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Masters Degrees (Independent Study)

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The Independent Study Programme (ISP) is an open and flexible programme, based on a 'professional development' model. it caters for different levels of expertise and experience and appealing to students from a wide variety of backgrounds. Read more
The Independent Study Programme (ISP) is an open and flexible programme, based on a 'professional development' model. it caters for different levels of expertise and experience and appealing to students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It offers intensive (full or part time) study in dance enabling you to navigate a personal route of study and open up possibilities for your personal, artistic and professional development.

The programme provides opportunities for learners whose dance training/education has taken an unconventional route or have trained in a different style of dance or outisde of formal education, to study contemporary dance practice(s) within a conservatoire environment. Equally, the programme suits students with considerable training or professional experience who wish to re-engage with supprted learning or refresh, hone and broaden their knowledge and skills base.

Programme Content

Learning takes place in classes, workshops, lectures, seminars and tutorials and through self-directed study, including individual practice, reflection and research. You design your programme by selecting from a range of practices and perspectives across technical, creative and performance disciplines, up to a maximum of 120 UK credits:

• Contemporary Dance Technique
• Choreography
• Choreological Practice
• Devising and Performance
• Pilates for Dance
• Contemporary Jazz
• Ballet
• Movement Workshop: The Creative Body
• Movement Workshop: Dance as Performance
• Rep Extracts
• Soundscores for Dance
• The Dancing Body
• Dance Teaching: Principles and Practice
• Teaching Dance Technique
• Choreological Practice - Choreutics
• Dance Perspectives 1: History
• Dance Perspectives 2: Critical Frameworks
• Independent Investigation

See the Programme Specification on our website for more details: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/dance/professional-development/independent-study-programme

Assessment

Each component you select will be assessed separately, some by coursework assessment, others by written or practical assignments. At the end of the programme, you will receive a transcript detailing the components studied and assessed, and will be awarded a Trinity Laban Independent Study Programme Certificate.

Careers

Graduates have embarked on, or re-entered professional practice in: dance performance, choreography, dance teaching and dance management.

For some, the programme provides opportunities to discover and area of specialism that they wish to pursue through further study, and graduates have progressed onto postgraduate degrees across a range of dance-related disciplines.

Facilities

The Laban building is the world's largest purpose built contemporary dance centre and a leading conservatoire for contemporary dance artist training. Facilities include:

• Thirteen purpose built dance studios with the latest sprung flooring and large windows
• Laban Library and Archive
• 300-seat theatre
• Cafe and Bar

Faculty of Dance

Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is one of Europe's leading centres for the training of professional contemporary dance artists. Based in the RIBA-award winning Laban Building, in the heart of South East London's thriving arts community, Trinity Laban's Faculty of Dance is a creative and cosmopolitan community of performers, choreographers, teachers, designers and researchers, and is acknowledged internationally as a leader in the contemporary arts.

With one of the largest teams of specialist contemporary dance artist teachers in the world, our world class facilities include a 300 seat theatre, studio theatre and outdoor theatre, 13 purpose built dance studios and the largest dance library and archive in Europe.

We believe that contemporary dance has a vital part to play in everyone's lives. Our unique mix of energy and creativity advances the dance art form and fuels the dance world, connecting people to the exhilarating possibilities that dance offers. Our links with the professional dance world, local communities and other arts organisations ensure that an experience at Trinity Laban will be a rich and rewarding one.

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/dance-applications

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Leicester Media School’s Independent Study MA/MSc provides you with an opportunity to design your own individual programme of Master’s-Level study within the Leicester Media School (LMS), while being supported and supervised by leading national and international scholars. Read more

About the course

Leicester Media School’s Independent Study MA/MSc provides you with an opportunity to design your own individual programme of Master’s-Level study within the Leicester Media School (LMS), while being supported and supervised by leading national and international scholars.

There is a wide range of subject expertise you can draw upon to create your programme of study. You can create a programme within existing disciplinary boundaries or one that is inter-disciplinary. Example subject specialisms include journalism, media and communication, film, social media, new media technology, community media, radio and TV production, graphics, animation, game art design and music and audio production.

Reasons to Study:

• Flexible course tailored around your interests
you can structure the course to fit around your career aspirations, with the opportunity to choose your exit award

• Benefit from excellent academic support
the expertise of our experienced academics from diverse backgrounds will support you in your learning

• Learn alongside our award winning research groups
benefit from a variety of research fields across the Leicester Media School, ensuring that you can draw upon a wide range of subject expertise including our Institute of Creative Technologies, Media Discourse Group and Cinema and Television History Research Centre

• Take advantage of our placement opportunities
opportunity to incorporate local, national or international placements or academic exchanges into your studies

• Develop research skills
you will develop and enhance your research skills, methods and problem solving enabling you get a feel for independent research study, and develop your skills accordingly to progress to PhD if you wish

• Excellent graduate prospects
graduates could go on to work in national and international creative industries such as PR, digital and broadcast media as well as going into further academic study towards a PhD

This course is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds who wish to pursue Postgraduate study as preparation for a research degree. The course is also aimed at in service; teachers or other professionals wishing to develop their academic profile and subject knowledge for career purposes; or who wish to change their direction of study and move into media studies from unrelated disciplines.

Course Structure

The programme is made up of three stages, each of which, on successful completion, can function as a stand-alone award: a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and the Master of Arts. If you wish to proceed to the next stage you will not normally be awarded with the intermediary awards.

The first stage includes three modules:

Online Research Methods
Research Project Proposal
First Negotiated Module

The second stage builds on the work undertaken and the credits gained for the Post Graduate Certificate. It is made up of two modules. Each module will have been designed by you in conjunction with your mentors as part of your learning contract, to further develop and test your research and communication skills and project-specific knowledge.

The third and final stage is that of the master’s award, which builds on the work undertaken and the credits gained for both the PG Cert and the PG Dip. It consists of a single module – your research project or dissertation. This final module is designed to showcase the skills and knowledge you have developed, and culminates in two assignments – a dissertation or piece of research, and a report or a piece of practical work.

Once you have identified an area of research deemed appropriate for master’s-level research in the Leicester Media School, you will begin to design your programme of study with your mentors (your first and second supervisors). You’ll be able to design a programme where you develop the aims and objectives of study and the assessment criteria by which your work will be judged.

Teaching and assessment

Depending on the focus of your research, the course can be studied online or offline. The minimum, requirement is that you have fortnightly tutorials with your mentor.

A variety of assessments will be used. The first two modules, Research Methods and the Research Project Proposal, have prescribed assessments. Following on from that you can choose how to be assessed, as long as the mode of assessment is appropriate to your research project and the aims and objectives you have set out for the relevant module. All students will be encouraged to present at least one assignment as a conference paper and one as a short article for a peer-reviewed publication.

The online Research Methods module will be assessed through an initial commentary on the range of methods available, and an in-depth analysis of three potential methods that might be used for your project. You will be required to research, test and critically evaluate each of the three methods through their application to a case study relevant to your research.

The Research Project Proposal will be assessed through an initial critical review of literature relevant to your project review; an essay, report or presentation; and supporting presentation or paper identifying the focus of your study and the main case studies you will use. It will culminate in the submission of your learning contract. Your learning contract will outline the detail of what you will be assessed on and how, for each negotiated module and your final independent study.

Contact and learning hours

Supervision hours are 45 hours per year per full time student, 22.5 per part-time student. Self directed study is 145 hours for a 15 credit module, 291 hours per 30 credit module and 590 hours for the 60 credit module.

To find out more

To learn more about this course and DMU, visit our website:
Postgraduate open days: http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/open-evenings/postgraduate-open-days.aspx

Applying for a postgraduate course:
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply/entry-criteria-and-how-to-apply.aspx

Funding for postgraduate students
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/postgraduate-funding-2017-18/postgraduate-funding-2017-18.aspx

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This programme offers the opportunity to create an individually negotiated one-year course to suit your personal development needs, and to provide a solid grounding for your future career in music. Read more
This programme offers the opportunity to create an individually negotiated one-year course to suit your personal development needs, and to provide a solid grounding for your future career in music. The programme is available to students studying at Level 7 and Level 8.

Programme Content

You will be able to build a unique programme selected from components of the BMus (Hons) or MMus degrees and/or the PG Diploma/Artist Diploma programmes. Use the outstanding resources of our dynamic and creative conservatoire environment to support your development as a creative performer or composer.

Learning takes place through a blend of formal tuition, experiential learning and personal study. Instrumental, composition or vocal tuition/supervision is the central element of the provision, with the Professional Studies module consisting of individual one-to-one learning, group tuition, rehearsals, workshops, seminars and masterclasses. You will develop and contextualise your individual tuition/supervision within a broad range of solo, small-group/chamber, and large-ensemble activities including the CoLab module.

Visit the website for more information: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/music/independent-study-programme-advanced

Progression

After completing the ISP Advanced programme, students may progress to a postgraduate diploma or Masters programme.

Facilities

- 100-seat Peacock Room
- 100-seat Theatre Studio, with sprung dance floor
- Elegant Stuart & Mackerras Rooms for chamber music
- 80+ practice rooms
- Dedicated suites for Brass, Composition, Early Music, Harp Jazz and Percussion
- Music technology facilities including a recording studio and keyboard laboratory

Faculty of Music

Located within the beautiful Wren-designed King Charles Court at the Old Royal Naval College, Trinity Laban richly deserves its international reputation as one of the premier institutions in the United Kingdom for the study of music.

The Faculty of Music is celebrated for its fine facilities, which include state-of-the-art practice rooms equipped with superb pianos, the outstanding Jerwood Library of the Performing Arts and the magnificent concert halls in nearby Blackheath.

We have long been acknowledged for fostering and promoting a caring and supportive environment in which our students can flourish and we are particularly proud of the high profile of our professorial staff, who work as acclaimed soloists or belong to top London orchestras and opera companies.

The beautiful site set alongside the River Thames and Greenwich Park, the highly distinguished and talented professorial staff and our innovative and comprehensive course provision make Trinity Laban's Faculty of Music the natural choice for all who seek the best in professional music performance training.

"Trinity Laban is bursting with life and incorporates some of the most sought after professors in the UK. I would wholeheartedly recommend it to the young generation of musicians and feel proud to be a graduate myself."

George–Emmanuel Lazaridis, Piano

How to apply: http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study/how-to-apply/music-applications

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This module allows you to undertake an in-depth appraisal of a topic related to your professional discipline and produce an assignment which will demonstrate an increased knowledge base in the subject. Read more
This module allows you to undertake an in-depth appraisal of a topic related to your professional discipline and produce an assignment which will demonstrate an increased knowledge base in the subject.

On successful completion of this module you will be able to identify an area of your own area of professional practice/area of employment that you would like to develop in terms of a deeper understanding, service improvement or evidence base. The module helps develop contemporary knowledge of the selected area of practice/topic in relation to your current professional role.

The module will allow you an element of initiative on the part of the choice and approach to the study. The approach to a topic may be a critical review of literature or current research on a topic or a report on a work related issue. You may choose to review and evaluate current practice or report a recent change in practice. The essential elements in the module are evaluation and analysis. The approach to the topic should demonstrate critical appraisal.

A supervisor will provide initial guidance with the choice of topic and approach. Demonstration of the learning outcomes will be stated in the learning contract.

The module is offered in Semester One and Two. There are no set attendance dates for this module - you will negotiate individual supervision with your allocated supervisor for this work.

Why Bradford?

At the Faculty of Health Studies, University of Bradford, you can choose to study for individual modules, a named award or build module credits through the SSPRD Framework for Flexible Learning to achieve an award relevant to your professional needs.

The Framework for Flexible Learning in Health and Social Care is a Faculty-wide academic structure for Specialist Skills and Post-Registration Development. It offers students increased flexibility and choice in the modules and courses that can be undertaken and it is also responsive to employer needs. The flexibility also allows you to move from one award to another if your career changes or you take time out from regular studying. Shared teaching and research expertise from across the Faculty is offered through interdisciplinary teaching across our core research modules.

The Faculty of Health Studies is regionally, nationally and internationally recognised for its teaching and research, and works with a number of healthcare partners to ensure clinical excellence.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. Read more
Top-up your existing qualification to a valuable Masters degree in just one year. Our course will suit you if you already hold the advanced level CIPD qualification of professional practitioner standards awards or a Postgraduate Diploma in Human Resource Management. You can study with us while continuing to work.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

In our rapidly-changing business world, human resource managers have an ever-widening remit. Increasingly, organisations want to measure their effectiveness globally, rather than locally, and take strategic decisions that influence their overall structure and function. HR professionals will be involved in much of this work.

This academically rigorous course provides a sound basis for taking on senior HR roles. It focuses on how the global marketplace impacts upon labour markets, looking particularly at the changing nature of employment after the worldwide credit crunch.

Our team at Lord Ashcroft International Business School believes that managers learn with and from each other to find solutions to real-life problems at work. That's why we encourage participative learning methods and work-based assignments so that it's not just you who benefits from your development, but also your employer.

Our course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

While you’re here, you’ll benefit from state-of-the-art teaching and learning facilities, study areas, campus libraries with online databases containing professional journals, plus our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) through which you can access study resources and help.

Chelmsford: Semester 1: two three-day teaching blocks; Semester 2: one two-day teaching block plus independent study
Cambridge: Trimester 3 (June): one three-day teaching block plus independent study; Semester 2 (February): HRM in the Global Context plus independent study

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/human-resource-management-ma-stage-three-only-top-up

Careers

Your qualification will be recognised by CIPD, the UK's most credible specialist human resources training and awarding body.

Our course has a strong focus on the skills and knowledge you need for a successful career in human resource management. It’s essential if you’re preparing for, or aspiring to, managerial roles in HR either in UK or overseas.

Modules & assessment

Cambridge trimester 3 (June):
Three-day teaching-block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Cambridge semester 2 (February):
HRM in the Global Context plus independent study with support from dissertation supervisor

Chelmsford semester 1 (September):
Two three-day teaching blocks: HRM Strategy in a Competitive Environment and HRD in an International Environment

Chelmsford semester (2 February):
One two-day teaching block plus independent study support from dissertation supervisor

Assessment

We’ll asses your progress through modular assignments that incorporate written reports and essays, oral presentations, case study analysis, exams and a portfolio.

Your faculty

The Lord Ashcroft International Business School is one of the largest business schools in the East of England, with nearly 100 full-time teaching staff and approximately 6,000 students from more than 100 countries.

Our striking and award-winning business school building in Chelmsford, as well as new buildings in Cambridge, offer the most advanced learning technologies. We’re well-recognised for our centres of excellence by students, employers and professional bodies alike.

What makes us stand out is that our courses don't just give you sound academic knowledge – they’re at the cutting edge of current business practice and highly relevant to employers. This is owing to the close links we have with the business community and the partnerships we've developed with a wide variety of businesses and public service organisations.

We're interested in people who are confident, ambitious and ready to take the challenge of making a difference in the world of business. If that's you, we'd love to hear from you.

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​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. Read more

Course Overview

​The MA Creative Writing at Cardiff Metropolitan University is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career, and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice and contemporary writing in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links. We have a focus on the contemporary that is underpinned with expertise in historical periods.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university's commitment to e-learning.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are co​re and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10 credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. In a 10 credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20 credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30 credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60 credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (New and Experimental Writing, Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example).

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of creative writing or who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course focuses on sport and exercise physiology. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

External Examiner for Physiology Programmes (May 2011)

"I viewed a range of Research Projects this year. As always they are aligned to staff expertise – I strongly support this focus as I think it enriches the student experience to work with a knowledgeable and often highly motivated staff member."

In addition to the core modules listed above, students choose an optional module from:

Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
Students also undertake two further compulsory modules in Clinical Exercise Physiology and Performance Physiology.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Read more
This course provides a focus on sport and performance. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also choose optional modules from:

Performance Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Exercise Psychology;
Clinical Exercise Physiology;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete:
Effective Coaching.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also undertake additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, and choose one optional module from Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​. Read more

Course Overview

The MA English Literature is a rewarding taught degree offering an exhilarating analysis of English Literature using texts from the 'long nineteenth century' to the present day.​

The degree focuses on historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural representations and practices of location, space, history and textuality, and the effect of these on constructions of identity. Where possible, the modules encourage you to explore interdisciplinary boundaries and texts.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical writing and research skills, particularly in relation to literature that addresses history, place and space. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your employability in the arts and heritage sectors. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English---MA.aspx

​Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.

Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- New & Experimental Writing
In New and Experimental Writing you will encounter a range of transgressive texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Starting with the avant-garde, the module proceeds chronologically to the contemporary. We interrogate what it means to transgress aesthetic norms at various points in time and take into consideration historical and cultural context to consider whether there might be a connection between the challenging of literary and social standards. You will be able to approach these texts via a number of methodologies, including theoretical and creative.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Representing ‘the Past’
In Representing 'the Past', you will consider how we interpret 'the past' within a cultural context. Looking at both textual and extra-textual appropriations, and by showing how meanings of 'the past' are contested at any one time, you will consider how certain interpretations are naturalised and legitimated within culture.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it (Representing ‘the Past’).

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.

Employability & Careers​

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in the arts or heritage sectors. The programme is suitable for those who are teachers of English Literature at ‘A’ Level or GCSE and would like to enhance their expertise for professional development purposes.

The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace. A Master's degree in English Literature may lead to a variety of careers which include the particularly relevant areas of teaching, research, journalism, public relations, the Civil Service, publishing, the media, and employment in the public or voluntary sectors.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing. Read more

Course Overview

​MA English Literature & Creative Writing is a rewarding taught degree, combining the study of English Literature with the theoretical and practical component of fiction writing.

The MA is taught by published writers and researchers. The course is aimed to support you while you develop and hone your critical and creative writing skills, particularly in the field of fiction. You can take our MA for professional development purposes, in order to enhance your career and to increase your likelihood of publication. The MA will also help you specialise in the areas of creative practice as well as contemporary and historical literature in relation to place and space in order to pave the way for doctoral study.

We have expertise across a number of fields and our academic community is vibrant and dynamic with strong industry links.

The English Literature part of the degree analyses historic and contemporary textual representations of place, theorising cultural practices of location and space. The Creative Writing modules are specifically designed to develop you as a writer of fiction.

One of the great strengths of the programme is its flexibility. MA English Literature and Creative Writing can be studied either full or part time. Modules can be taken individually, allowing you to control the pace and depth of your postgraduate study. Programme delivery is enhanced by the university’s commitment to e-learning​.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/English-and-Creative-Writing---MA.aspx

Course Content​​

All of our modules are core and are delivered over one year full time or two years part time.
Term 1
- Researching Humanities
Researching Humanities will introduce you to research methods at MA level. The module provides a thorough breakdown of research methods across the fields of Creative Writing and English Literature. This module is taught across all of our MA Creative Writing and English Literature pathways and it is also a great opportunity for you to get to know your peers.

- Short Story Writing
Short Story Writing provides a thorough introduction to the short story. This is done through two distinct, but integrated, approaches: a critical analysis of the development of the short story, with particular focus on twentieth century and contemporary writing; and through the creative practice itself. Each week you'll be encouraged to explore key techniques and approaches in your own writing through writing workshops.

- Literature and Landscapes
In Literature and Landscapes, you’ll examine artistic and literary representations of landscape, and engage with the complex social, cultural and aesthetic factors that contribute to the formation of identity. The module provides a comparative foundation from which you’ll consider representations of the urban encountered in Writing the City.

Term 2
- Novel Writing
Novel Writing extends and deepens your engagement with fiction writing. The module provides you with a thorough introduction to the novel as a distinct fictional genre focussing on the contemporary. As well as examining key works, you'll also be working on your own creative practice. A key part of the module focuses on the preparation of your work for publication.

- Writing the City
In Writing the City you'll explore representations of urban space through set texts and in your own creative writing. In this module you’ll examine texts that explore the urban in literary fiction, particularly throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

- Critical Practice
Critical Practice prepares you for your dissertation through which you'll be able to submit a substantial body of creative work along with a contextualising critical commentary.

- Dissertation
The Dissertation module is your opportunity to create a portfolio of writing, such as a collection of short stories or an excerpt of a novel that you are working on. The creative work will be accompanied by a critical reflection in which you contextualise your writing within a critical framework and with reference to other texts.

Learning & Teaching​

​Most modules are taught through group workshops and seminars. Some modules will also include individual tutorials and the dissertation module is delivered entirely through one-to-one tutorials with your supervisor.

In workshops and seminars full use is made of University technology and course materials will be delivered and stored through our Virtual Learning Environment. It will be possible for you to access the Virtual Learning Environment remotely and you will be encouraged to do so.

Most modules are 20 or 30 credits although we also have a 10-credit module and the dissertation is worth 60 credits.

In a 10-credit module you will receive 11 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 89 hours of independent study. In a 20-credit module you will receive 22 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 178 hours of independent study. In a 30-credit module you will receive 33 hours of timetabled teaching and you will be expected to conduct 267 hours of independent study. The 60-credit dissertation is mainly conducted with independent study. You will receive 6 hours of tutorial supervision (this includes supervisors looking over your work) and you will be expected to conduct 594 hours of independent study.

Each student is appointed a personal tutor who will be available for academic advice, pastoral support and personal development planning. Tutors also have weekly office hours.

A critical but supportive environment is achieved through a combination of workshops, research seminars and e-learning. You will be introduced to the practicalities of preparing and submitting your work for possible publication.

Assessment

We have a variety of approaches to assessment across the programme depending upon the module. All creative practice modules (Short Story Writing, Novel Writing, Dissertation) are assessed through portfolios of creative work and accompanying critical essays in which you are required to reflect on your creative practice and to contextualise your work with reference to other texts. These modules also include class-based formative peer-assessment in the form of writing workshops. These do not count towards your final grade but the sessions do help you grow and reflect as a critical and creative writer.

In some modules (Writing the City) you can choose your method of assessment (creative portfolio and critical essay, or essay, or reflection, for example). In other modules (Literature and Landscapes) you will be asked to produce an essay.

In the introductory Researching the Humanities module you will be ask to produce a visual representation of a chosen research method, in the form of a poster. In other modules, such as Writing the City, you will be asked to post your work to a reflective blog.

Modules also make use of Virtual Learning Environments for assessments and you may be asked to view material online and then to respond to it.

You will receive tutor support in class and through our VLE in order to prepare you for each assessment point. We also have library facilities online and at campus.​

Employability & Careers​

Many of our students use the course to generate and hone their own writing for publication. Our creative practice modules are designed with eventual publication in mind. For example, in our Novel Writing module you will be taught how to write a synopsis for submission to an agent or publisher. Several of our students have had publication success (see below).

The MA is also a great choice for those wishing to enhance their employment and professional opportunities in editorial and publishing careers. The programme is suitable for those who would like to become teachers of English literature and creative writing as well as those who are already teachers. For example, teachers of English at ‘A’ Level and GCSE often find the course suitable for professional development purposes, providing them with skills to enhance their teaching of English literature creative writing within their current curricula or skilling them up to deliver the new Creative Writing ‘A’ Level.

Our MA is appropriate for those who would like careers in community-based education and practice. The course also prepares you for further study at PhD level at Cardiff Metropolitan University and beyond.

This degree will encourage you to develop the valuable transferable skills of autonomy, effective collaboration, self-direction, organisation, initiative and adaptability that are highly regarded in the workplace.

Recent student publishing successes:
Barbara A Stensland (MA Creative Writing) writes a blog about living with MS that has recently been published as a book, Stumbling in Flats (2015). It has been shortlisted for The International Rubery Book Award 2015.

Emre Karatoprak (MA Creative Writing) had his first novel published on Amazon, Türbülans (2013).

Alex Sambrook (MA Creative Writing) had a short story shortlisted in the prestigious Bridport Short Story Competition (2012).

​Stacey Taylor, (MA English & Creative Writing), won the It Started With a Kiss competition run by Authonomy in November 2011 with a 416 word flash fiction.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment, Moodle. Read more
This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

The 10-week 10-unit modules are delivered by a variety of media including video, audio, written materials and supplied text books, designed to accommodate a range of learning styles and personal circumstances.

Your study is supported by a tutor responsible for a small number of other students who together make up a study group. Further academic guidance comes from the Programme Lead. Assessment is through reports, discussion submissions, essays and independent research topics.

Why choose this course?

A flexible learning programme offering the skills and knowledge necessary for a successful entry into publishing that can be studied from home. Designed to be studied in conjunction with employment in any field, the programme addresses evidenced publishing employers' needs.

Unparalleled support from tutors and state-of-the-art learning technologies. Your enrolment at Oxford Brookes within the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies provides you with relevant and tailored learning opportunities. There is no similar distance learning provision offered by higher education institutions in the UK or Europe. Develop the skills and knowledge necessary to address the marketing, production and editorial functions in publishing, as well as skills in data analysis and writing practices - expertise that is currently in demand by the publishing industry which requires individuals who are able to asses, evaluate and synthesize data.

This course in detail

This part-time programme is usually studied over two years. However, you are able to take up to 5 years to complete the necessary credits.

Four core compulsory modules make up the first year and address marketing and sales, digital production and workflow, and editorial as publishing-related topics and research skills as preparation for the later dissertation.

In the second year, you choose one module from each of two groups: either International Publishing and Rights or Independent Study; and then either Culture of Publishing, Journals or Independent Study.

The Independent Study module is specifically designed to provide you with a structured pedagogic framework in which to reflect on and develop your experience of work in publishing.

You may, however, select the Independent Study module once only.

Your programme is completed with a longer period of research and writing (about 6 months), supported by a supervisor, which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation. The modules are as follows:
-Marketing and Sales Management
-Digital Production and Workflow Management
-Editorial Management, Functions and Strategies
-Research Skills
-International Management of Publishing and Rights
-Culture of Publishing
-Management of Journals
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the list of modules you choose from may vary from that shown, although this is a rare occurrence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is presented in a structured modular framework of compulsory and optional modules which provide both core competencies and knowledge while offering the opportunity for you to tailor your programme. You will be encouraged through discussion forums, individual reading and investigative practices in the modules to engage actively with your study. This approach is informed by and based on the understanding that your learning should be relevant to your interests.

In presenting the learning materials online, each module clearly outlines the structure of the 10 units at the start, identifies points of increased input, discussion areas, activities and assessments enabling you to adjust your engagement with the learning, within the requirements of the module, to suit your individual timetables. Within the modules and during the course of the programme, culminating in the dissertation, your autonomy in your learning increases through structured activities that start with close guidance and build towards greater independence. Flexibility, where possible, while aiming for a cohesive and supportive group of fellow students, is built into the timetable of discussion forums, communication with associate tutors and other students.

Careers and professional development

This course is targeted at individuals who either want to start a career in publishing or who are already working and want to enhance their career with an advanced degree. If you are a recent graduate who wants to enter publishing but are unable to continue with full time study then this programme enables you to develop appropriate knowledge of the industry. If you are already working and want to progress your career or change career, then the topics we cover in this programme provide the basis for this change.

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Apply scientific principles underpinning sport to the context of performance enhancement in the growing field of sport science. This course will give you expert knowledge in a specialist area of the science of sport performance. Read more
Apply scientific principles underpinning sport to the context of performance enhancement in the growing field of sport science.

This course will give you expert knowledge in a specialist area of the science of sport performance. It will develop applied techniques which will help you pursue a career in sport science support, academic research, teaching or other science based professions.

The applied focus of this course is supported by contemporary, well-equipped and supported laboratory facilities.

The course content is aligned to the requirements of supervised experience (SE) with the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MSc-Sport-Performance-Enhancement-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

Traditionally sport science has been based on three foundational scientific disciplines - physiology, biomechanics and psychology. You’ll either study two disciplines in breadth or a single discipline in depth with a negotiated independent study.

This course provides a contemporary, interdisciplinary and applied approach to the science of sport performance enhancement. You'll have the opportunity to advance your knowledge and understanding of scientific principles in this context. You'll learn how to apply theoretical concepts and to develop practical professional skills for situations that sports scientists encounter on a daily basis.

You’ll also study research methods and data analysis and will work on an interdisciplinary team providing support services for an athlete client, which will expose you to a range of practical and ethical issues associated with support work.

You’ll be able employ advanced investigative, analytical and practical techniques in your field and increase your employability in an academic or applied setting.

You’ll also develop as a reflective practitioner, taking responsibility for your own learning and on-going professional development.

You'll learn by a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, laboratory sessions and through independent study. There may also be some opportunities to study abroad.

Modules

PgCert
• scientific methods
• biomechanics and performance enhancement
• psychological interventions for sport performance enhancement
• applied physiology and sport performance
• independent study module

PgDip
• sport science support of performance athletes
• contemporary issues in sport performance
• Independent study module

MSc
• independent research project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Sport science support is a growing field. Many professional sporting bodies now employ sport scientists in a performance support role and this course is ideal if you have an interest in this area.

The alignment of course content to the requirements of supervised experience (SE) with the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) will help you achieve accreditation if SE is continued after graduation.

The emphasis on research skills also equips you to continue on to possible PhD study and a research or teaching career.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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Philosophy tackles some of the deepest and most complex questions about humanity and its place in the world. This programme will allow you to study the key debates, trends and approaches in different areas of philosophy while improving your skills in research and critical analysis. Read more

Philosophy tackles some of the deepest and most complex questions about humanity and its place in the world. This programme will allow you to study the key debates, trends and approaches in different areas of philosophy while improving your skills in research and critical analysis.

Core modules will give you an overview of different topics in analytic philosophy, from philosophy of mind, religion, language and science to epistemology, ethics, aesthetics and metaphysics. You’ll also choose from a variety of modules specialising in the areas and topics that interest you the most.

You’ll be supported by active researchers in a stimulating environment based around our six research centres, with access to excellent library resources covering a broad span of subjects. It’s an excellent opportunity to gain diverse skills for a wide range of careers, as well as further study.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

Throughout the course you’ll take two core modules introducing you to different topics, approaches and methods in areas of analytic philosophy. You’ll explore current and historical debates in subfields including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, ethics, metaethics, aesthetics, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of science— all while improving your skills in research and critical thinking.

From this foundation, you’ll build specialist knowledge in areas that particularly interest you with your choice of optional modules. You can take an upper-level undergraduate module (with boosted assessment requirements) to fill gaps in your background knowledge, sign up for an independent study, or choose from several MA modules the School has to offer.

You’ll continue to specialise when you complete your dissertation – an independent research project on a topic of your choice that allows you to showcase the skills and knowledge you’ve gained. You can choose to swap one of your optional modules to extend your dissertation if you want to go into even more depth.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll study three compulsory modules including your dissertation, as well as a single optional module. If you choose the standard dissertation (60 credits) rather than the extended dissertation (90 credits), you can take a further optional module.

  • Analytic Philosophy A 30 credits
  • Analytic Philosophy B 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Special Options in Philosophy A 30 credits
  • Independent Study A 30 credits
  • Independent Study B 30 credits
  • Special Options in Philosophy B 30 credits
  • Topics in the Philosophy of Physics 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • Advanced Topics in Realism and Representation in Science 30 credits
  • Advanced Topics in Metaphysics of Science 30 credits
  • Philosophy of Science: Classic Debates & Current Trends 30 credits
  • Metaphysical Issues in Philosophy of Religion 30 credits
  • Contemporary Readings in Philosophy of Religion 30 credits
  • Sin, Public Discourse and Public Life 30 credits
  • Contemporary Issues in Religion and Gender 30 credits
  • Religion, Society and Public Life 30 credits
  • Theology and Public Life 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Philosophy MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our modules are taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, where you can discuss the issues arising from your reading with fellow students and your tutor. You’ll also have one-to-one supervisions while you work on your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We use different forms of assessment, including essays, seminar participation and your dissertation.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a range of in-depth subject knowledge, but it will allow you to develop high-level skills in research, analysis, interpretation and communication.

All of these qualities are valuable to a range of employers across sectors and industries, and we’re proud of our record in preparing postgraduates for their careers after graduation. They’ve gone into roles such as teaching, consultancy, business management, administration, accountancy, law, journalism and the civil service among others.

Many of our graduates also progress to further study, and ultimately pursue academic careers.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website



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The course focuses on the application of physiology and psychology to outdoor activities. It aims to develop students’ practical and theoretical knowledge as well as their ability to propose possible alternative hypotheses to current thinking. Read more
The course focuses on the application of physiology and psychology to outdoor activities. It aims to develop students’ practical and theoretical knowledge as well as their ability to propose possible alternative hypotheses to current thinking.

As with other MSc programmes, this MSc been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests. It is intended that the skills learnt on this programme will enable students to apply theory to professional practice. The programme benefits from being taught by staff with a wide a range of physiological and psychological expertise.

Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (i.e. equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

In addition to the core modules listed above, students undertake an additional compulsory Higher Skills module. On completion of this module students should be sufficiently knowledgeable and skilled to work in scientific and outdoor related disciplines. Due to current industry regulation and insurance requirements, the attainment of nationally recognised vocational qualifications is essential to gain employment in outdoor activities. This module will enable students to progress towards, or actually attain, National Governing Body (NGB) awards in outdoor activities. Pending approval of prior learning/experience, this module may not need to be pursued. However, an additional 20 credits would need to be studied instead.

Finally, students are able to choose one optional module from:

Performance Physiology;
Sport Psychology;
Effective Coaching;
Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete.
The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours of student time (including formal contact).

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