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Masters Degrees (Indigenous)

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The Department of Indigenous Studies (formerly the Aboriginal Governance Program) is grounded in the intellectual and cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the globe. Read more
The Department of Indigenous Studies (formerly the Aboriginal Governance Program) is grounded in the intellectual and cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the globe. We welcome students from all backgrounds and disciplines to explore the unique complexities and broad, diverse cultures associated with Indigenous studies which include natural resources, economic development and Indigenous knowledge. The Department of Indigenous Studies is proud to offer its students the opportunity to pursue a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance degree, which was established in 2008.

Join us as we examine Indigenous governance through Indigenous wisdom and multidisciplinary coursework in Indigenous/Aboriginal governance and disciplines like politics, anthropology, human ecology, sociology, law, history, religious studies, and conflict resolution studies. We recognize and honor the central role of language as carrier of culture, conveyor of tradition and knowledge, and signifier of individual and community identity by supporting the teaching of the Indigenous languages Ojibwe and Cree.

Graduate students will earn a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance, preparing them for leadership and management positions within Indigenous governmental and non-governmental organizations, and in urban and other community-based organizations; or to further their educations in a variety of Ph.D. programs.

About the Program

The two-year program Master of Arts (MA) in Indigenous Governance offers students an innovative and unique indigenous-centered, graduate level education.

The MA in Indigenous Governance is a multidisciplinary program grounded in an understanding of Indigenous peoples' values, principles, and philosophies. The approach we foster is one that combines a supportive environment for students of all backgrounds, while modeling and fostering the highest standards of excellence inside and outside of the classroom. We recognize and honor the central role of language as carrier of culture, conveyor of tradition and knowledge, and signifier of individual and community identity by requiring the study of an indigenous language, for example, Ojibwe or Cree. An international focus will prepare students to take leadership positions in the private and public sectors, to create and influence policy, to creatively approach development and governance from an indigenous perspective, and to promote the visibility and recognition of sovereign Indigenous peoples and communities in Canada and abroad.

The MA in Indigenous Governance pursues the enhancement of higher learning and advanced research for students and faculty while striving to contribute to the social, political, economic and intellectual aspirations and interests of Indigenous people, communities and nations in Canada and in the international sphere. Its uniqueness and innovative character derives primarily from the historical, political and legal context of Manitoba and Treaty One Territory, while making the intellectual heritage of Indigenous peoples a dynamic feature and extending its scholarly inquire to the broader domestic and international context. Required courses include topics of Indigenous self-determination and self-government, Indigenous Knowledge and Wisdom, languages, and specialized research methods and ethics.

The program’s specific objectives are to:
-Provide studies in matters of good governance grounded in indigenous thought and values.
-Provide an in-depth understanding of the human, environmental and financial issues and processes relevant to indigenous self-determination.
-Promote leadership and skills in areas of policy development and professional practice relevant to indigenous governance and public service organizations working with Indigenous peoples.
-Create an intellectual space of excellence to engage indigenous and non-indigenous scholars in the gathering, application and evolution of indigenous knowledges, philosophies and governance models.

The focus of the degree is on the theory and practice of the distinctive cultural, social, economic, political and legal environments of Indigenous governance. MA in Indigenous Governance offers a thesis-based or practicum-based program.

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Human rights. Climate change. Land and territory. Biodiversity. Water. Language and heritage. Natural resources. Social inclusion. Read more
Human rights. Climate change. Land and territory. Biodiversity. Water. Language and heritage. Natural resources. Social inclusion. Economic disparity. Disease. Population. Sovereignty. There is no fundamentally important political, social, economic, and cultural issue of our time that does not affect, and that is not affected by, Indigenous Peoples. And there is no development process that can unfold successfully without understanding Indigenous ways of life and Indigenous world views. That is why the core of the University of Winnipeg Master’s in Development Practice program integrates fully and seamlessly the theory and practice of development with the experience of Indigenous culture and knowledge.

The Master's in Development Practice program (MDP) is an innovative professional degree offered by a network of over thirty leading universities on six continents. At the University of Winnipeg, the MDP uniquely focuses on Indigenous development - the only program in the world to focus on how Indigenous knowledge and experience can help shape a sustainable path for development, rooted in culture and identity.

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Foster the pathway of knowledge to strength, independence and growth for future generations. The Master of Māori and Indigenous Business (MMAIBus) is an online, part-time masters degree designed to equip you with the dynamic business expertise to lead and manage a Māori or Indigenous business. Read more

Foster the pathway of knowledge to strength, independence and growth for future generations.

The Master of Māori and Indigenous Business (MMAIBus) is an online, part-time masters degree designed to equip you with the dynamic business expertise to lead and manage a Māori or Indigenous business.

The burgeoning Māori economy needs skilled business graduates to drive sustainable local, national and international growth - and this highly practical degree will set you up to be at the forefront of Māori or Indigenous-led enterprises.

This three-year course is aimed at those who wish to advance their professional career and move into a senior leadership/management role. It's also ideal for anyone who wants to start their own entrepreneurial business.

The course is designed to maximise the impact of Māori on New Zealand's economic development and wellbeing.

You'll gain the knowledge, skills and confidence to develop executable business strategies and make better business decisions, enriched by an understanding of Māori cultural values and Indigenous approaches to business.

Course content

The course consists of 12 core papers covering topics such as the Māori economy; process and project management; marketing; innovation and entrepreneurship; finance and accounting; people management; and international business.

Each paper is a 10-week block of study, and you'll normally complete four papers a year (40 weeks) for three years.

Students will analyse real-life case studies of Māori businesses, and engage with a wide range of Māori and Indigenous business leaders.

You'll also learn about the importance of ethical business practices and Māori values in contributing to sustainability, improved stewardship of taonga (treasures), community wellbeing, and tikanga Māori (Māori culture).

Towards the end of the course, you'll complete a capstone project investigating a real-world business issue, and undertake an advanced social enterprise project.

Online learning - when and where it suits you

This programme is delivered as an online partnership between six New Zealand universities, providing you with access to some of the country's leading business academics and practitioners.

Partners include the University of Auckland, Auckland University of Technology, Massey University, University of Otago, Victoria University of Wellington, and the University of Waikato.

Students can enrol with the preferred university of their own choice - whether that's in your home region or further afield.

All classes are taught online, allowing you to complete the work when and where it suits you, through a combination of individual learning and online group activities. There will be webinars, videos, class discussions, readings, interactive tasks and weekly tutorials.

At the University of Waikato, our classes will be jointly delivered by http://www.management.ac.nz" target="_blank">Waikato Management School and the Faculty of Māori and Indigenous Studies.

Kaupapa Māori teaching and learning

The teaching and learning style is kaupapa Māori, and is designed to support students' academic and business success.

To get you started, the programme kicks off with a two-day wānanga to connect you with your national community of MMAIBus staff and students. Support services will be explained to you during the wānanga.

Students will also have opportunities to meet face-to-face with staff and other students at their nearest university every week, to facilitate group activities and support whakawhanaungatanga.

This will help you to build and connect with a large network of future Māori business leaders across the country.

The course content has evolved from consultation with iwi, hapū and whānau, government, senior Māori academics, and community and corporate leaders.

Career opportunities

  • Business owner
  • General manager
  • Management consultant
  • CEO of not-for-profit community enterprise


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Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law (LLM Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples') provides an opportunity to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights. Read more

Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law (LLM Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples') provides an opportunity to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights.

You'll examine how the United Nations and other international organisations influence the process of Indigenous rights development. You will learn what role the State plays in recognising environmental and economic rights of indigenous peoples.

What will post-settlement New Zealand legal landscape look like? You could be the driving force behind developing truly inclusive New Zealand Jurisprudence that would incorporate the best of the traditional Māori practices and Common Law.

The knowledge and skills developed through our specialist programme are relevant in roles in:

  • Academic teaching and research;
  • Treaty settlement
  • Maori governance
  • Crown Law
  • Local and central government
  • Education
  • Māori economy

The Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples’ Law programme is offered with the same study

options as those of Master of Laws (LLM). Please see the Master of Laws page for more information.

Cultural experience

The Faculty members come from a wide range of nations and cultural backgrounds, creating a truly multicultural environment. This helps foster in our students an increased awareness of global issues, exposes them to multiple historical and cultural perspectives as well as offer insight into legal systems outside the jurisdiction of the Common Law.

We have the most diverse and vibrant student body of all law schools in New Zealand. Up to 30 per cent of all our students identify themselves as Māori and nearly 16 per cent come from Pacific background. Nearly 40 per cent of our students are over the age of 25.

The Faculty's three dynamic law student associations: Pacific Law Student Association (PLSA)Te Whakahiapo (Māori Student Association) and Waikato University Law Student Association (WULSA) play an important role of fostering great collegial relationships between students and offer plenty of social and learning opportunities.

Our Mentoring Programme will provide extra support and guidance in your studies, help you to navigate through the transition period from school or previous employment to university study as well as advise you on other services and opportunities available to you on campus.



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The Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato places a strong emphasis on the development of research skills. The classes are small and are typically offered in seminar style discussions. Read more

The Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato places a strong emphasis on the development of research skills. The classes are small and are typically offered in seminar style discussions. This approach to teaching at an advanced level creates opportunities for you to share perspectives and discuss issues related to the topic. It'll help you to improve your communication skills and gain expert knowledge. It creates opportunities for you to network with others and renew motivation and confidence. You'll also get a lot of one-on-one time with the lecturing or supervising academic staff.

We offer the largest selection of papers in Cyber Law in New Zealand, and therefore you can complete this Masters focusing on this area.

The Faculty hosts two research centres: Centre for Environmental, Resources and Energy Law (CEREL) and Māori and Indigenous Governance Centre (MIGC). You’ll benefit from the expert knowledge and national and international professional associations in these fields. For example, you’ll be eligible to apply for the International Bar Association scholarship. Waikato Faculty of Law is the only school in New Zealand that offers this opportunity.

Whether your interest lies in Cyber Law, Law of War and Conflicts, Transnational Criminal Law, Indigenous Issues or Environmental Law, you will benefit from nationally and internationally recognised academic staff.

Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law

Passionate about indigenous issues? This Masters programme will allow you to study in-depth the historical and developing trends within the area of indigenous peoples' rights. You'll develop skills enabling you to participate actively in the development of Pacific jurisprudence and to enhance global understanding of Pacific legal systems.

Read more about Master of Laws in Māori/Pacific and Indigenous Peoples' Law.

Double LLM: University of Waikato and University of Arizona

Interested in holding two LLMs from internationally highly regarded Faculties of Law in significantly less time and in two different countries?

If you’re a dedicated, engaged student and you’ve successfully completed 90 points of LLM at Waikato (or 75% of our LLM), you could receive 6-8 credits towards the LLM degree at the James E Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona.

There are two options on offer for LLM in Arizona: Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy LLM (composed of 24 credits) or International Trade and Business Law LLM (composed of 26 credits).

Cultural experience

The Faculty members come from a wide range of nations and cultural backgrounds, creating a truly multicultural environment. This helps foster in our students an increased awareness of global issues, exposes them to multiple historical and cultural perspectives as well as offer insight into legal systems outside the jurisdiction of the Common Law.

We have the most diverse and vibrant student body of all law schools in New Zealand. Up to 30 per cent of all our students identify themselves as Māori and nearly 16 per cent come from Pacific background. Nearly 40 per cent of our students are over the age of 25.

The Faculty's three dynamic law student associations: Pacific Law Student AssociationTe Whakahiapo (Māori Student Association) and Waikato University Law Student Associations play an important role of fostering great collegial relationships between students and offer plenty of social and learning opportunities.

Our Mentoring Programme will provide extra support and guidance in your studies, help you to navigate through the transition period from school or previous employment to university study as well as advise you on other services and opportunities available to you on campus.

Career opportunities

  • Government departments
  • Law teaching and research
  • Civil and public service and the judiciary
  • Banking, financial services and financial regulation
  • International development organisations
  • Non-governmental organisations such as human rights agencies
  • Private legal practice
  • Business


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Course outline. The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. Read more

Course outline

The underlying philosophy of the LLM is to develop specialists in the field of International and Commercial Law. The programme attracts students from a wide variety of backgrounds with different experiences. It stresses the importance of interaction between staff and student, as well as between student and student. We believe this is an essential element in the development of effective lawyers in this area.

Following successful completion of the LLM in International and Commercial Law, you should have developed a range of skills, which include:

  • A sound understanding of each of the chosen areas of the law
  • Confidence in the analysis of complex case-law
  • The ability to make your argument convincingly, orally and in writing
  • The ability to take a co-operative approach to problem solving

Start dates

Students may take the LLM over

  • 12 months starting in September; or
  • 9 months starting in January.

Teaching methods

Seminars are the primary teaching method for this course. They encourage the development of clear analytical skills and create a forum where you can test your ideas against the arguments of your peers. Whether you enter the legal profession or business world you will find it is essential to have developed persuasive abilities. LLM options are taught in the form of three hours of seminars spread over each of the teaching weeks of the course. LLM seminars for subjects which are also taught at LLB level take place in two hour blocks every fortnight.

You are expected to read the cases and other materials relevant to the particular seminar in advance. At the seminar you will be asked to support your opinions and discuss your analysis of the area with your fellow students. In some modules you may be expected to make a presentation on a topic given to you by your tutor. Whilst these tasks may seem daunting at the beginning of the year, you will rapidly gain confidence as your debating skills develop.

Where seminars are on a fortnightly basis, the course will be supported by three hours of lectures per week during the lecturing period. Seminars will complement the lecture series.

Course material is available on the University’s own Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Moodle. This allows students to download lecture notes, submit assignments and share resources in an electronic forum both within the University’s computer network and remotely.

Specialist designations

Students can select specific modules to have their LLM designated as specialising in:

  • International Trade and Maritime Law;
  • International Oil and Gas Law; or
  • Financial Services Law

Each designation requires the following to be taken:

  • 20 unit Advanced Legal Research module;
  • 40 unit Core module; and
  • 120 units of Options.

The modules currently offered for the designations are as follows:

International Trade and Maritime Law

  • Advanced Legal Research (20)
  • International Trade and Maritime Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

  • Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
  • Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
  • International Intellectual Property (40)
  • Law of Business Organisations (40)
  • Law of World Trade (20)
  • Marine Insurance (20)
  • Dissertation (40)

International Oil & Gas Law

  • Advanced Legal Research (20)
  • International Oil and Gas Law and Policy (40)

120 units of Options from:

  • Banking Law (40)
  • Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
  • Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
  • EU Competition Law (20)
  • International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
  • Marine Insurance (20)
  • Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
  • Dissertation (40)

Financial Services Law

  • Advanced Legal Research (20)
  • Banking Law (40)

120 units of Options from:

  • Law of Business Organisations (40)
  • Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
  • EU Competition Law (20)
  • Marine Insurance (20)
  • Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
  • Securities Regulation (20)
  • Dissertation (40)

Non-designated LLM

Students who wish to have an LLM in International and Commercial Law without a designation must take

  • Advanced Legal Research (20)

160 units of Options from

  • Banking Law (40)
  • Commercial Conflict of Laws (20)
  • Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights (20)
  • Environmental Regulation and Energy Exploitation (20)
  • Intellectual Property Law (40)
  • International Human Rights (20)
  • International Medical Law & Ethics (20)
  • International Oil and Gas Laws and Policy (40)
  • International Trade and Maritime Law (40)
  • Law of Business Organisations (40 units)
  • Law of War (20)
  • Law of World Trade (20)
  • Marine Insurance (20)
  • Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery (20)
  • Public International Law (40)
  • Dissertation (40)

September start

The September start allows students to take more time to adjust to postgraduate studies. In the first term students must take the Advanced Legal Research module and choose Money Laundering, Offshore Banking and Asset Recovery, Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Rights, or EU Competition Law. All the modules are then available from January onwards, subject always to there being sufficient students opting for them



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The University of Winnipeg has received provincial approval for the creation of a new two-year Master of Arts in Criminal Justice degree which can be pursued full or part-time and will include the option to take courses in Indigenous Governance and the Public Administration graduate programs. Read more
The University of Winnipeg has received provincial approval for the creation of a new two-year Master of Arts in Criminal Justice degree which can be pursued full or part-time and will include the option to take courses in Indigenous Governance and the Public Administration graduate programs. It is the first graduate program of its kind in Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, or Northwestern Ontario.

“The MA in Criminal Justice is an important addition to the suite of innovative, multidisciplinary graduate programs offered by the University of Winnipeg.,” said Dr. Mavis Reimer, Dean of Graduate Studies. “This degree will offer a stream designed for professionals in the various sectors of the justice system and a stream designed for research students. An important focus of the program will be on Indigenous justice issues, supporting and extending the commitment of the University to the Indigenization of its curriculum.”

The new degree is expected to begin in 2018-2019 and once fully established, will accommodate 25 students in the program. Criminal justice is a popular undergraduate program at UWinnipeg with 630 undergraduate students currently selecting it as their major.

“We are very excited to have received approval for this new Master’s which will provide students with opportunities to learn about all aspects of the criminal justice system including policing, criminal law, and corrections,” said Dr. Steven Kohm, Chair, Criminal Justice. “Students in our MA program will be able to contribute to meaningful debate and serious research into pressing issues of justice facing Manitoba and Canada. This strengthens UWinnipeg’s leadership in justice education in Western Canada.”

The new Master’s will offer either a course-based stream or a thesis stream, designed for those continuing to PhD work. Concentrations within the program will be on traditional criminal justice theory, methods, criminal justice policy, and program evaluation.

The program is expected to attract professionals already working in the field as well as undergraduates from criminal justice and related disciplines such as sociology, political science, and conflict resolution. The new degree is also expected to appeal to adult learners already established in justice and social-service professions. The program has designed opportunities for students to pursue electives in the graduate Indigenous Governance program, with a view to specifically attracting students interested in Indigenous justice issues.

Criminal justice is a discipline that has arisen at the intersection of several disciplines, including law, psychology, sociology, urban studies, and criminology since the 1960s. The UWinnipeg approach is multi-disciplinary.

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The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels. Read more
The LLM in Human Rights Law programme is designed to enable students to form an advanced conceptual understanding of international law relating to the promotion and protection of human rights at the international, regional and domestic levels.

Human Rights Collegium at Queen Mary

The Human Rights Collegium is the first association between a university and a non-governmental organisation established to provide scholarly expertise, research and teaching on national and international human rights. The Human Rights Collegium is based at Queen Mary, University of London and is a consortium of members of the School of Law and the British Institute of Human Rights. The collegium's aim is to focus on areas that are at the forefront of human rights to help contribute to its progressive development and to benefit the community. These rights include socio-economic rights; rights of women; international child rights and the rights of other vulnerable groups.

Internships

Queen Mary LLM students have the opportunity to apply for three summer internships with the British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR).

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Human Rights Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM035 Gender, Law and the State: Current Legal Issues (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM038 Human Rights of Women (45 credits)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM078 Mental Health Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM170 Cultural Diversity and Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM172 Comparative Immigration and Nationality Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. Read more
The MA in African Literature enables students to engage critically with varied aspects of oral and written literatures in Africa. The programme is unique in the way it encourages exploration of relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories. The module ‘Theories and Techniques of Comparative Literature’ provides theoretical and methodological skills while the programme’s other units focus on specific areas such as literatures in African languages and contemporary African literature in English.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/

Structure

All students are required to write a 10,000-word dissertation in the field of their major course, which allows them to carry out a substantial piece of independent academic work on a selected topic. The dissertation is taken in either the core module or in the module ‘Selected Topics’.

Students must take the core module plus two modules from list A or B. List B modules assume a linguistic competence in the chosen language equivalent to that acquired in a first degree.

Not all modules listed below may be offered every year, and new modules may become available. For an up-to-date list of modules on offer, please visit the relevant departmental website or contact the Faculty office. Some modules may be taught in other departments of the School.

- Core Module
Literatures in African languages - 15PAFC124 (1 Unit) - Full Year

- List A: Pan-African Modules
Travelling Africa: Writing the Cape to Cairo - 15PAFC139 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Theory and techniques of Comparative Literature - 15PCSC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year
The Story of African Film: Narrative Screen Media in Africa - 15PAFH006 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Aspects of African film and video 2 - 15PAFH007 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
Research Methods In Translation Studies - 15PLIH046 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017
African Philosophy (PG) - 15PAFH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1
Realism and Magical Realism in the Afrophone Novel (PG) - 15PAFC146 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017
Afrophone Philosophies (PG) - 15PAFH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017

- List B: Language-specific Modules
Practical translation from and into Swahili - 15PAFC029 (1 Unit) - Full Year
Directed Readings in an African Langauage - 15PAFC147 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017

Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 26kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/africa/programmes/maaflit/file80692.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The taught part of the course consists of core lectures introducing basic concepts, theory and methodology; and additional seminars that extend the core material into other areas. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

A 10,000-word dissertation written over the summer offers students the opportunity to develop original research in an area of special interest. The course is formulated within two tracks:

- Learning Resources
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A postgraduate degree in African Literature from SOAS provides students with competency in language skills and intercultural awareness and understanding. Familiarity with the region will have been developed through a combination of the study of language, history, cinema, politics, economics or law. Graduates of this programme will develop their ability to engage with and explore relationships between indigenous African aesthetics and contemporary literary theories.

Postgraduate students gain linguistic and cultural expertise enabling them to continue in the field of research or to seek professional and management careers in the business, public and charity sectors. They leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including written and oral communication skills; attention to detail; analytical and problem solving skills; and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse
range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

Some graduates leave SOAS to pursue careers directly related to their study area, while others have made use of the intellectual training for involvement in analysing and solving many of the
problems that contemporary societies now face. The MA African Literature can lead to further study and research, however there is also a range of opportunities in fields such as:

- Education
- Publishing
- Archive work
- Arts Management
- Media

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Covering historical and philosophical bases of theatre and performance practices from different parts of the world, on this degree you'll investigate indigenous and contemporary performance and theatre traditions from a variety of cultural contexts. Read more

Covering historical and philosophical bases of theatre and performance practices from different parts of the world, on this degree you'll investigate indigenous and contemporary performance and theatre traditions from a variety of cultural contexts. The MA in World Theatres is one of the few freestanding taught Masters programmes in world theatres and performance in the UK and globally.

The programme aims to train graduates for professional employment in a range of positions in theatre, in government settings, in the culture sector and in HE internationally that require solid intellectual preparation and knowledge of the field. Practitioners who come on the programme can use knowledge acquired to extend the articulation of their career.

Programme Aims 

This one-year full‐time or two-year part-time programme of study aims to cover the historical contexts and philosophical bases of theatre and performance practices from different parts of the world, some of which are rarely introduced in UK HE. It will thus involve the student in a study of indigenous and contemporary performance and theatre traditions from a variety of cultural, national and international contexts. From this vantage context, students will be able to compare and contrast such work critically, within and beyond a European perspective, and in turn use this perspective to consider contemporary theatre in multicultural Britain.

The main aims of the programme are: 

  • To introduce the student to the whole range of drama, theatre and performance practices from many areas of the world 
  • To allow the student scope for creative yet rigorous and critical thinking combined with cumulative knowledge 
  • To enhance understanding of the interaction between practice and theory in all areas of performance study 
  • To encourage and foster independent research, carried out through the scholarly channels of books and visual archives, as well as through access to practice, if/when available 
  • To provide access where possible to industry opportunities to extend their study, in particular with our new Associate Organisation, LIFT and its biennial festival of international theatre as well as its on-going programming of activities.

Modules and Structure 

All students on the programme will undertake four taught modules and a research project. The programme may be taken full-time or part-time for the duration of one year or two years, respectively. For full-time students, the programme runs over three terms, of which Term One is devoted to two modules and students will also be required to undertake training for research and academic writing in preparation for the Research Project. Term Two comprises two modules and the Research Project, while Term Three is devoted entirely to the Research Project. 

Part‐time students have two terms in their first year of study and three terms in their second year.

Full-time students 

Term 1 (Autumn) - World Theatre: Contexts and Practices + Contemporary African Theatre and Research Project (training for research and academic writing) 

Term 2 (Spring) - Asian Theatre: From Bharata to Brecht and Eastern European Theatres and Research Project 

Term 3 (Summer) - Research Project

Part-time students 

Year One 

Term 1 (Autumn) ‐ World Theatre: Contexts and Practices or/and Contemporary African Theatre 

Term 2 (Spring) - Asian Theatre: from Bharata to Brecht and/or Eastern European Theatres 

Year Two 

Term 1 (Autumn) - World Theatres: Contexts and Practices and/or Contemporary African Theatre (depending on how many were taken in Year One) and the Research Project 

Term 2 (Spring) - Asian Theatre: From Bharata to Brecht and/or Eastern European Theatres (depending on how many were taken in Year One) and the Research Project 

Term 3 (Summer) - Research Project

Teaching and Assessment

Teaching is via lectures, seminars, workshops and practice sessions with our resident teaching team alongside guest lecturers and theatre companies. A mixed mode of assessments are used which can either be in the form of a written assignment or PaR submission.

Skills

The department is home to the African Theatre Association (AfTA) and its bi-annual journal, African Performance Review. The Department of Theatre and Performance has close links with two research centres: The Pinter Centre for Performance and Creative Writing and The Centre for the Body, that each generate learning opportunities via programmes of talks, conferences and workshops. The Department runs regular extramural activities, including hosting international practitioners in the Performance Research Forum (Dis-Play) series. The department’s special relationship with the Goldsmiths Confucius Institute and its association to the Beijing Dance Academy, also contributes to the global performance practice opportunities offered. Together, these organisations provide a unique research and professional resource for students on Theatre and Performance programmes. 

Expertise is provided by the Department's resident staff, most of who are not only dedicated and experienced teachers, but are also distinguished practitioners and researchers in their own right, working in national and international contexts. The Department also draws on a large pool of visiting practitioners and academics to provide a breadth of expertise and contact with current practice.

Careers

The broad range of interests combined in this programme will prepare you for a diverse range of employment and/or a portfolio of careers in theatre and performance as well as the arts industry as a whole in different socio-cultural environments:

  • facilitation and animation in both mainstream, applied and community theatre contexts nationally and internationally
  • administrative and support servicescultural leadershipgovernment organisations
  • journalism and broadcasting (including radio, television and print journalism)
  • teaching at all levels
  • interpretation and translation in theatre and performance contexts
  • acting, directing, design, dramaturgy

In addition, you can use this programme as a springboard for further study, either vocational or intellectual (including entry into MPhil/PhD programmes).

In short, the multiple skills – intellectual, critical and creative – developed by this programme will provide you with the flexibility of thought and approach necessary for creative insertion into the global job market. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Who is it for?. The Specialism in International Human Rights Law is designed for students from all backgrounds who have an interest in the intersection between human rights and international law. Read more

Who is it for?

The Specialism in International Human Rights Law is designed for students from all backgrounds who have an interest in the intersection between human rights and international law. It will enable students with this to develop a career in human rights law or to embark on policy-oriented careers in government and non-governmental organizations at the domestic and international level.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in International Human Rights draws from the expertise of The City Law School's team of experienced human rights scholars. It gives you an opportunity to examine intellectually the subject from various angles - minority protection, human rights at times of war, the prosecution of international criminals, to name a few.

This masters degree helps you appreciate and understand how international law intervenes to protect human rights and where the gaps are in international law.

The Specialist LLM in International Human Rights provides the opportunity to study some of the most significant issues in international human rights protection facing the world today. You will have guidance and expert academic support to examine a number of important issues in international human rights protection law, including how the law of war and armed conflict protects the civilian, how minority protection is being regulated by international law, the remedies available in international criminal law, and the extent to which the rights of indigenous people are safeguarded by international law.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus -  with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as ten weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules

Choose from the following 30-credit modules:

  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Public International Law
  • International Criminal Law: the Practitioner Perspective
  • International Criminal Law: Crimes and Institutions
  • International Human Rights in Law and Practice
  • International Law and the Global Economy
  • International Law and the Use of Force
  • Law and War
  • Minorities and Indigenous Peoples in International Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM in International Human Rights, you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the human rights field.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.



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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Why this course?. Understanding the development and functioning of environmental law across different levels of environmental governance is an important issue of our time. Read more

Why this course?

Understanding the development and functioning of environmental law across different levels of environmental governance is an important issue of our time. This requires moving beyond the traditional approach to teaching international, regional, EU and national environmental law in isolation from one other.

There's also a growing need to understand the relevance for environmental governance of the legal practices of indigenous peoples and local communities, business entities, local administrations, and transnational environmental practitioners.

The programme aims to help students critically appraise and creatively contribute to environmental regulation and governance at the international, transnational, national and local levels.

Studying this course, you'll be equipped with a wide range of expertise in environmental law, in areas like:

  • biodiversity
  • land
  • food and agriculture
  • climate change and energy
  • corporate accountability
  • environmental justice
  • water and oceans
  • human rights
  • sustainable development

You'll focus on the global dynamics of environmental law. In particular, you'll look at the mutual influences and interactions among different regulatory levels.

The programme draws both on cutting-edge academic research on global environmental law, and on first-hand professional experience in environmental law and governance at different levels.

Employability

Your ability to gain international employment is at the heart of this course. It'll equip you with the skills and expertise you need to pursue a career in:

  • international organisations
  • national governments involved in international, EU and/or transnational law matters
  • non-government organisations that operate at a regional, sub-national, national or international level
  • private companies concerned with international, EU and/or transnational environmental law

The Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding with the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) to establish a collaboration on innovative teaching of international environmental law, as well as to arrange for internships at UNITAR for students on the LLM in Global Environmental Law & Governance.

Distinctive features of course

  • specialisation in a range of thematic areas in environmental law
  • innovative focus on the interactions between different levels of environmental regulation & governance (international, EU, national, transnational & sub-national)
  • live for a year in Glasgow, taking part in the research events, activities & projects at the Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance
  • open to law & non-law graduates
  • tailored advice on international careers

Work experience

We have a successful track record of helping LLM students obtain competitive international internships with United Nations organisations. These are optional, and their duration and conditions vary depending on the host organisation. They usually start towards the end of the course. 

Our programme directors are currently concluding formal agreements with selected international organisations to secure a number of internships for LLM students each year. 

Career advice

Our course directors will provide advice on international careers. They can give you some insider tips on how to apply for jobs with, for example, the United Nations and will be available to review job applications. 

Network with other professionals

LLM students will become part of a closed alumni group on LinkedIn. This will give you the opportunity to network with other professionals in environmental law and governance. It'll also ensure you're updated on selected job opportunities.

Global Practitioners among teaching staff

This course is taught by one of the most wide-ranging groups of environmental law experts in the UK. Our staff have expertise in: 

  • biodiversity
  • climate change
  • forests
  • oceans and fisheries
  • land
  • water
  • human rights and the environment
  • environmental justice
  • corporate accountability and more

They'll not only draw from their own cutting-edge academic research, but also their involvement in multilateral environmental negotiations, consultancies for the United Nations and regional organisations, legal advice to developing countries on reforms of natural resource laws, and collaborations with non-government organisations and indigenous and local communities’ organisations.

Some of your classes will also include input from many of our external experts and practitioners. This includes those from

  • the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO)
  • the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)
  •  the European Commission

Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance

The Strathclyde Centre for Environmental Law & Governance (SCELG) aims to identify and shape emerging areas of legal research in environmental governance. 

Our students are an integral part of the centre, together with academic staff, PhD students and visiting scholars. You'll have the chance to take part in the research and consultancy work carried out by the centre. You can put your new skills and knowledge into practice, strengthening your CV. 

The BENELEX project

The BeneLex project aims to investigate the conceptual and practical dimensions of benefit-sharing.

You'll be involved in ongoing research on fair and equitable benefit-sharing, in the areas of:

  • international biodiversity
  • climate
  • land
  • oceans 
  • human rights law

Events

You'll take part in SCELG events, and will be responsible for organising the annual Festival of Environmental Law and Governance. There, you'll present your LLM dissertation project, and network with other students and a wide range of experts already working in the area.

Residential sessions

Climate Change Law & Policy (LLM) is taught via distance learning with the exception of two residential weeks. Students on the course come to Scotland and stay for one week per semester to attend masterclasses and workshops with their peers. You'll be given the opportunity to take part in these residential sessions for learning and networking purposes.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series and houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information which you can access from home. This includes all major legal databases.



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Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues. Read more

Conceived in the context of world-systemic transformation, this MA will give you the analytical tools to understand contemporary developments and world(s) through an encounter with post-colonial theory and international political economic issues.

We're witnessing today a tectonic shift in global geopolitics. The emergence of China, Brazil and India as global players, the development of global governance, the financial crisis, climate change – are all symptoms.

On this Masters you’ll grasp concepts like race, diaspora, hybridity, difference, grassroots development, HDI, multitude, immanence, and human rights.

These concepts are used to analyse practical, policy and activist issues arising from globalisation: global civil society, the role of international organisations (the IMF, WTO, UN and World Bank and global NGOs), intellectual property rights, social capital, financialisation, global governance and deep democracy.

You'll deal with issues like terrorism, microfinance, indigenous people, gender and sexuality, multiculturalism and environmental justice.

The MA is ideal for anyone pursuing careers in policy research, NGOs, advocacy, charities, international organisations, cultural and political activism, global media, art and curating, as well as for further academic work leading to a PhD.

Practical placement

The Masters includes a supervised and assessed practical placement. This may be with NGOs in India or Africa, arts and conservation organisations in China, indigenous activists in Latin America, London-based global NGOs, diasporic communities, think-tanks, environmental organisations, publishers or financial/microfinance organisations.

Leading theorists and visiting lecturers

You'll be taught by leading theorists and visiting lecturers drawn from a wide circle of activists, artists, film-makers, lawyers, economists, journalists and policy-makers.

Modules & structure

Core modules

Recommended option modules

You take option modules to the value of 30 credits. Modules can be chosen from across Goldsmiths departments and centres. Option modules are subject to availability and approval by the module lecturer/convenor.

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Other option modules, by department

You may prefer to look through the full range of optional modules available across Goldsmiths departments.

Please note that not all the modules listed below may be open to you - your final selection will depend upon spaces available and timetable compatibility.

Assessment

Essays and/or practical projects; dissertation.

Skills

The programme provides advanced training for labour market-relevant skills in transnational analysis of sovereignty, democracy, governmentality, financialisation, intellectual property rights, and the role of non-governmental organisations.

Careers

Suitable careers and areas of work for graduates of the programme include:

  • the academic sphere
  • government and non-government sectors
  • arts and art administration
  • publishing
  • journalism
  • media
  • the culture industry in general

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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