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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

This programme is designed for those who want to understand global processes and development, and for those who want to work on, or analyse, development related tasks and issues. It is also highly relevant to anyone working, or intending to work, in development advocacy, policy making, and global development policy analysis, in the NGO sector, government agencies, and international development organisations.

We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, but we also welcome students who have worked in the area of development, or in a related field.

This exciting programme offers a critical examination of the contemporary process of globalisation and how it influences the developing world, both before and after the ongoing global crisis. The MSc Globalisation and Development blends, in equal measure, critical analysis of mainstream thinking, alternative theories and practices, and case studies of political, social and cultural aspects of globalisation and development.

This degree draws its strength from the unrivalled expertise at SOAS in development problems and processes. The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in how globalisation influences the developing world, and how the poor majority responds to these challenges.

Highlights include:

- Critical and historical approaches to globalisation and their relationship to neoliberalism, imperialism and US global hegemony.

- Contemporary globalising processes – capital flows, state-market relations, transnational corporations, global commodity chains, inequality and poverty on a global scale.

- Transformation of work in the age of globalisation – new types of work, informalisation and precarisation, labour migration, agrarian change and gender relations.

- Globalisation and imperialism – post-Cold War imperial and civil wars, global and regional challengers to US hegemony: China and Russia.

- Globalisation, democracy and culture – human rights, democratisation, cosmopolitanism, standardisation, homogenisation.

- Alternatives to neoliberal globalisation – global labour movement, transnational social movements and NGOs, environmental issues.

Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see 'Structure' for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Globalisation and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying optional modules to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 76kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscglobdev/file101725.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Globalisation and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions. An MSc in Globalisation and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years. Read more
Everything we do is aimed at helping you to appreciate the approaches and methods used by historians, and developing your knowledge of historical trends, processes and events over the past 300 years.

You will have the opportunity to explore a range of social and cultural developments in the history of Britain, Europe and the wider world. Throughout your study, you will work in small groups or individually, guided by your expert teaching team. Their historical research in areas such as urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement, is of an international standing and will feed into your learning.

Our teaching will give you the platform to reflect on historical interpretations of the past and conduct your own independent historical research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/socialhistory_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will develop a range of transferable skills valued by employers in areas such as teaching, local government, administration, management, the civil service, marketing, public relations and the non-profit sector. Your course will also provide you with an excellent grounding should you want to pursue further postgraduate study.

- Teacher
- Historical Researcher
- Lecturer
- Journalist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will work in small groups or individually with research-active historians throughout your period of study. Our history team has strengths in many areas and you will benefit from their expertise in urban history, the history of crime, environmental history, imperialism, sexuality and gender, migration, popular culture and social movement history.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
This is an introduction to research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history through the theme of war. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how World War Two has been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.

Underworlds: Representations of Crime, Police & the Criminal c.1700 to c.1945
You will study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.

Sexuality, Gender & Popular Culture in Britain 1918-1970
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You will explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.

Organised Crime in the Modern World: Global Criminal Cultures
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You will study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.

European Cities: Making Urban Landscapes & Cultures since c.1945
You will examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration, 1768-1996
This is an opportunity to consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs and ethnographic studies. You will learn how travel, tourism and exploration has evolved - influenced by innovations in transport, health and media, public tastes, colonial policies and racial attitudes.

A Cultural Revolution? The Sixties in Comparative Perspective
Focusing on cultural, social and political elements of the 'long 1960s' (1958-1975), you will study a wide variety of political movements, social changes and cultural forms - such as music, film, TV, theatre and literature - looking at the United States, Britain and Western Europe, and the wider world.

Dissertation
You will undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources.You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Many of the interconnected, global and political processes in the contemporary world stem from the legacies of imperialism and colonialism. Read more
Many of the interconnected, global and political processes in the contemporary world stem from the legacies of imperialism and colonialism. This innovative MA provides global, imperial and postcolonial perspectives on the making of the modern world.

This programme analyses the forces of globalisation, the global trajectory and dissemination of ideas, the relationship of knowledge to power, and the history of resistance to imperial expansion. It takes an expansive approach to the global history of ideas by examining representations, images, power, and cultural encounters. You will be taught by some of the foremost experts in their respective fields. The MA has particular, but not exclusive focus on South Asian, African and British Imperial history and cultures.

This programme is ideal for anybody wanting a career with an international aspect, entering fields such as journalism, the civil service, international NGOs and business. Its rigorous intellectual approach will be of particular benefit to those planning to pursue doctoral work, preparatory to an academic career.

The range of topics you will be able to pursue include:

• British Imperial Culture and Identity
• Cultures of Resistance
• Race in Global Perspective
• Colonial Power and Indigenous Knowledge
• Religion and Imperialism
• Anti-colonial Nationalism
• Cross-cultural Encounters

This programme:

• Is interdisciplinary in nature
• Taught by world renowned academics, including Professor Sir Christopher Bayly
• Has an extensive range of module choices

Why study Global and Imperial History at Queen Mary?

The School of History offers a wide range of postgraduate programmes and has a world-class research base. Our high-quality teaching is inspired and informed by our research, and carried out in an atmosphere conducive to learning. Our academic staff have outstanding research reputations and include six Fellows of the British Academy, the former President of the Royal Historical Society and two recipients of the French distinction of the Ordre des Palmes Académiques.

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With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. Read more
With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. A central theme is the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe and related issues in the fields of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies/political

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in American Studies or related area
You are required to have a Dutch Bachelor's degree (or equivalent, from a research university) in American Studies or a Bachelor's degree in English Language & Culture with a specialisation in American Studies. If you have specialised in English you can apply if you had at least 40EC in courses related to American Studies. If you have a different academic background, you will need to have achieved 60 EC in courses related to American Studies.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the program, you need to have a sufficient level of English. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following
- A TOEFL score of at least 600 (paper-based), 250 (computer-based), 100 (internet-based);
- An IELTS score of at least 7.0;
- A Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of B or higher.

Career prospects

There is a wide range of opportunities for graduates from the Master's program in North American Studies. Your broad interdisciplinary education and excellent command of English will help you find a job in an international setting. You could work in school or university education, in research, in journalism or other media, in publishing, museums, international finance, government, business, international affairs or as a diplomat.

Our approach to this field

With the so-called ‘transnational turn', American Studies increasingly looks across and beyond national borders. In this program, you will explore the politics, culture and society of the United States, both within and outside the national borders. A central theme is the exchange of cultural and political ideas between North America and Europe and related issues in the fields of Americanisation, globalisation, cultural mobility and political and cultural imperialism.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/americanstudies/political

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This MA offers an unusually wide-ranging exploration of the cultural manifestations of colonial conquest, national identities, anti-colonial resistance and post-colonial struggles. Read more
This MA offers an unusually wide-ranging exploration of the cultural manifestations of colonial conquest, national identities, anti-colonial resistance and post-colonial struggles.

You will have the opportunity to study these interconnected experiences from the beginnings of European imperialism to the present day. The MA recognises both disciplinary and interdisciplinary dimensions of the field; all of the modules involve questions of culture, history, and politics, but some modules focus on a particular discipline.

The range of modules allows for a comparative understanding of different forms of imperial rule, and it encourages a comparative approach to African, Asian, Irish, Middle Eastern and Pacific responses to the experience of colonisation. You will also be able to explore the transnational elements of cultural production and reception.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of approximately 4,500 words each
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. Read more

About the course

This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. As well as specific research training in history, you’ll also gain a broad range of transferable skills that will be of value to employers outside academia.

If you’re already focused on taking a PhD in history, this intensive course improves your chances of getting funding from the AHRC, ESRC and others.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Dissertation; Research Presentation and a choice of research skills modules including Research Skills for Historians; Directed Reading; Palaeography; Latin and modern languages.

Examples of optional modules

Order and Disorder Around theYear 1000; Prisoners of War in the Twentieth Century; Crime and Punishment in Late Antiquity; City Life in Jacksonian America, 1828-1850; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Cold War Histories; Debating Cultural Imperialism in the Nineteenth-Century British Empire; Stories of Activism, 1960 to the Present.

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At the core of this programme lies the design, research and composition of a dissertation (maximum length 40,000 words). You meet regularly with your supervisor/s and other members of the department to review your progress. Read more
At the core of this programme lies the design, research and composition of a dissertation (maximum length 40,000 words). You meet regularly with your supervisor/s and other members of the department to review your progress. Alongside the research project, you are expected to follow the Warwick Historical Research Core module, Theory, Skill and Method.

Research areas include, by period

Renaissance; Early Modern; and Modern

By geographical region

Africa; North, Central and South America; the Caribbean; Britain and Continental Europe; and Asia
(with a particular focus on South Asia and China)

By theme

Race, Ethnicity and Slavery; Popular and Political Protest; History of Religion; Gender and Family History; 18th-Century Studies; Technology; Cultures and Practices of Health and the History of Medicine; Global History; Visual and Material Culture; Luxury; Histories of Violence; Empires and imperialism.

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The MSc Empires, Colonialism and Globalisation focuses on the phenomenon of imperialism and related issues, including technologies and ideologies of empire, notions of race, ethnicity and gender, economic development and underdevelopment, and trans-regional flows and interactions. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Empires, Colonialism and Globalisation focuses on the phenomenon of imperialism and related issues, including technologies and ideologies of empire, notions of race, ethnicity and gender, economic development and underdevelopment, and trans-regional flows and interactions.

You will take a compulsory course designed to provide you with knowledge of the history and historiography of empires since the fifteenth century, and their legacy for our world today. This will be complemented by a wide range of specialist options from the Departments of International Development, Government, Economic History, International History and Geography, as well as the European Institute and the Gender Institute. You will engage at an advanced level with the latest academic research in the field, and undertake your own term papers and a research-based dissertation.

Graduate destinations

Students develop highly transferable skills valued by employers and go on to work in the foreign service, the EU, political think tanks, risk assessment, journalism, the NGO sector, or stay on to take a research degree.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Modern History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Modern History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Modern History is designed for students who are particularly interested in the study of the modern period and the emergence of the characteristics of modernity from the pre-modern world.

Key Features of MA in Modern History

The expertise of Swansea’s modern historians encompasses Welsh, British, European and global history, with specialisms in economic and industrial history, questions of identity and nationality, imperialism, medicine, politics, sexuality, and sport.

Swansea has a long history of excellence in the study of modern history, and many students who have completed their MA successfully have also studied for their doctorate here.

Students on the MA in Modern History course will benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Modern History course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study for the MA in Modern History is available.

MA in Modern History Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to modern history.
- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of modern history.
- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA Modern History course typically include:

• Historical Methods and Approaches
• New Departures in the Writing of History
• Communicating History
• Fascism and Culture
• From Princely Possessions to Public Museums: A History of Collecting and Display
• Power, Conflict, and Society in the Modern World
• Venice and the Sea
• Directed Reading in History

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Modern History from a history or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to modern history.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Modern History graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.

Research Interests

All staff in the Department of History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise.
Our researchers are involved with the Arts and Humanities research centres: the Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power and Empire and the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these Centres and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

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This course focuses on the key theories of global economics and international relations, and aims to develop the professional skills that many employers expect when hiring political and economic analysts. Read more
This course focuses on the key theories of global economics and international relations, and aims to develop the professional skills that many employers expect when hiring political and economic analysts. It will enable you to develop an advanced understanding of the close interaction between economics and politics on the world stage.

Key features
-You will be fully supported in developing postgraduate academic skills and preparing your dissertation, which allows you to research an area of particular interest in greater depth.
-Alongside your academic studies, you will gain skills in problem-solving and organisation; data collation, review and synopsis; communication (oral, written and electronic); time management; computing; and co-operation and teamwork.
-You can take part in an active interchange of policy ideas with research-active staff and visiting speakers through seminars organised by the Political Economy Research Group.

What will you study?

You will gain a thorough grounding in the main issues and theories that shape relations in the international economic system. You will also take modules that outline the main institutions and factors that influence global economic and political governance. At the same time, significant attention is given to your career development skills. There is a strong emphasis on developing research and analytical writing skills. Your dissertation will allow you to develop an area of particular interest in greater depth.

Assessment

Coursework assignments, including essays and reports, plus dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-International Political Economy: Capitalism, Imperialism and the State
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-Dissertation
-Economics Dissertation

Optional modules
-Economic Change and Ideas
-Financialisation, Globalisation and Economic Policy
-From State to Global Politics
-Political Economy: Effective Demand, Exploitation and Crisis
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations

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This unique course covers the theory and history of international conflict and of intra- and inter-state disputes in the contemporary international system. Read more
This unique course covers the theory and history of international conflict and of intra- and inter-state disputes in the contemporary international system. It draws on subjects such as international relations, politics, economics, sociology and history. The course will enable you to examine and analyse the issues and dynamics that shape and influence conflict in the modern world, as well as explore the tools to manage and resolve it.

Key features
-The case studies, backed up by the theoretical and historical foundations taught in this course, bridge the gap between traditional international relations courses - the rationale of which is based on institutional and/or statist approaches - and those that specialise in conflict management and resolution.
-Kingston University is established as one of the leading centres of expertise on conflict, conflict dynamics and processes of conflict management and resolution. You will be taught by highly acclaimed academics and experts, including presentations by leading figures from politics, the media and international organisations.
-Our year-long (30-credit) modules provide increased contact time with academic staff. You will also be fully supported in preparing your dissertation, in which you will research an area of interest in depth.
-Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations contributing to the debate.

What will you study?

You will look at the theory and history behind international conflict at all levels of interaction, from the interpersonal to the international. You will also examine how conflict manifests itself in the contemporary international system, and the techniques available to manage and resolve violent disputes. In addition, you will explore key questions, such as the role of religion and gender in conflict, weapons proliferation, the function of outside actors, and the effects of conflict on civilians. You will apply your skills in a piece of original research of 12,000-15,000 words.

Assessment

Seminar presentations, essays, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Dissertation
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal

Optional modules
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-International Political Economy: Capitalism, Imperialism and the State
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations

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This course aims to provide an understanding of the forces of global politics and to develop the skills needed to actively engage in the academic and professional discussions that are shaping the contemporary international agenda. Read more
This course aims to provide an understanding of the forces of global politics and to develop the skills needed to actively engage in the academic and professional discussions that are shaping the contemporary international agenda. With a particular focus on human rights and international conflict, it strikes a careful balance between the theoretical and practical elements of the study of international relations.

Key features
-The course draws extensively on the highly acclaimed academics and experts of human rights and international conflict teaching from within the University.
-You can specialise in the subfields of international political economy, conflict or security and human rights. The wide choice of option modules enables you to tailor the course to your interests.
-Our year-long (30-credit) modules provide increased contact time with academic staff. In addition, you will be fully supported in developing postgraduate academic skills and preparing your dissertation, which allows you to research an area of interest in depth.
-Lively discussion is encouraged, with visiting speakers, leading academics and figures from human rights and international organisations.

What will you study?

You will explore the development of international relations and the key ideas that have shaped our understanding of the modern system. You will learn about actors and institutions such as the United Nations, the United States and the European Union, and you will study theoretical and policy debates concerning globalisation and underdevelopment.

You will investigate a country's financial flows, trade and investment, and will have the opportunity to take an in-depth look at issues of human rights and international conflict. Your dissertation will enable you to study an area of interest in depth. Alternatively, you can pursue an applied research project based on your work placement.

Assessment

Seminar presentation, essay or equivalent study, and dissertation/applied research project.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Dissertation
-Research Skills and Dissertation/Project Proposal
-The Theory and Practice of International Relations

Optional modules
-Conflict Theory and Resolution
-Contemporary Issues and Case Studies in Security and Conflict
-Crime, Harm and Justice
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-From State to Global Politics
-Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity
-Human Rights: Architectures, Actors, Activism
-International Political Economy: Capitalism, Imperialism and the State
-Strategies for Achieving Human Rights
-Terrorism, Political Violence and Human Rights

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The History of Art MA at UCL draws on the world-leading research and teaching expertise within the department, and is designed to enable students to acquire specialised knowledge pertaining to the field of art history and to develop independent research skills. Read more
The History of Art MA at UCL draws on the world-leading research and teaching expertise within the department, and is designed to enable students to acquire specialised knowledge pertaining to the field of art history and to develop independent research skills.

Degree information

Students develop skills for engaging with visual materials and gain historical knowledge, enabling them to interpret artefacts in relation to their social and cultural contexts. They are introduced to current methodological debates in the field and encouraged to define their own position through reasoned historical and theoretical arguments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of a core module (30 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Methods, Debates and Sources in History of Art

Optional modules - options may include the following:
-Human and Non-Human in Medieval Art
-Cannibalism and the Early Modern Image
-Vision, Tourism, Imperialism: Art and Travel in the British Empire, 1760-1870
-American Media: Publicity and the Logics of Surveillance
-Politics of the Image: Germany 1890-1945
-Art as Theory: The Writing of Art
-Art and Technology in Nineteenth-Century France
-Photographic Cultures: Photography's Publics and the Production of Politics
-On Sex and Violence
-Race/Place: Exotic/Erotic
-Tracing the Body: Technologies of Representation in 18th and 19th-Century France

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 13,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, as well as gallery and museum visits. Assessment is by two essays for each of the taught courses (six essays in all), the dissertation and a viva.

Careers

UCL's History of Art graduates have a excellent record of success in entering PhD programmes, careers in museums and galleries, the art trade, the heritage industry, art publishing, and art conservation. The unique combination of visual analysis and intellectual rigour offered by the MA has also proven valuable in diverse careers including journalism, publishing, and advertising. For those aspiring to an academic career, the MA is a requirement for a PhD, and many former MA students have sucessfully received funding for research degrees, and subsequently obtained academic positions, at prestigious institutions in the UK, North America, and elsewhere.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Artist Assistant, Ai Weiwei
-Head of Client Service, Bonhams 1793
-Collections Assistant, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
-PhD History of Art, University College London (UCL)
-Museum Intern, Peggy Guggenheim Collection

Employability
Our History of Art MA provides focused training in the history of art and its methodologies. It encourages students to develop original critical thinking on all aspects of visual culture, and promotes a serious engagement with historical and contemporary cultural debates. You will learn how to work collaboratively as well as independently to develop your skills in written and oral communications. The MA is an excellent starting point for a career in academia, curating, for working in the heritage industry, commercial art galleries, and other sectors of the cultural industries.

Why study this degree at UCL?

History of Art at UCL is one of the most dynamic centres for the study of art history and visual cultures in the world. The department is top-rated for research; and all staff are active researchers in a range of specialist fields. Our teaching and research move beyond traditional forms of art history to address visual and material cultures more broadly, and we are committed to a wide range of critical and historiographical enquiry.

The MA in History of Art is a challenging and versatile degree; you will study in a community of c. 40 graduate students; at the same time you will work in smaller groups and in close contact with tutors in your special subject courses.

The department is located in Bloomsbury, close to the Warburg Institute, the British Library, and the British Museum. The National Gallery, Tate Galleries, and the Victoria and Albert Museum are also within easy reach. UCL's own Art Museum holds many rare and important works.

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