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Masters Degrees (Improvisation)

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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The MA Performance Dance has grown from a longstanding tradition of postgraduate study in dance at Chichester. Read more
The MA Performance Dance has grown from a longstanding tradition of postgraduate study in dance at Chichester. Offering dance graduates as well as dance artists, at different stages of their artistic lives, the chance to undertake a Masters Degree or Post Graduate Diploma in the UK’s leading Practice as Research department.[ae1] The programme enables students to develop their dance practice as a performer working intensively with a wide variety of established and up and coming international choreographers and performing with the University’s touring performance company: mapdance.

Course content
The MA performers route is led by mapdance company Artistic Directors, Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.
Working intensively with international guest choreographers, students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches.
mapdance operates as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

The 2016/17 Repertory includes new commissions and from Shobana Jeyasingh, Lea Anderson, Hagit Yakira and Cai Tomos.
The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

The MA Performance Dance operates in the context of a professional performance programme and a series of presentations by visiting artists and researchers.

Guest lecturers on the MA have included practitioners and curators all working at the edges of dance research.
There are also opportunities to engage in cutting-edge research with interactive technologies or to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.
Audition Dates 2017:
28h February, 28th March and 23rd May.
Fees and Finance
Auditions for the post-graduate mapdance programme are currently available.
To apply for 2017-2018, please contact Admissions
To find out more about MA Performance Dance visit mapdance

Home tuition fees 2017
MA Performance Dance - Full Time including dissertation £10,440
Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester: £9396
Overseas fees 2016 are £14,450
Find out more in the application pack here, application form and reference form.

Where this can take you
This course is suitable for you if you are a recent graduate or a dance artist who wishes to extend their technical and performance skills (and have completed a recognised BA degree).

It will offer you …
o an opportunity to work with international established and up and coming choreographers reflect on your professional practice and prior training
o intensive technical training through a variety of contemporary techniques, Pilates, contact improvisation and Ballet
o an opportunity to tour the repertoire across the UK and internationally
o an opportunity to develop your teaching skills within the context of a touring company
o time to deepen your understanding of your professional skills through practice, research and scholarship
o professional Development
o deepening your ability to articulate what you do in written and spoken form
o a stepping-stone toward PhD study

You will develop skills in…
o performance
o technique
o teaching in the context of a touring company
o choreographic methodology and critical thinking
o working independently (via dissertation projects)
o research and the articulation of that research in writing

It will give you…
o tools and skills to support you in the transition to professional practice
o extensive experience of working with established choreographers alongside touring and networking that can aid you in gaining work as a performer or in establishing your work as an independent artist
o a qualification that can aid in obtaining work within educational and HE institutions
o preparation for further study i.e. PhD or professionally-related qualifications
Work placements

There are opportunities to engage with cutting edge research into interactive technologies and to market yourself professionally as an artist using DVD and website technologies.

People you'll meet
Now in its 11 year mapdance is directed by co-artistic directors Yael Flexer and Detta Howe.

This year the company is commissioning choreographers:
o Shobana Jeyasingh
o Lea Anderson
o Hagit Yakira
o Cai Tomos

Indicative modules
The MA in performance includes three core modules: Repertory, Techniques for Performance and Reflective Practice.
The postgraduate diploma includes two core modules: Repertory and Techniques for Performance and an optional module.
Repertory Module:
The repertory module: mapdance encompasses intensive creation periods with international guest choreographer. Students develop their technical and performance skills and deepen understanding of the creative process through experiencing varied choreographic methodologies and artistic approaches. Operating as a professional company with daily technique classes and rehearsals, the creation periods begin in Sept through to February. From mid-February to May, the company tours nationally and internationally whilst also offering educational workshops.

Techniques for Performance Module:
The Techniques for Performance module accompanying the repertory module (and compulsory for performers route) focuses on excellence in contemporary dance performance involving daily technical training in various dance techniques including release and contemporary techniques, contact improvisation, Pilates and Ballet work. This module normally runs autumn and spring semesters.

Teaching and Assessment
Assessment on the MA performers route is based on four core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) Reflective Practice (30 credits) and Dissertation (60 credits).
Assessment on the postgraduate diploma performers route is based on two core modules, Repertory (60 credits), Techniques for Performance (30 credits) and one optional module.

Assessment Techniques for Performance is continuous, that is process based.
Similarly the Repertory module is continuously assessed however the assessment is comprised by marks given by guest choreographers during the creation process and marks given by both Artistic Directors in rehearsal and on tour assessing both process and performance.

Applications & Course Pre-requisites
Application to the course is made by completing the online application form and completing the additional requirements.
You will also be invited to attend an audition and an interview.

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Why study at Roehampton. Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Build a rewarding career as a professionally-qualified registered dance movement psychotherapist. Graduates are eligible to register with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMP UK).
  • Benefit from our established network of psychotherapists and gain work experience within a supervised clinical placement in a range of settings. 
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.
  • The only institution in Europe to offer training in all of the arts and play therapies, including dramatherapy, art and dance movement psychotherapy, music and play therapy.

Course summary

This course is designed for people who have prior dance experience and professional or volunteering experience with people in need, and would like to practise as a dance movement psychotherapist.

Dance movement psychotherapy is a relational process in which a client and therapist engage in an empathetic creative process using body movement and dance to assist the integration of emotional, cognitive, physical, social and spiritual aspects of self. We believe that focusing on the creative potential of individuals in a relationship creates a sound ethical basis for psychotherapeutic work.

You will be taught by leading experts who will equip you with the skills, experience, and confidence to work as a dance movement psychotherapist. All graduating students are eligible to apply for registration with the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy (ADMP UK). Graduates often create their own positions; facilitating dance movement psychotherapy sessions within settings including: social services; special needs; schools; psychiatry; probationary and rehabilitation units; forensic psychiatry.

The course offers opportunities for you to explore and expand movement preferences, ways of interacting with others, belief systems, prejudices and values. Emphasis is placed on development of your own style as a dance movement psychotherapist. You also have the opportunity to perform and exhibit your ongoing work in a yearly Arts Therapies exhibition.

The MA in DMP benefits from cutting edge research conducted through the Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) and this feeds directly into teaching. The programme ethos emphasises a critical consideration of different descriptions and explanations of bodies, human systems and therapeutic practices in different places and times. In the context of an individual student's experiences, beliefs, values and different 'cultures', our teaching actively promotes a participatory ethic, self-reflexive practices and the ability for critical reflection on: creative processes, intersubjectivity and the construction of social and power differentials, in learning and in psychotherapy.

Content

The uniquely interdisciplinary MA course in Dance Movement Psychotherapy integrates theoretical, experiential and clinical learning, preparing students to practice as dance movement psychotherapists. Cutting edge research cascades into teaching emphasising the social, biological and psychological construction of the moving body and meaning-making. Students are encouraged to develop a self-reflexive practice and the ability for critical reflection on creative processes.

Key areas of study include Contemporary DMP and psychotherapeutic theories, Feminist embodied reflexivity, clinical placement and supervision (for one-two days a week), dance movement improvisation skills and interventions, embodied performance practice, experiential anatomy for clinical practice, human development, movement and growth, Laban Movement Analysis and video observation.

Embodied practice and working with attention to the art of dance is placed at the centre of the programme. Drawing from Feminist, Psychoanalytical, Phenomenological and Systemic frameworks, the training emphasises the creative role of curiosity and a 'not knowing' position, a respect for difference, and appreciation of the effects that mutual influences have in all relationships.

Modules

Here are examples of modules:

  • Creative Processes: Reflexive Movement Improvisation
  • Theoretical Approaches in Dance Movement Psychotherapy
  • Psychopathology: Alternative World Views

Career options

Graduates can enter a variety of roles including: NHS clinical practice within in and out patient services, community services, prison services, special needs schools, performing arts contexts, drug rehabilitation, in social services with immigrants and asylum seekers, in shelters with women who have suffered domestic abuse, dementia services, learning disabilities services, child and adolescent mental health services.

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Why study at Roehampton. Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), this training leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a music therapist. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Approved by the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), this training leads to a nationally recognised professional qualification as a music therapist.
  • Work placements organised by the University, the majority with a music therapist on site.
  • Music therapy course staff have their own current clinical work, and are therefore embedded in current practice and clinical thinking.
  • The staff team are involved in writing and researching and have a high profile within the UK music therapy profession 
  • Work as a music therapist to benefit people with a wide range of challenges.
  • In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, the leading national assessment of quality, 100% of the research we submitted was rated “world leading” or “internationally excellent” for its impact.

Summary

Become a qualified music therapist to facilitate people’s move towards well-being through specific therapeutic aims using a primarily non-verbal relationship in music. Music Therapy as practised in Great Britain is largely based on improvisation, the music being the shared, and the spontaneous creation of client and therapist.

The Music Therapy programme offers training for competent, practising musicians to become therapists, bringing together their skills, education and other life experiences. On completion of the training, graduates are eligible to apply to the HCPC for registration, with the ability and flexibility to practice within the NHS, Social Services, education or private sector. 

Essential to music therapy is the relationship between client and therapist. At Roehampton we have chosen to base our Music Therapy training programme on the use of psychoanalytic ideas to inform our understanding of the therapy process and the ways the client works with the environment, the therapist and the music. Broader theories and ways of working are also studied in order to equip students to meet a range of clinical need. Other styles of music, including song writing, the use of technology and pre-composed music are also used as appropriate to the need of the individual. 

The course emphasises your emotional development as a practitioner, together with clinical exploration through critical enquiry. In addition to this, students must be prepared to enter mandatory individual personal therapy for one year of the training.

Music Therapists work within a wide range of clinical settings, individual and group work. They work with people of all ages; from infants and young children through to elderly adults. Music therapy can benefit people with a wide range of difficulties or challenges, including mental health problems, learning disabilities and autism, dementia and neurology, as well as people experiencing serious illness such as cancer or those who have experienced trauma. 

Content

The programme aims to encourage a critical and evaluative approach to both theory and practice in music therapy. It is designed to prepare students for work with children and adults with a range of disabilities and illnesses, and placements usually include work with children and adults with learning disabilities, autism and Asperger’s syndrome and mental health problems.

After visits to a variety of workplaces which offer music therapy, you will undertake individual and group work in two contrasting settings over six months, January to June (first placement) and September to February/March (second placement).These clinical placements will provide you with music therapy work experience alongside qualified Music Therapists. You will also participate in an experiential group, which gives you an opportunity to develop your own self-awareness and examine personal and group dynamics through verbal and musical processes. In addition, it is a requirement for you to find and fund personal individual therapy outside the course. 

Key areas of study include human development and growth and the clinical context for music therapy, clinical improvisation, observational studies, music therapy theory, clinical case work and supervision, introduction to research and your dissertation. Personal development and reflection on this is central throughout the programme.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Music Therapy Theory and Practice 1 and 2
  • Observational Studies
  • Research Methods 
  • Research Portfolio

Career options

Music Therapists work within a wide range of clinical settings. They work with people of all ages; from infants and young children through to elderly adults. Music Therapists work within statutory services (such as the NHS, education or social services), within charities and private organisations, and in private practice. To find out more, you can join the British Association for Music Therapy.

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Additional Entry Requirements. Interview. You can apply between October to May. Places are offered on a first come, first served basis and applicants are advised to apply as early as possible. Read more

Additional Entry Requirements:

Interview: You can apply between October to May. Places are offered on a first come, first served basis and applicants are advised to apply as early as possible. Interviews are usually held between January to June. The personal statement should include: reasons why the applicant feels drawn to the profession of music therapy; specific musical skills; and details of relevant experience within caring professions. Some applicants will be asked to attend for audition and interview. This will usually include group improvisation with other applicants and an individual audition in which the applicant will: play prepared pieces; improvise on a given theme; and sing a short song of their own choice, if voice is not main study. The interview will assess each applicant’s personal suitability for this profession, ability to reflect, and readiness for the demands that the course entails. For overseas applicants, auditions and interviews may be conducted by Skype.

Criminal Records Check: A satisfactory criminal records check will be required

Course Description:

The theoretical focus of this course encompasses psychodynamic, humanistic, developmental and music-centred approaches to music therapy. Some lectures in theoretical studies are shared with students from the MSc Art Psychotherapy. The training is designed to prepare students for work with vulnerable children, adolescents and adults with a wide range of needs, including learning disabilities and mental health needs.

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching includes practical and academic elements with an emphasis on experiential learning and teaching methods, including lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assessments are both practical and written. The following areas are covered:

  • Therapeutic musical skills, with an emphasis on improvisation, interaction and application in a therapeutic context 
  • Relevant psychological, developmental, and music therapy theory
  • Different client groups: knowledge of different areas of need, diagnosis, and work context
  • Self-development 
  • Observation and critical thinking skills 
  • Professional issues, such as ethics and team communication

Placements include work in a variety of settings and are organised by QMU. In  Level One, practice placement is with a music therapist, one day per week from October to March. In Level Two, students attend practice placement two days per week in both semesters and work in a more autonomous way. Students are required to meet costs for travel to placement. Personal development is fundamental to therapeutic training and it is a course requirement (and requirement by the Health and Care Professions Council) that students attend regular personal therapy throughout the course, with a minimum of 40 hours attendance. This work is non-assessed and students are required to cover the cost.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module requires you to attend classes at QMU and to study independently. Attendance requirements at QMU will depend on the module. In Level One students attend QMU on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. In Level Two, classes are on a Thursday. Practice placement days are additional.

Links with industry/professional bodies

Part of our strength comes from our location. Being based in Edinburgh means that the course has been developed over time in cooperation with key national cultural agencies and other bodies with a strategic interest in the development of arts organisations and festivals. Our location in the ‘festival city’ also allows for strong practical links between the course and the many arts, festival and cultural organisations based in and around Edinburgh, across Scotland and the UK. The course is validated by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Modules

Level 1: Practice Placement 1/ Interdisciplinary Studies 1/ Therapeutic Skills and Interpersonal Learning/ Research Methods (all 30 credits)

Level 2: Practice Placement 2/ Interdisciplinary Studies 2 and Interpersonal Learning (both 30 credits), plus Professional project (60 credits)

Careers

On graduation you will be eligible for registration with HCPC, and will be qualified to apply for work in organisations such as the NHS, education, charitable bodies, social services, or in the private sector.  Music therapists are employed throughout the health, education and community sectors. Registered  music therapists are eligible for full membership of the British Association for Music Therapy.

Most of our graduates have found employment within care homes, schools, the NHS, and charities including Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy in Scotland. Many others have become successful freelance practitioners.

Quick Facts

  • This is the only music therapy training course in Scotland. 
  • Exciting collaborative opportunities between this course and MSc Art Psychotherapy (International) course. 
  • Practice Educators for all Year One students are music therapists.


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Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK. Read more
Get professional training in music therapy on our internationally recognised Master’s course. When you graduate, you’ll be qualified to work as a music therapist in the UK and overseas, and eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council in the UK.

Overview

If you’re an experienced musician and want to put your skills to use supporting children and adults with additional needs, our emphasis on clinical placements will prepare you for a rewarding career.

Through lectures, practical workshops, case discussions and theoretical studies, we’ll introduce you to the most recent, effective music therapy approaches. You’ll reflect on your own practice in our clinical supervision group discussions, supported by regular individual tutorials.

In the UK there are two central elements of music therapy: the use of improvised and pre-composed music; and the significance given to the relationship between client and therapist. These principles will underpin your training. Our experiential teaching includes: development of your improvisation skills; focused work on your first instrument; keyboard, single line instrument and voice; music therapy theory and links to practice; block clinical placements in at least two fields, including community settings, schools, hospitals and hospices; and experience in multidisciplinary teams.

Your training will take place in our new state-of-the-art Music Therapy Centre and Clinic, where you’ll often study with MA Dramatherapy students. All our students go on supervised clinical placements, preparing you for employment in many different settings.

Throughout the course you'll be supported by our team of qualified music therapists, who have a strong reputation for research. In 2013 we appointed Jörg Fachner as Professor of Music, Mind and the Brain, to further develop our research activities. One of our course tutors, Professor Amelia Oldfield, was recently awarded the first ever Clinical Impact Award by the World Federation of Music Therapists. And in 2014, our music, dramatherapy and performing arts research was acknowledged as 'world-leading' in the UK Government's Research Excellence Framework.

Teaching times: two days a week plus two days on a clinical placement (Year 1). One day a week on campus plus a placement of least one day a week (Year 2).

Careers

As a qualified music therapist you’ll be able to work in many different areas including the NHS, hospices, social services, the education sector and the voluntary sector. The NHS Agenda for Change has led to improved career paths for music therapists at levels similar to, or higher than, those of other allied health professions.

You may also choose to work privately, or on a freelance basis, with a client base including adults and children with learning difficulties, mental health problems, and other special needs.

Successful completion of this course will allow you to register with the Health and Care Professions Council, a legal requirement for music therapists in the UK. Your qualification should also be recognised around the world.

You’ll benefit from our links with the British Association for Music Therapy and other allied health professions; Professor Helen Odell-Miller, for example, advises at government level for the profession. You’ll also be able to forge links with practitioners such as psychotherapists, arts therapists and psychiatrists.

Modules

Year one:
• Music Therapy Practical and Clinical Skills
• Music Therapy and Dramatherapy Multi-Disciplinary Theoretical Studies
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (1)

Year two
• Clinical Placements and Experiential Development (2)
• MA Therapies Major Project

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your learning in a number of ways, including essays, live presentations and practical tasks such as clinical improvisation and composition. You’ll also undertake some self-analysis and reflection with your personal tutor.

Half-way through the course, your progress and process towards becoming a music therapist will be assessed by an examiner. Your final piece of written work will be a Major Project, which involves clinical evaluation. Meanwhile, in your final oral assessment you’ll present a piece of clinical work to two examiners, who will assess your overall clinical skills and readiness to practice.

One of our modules touches on dramatherapy and covers content from our MA Dramatherapy, as well as the Music Therapy course. Where techniques and approaches are specific to each profession you’ll be taught separately but on more generic subjects, such as psychoanalytic studies, psychiatry and psychology, you’ll benefit from working together.

Specialist facilities

You'll work in our new purpose-built therapy centre, which includes state-of-the-art therapy rooms and a large hall. The centre is used for all of our teaching and for our professional therapy consultations. We have a large range of musical instruments, specifically chosen for clinical work, and high-quality recording and videoing equipment in the therapy rooms.

You’ll also have access to the extensive range of facilities offered by the Department of Music and Performing Arts, including a fully-equipped drama studio, two other large drama rehearsal spaces, a recital hall, a suite of computer music studios and music practice rooms.

Our Cambridge campus also houses the Mumford Theatre, a full-size venue for professional touring companies.

Research

Our music therapy staff members are internationally renowned researchers and consultants and our research is recognised as world-leading. We hold regular international conferences and support a vigorous community of research students.

***This course has now reached full capacity for September 2016 but we are now accepting applications for September 2017***

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MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation. Read more
MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation.

This programme is enhanced by a group of internationally active sound artists, composers and field recordists who curate and participate in the activities of the SARU (Sonic Art Research Unit) and the annual festival Audiograft. The weekly Listening Group complements the core provision and introduces you to the vibrant research culture around Sound Arts.

You will develop individual and collaborative practice-based work in a stimulating environment that encourages dialogue and growth as part of a reflective community. This is a good basis for the intensive, fascinating and challenging work that thrives in this supportive, innovative and creative context.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers state-of-the-art technical facilities for Sound Arts and 24-hour studio access. This course is taught by leading Sound Arts practitioners creating ‘world-leading’ research as defined by the REF2014 (Research Excellence Framework). You will have access to expertise in sound art, field recording, electroacoustic composition, site-based practice, experimental composition and improvisation. Sound Arts is situated in an interdisicplinary context and you will work with students from Art & Design and Music.

The Sonic Art research Unit (SARU) and the annual ACE funded audiograft festival provide a stimulating environment for innovation and experimentation in your creative practice. Many of our Arts MA students progress to PhD study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include:
-Lectures and seminars held by staff on specialised topics.
-Team teaching in group seminars involving generic issues in research methodologies for practice based research.
-Feedback from staff during group feedback sessions, where staff make comments and provide you with constructive criticism and analysis of your work.
-Staff led group discussions arising out of your practical work presentations.
-Individual tutorials that address your individual research concerns.
-Specialised introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice based work.

Careers and professional development

Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practicing sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration.

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This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics. Read more
This course is primarily a research programme with taught elements. You can study a range of musicological and creative practice topics.

The MMus is a research Master's. It is 12 months full time or 24 months part time. This is a research programme, but there are some taught modules.

The MMus is an excellent foundation for students going on to a PhD. It is also a valuable qualification in its own right. For some the MMus adds a further dimension to their undergraduate degree, in a 3+1 model.

Your studies

The styles or repertories covered during your study can range across the full spectrum of early, classical, avant-garde, folk, popular and world music genres.

You can focus on creative musical practice, musicology, or a combination of the two. Use the elective projects to tailor your studies.

Careers

Studying music is both intellectually and musically demanding. You'll develop transferable skills to help you in your career, whatever you choose to do.

Transferrable skills
Studying music requires you to engage in a broad range of practical and intellectual activities. These include performance, composition, improvisation, analysis, research and critical intellectual enquiry. We foster teamwork and initiative through participation in music ensembles. You'll gain communication skills through performance, presentations and written work. Flexibility, self-discipline and good time management are all required to attain high technical standards. These skills are necessary to balance the demands of study, practice and performance.

Employability
Our graduates often become self-employed musicians, performers, composers, teachers, academics, music therapists, studio managers or sound engineers. Other opportunities include arts administration, music production, specialist magazine journalism, music librarianship or music publishing. The wide range of transferable skills music graduates develop means that you can easily move into any discipline. These include management, marketing, accountancy, law, events management, journalism and IT.

Careers resources
The University's award-winning Careers Service can help with planning for your future career from the day you arrive. They can help you even after you graduate from Newcastle. Read our Careers with a degree in Music publication. This will tell you more about:
-What a music degree is like
-How it prepares you for the world of work
-Our graduates who have pursued various roles

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MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. Read more
MA Acting is a challenging course that gives you a personal methodology based upon East 15’s unique practices. On one level it is a thoroughly practical, highly intensive, vocational course. On another level, it is a thought-provoking, life-changing reflection on the function and art of the actor – exploring techniques from some of Europe’s most influential practitioners as well as innovative professional practice from the UK and internationally.

Example structure

We offer dynamic and unique course for actors, directors, technical theatre specialists and students of theatre practice. Training at East 15 draws upon 50 years of tradition combined with a keen sense of the world of stage and screen today.

First Term
In the first term, there are classes in movement, voice and singing, as well as contextual studies. The entire programme of teaching across the course coheres to lead the actor from an exploration of personal self to that of the body in time and space and from there to the creation of character and the realisation of text.

Acting classes promote the development of intuitive, creative responses which are then framed by the introduction of techniques to build character and play actions. Showings of short naturalistic scenes give opportunity to integrate and apply technical voice and movement work in the context of an acting exercise.

Second Term
In the second term, skills classes continue. The acting work begins with an intensive Shakespeare module which develops and strengthens the integration of technical skills with acting technique. This is followed by the Research Performance Project in which you engage with specific time in history and experience East 15’s distinctive Living History Project.

This signature project is a non-performed improvisation in which the actor can, through rigorous ‘actor-centric’ research and a residential period away from the campus environment, experience and identify with the practical and visceral realities, as well as the psychological and emotional attributes of the character.

Subsequent to this you devise a studio performance based on your intellectual, emotional and sensory experience. You are also given responsibilities in stage management and production to enhance your overall understanding of what it is to make theatre and to prepare you for the realities of the industry.

Towards the end of term two participants begin to research and develop their MA project.

Third Term
The first part of Term Three focuses on media. The film project teaches skills of acting for the camera and provides material for the actor’s show reel. The radio drama project teaches radio skills and microphone technique and provides material usable in a voice reel. At the same time, you begin work on your MA Projects. The MA Projects involve working in small groups on self-generated projects, in which participants are given independence and autonomy as company members. These are performed in East 15’s Corbett Theatre or in other venues as appropriate.

The second half of term 3 sees a full production of a text-based play usually in our on-campus Corbett Theatre.

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The MA/MFA Advanced Theatre Practice is a well-established course aimed at drawing together those wishing to play a leading role in tomorrow’s new performance and theatre-making worlds. Read more

ABOUT MA/MFA ADVANCED THEATRE PRACTICE

The MA/MFA Advanced Theatre Practice is a well-established course aimed at drawing together those wishing to play a leading role in tomorrow’s new performance and theatre-making worlds. As participants in this course, students will be part of a carefully selected group wanting to pool their resources and imagine the theatre of the future.

At the start, students are likely to bring their existing knowledge and practical experience, for example, as a Performer, Designer, Visual Artist, Writer, Director, Musician, Puppeteer, or Dramaturg. Alternatively, students may have another body of knowledge and experience that they are keen to hone with others in the creation of new performance work.

Whatever their existing skills, participants will have a passion for innovation and company work, and be ready to challenge and extend specialist practice through collaboration with others. Students on this course may be performers with good physical and vocal skills, for example, wishing to extend their ability to create new work through contact with puppetry and object theatre, writers and directors. Or a student may be a dramaturg, wishing to develop academic knowledge with others in the rehearsal room; or a designer with experience in
lighting, sound, scenography, or visual media for performance wishing to work with colleagues in non-hierarchical situations.

Participants may bring knowledge and experience from other academic disciplines, such as science and mathematics, film and animation, anthropology, choreography, or composition, which they are keen to develop in an experimental theatre-making environment, through improvisation and play. While practical and research interests arise from particular disciplines, engagement with this course will be as a participant in an innovative collaborative laboratory for practical experiment.

ASSESSMENT

Practice is assessed throughout the first three terms through continuous assessment of contribution to the rehearsal/development process
combined with essays reflecting on this work in the broader context of contemporary theatre practice. Peer assessment also forms a part of the assessment process. The course will prepare students for the sustained independent project, where they will take a performance work that they have made with colleagues to a documented encounter with a public audience during the summer.

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Our Music MPhil programmes enable you to pursue advanced research in the areas of classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music through a range of approaches. Read more
Our Music MPhil programmes enable you to pursue advanced research in the areas of classical, popular, world, contemporary, early, folk and traditional music through a range of approaches. These include practice-based research, and musicological and theoretical inquiry.

Practice-based research focuses on composition, performance and improvisation. Areas of musicological and theoretical inquiry can include the following approaches:
-Cultural and critical
-Istoriographic
-Ethnomusicological
-Music analytical
-Philosophical and aesthetic

If you choose to engage in academic research you are normally assessed by a thesis of no more than 100,000 words for PhD and 50,000 words for MPhil, inclusive of notes, bibliography and appendices. If you choose to undertake practice-base research you will normally submit a portfolio (eg of scores, sound files, video files, other forms of documentation or some combination of these), supplemented by a related dissertation to explain the larger, practice-based component.

Applications are welcome from students with academic or practice-based research interests in any field of expertise among our staff. To view the areas that we are able to supervise please see the ICMuS Research Website, as well as individual staff pages.

You will join a wider community of fellow postgraduate students working in the International Centre for Music Studies (ICMuS), and more widely in the School of Arts and Cultures and Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. ICMuS also holds regular PhD/MPhil forums for students to discuss their research.

Delivery

These programmes are delivered on the Newcastle campus (with options for a period of study abroad). You will be assigned a principal supervisor, supported by a wider supervisory team of one or more additional supervisors. In the first year, you will complete the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Doctoral Research Training Programme. Beyond this, study is based on one to one tutorials with your supervisors, which can be flexibly scheduled. A blended approach of in-person and web-based supervision can also be negotiated for students studying remotely.

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Why Surrey?. Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

The Composition pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to develop your individual compositional style and technique through tutorial guidance and opportunities for performances, workshops and recordings.

Various stylistic and generic strands can be pursued individually or in combination, including jazz, music for screen and multimedia, contemporary music for the concert hall and computer sound design.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of composition-related options. Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and submit a composition folio.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Short-course opportunities

The School welcomes applications from students who wish to undertake one module of study from the Masters programme.

Selection process

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

Research

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA).

School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres. The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in-progress.

Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

Educational aims of the programme

The MMus (Composition) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music composition and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
  • Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
  • The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Frame research questions
  • Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
  • Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills

  • Produce stylistically original and technically professional compositions

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate subject knowledge clearly
  • Self-direction and autonomy
  • Originality in problem solving
  • Work in and manage groups
  • Efficient time management

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK. Read more

Why choose this course:

• This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK (ADMPUK), so you'll become a fully registered dance movement therapist with the ADMPUK

• You'll develop the skills you need to support the health and well-being of vulnerable people, so it's a really rewarding course to choose

• This course will give you dance movement psychotherapy training and a licence to practice, as well as giving you an academic qualification at masters level

• We will support you during your placement to make sure that you're ready for your career in dance movement psychotherapy when you graduate

• You will be given the opportunity to undertake CPD training in Zero Balancing body work. This concerns the cultivation of sensitivity to the structure and energy of the body.

About the course:

The programme gives you solid experience of clinical dance movement therapy practice, supervision and work in education, as well as further closed group work. The main emphasis is on your work in a clinical environment and using creative skills to explore self-expression. You will be allocated a personal tutor who'll be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as taught components, you'll be required to engage in personal therapy as this is a requirement for professional registration. This is a private arrangement and the cost is not included in the fees. Individual or group therapy is acceptable.

This course is accredited by the Association for Dance Movement Psychotherapy UK, so you can be confident that you'll be learning the most up to date thinking on dance movement psychotherapy.

During the course you'll build up your experience of clinical dance movement therapy, and use your creative skills to explore self-expression.

It's important to understand the history of dance movement psychotherapy from the early pioneers through to the current thinking. You'll cover concepts such as the theory and practice of the art form and the importance of improvisation, creativity and play. You'll also use and reflect on psychotherapeutic theory, while considering the implications for placement and practice. Because anatomy and physiology are essential to your understanding of movement and its relevance for psychotherapy, you'll also explore this during the course.

We've excellent facilities including our new dance studio, and have close links with Déda, the Derby dance centre.

You'll be allocated a personal tutor who will be responsible for monitoring your overall progress. As well as the taught components, you'll need to take part in personal therapy throughout the course, which can be individual or group therapy, because this is a requirement for professional registration as a dance movement psychotherapist.

You'll need to undertake health screening at the start of the course to monitor your fitness to practice.

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This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council for its high quality. After successful completion of this course you'll be able to apply through the Health and Care Professions Council or professional registration as a dramatherapist. Read more

Why choose this course:

• This course is accredited by the Health and Care Professions Council for its high quality

• After successful completion of this course you'll be able to apply through the Health and Care Professions Council or professional registration as a dramatherapist. You will also be able to register as a full member of the British Association of Dramatherapists, the UK's professional organisation for art therapists

• Focusing on the use of theatre in the therapeutic process, you'll explore the role of improvisation and the need to adapt therapeutic interventions to individual client needs

• You'll develop skills in assessing the impact of your own values and beliefs on your practice and the impact this may have on your clients and patients

• We have our own playback theatre company, specific to this Dramatherapy programme, which utilises your improvisational skills to develop the audiences' stories. Previous students have performed at festivals, conferences and university events.

About the course:

This full time course is made up of three phases - PG Cert, PG Dip and MA. You will need to come in to the University one day each week, and spend up to two days each week in your clinical placement.

You will learn how to develop, appraise and apply different theatrical models and Dramatherapy approaches in your studio work, and explore how you can apply these therapeutically to different client groups.

In your clinical placements you will have the opportunity to apply your theoretical knowledge and practical skills in a clinical setting. You will be supervised by a Dramatherapist from the University, who will help you to consider and reflect upon the work you do in your placement.

Throughout this course you will be encouraged to reflect and consider the impact and consequences of your interventions.

You will be required to undertake a total of 72 sessions of personal therapy, as stipulated by the British Association of Dramatherapists (BADth), for the duration of the training. The cost of therapy will be covered by yourself, this is in addition to the standard course fees.

When you have successfully completed all elements of this course and the personal therapy sessions, you are eligible to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a Dramatherapist. HCPC are the regulatory body.

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We're proud to have been awarded The Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2015 for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. Read more

We're proud to have been awarded The Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2015 for ‘world-leading work to promote, produce and present contemporary music to an international audience'. This represents one of the most coveted distinctions in UK Higher Education.

We have a thriving community of postgraduate musicians who receive regular individual tuition from staff who are recognised nationally and internationally in their chosen specialisms, and by a team of part-time instrumental and vocal teachers from regional and national orchestras, many of whom are distinguished solo performers.

You’ll have many opportunities to perform by taking part in directed ensembles, amongst which are the Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, Big Band, Symphonic Wind Orchestra, Brass Band, Choir, Chamber Choir, Opera Group, New Music Ensemble, Early Music Ensemble, Folk Group, Samba Band, Blues Group, Improvisation Group, and A Cappella Choir, as well as various chamber music ensembles.

Our Live Music at the University of Huddersfield series features a range of weekly student concerts, as well as recitals and masterclasses by guest artists. Recent visitors have included Emma Kirkby (voice), Garth Knox (viola), Anton Lyakhovsky (piano), Neil Heyde (cello), Richard Haynes (clarinet), Jah Wobble (pop ensembles), Lore Lixenberg (voice), John Scott Whiteley (organ), Claude Delangle and Snake Davis (saxophone), Ensemble 360,vocal ensemble EXAUDI, and the instrumental group ELISION.



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