Visualisation of the Resource Nexus
-Resource Governance and the Global South
-Eco-Innovation, Business and Market Development
-Earth Resources and Sustainability
-Climate Risks to Hydro-Ecological Systems

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, project group work and presentations from visiting speakers from a range of businesses and other organisations. Assessment is through examination, assessed coursework, group work, and a dissertation.

Fieldwork
Students will participate in a field trip to Ironbridge (the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution). There will be no additional costs to students for this trip.

Careers

This programme equips students for challenging, rewarding and socially beneficial employment in a wide range of sectors including business, national and local government, NGOs and global organisations concerned with economy-resource-environment interactions. The programme includes a careers event with speakers from a variety of organisations, providing an opportunity to discuss opportunities with potential employers.

Students become members of the Sustainable Resources MSc alumni network and will be invited to attend alumni events and benefit from networking opportunities with fellow students.

Employability
On graduation students should possess a sound understanding of the key challenges surrounding sustainable resource use, supply and demand drivers and future strategies for global natural resource management. Students should also be technically competent in a range of economic, social science and modelling skills and techniques including integrated assessments, life cycle analysis, material flows analysis, foresight analysis/scenario analysis, system dynamics, and computable general equilibrium models (CGE).

Students develop 'key skills' valuable for future employment, including communication skills (written and oral), teamwork, breaking down complex problems, decision-making under uncertainties, intercultural communication, working in interdisciplinary environments, and awareness of the business context.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Sustainable Resources (ISR) has a world-leading research portfolio in the area of sustainable use of resources, economics and the environment. ISR is particularly strong in analysis related to actors and their decision-making as well as strategies.

The exciting multidisciplinary programme includes contributions from economics, law, political science, development planning, engineering and the natural sciences as appropriate for understanding planetary boundaries, the circular economy, people and the resource nexus, and developing response options.

Learning key employment skills is an integral part of the programme. The residential field trip to Ironbridge offers a valuable opportunity for student and staff interaction and staff at the start of the year. Regular seminars are held across UCL and there will be opportunities to undertake industry-focused dissertation projects.

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This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present. Read more
This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present.

The core modules on the course examine: the Royal Navy in the twentieth century, warfare in ancient and medieval times., the impact of the French and Industrial Revolutions on warfare in the age of 'total war'.

Optional modules give students the opportunity to study the Second World War, warfare in modern Africa and, additionally, the programme draws on Brunel’s expertise in intelligence studies. You also have the chance to take an optional module in this area with Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS).

Students will also complete a 15,000 dissertation on any military history topic, drawing on the wide expertise of staff in the department.

Module descriptions

War in History 1789-present includes:
Limited war and the period before 1789; the French revolution and the birth of the modern style of warfare; the impact of the industrial revolution on warfare; Jomini and Clausewitz; the idea of 'absolute war'; warfare in the 19th century: on the road to 'total war'; the First World War; changes in warfare in the inter-war period: Blitzkrieg and 'deep battle'; the Second World War; the nature of warfare after 1945; Korea, Vietnam and the Arab-Israeli conflicts; counter-insurgency; low-intensity conflicts; warfare in the 21st Century.

Intelligence History:
Failure & Success takes students through the history of the practice of intelligence from "Plato to NATO", or ancient times to the modern days, linking political, social and technological factors into a greater understanding of the profession. The second term is largely student-led, individual students presenting case studies, improving their own historical understanding while developing their skills at formal presentations in front of critical audiences.

The Second World War:
explores the military, political and socio-economic events and developments of the Second World War; focuses on the historiography and cultural significance of the war up to the present day; and adopts an "international history" approach by building its analysis around the interaction of states and peoples in this global conflict. Seminar discussions will focus around the interpretation of various controversial aspects of the Second World War through examination of primary sources of different kinds and of different secondary interpretations.

The Royal Navy in the Twentieth Century:
examines a turbulent period in British naval history. At the start of the twentieth century The Royal Navy was the largest and most powerful maritime power projection force in the world, with more ships and more bases than any other. However, it faced dangerous enemies. Initially focused on the ‘traditional’ threat posed by France and Russia, it soon had to adjust to the menace of a rising and hegemonic Germany. Subsequently, it would also find itself facing the resurgent might of Italy and Japan. As such, the Royal Navy faced the need to be everywhere and combat everyone, a daunting proposition in overstretch. The need to win out in several arms races, to fight two global wars and then prepare to face the prospect of a third posed challenges in the military, economic, social, technological, geographical and ideological realms. How the British state and its navy addressed and surmounted these challenges is a matter of considerable dispute among historians. This module will navigate these debates and in so doing chart the rise and decline of British sea power.

War and the Military in Modern African History: explores the role of warfare and the military in the course of modern Africa’s history, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. The module will combine broad themes as well as specific case studies, and it will explore the ways in which violence and conflict have influenced economy, society and polity in the modern era. The module aims to encourage students to consider the enduring imagery and stereotyping around African warfare in the West, and to think of warfare in constructive as well as destructive terms. Key topics for study will include the growth of identities based on violence and militarism, for example the development of the Zulu state; the relationship between military and political administration; the economics of African war; anti-colonial insurgency and guerrilla wars of the late twentieth century, and recent developments in ‘warlordism’, interstate and proxy conflict.

Warfare in the Age of Muscle: introduces students to the study of European warfare from the Classical era to the age of gunpowder in an historical and social context and it will provide them with a critical introduction to the impact of warfare on politics and society in Europe from ancient times to 1453. It will introduce the methods of historical research as applied to military studies and will also achieve the following: introduce students to applied problems in military planning and operations via ancient examples; teach students to develop a practical insight into why certain operations succeed and fail; illuminate significant areas of military operational, logistical, and intelligence activities in order to arrive at an objective and neutral evaluation of the possibilities, limitations and perils of warfare.

International Security:
This module will introduce you to the changing nature of war, conflict and insecurity. In the first semester you will critically analyse traditional and contemporary Theories in Security Studies. In the second semester, you will be asked to systematically apply these theories to major security issues and policies, such as the arms trade and proliferation, ethnic conflict and humanitarian interventions, pandemics and biopolitics.

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Engineering has been a key element in the development of society since the industrial revolution. Very little in modern society remains untouched by the actions of engineers. Read more
Engineering has been a key element in the development of society since the industrial revolution. Very little in modern society remains untouched by the actions of engineers. The Engineering Council, in Chartered Engineer and Incorporated Engineer Standard (UKSPEC), sets out its definition of an Engineer:

Engineers are characterised by their ability to develop appropriate solutions to engineering problems, using new or existing technologies, through innovation, creativity and change. They might develop and apply new technologies, promote advanced designs and design methods, introduce new and more efficient production techniques, marketing and construction concepts, pioneer new engineering services and management methods. Chartered Engineers are variously engaged in technical and commercial leadership and possess effective interpersonal skills.

It is widely reported that Oil and Gas engineering industries suffer from a lack of graduates with the Further Learning which incorporate management skills. In order to address these issues the Oil and Gas Engineering with Management seeks to provide a sound education in areas of Oil and Gas engineering through an integrated and co-ordinated programme.

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This programme is subject to validation. Read more
This programme is subject to validation.

The MA International Fashion Marketing brings together two disciplines for which Regent’s is internationally renowned – fashion and marketing – to provide future fashion marketing managers and directors with the practical and intellectual skills to lead and succeed in the vibrant and fast-changing fashion industry.

Our MA programme has been developed in consultation with industry experts and designed to ensure that our graduates are best placed to capitalise on new opportunities presented by the most sustained period of creative disruption in fashion since the industrial revolution.

Technological innovation is challenging long-established fashion systems and changing the ways in which the industry markets itself globally. Dynamic and fast-paced by nature, the industry is set to continue this period of disruption for the foreseeable future.

Our programme will place you at the heart of the fashion-business revolution, located in central London, the heartland of fashion.

In addition, you will benefit from a study trip to Milan, included in the fees, and have the opportunity to go to Paris and New York, covering all four of fashion’s premier destinations.

Why should I choose this programme?

If London is the fashion capital of the world, Regent’s is surely the best place to study in London. Located in royal Regent’s Park, we are often considered to have the most beautiful campus in the UK’s capital city – and with our sister site in neighbouring Marylebone Village, a haven for fashion and design, there is no better location.

The programme itself is thoroughly grounded in well-established fashion marketing theory and practice, while also focused on developing your personal, professional and leadership skills, as well as your ability to think creatively in response to change.

You will enter the industry in a climate of disruption and uncertainty, particularly to supply chain management and fashion marketing communications, but you will relish the opportunities that this presents.

We encourage students from different disciplinary backgrounds to join our cohort, not only business.

Based on years of experience, we consider there to be five essential elements to gaining the best possible postgraduate education in international fashion marketing and ensuring the most rewarding time as a student.

The best education in fashion marketing is:

‌•Intimate
‌•Intensive
‌•International
‌•Industry-focused
‌•Independent
‌•Intimate

Our teaching philosophy is based on personal attention: our classes are small, with a maximum cohort size of 20. Every student gets to know their lecturers and peers, and you will benefit from more contact time with teaching staff than you would elsewhere. The Regent’s mission is to develop tomorrow’s global leaders: we know that developing you as a future leader in international fashion marketing is most effectively done in an intimate learning environment.

Intensive

Our MA programme is dynamic and intensive, combining modular study with field trips, masterclasses, live projects and industry opportunities. We will immerse you in the fashion industry and the discipline of fashion marketing for the duration of the programme, as well as provide you with the connections to succeed thereafter.

International

There is no better place to study international fashion marketing than Regent’s. With students from over 140 nationalities spread across a small community of 3,500 full-time students, we can confidently claim to be the most internationally diverse university in the UK. With an unmatched international focus and a range of study opportunities at key destinations abroad, our MA programme is truly global.

Industry-focused

As well as being industry-focused in its design and content, your programme is delivered by practitioner lecturers, and encompasses live projects with industry as well as masterclasses with influential industry professionals.

In order to prepare you for careers in international fashion marketing, you will begin your relationship with staff from our dedicated Careers & Business Relations team from Day One, many of whom will jointly deliver your teaching on relevant modules.

Independent

As a private institution, independence is our legal status, but it is also an attitude of mind. We make an intellectual claim on independence, and our students are encouraged to think and operate with independence and individuality.

This is essential to success in both marketing and fashion. By the time you graduate you will have developed your own unique approach to international fashion marketing and your own strengths in relation to the industry.

Key skills, aims and objectives

As an aspiring fashion marketing manager or director, the aim of the MA International Fashion Marketing is to give you the intellectual and practical knowledge to create and implement a fashion marketing strategy within the complex, fast-changing and dynamic international context of the contemporary fashion industry, and to develop the skills necessary to lead and succeed in your future career.

The main educational objectives of the programme are to:

Provide an inspiring learning environment – an environment where you can feel confident that you are acquiring the knowledge and skills that will fully equip you to enter the international fashion industry as a consummate professional
Develop you as a distinctive individual – a professional who is capable of independent, innovative and entrepreneurial thinking in relation to complex and changing contexts
Hone your critical and creative thinking – offering you the opportunity to learn to apply critical, analytical and creative thinking to theoretical and practical fashion marketing briefs
Build your expertise – fostering a thorough knowledge and understanding of the nature and structure of the international fashion industry and its processes, from trend-forecasting through to distribution
Develop your intercultural intelligence – ensuring a sound knowledge of international fashion marketing management for international markets
Develop your technical and strategic skills – developing confident knowledge of marketing strategies, marketing activities and integrated marketing communications strategies and their applications within global fashion contexts
Foster your independence – cultivating your independent application of fashion marketing theories and methodologies
Develop you as an ethical practitioner – ensuring you graduate with a rich appreciation of the ethical and environmental responsibilities involved in the international marketing of fashion
Cultivate reflective practice – facilitating the development of effective reflective and self-management skills
Future opportunities
For over 20 years, Fashion & Design at Regent’s has successfully launched graduates into international careers in fashion. While many of our graduates start their own businesses and creative ventures, some of the brands that our alumni have worked for include:

‌•All Saints
‌•Burberry
‌•Christina Siriano
‌•Coach
‌•Fashion Scout
‌•Fujiwara
‌•Gap
‌•GQ Magazine
‌•Hackett
‌•H&M
‌•Jaeger
‌•Marks & Spencer
‌•Matthew Williamson
‌•Puma
‌•Ralph Lauren
‌•Roland Mouret
‌•Saks
‌•Selfridges
‌•T‌he White Company
‌•Top Man
‌•Vivienne Westwood
‌•Zandra Rhodes Enterprises

Further Entry Requirements

Exceptional Entry

If you do not meet the essential entry criteria outlined above, you may be eligible to apply for exceptional entry. In order to do so, you must:

Have a minimum of two years of relevant work experience
Provide a 1000-word personal statement outlining your reasons for applying, and how your previous experience is relevant to the programme
Be prepared to attend an interview with the Postgraduate Admissions Panel
Please contact us for further information on applying through this route:

English requirements
PLEASE NOTE: Latest update regarding ETS & TOEFL testing – The Home Office has suspended all ETS tests, including TOEFL exams, as evidence of English language ability from new visa applicants.

Please see the Home Office website for further information: https://www.gov.uk/government/world-location-news/changes-to-english-language-certification-for-visa-applications--3

Therefore, if you are relying on an ETS / TOEFL certificate for Visa purposes please be aware that you will now need to take an alternative English proficiency test.

We will continue to accept the following English language proficiency tests:

IELTS
PTE Academic
Cambridge Advanced
Regent’s University London on campus diagnostic test
If you have taken and submitted the TOEFL test as part of your admissions application, or have any questions in relation to the above, please do not hesitate to make contact with our Admissions team to seek further advice and support.

– 18/07/2014

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Lean aims to eliminate waste in the creation and discovery of value. The mission of this programme is simplicity in product and service design. Read more
Lean aims to eliminate waste in the creation and discovery of value.

The mission of this programme is simplicity in product and service design.

We aim to actively seek out the best ideas and practices in product and service design innovation, and to communicate them in ways that establish a questioning culture.

This programme is aimed at professionals in Service Design, Agile, and New Product Development, incorporating the associated Innovation concepts and tools (such as TRIZ), held together with Systems Thinking.

To quote Michael Porter (from Harvard Business Review, October 2015):

“The core functions — product development, IT, manufacturing, logistics, marketing, sales, and after-sale service — are being redefined, and the intensity of coordination among them is increasing. Entirely new functions are emerging, including those to manage the staggering quantities of data now available. All of this has major implications for classic organizational structure. What is under way is perhaps the most substantial change in the manufacturing firm since the Second Industrial Revolution, more than a century ago.”

This degree is at the forefront of the exciting developments in Design Thinking, Servitization, Lean Startup, Product Service Systems (PSS), the Internet of Things, Product and Service Psychology, and Agile Thinking.

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Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s. Read more
Surrey were the pioneers of sophisticated ‘micro-satellites’ in the 1980s.

Since then, our sustained programme of building complete satellites, performing mission planning, working with international launch agencies and providing in-orbit operations has kept us at the forefront of the space revolution –utilising new advances in technology to decrease the cost of space exploration.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our Masters in Space Engineering programme is designed to give you the specialist multidisciplinary knowledge and skills required for a career working with space technology and its applications.

Surrey students have access to all aspects of the design and delivery of spacecraft and payloads, and as a result are very attractive to employers in space-related industries.

As we develop and execute complete space missions, from initial concept to hardware design, manufacturing and testing, to in orbit operations (controlled by our ground station at the Surrey Space Centre), you will have the chance to be involved in, and gain experience of, real space missions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Space Avionics
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing & Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning– know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin space engineering.
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of mobile and satellite communications and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within space engineering.
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research & development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The author Jane Austen's lifetime (1775-1817) spans a fascinating period of British history and both she and her writings need to be understood in the context of her time. Read more
The author Jane Austen's lifetime (1775-1817) spans a fascinating period of British history and both she and her writings need to be understood in the context of her time.

This MA concentrates on the world in which Austen lived and it explores the wider social, political and cultural history of a vital period between the American Revolution and the end of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, events that bookend Austen’s life.

WHY STUDY MA JANE AUSTEN'S ENGLAND?

The course takes students from the last years of George III's active monarchy through to the Regency, and it also encourages students to engage with a complex society that was undergoing rapid growth, commercial/industrial development and growing demands for reform at home, while simultaneously restoring its imperial credentials and expanding to become Europe's leading international power. Additionally it examines the nature of contemporary debates and discussions about gender through Austen's life, work and the characters that she created reflecting the gendered expectations and tensions that operated in both women's and men's lives at the time.

Those studying this course will also benefit from its location in Bath and from the well-established association of Bath Spa University with the heritage sector, specifically through our close connections with the Jane Austen Centre, Jane Austen’s House Museum, Chawton House Library, and the Holburne and other Bath Museums. This will enable students to learn how Jane Austen’s England is used to generate both income and provide jobs in the contemporary local and international worlds, and encourage them to use their own knowledge and imagination to contribute to this. It also allows opportunities to use academic expertise across Bath Spa University and in the multi-disciplinary Centre for History and Culture.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The MA is awarded by successfully completing 180 credits as follows:

- two 30-credit compulsory modules;
- a combination of optional modules totalling 30/60 credits depending on Dissertation;
- a 60/90-credit Dissertation.

MODULES

Compulsory Modules (30 credits):
- Austen’s England, c.1775–1820 – a two-week summer school in August
- Research Skills and Method

Optional Modules (30 credits) - these would include but are not restricted to:
- Austen’s England, the Historical Context
- Gender and Society in Austen’s England, c.1775–1820
- Navy and Nation in Austen’s England
- A module from ‘The Country and the City’ strand of the MA: Landscape, Literature and Environment

Students will also be able to take an optional 30-credit module from within the BSU taught postgraduate framework.

Dissertation (60/90-credit):
Students will be assigned an individual dissertation supervisor, who will work with them on a one-to-one basis to develop an original piece of historical research of 15,000/20,000 words. The 60-credit dissertation represents a detailed piece of research carried out by the student who, although supervised by a member of the academic staff, will be expected to work independently, to demonstrate sufficient mastery of the chosen topic and an appropriate ability in the organisation and presentation of the material. The 90-credit dissertation is offered to students who demonstrate a clear grasp of their subject matter, and who therefore would benefit from devoting themselves more fully to the dissertation topic, rather than taking another taught module

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