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The English-language Master in Modern Indian Studies is an interdisciplinary MA programme focusing on economic, political, social and cultural transformations in modern India. Read more

Applications close May 15.

The English-language Master in Modern Indian Studies is an interdisciplinary MA programme focusing on economic, political, social and cultural transformations in modern India.

The study programme addresses a number of key questions including: How does India's cultural and religious diversity effect societal developments? How does the democratic system address issues of social inequality? How can the dynamics of economic development in a pluralistic society be understood?

Looking for answers to profound questions such as these requires an interdisciplinary approach. That's why faculty and researchers at the Centre for Modern Indian Studies (CeMIS) come from a wide range of academic backgrounds including development economics, anthropology, history, Indology, political science, religious studies and sociology.

About CeMIS & the University of Goettingen

Founded in 2009, CeMIS has established an excellent reputation as one of the few centres in Europe and South Asia taking an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern India. It is part of the University of Goettingen, one of the academically outstanding universities in Germany. Boasting over 40 Nobel Prize winners, the university has a rich tradition and is renowned for its outstanding research institutions and its welcoming campus environment.

The University of Goettingen is an equal opportunities institution which actively promotes diversity. We especially encourage women and those from socially disadvantaged backgrounds to apply.

Costs

• There are NO tuition fees at German universities
• Affordable cost of living in a traditional German university city of 120,000 inhabitants
• The student union membership fee (about 300€/semester) includes free travel in the city and throughout the state, free entry to a number of cultural events, and subsidised meals for students at the university canteens.
• Third-party scholarships may be available. Find out more at http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/scholarships/557109.html

Contacts

• Want to know more about the study programme, please contact Dr Michael Dickhardt:
• Have questions about the application and admissions process, please contact Martin Ertelt:
Want to speak to a current CeMIS MA student? Contact:
• Nidhish Krishnankutty Sundar: After finishing a MA in Political Science from Hyderabad Central University, last year Nidhish started a MA at CeMIS:
• Maria Pomohaci: Maria is an international student who has just completed her MA and is about to start her PhD:

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Provides a comprehensive framework for the study of contemporary India and the development of expertise in one of a number of disciplinary and professional fields. Read more
Provides a comprehensive framework for the study of contemporary India and the development of expertise in one of a number of disciplinary and professional fields. Equips students to deal with the conceptual challenges relating to work in and on India and to analyse the fundamental problems of contemporary India in relation to global concerns. Careers network providing support for internships and employment.

Key benefits

- Offers students the opportunity to connect the study of India to both more general theoretical concerns and a more practical perspective.

- A distinctive perspective on contemporary India, enabling the analysis of fundamental problems in relation to global issues.

- A wide range of optional taught modules drawing on King’s-wide expertise.

- The location in the heart of London brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities, unrivalled access to library and archival resources, and easy access to resources in Europe.

- Tailored professional development and careers network providing support for internships and future employment.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/contemporary-india-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This programme will explore the specific characteristics of contemporary India by connecting theory and practice at a concrete level. Students can study themes including India’s democratic politics, contemporary history, foreign policy and security issues, dilemmas of secularism, urban and public health problems, varieties of cultural production and consumption, economic growth and diverse social change, the role of India's media and consequences of India's science and technology policy choices.

Our programme is built around two core courses, which aim to develop your awareness of, on the one hand, the working of political power and the changing social and economic order in India and, on the other, the deep historical forces that shaped the Indian subcontinent both before and after independence and partition in 1947:

• Making of Contemporary India: Political Power and Social Order in Historical Perspective
• Contemporary India: State, Society and Economy since 1947.

You can build on these core modules with a wide range of optional modules to pursue degree programmes tailored to your principal interests. In addition, you receive expert supervision and research methods training to write a 15,000-word dissertation. You also have access to a range of external modules offered by departments across the Schools of Arts & Humanities and Social Science & Public Policy.

Our MA is based in the King’s India Institute and benefits from a growing and dynamic staff strongly committed to research and teaching. You will also benefit from the expertise of affiliate faculties of the King’s India Institute based in a number of departments across the university.

- Course purpose -

Our programme provides high-quality postgraduate teaching and research training in the study of contemporary India. The study of contemporary India provides an intellectual laboratory through which to address theoretical and policy questions of global importance. You are encouraged to use the Indian experience to question assumptions within established disciplinary fields and to challenge settled global consensuses, while simultaneously deploying larger perspectives to analyse India in ways that enable them to differentiate between what is universal and what is specific and contingent to the modern Indian experience.

- Course format and assessment -

Core modules:

- Dissertation
- Contemporary India II: State, Society and Economy since 1947
- Contemporary India I: Political Power and Social Order in Historical Perspective

Most modules will be assessed by a 4,000-word essay but some will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these. The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal.

Career prospects

Our programme aims to prepare you for both research and non-academic professional careers: in government, media and publishing, business and the corporate sector, international agencies and NGOS, and policy research.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This MPhil is by dissertation only. It aims to give students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or as a way to complement and enrich their interest in the Indian religious and intellectual traditions. Read more
This MPhil is by dissertation only. It aims to give students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or as a way to complement and enrich their interest in the Indian religious and intellectual traditions. The dissertation-only format entails working closely with one supervisor throughout the year on a dissertation to be submitted in mid-August.

The dissertation will be on a subject approved by the Degree Committee, and has a word limit of 25,000, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography. An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field in which it falls will be required.

We strongly encourage prospective applicants to discuss their particular interests with one of the potential supervisors before applying.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpsar

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Sanskrit (and/or Pali/Prakrit);
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on pre-modern South Asian culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

Even though there are no taught courses, students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (South Asian Studies) may attend a weekly graduate seminar and other reading groups with PhD students and post-doctoral researchers, thus having an opportunity to interact with their peers and seniors in a supportive environment. They may also receive training in codicology, manuscriptology, and other skills. Where relevant, they are also encouraged to attend advanced undergraduate lectures and language courses. Students can also benefit from access to Hindi language literary sources under the guidance of the Faculty's Teaching Officer in Hindi.

All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants should contact prospective supervisors by email and discuss potential MPhil dissertation topics.

Assessment

For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (South Asian Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 25,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

Those students who take the MPhil by research will be required to take a viva examination.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Rapson Scholarship in Indian and Iranian Studies -

Grants are offered for postgraduate research in Indian and Iranian Studies, but preference is given to applicants who use Sanskrit, Pali or Avestan sources for their research. The value of the scholarship will be determined by the Electors after taking account of any other financial resources available to the applicant. The maximum award is equivalent to University and College fees at the home/EU rate for up to three years. Both MPhil and PhD applicants will be considered for this scholarship.

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The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas. Read more
The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas: Architecture, Communications and Media, English, Music and Philosophy. You will receive training in research skills and supervision from one or more academic specialists in their subject area(s).

The programme provides excellent preparation for you if you’re intending to undertake a PhD in the Arts and Humanities, but is also a good choice if you wish to pursue a research project for purposes of professional development or personal interest. You will become part of a community of active researchers and will be encouraged to pursue your own research interests in collaboration with an academic supervisor.

Key Facts

Internationally renowned
The department has a strong international reputation for its work in Philosophy of Language, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Mind, History of Philosophy, Environmental Philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Moral and Political Philosophy, Continental Philosophy, and the Philosophy of Art.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
63% of our research outputs were rated world-leading or internationally excellent, and 37% were rated as internationally recognised.

Why Philosophy?

We offer a distinctive combination of unusual philosophical diversity in a close-knit atmosphere with excellent staff-student relations.

Our staff publish and lecture in a wide range of philosophical areas, including: Logic and Philosophy of Language; Metaphysics; Ancient Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Moral and Political Philosophy; Aesthetics; Buddhism and Indian Philosophy; Environmental Philosophy; Continental Philosophy; History of Philosophy and Literary Theory. We supervise research projects in all of these areas within our friendly, down to earth and vibrant postgraduate research community.

Experience the full breadth of our academics' expertise

Our staff publish and lecture in a wide range of philosophical areas, including: Logic and Philosophy of Language; Metaphysics; Ancient Philosophy; Philosophy of Mind; Moral and Political Philosophy; Aesthetics; Buddhism and Indian Philosophy; Environmental Philosophy; Continental Philosophy; History of Philosophy and Literary Theory. We supervise research projects in all of these areas within our friendly, down to earth and vibrant postgraduate research community.

Career prospects

Our programmes aim to equip students with the general and widely applicable analytical, argumentative and problem solving skills and abilities valued by employers. Some of our postgraduate students have gone on to a career in academic Philosophy, but a variety of careers are open to those obtaining postgraduate Philosophy degrees, including business, management, the law, the media, the arts, computing, the Civil Service and teaching.

The MRes Arts may enhance the career prospects of those working or wishing to work in fields associated with the study of Arts subjects or other areas of academic work and study, including teachers, librarians, and professional writers. While managerial positions often require the ability to conduct research or project-work and to demonstrate sustained and complex organisational skills in ways encompassed by this programme, its emphasis on oral and written communication skills as well as on IT-based presentation skills will be useful for many types of employment. Some students may want to take this course for its own sake and for the sake of personal development and the revitalization of subject awareness. Equally, the MRes is designed to prepare students too for further research at MPhil or PhD level, and to enable them to enter postgraduate study, thus offering a first step towards a career in academic teaching and research.

The advanced study of one or more Arts subject on this programme equips students with powers of fine discrimination and judgement that will set them apart in workplaces of many kinds. The skills it fosters are those which enable graduates to deal logically with the complex demands of a whole range of careers. These skills include:

- the ability to process large amounts of information
- the ability to organise disparate material into a coherent argument
- the capacity to compare many different views and come to a decision about the merits of each
- the independence to define a complex project and bring it to completion with minimal input.
- imaginative and creative responsiveness to problems
- powers of expression (both written and oral) which allow for the lucid delineation of nuanced ideas.

Such skills are essential for those considering careers in, for example, journalism, publishing, management, and the law. Graduates have gone on to work in a wide variety of professions. Our alumni include lecturers, communication specialists, broadcasters, writers, teachers, librarians, public relations managers and publishers.

MRes Arts students will have access to the University's Careers and Employability Service and to careers events at both School and University level. Supervisors and other academic staff will be able to provide guidance and support to students intending to progress to doctoral study and academic careers.

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Ethnomusicology is the study of music’s relationships to the social and cultural contexts in which it occurs, seeking to understand what music is, and the role it plays in human interactions and experiences. Read more

About the course

Ethnomusicology is the study of music’s relationships to the social and cultural contexts in which it occurs, seeking to understand what music is, and the role it plays in human interactions and experiences. We boast one of the UK’s largest ethnomusicology sections, and our staff’s specialisms are unusually diverse, including: the music of Korea; folk music, dance and song of England, and of the British Isles, and North Indian classical music.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick are at the forefront of their specialist fields.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Seminars, individual tutorials and fieldwork. Assessment takes a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.

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The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you will explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies. Read more
The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you will explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies.

Core modules will improve your research skills and introduce you to key concepts and issues in social and cultural history. You will also choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to focus on societies and periods that interest you.

You could study apartheid in South Africa, communities and castes in India, birth and death in medieval Europe or social movements in the USA. Youll be able to focus on gender, race and religion as well as other issues that have shaped the lives of individuals and communities.

Taught by expert researchers within the School of History and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute, this programme uses the latest approaches and thinking in social and cultural history to give you an insight into the lives of others.

Facilities

From the beginning of the programme you'll study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you'll also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You'll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the Making History: Archive Collaborations optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You'll be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You'll submit this by the end of the programme in September..
We have a wealth of resources allowing you to explore topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library and its Special Collections contain a huge number of early printed, archive and manuscript materials including the Liddle Collection on the First and Second World Wars, Leeds Library of Vernacular Culture, manuscript and commonplace books, travel journals and one of the best collections of cookery books and household manuals in the country.

Extensive collections of national, regional and local newspapers from over the years are available on microfilm, as well as cartoons and satirical prints from the British Museum and extensive collections of letters and correspondence. There is even the Yorkshire Fashion Archive and M&S Archive on campus, allowing you to gain a real insight into popular culture over time.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months

Course Content

From the beginning of the programme you will study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you will also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You will also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the Making History: Archive Collaborations optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You will be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You will submit this by the end of the programme in September.

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways. Asian Religions or Late Antiquity. Late Antiquity Pathway. Read more
Our MA in Religious Studies allows you to specialise in one of two pathways: Asian Religions or Late Antiquity.

Late Antiquity Pathway

On this pathway you will discover the great religious and cultural transformations of Late Antiquity - the landmark period when contemporary world faiths emerged. This pathway draws on internationally-recognised expertise in Religion from Late Antiquity to the contemporary era, across a wide geographical area, and with sensitivity to issues in the public eye. Acquiring advanced theological, historical and linguistic skills, you will analyse major texts and artefacts of the period (200 - 800AD) to better understand the major world religions. Drawing on the concentration of expertise found in the Centre for Late Antique Religion and Culture, you will explore religions such as Paganism, Gnosticism and Zoroastrianism. A highlight is the availability of Arabic, Greek or Latin teaching for deeper understanding of original sources.

Asian Religions Pathway

This pathway allows you to explore the religious literature and culture of South Asia or China in combination or isolation in this specialist programme.

You will be rooted within the Centre for the History of Religion in Asia, with expertise ranging from Chinese Buddhism to the study of the ancient Indian religious tradition of Jainism. At the heart of the UK’s largest single concentration of Mahabharata scholars, you also have the rewarding option of gaining a firm grounding in the classical Indian language of Sanskrit if you wish.

Distinctive features

Teaching by internationally renowned experts and informed by the latest research of our Centres for the History of Religion in Asia and Late Antique Religion and Culture.
The opportunity to engage in postgraduate research culture, by participating in Research Centre activities
Designed to be flexible to your interests

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The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. Read more
The flexible modular structure of our taught MA programme allows students to focus on a chosen area of specialism but simultaneously facilitates exploration of a wide range of research areas relating to music. It will provide an excellent foundation for undertaking postgraduate research at doctoral level, but will also benefit the professional development of musicians intending to pursue careers in teaching, arts administration, broadcasting, and other domains.

Students on the Taught MA programme join a vibrant international postgraduate community and study with scholars, composers, and performers who have achieved international recognition in their fields. The Music Department has been ranked in the top three music departments nationally in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 and the Complete University Guide 2016.

The MA Music programme will normally facilitate study of the following areas of specialism:
-Musicology
-Ethnomusicology
-Composition (acoustic and electro-acoustic)
-Performance

In addition, other options typically available have included:
-British Music
-Indian Music
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-World Music Analysis
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis
-Choral conducting (with special focus on Anglican church music)

Programme structure

Students will choose modules from sections A, B, C, and D below:

A. Major project, weighted at 60 credits (a dissertation, a public recital, or a portfolio of compositions/orchestrations and arrangements – depending on your chosen area of specialism)

B. A 30-credit module linked to your chosen area of specialism

C. Two compulsory core 30-credit modules embedding research training and engaging with major intellectual issues attendant on all subject areas

D. An additional 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B, subject to approval of the Board of Studies in Music.

Example: MA with specialism in Musicology

A. A 12,000-word dissertation on a musicological topic weighted at 60 credits

B. 30-credit module ‘Contemporary Musicology’

C. Compulsory core 30-credit modules, ‘Core Research Seminars’ and ‘Research Methods and Resources’

D. 30 credits of Music undergraduate modules/selected undergraduate OR postgraduate modules offered by another department OR another related specialism-specific module from list B

Core Modules

-Research Methods and Resources
-Core Research Seminars

And The following specialism-specific modules will be offered every year:
-Contemporary Musicology
-Ethnomusicology in Practice and Theory
-Compositional Techniques
-Music Performance

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:
-British Music
-Music Analysis
-Practice and Theory of Choral Conducting
-Advanced Organ Studies
-Electronic Music
-Orchestration and Arranging
-Indian Music
-World Music Analysis
-Music, Mind, and Culture
-Audiovisual Documentation and Analysis

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of seminars, practical sessions and one to one supervision. Seminars provide opportunities for students to discuss and debate particular issues, and to present their own original work, informed by the knowledge that they have gained through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Practical sessions in areas such as studio or field recording techniques help to prepare students for their own independent work.

All students must undertake an independent project (dissertation,composition portfolio, or performance), which is developed with the help of one-to-one expert supervision. Finally, optional modules can be drawn from the undergraduate and postgraduate programmes of Music or of other departments –these free-choice modules may involve other forms of staff-student contact, depending on the subject area. The Department actively promotes interdisciplinary approaches to the study of music and students are encouraged to engage with other disciplines in the humanities and sciences.

The contact hours experienced by each individual student will vary considerably, given a high degree of flexibility in the programme. Students will typically attend between 2 and 4 hours of seminars per week in term time, as well as additional practical sessions as appropriate. Individual supervision of dissertations, performance projects and composition portfolios amounts to an average of 6 hours spread over over the second and third terms.

Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to attend research seminars, both student-led and those involving staff or guest academic speakers (typically 1-2 hrs each week). They must also undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and assessments, to broaden their subject knowledge and to prepare their dissertations or portfolios. Students are encouraged, as an integral part of their studies, to take advantage of other opportunities including participating in performance opportunities (including staff-led ensembles) and attending research and composition seminars, some of which are organised in conjunction with university research institutes.

There is a busy programme of musical performance, both within and outside the music department, which complements students’ academic programme by providing opportunities both to listen to and to perform a wide variety of music. The many musical ensembles to which students can contribute includes both independent societies (including orchestras, choirs, opera and musical theatre as well as a Javanese gamelan) and department-run ensembles such as the New Music Ensemble and Korean percussion group.

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This MSc will provide you with the knowledge and skills to manage sports injuries and illness and to explore the relationship between physical activity and health. Read more

Overview

This MSc will provide you with the knowledge and skills to manage sports injuries and illness and to explore the relationship between physical activity and health.

The clinical SEM course is aimed at doctors, physiotherapists and allied professionals with a strong musculoskeletal clinical background. We feel strongly that the range of backgrounds of the students provides students with a rounded education, drawing on the wide ranging clinical experience and different expertise of the students and lecturers.

Key facts

Clinical exposure - The MSc offers students the opportunity to sit in Sports Medicine clinics with consultant SEM doctors and physiotherapists. In these clinics the student will have exposure to all sections of the community, children, recreational athletes, elite athletes and the elderly. The student will see a wide ranging spectrum of musculoskeletal problems and first hand investigation and treatment.

Face to face teaching - One of the strengths of the Nottingham MSc is the face to face teaching that take place. This allows students real time interaction with clinicians, scientists and lecturers, enabling in depth exchange of knowledge and ideas. We believe that with this the student has a much greater understanding of the subject than with distance learning.

Pitch side exposure - Included in the fees is a Gold standard pitch side emergency care course (EMMiITS). This takes place at the beginning of the academic year and success in this course enables the student to undertake pitch side emergency care at the weekly BUCS matches. Students may wish to undertake a placement with a professional team and we will facilitate this whether ever possible.

Full and part-time option - As many of our students are practising professionals we have developed a range of study options to enable them to continue with their clinical practice whilst studying. The full time course is undertaken over one year. The part time course covers the same modules but can be taken over 2, 3, or 4 years.

Research projects - The research projects are a key strength of the course. Students are encouraged to undertake a project in a field of interest. However we acknowledge that not all students will be able to do this and we have a range of projects within the department that students can undertake, within both clinical SEM and also in nutrition and muscle physiology within the School of Life Sciences. International students have the opportunity to develop research and undertake research projects within their home country.

Course quality - The MSc has a faculty of excellent internal and external lecturers of all disciplines, all experts in their field. Many of the lecturers work at a national and international level in Sport and Exercise Medicine. Established in 1991, the MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine is one of the longest running SEM courses in the country and is constantly updated and improved. This successful programme is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the top sports and exercise medicine courses for the rounded sports medicine specialist.

This course is now delivered as part of the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine – East Midlands (NCSEM-EM), which is a London 2012 legacy funded project aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of the nation.

Structure

The MSc Sports and Exercise Medicine can be taken full-time over one year or part-time over two to four years. As an MSc student, you will study a series of core modules in sports and exercise medicine, which includes research methods tutorials, in addition to the compulsory project and dissertation module. This is an exciting opportunity to undertake research on a subject related to sports and exercise medicine or exercise physiology under the supervision of an appropriate member of academic staff. There are also a wide variety of optional modules to meet your specific interests.

This course can also be taken as a Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) by those who do not wish to complete a research project and dissertation. The PGDip can be taken full-time over 9 months or part-time over 18 months.

The syllabus is covered by lectures, seminars, sport placements, anatomy teaching in our dissection room, eLearning and practical sessions. The course includes a two-day programme in Emergency Medical Management in Individual and Team Sports (EMMiITS).

Compulsory Modules

Module A34614 - Sports Injury Anatomy (20 credits)

Module A34628 - Clinical Sports Injury (10 credits)

Module A34632 - Sports Injury Assessment (10 credits)

Module A34633 - Pitchside Care of the Injured Athlete (10 credits)

Module A34616 - Physical Activity in Health and Disease (20 credits)

Module A34621 - Research Methods (10 credits)

Module A34631 - Project and Dissertation: Sports and Exercise Medicine (60 credits)

Students can also choose modules totalling a further 40 credits from a selection of optional modules. Full details can be found online.

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. This list is an example of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

Assessment

Your work will be assessed by a number of methods including both written and practical examinations, oral presentations, essays, reflective portfolio as well as the dissertation.

Careers

On completion of the MSc course, our graduates become involved in a wide range of sport and exercise related activities from General Practice and consultants in Sports Medicine to the provision of medical care for professional athletes and teams.

Graduates have gone on to successful careers including the Head of Sports Medicine for the Rugby Football League, the Chief Medical Officer to the England and Wales Cricket Board, the Director of Training and Conditioning for the New York Knicks Basketball team, Lead Physiotherapist for the Indian Cricket team, league football club physiotherapists and county cricket club doctors and physiotherapists.

Other achievements include winning the Health Specialist of the Year award in Dubai 2014 and presentation at various conferences.

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If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017. Read more
If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017.
http://www.shu.ac.uk/VCAwardJanuary2017

If you have experience in business or have studied a business-related degree, this master's course improves you career prospects in the management of international organisations. You combine study of how businesses operate in different parts of the world with techniques and skills designed to maximise your effectiveness in an international environment.

The course focuses on managing international organisations in a rapidly changing, global, business environment. It is for those who have previously studied a business-related subject and/or have business work experience.

We equip you with the necessary skills to work at a managerial level in an international organisation and to work effectively in more than one country. You have the opportunity to develop cultural intelligence and work in multicultural teams. This course has a diverse mix of cultures with students from China, Russia, Indian subcontinent, Africa, SE Asia and the EU.

Your studies involve a mixture of knowledge-based learning such as understanding the dynamics of business in different parts of the world and skills-based learning including work experience. Both are underpinned by rigorous application of current academic theory.
You gain
-Knowledge and understanding of how businesses work in different regions of the world.
-Practical techniques to support international management, such as country evaluation, methods of international market entry, market development planning and strategic analysis.
-International management skills including multicultural group work, making decisions in different cultural environments and leadership skills for international management.
-Knowledge of the role of the internet and e-commerce as tools for international managers.
-An understanding of the management of global alliances, supply chains, exporting and the development of international trade and investment policies.

The work experience part of the course includes:
-Business simulations
-An international consultancy project
-Visits to companies and organisations
-Guest speakers.
These opportunities give you the chance to develop your practical skills in a real world setting.

Previous consultancy clients have included the BBC Worldwide, Marshall Aerospace, Sheffield Forgemasters Ltd, British Telecom, Stanley Hand Tools.

Your dissertation, which is a major project, is usually on an issue of strategic importance geared to your interest. It can be based on a live issue identified by an international company.

For further course details, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-international-business-management

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by EPAS. This accreditation recognises the academic rigour, employability, internationalisation and research that underpins the course. The continuous improvement that EPAS requires means that you will benefit from international partnerships, and more opportunities to work study and aboard.

Course structure

Full-time.
September start – typically 12 months.
January start – typically 15 months but you can complete it in 12 months.
Work experience route - September start – typically 18-24 months.

Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma
Core modules
-Global business environment
-International management competencies
-Global business strategy
-Global supply chain management
-Managing global alliances
-International consultancy project
-Global business environment
-International management competencies
-Global business strategy
-Global supply chain management
-Managing global alliances
-International consultancy project
Options
Two from:
-Relationship marketing
-Enterprise and innovation, an international perspective
-Perspectives on international human resource management
-Information strategy for a global economy
-International business finance
-Export management

MSc
-Research methods
-Dissertation

Assessment
-You complete a range of assignments during and at the end of each semester.

Other admission requirements

-Overseas applicants from countries whose first language is not English must normally produce evidence of competence in English. An IELTS score of 6.0 with 5.5 in all skills (or equivalent) is the standard for non-native speakers of English. If your English language skill is currently below an IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in all skills we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English level.
-If you do not meet these criteria you can apply for the Graduate Diploma in Business and English. This is a pre-masters course that gives you the opportunity to improve your English language skills and business knowledge. After passing this diploma we automatically offer you a place on one of the masters degrees offered by Business and Finance.

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These courses offer a flexible route to advanced musical study including classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional. Read more

Course Overview

These courses offer a flexible route to advanced musical study including classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional. You can pursue these research-based courses through creative practice (eg composition, performance, improvisation, musicology, or a blend of these) or musicological study in a field of your choosing.

Practitioners are able to study in areas such as performance, composition, studio-based work, improvisation, sound-art and mixed media – focusing in any one of these, or blending them according to their creative needs. Musicologists are able to study in areas such as critical and cultural musicology, ethnomusicology and world music, folk music studies, early music, popular music studies, and music theory and analysis. It is also possible to combine practice-based and musicologically orientated projects.

The Music Research Training module teaches essential skills and methodologies for the rest of the research-focused course. A series of three elective projects allows you to pursue research selected from a range of topics taught in staff-led seminar groups, or undertake supervised solo study in practice-based or musicological research.

Elective projects offered in recent years include: Urban Musicology; Improvisation for Creative Practice; Debates in the Philosophy and Theory of Music; Advanced Studies in Ethnomusicology, Folk and Traditional Music; Environmental Sound Art; Indian Music in Practice; Studying Popular Music; Projects in Music Analysis; Early Music Notation and Editing; Early Modern Music Materials.

The MMus and PGDip can be regarded as qualifications in their own right, but they also offer preparation for doctoral study, not least because of the strong research emphasis.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mmus-pgdip/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/music-mmus-pgdip/#howtoapply

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These courses are aimed at music teachers and working musicians and can change the way you think about your work. It could also take your career in a new direction. Read more

About the course

These courses are aimed at music teachers and working musicians and can change the way you think about your work. It could also take your career in a new direction.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Much of the course is taught online in online discussions and tutorial groups, email and telephone tutorials. You’ll also attend lectures and seminars at annual residentials and optional study days.

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Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Read more

About the course

Theis distance learning course combines annual residential weeks in Sheffield with longer periods of internet-supported study which means students can be anywhere in the world. Traditional and world musics and their associated cultures are studied through practical methods such as fieldwork and direct participation in music-making as well as library research and theoretical interpretation. Students gain both a deeper knowledge of the music and a set of skills for discovering and communicating new knowledge about music. The courses are intended for musicians, educators and enthusiasts who want to know more about traditional and world musics and about ways of studying and understanding music in its social and cultural context.

The course shares various modules with the Traditional Music of the British Isles MA, while allowing students to specialise in an area of their choice. World Music Studies is interpreted quite literally as encompassing, in principle, the study of any and all musical activity in the world: Western as well as ‘exotic’, popular as well as classical, amateur as well as professional.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course tutors

This course is taught by qualified ethnomusicologists who have both scholarly and practical expertise in traditional and world musics: Fay Hield, Simon Keegan-Phipps and Andrew Killick.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

Lectures, seminars, world music performance workshops and email tutorials with supporting course texts and guidance notes. Assessments take a variety of forms such as reports and essays, fieldnotes and recordings, and a final dissertation or folio.

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This course is the longest established masters in music psychology in the UK, and a collaboration with the Department of Psychology. Read more

About the course

This course is the longest established masters in music psychology in the UK, and a collaboration with the Department of Psychology. Our tutors – Nikki Dibben, Stephanie Pitts, Vicki Rowe, Renee Timmers and Victoria Williamson – have been published widely in music psychology and education. This course allows you to use psychological methods and theory to interpret and understand musical behaviours, sounds and ideas. You will be introduced to a range of areas including music cognition and neuroscience, musical development, music in everyday life, and musical performance.

You may specialise within an area through a written dissertation, and the pursuit of original research, generally including experimental or observational empirical investigation. Students may also take cognitive neuroscience modules within the Department of Psychology.

About us

Music at Sheffield attracts world-leading academics and musicians working in a wide range of specialist fields. This is reflected in the diversity of the MA programmes we offer, both on campus and by distance learning. Our courses are taught by experts and backed by world-class research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 84 per cent of our work was rated internationally excellent or world-leading.

We are influential in composition, ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, music technology, music management and psychology of music. Our MA programmes allow students to take advantage of the department’s distinctive interdisciplinary research environment and to be part of a strong postgraduate community by taking modules from other specialist areas. Our three research centres, Music, Mind, Machine; Sheffield Performer and Audience Research Centre, and Music and Wellbeing provide a hub for research collaborations in music psychology and audience research.

Performance is an important part of our work. You will have the chance to participate in orchestras, music theatre, contemporary music, folk and world traditions. We have strong links with the community, giving you the chance to volunteer with local arts organisations.

Your career

Our graduates are employed by universities, colleges, concert agencies and music promoters. Many work in education; others are performers in various genres, in the UK and abroad. Some work in recording studios.

Studios and equipment

We have a postgraduate research suite and several studios for advanced compositional work, software development, sound recording, laboratory and field experimentation, transcription, music notation and other research applications. You will have access to scores, books, periodicals, recordings and online resources.

Through a series of graduate study days you will be able to use the tools for digital recording, video and film. We also have excellent practice facilities and collections of historical and world music instruments.

Our team of professional musicians bring performance expertise to the department – including clarinettist Sarah Watts, pianist Inja Davidovic, jazz guitarist Ronan McCullagh and North Indian tabla and santoor performer John Ball.

Funding

University and faculty funding is available each year. The closing date for applications is mid-January. The department has a number of studentships available for our strongest candidates. The closing date for these is the end of April. You can also apply for a small grant to support your postgraduate research project.

Course content

See http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/music/prospective-pg/taught

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through seminars, laboratory-based demonstrations and individual tutorials. The taught programme is continuously assessed through a variety of forms such as reports and essays. They are usually individual assessments, even if they concern the processes and outcomes of group work.

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