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Masters Degrees (Immuno)

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If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017. Read more
If you’re an international fee-paying student you could be eligible for a £3,000 discount when you start your course in January 2017.
http://www.shu.ac.uk/VCAwardJanuary2017

This course is suitable if you:
-Wish to pursue research into molecular and cell biology or disease mechanisms at PhD level.
-Want to improve your knowledge and skills to be competitive in the life science jobs market.
-Are currently employed and seeking to improve your career prospects.

Most of your practical work is carried out in our teaching laboratories which contain industry standard equipment for cell culture, quantitative nucleic acid and protein analysis and a sophisticated suite of analytical equipment such as HPLC and gas chromatography. In addition many of our research facilities such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and mass spectrometry are used in taught modules and research projects and our tutors are experts in these techniques.

You gain:
-A detailed and up-to-date understanding of molecular biology and cell biology.
-Knowledge of how alterations or defects in cellular processes may lead to disease, such as cellular dysfunction leading to degenerative diseases, cell cycle dys-regulation in cancer, and how mutations result in genetic diseases.
-Hands-on expertise in the latest techniques including cell culture, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, immuno-histochemistry and recombinant DNA technology.
-Professional skills to further your career in research or the life science industry.

The teaching on the course is split between formal lectures and tutorials, and laboratory-based work. A third of the course is a laboratory-based research project, where students are assigned to a tutor who is an active researcher in the biomedical research centre. Typically, taught modules have a mixture of lectures and tutorials and involve a significant amount of laboratory time. Other modules are tutorial-led with considerable input from the course leader who acts as personal tutor.

Tutors complete research within the Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre into cancer, musculoskeletal diseases, human reproduction, neurological disease, medical microbiology and immunological basis of disease. Their work is regularly published in international peer-reviewed journals, showing that the course is underpinned by relevant quality research.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/mscpgdippgcert-molecular-and-cell-biology

Course structure

Full time – 14 months to Masters. Part time – typically 2 years to Masters. The diploma and certificate are shorter. Starts September and January.

The Masters (MSc) award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.
The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.
The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) is achieved by successfully completing 120 credits.

Core modules
-Biomedical laboratory techniques (15 credits)
-Cell biology (15 credits)
-Cellular and molecular basis of disease (15 credits)
-Molecular biology (15 credits)
-Professional development (15 credits)
-Research methods and statistics (15 credits)
-Research project (60 credits)

Options (two from)
-Applied biomedical techniques (15 credits)
-Cellular and molecular basis of cancer (15 credits)
-Molecular biotechnology (15 credits)

Assessment
Assessment methods include written examinations and coursework including: problem-solving exercises; case studies; reports from practical work. Research project assessment includes a written report and viva voce.

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The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Read more
The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whilst these treatment have served well and new drugs will continue to be designed, clinical trials over the last five years have shown that boosting the body’s immune system, whose main task is to deal with invading pathogens, can help our immune system to destroy tumour cells. Many of the new immunotherapies may be tested in combination with more conventional treatments or tested alone, but investigators and oncologists now believe immunotherapy, initially combined with pharmacological treatments, will soon provide curative therapies and certainly give many patients a new lease of life.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of the Cancer Immunotherapy MSc are to:
-Provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data
-Deliver a programme of advanced study to equip students for a future career in anti-cancer drug and immunotherapy development
-Cover new areas in immunotherapy (some of which may enhance existing pharmacological therapies including: History of immunotherapy and review of immune system; Monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and prevention; DNA vaccines against cancer; Adoptive T cell therapy; Dendritic cell vaccines; Antibodies that stimulate immunity; Adjuvant development for vaccines; Epigenetics and cancer: improving immunotherapy; Immuno-chemotherapy: integration of therapies; Exosomes and Microvesicles (EMVs) in cancer therapy and diagnosis; Dendritic cell vaccine development and Pox virus cancer vaccine vectors; Microbial causes of cancer and vaccination

Students will have access to highly qualified researchers and teachers in pharmacology and immunology, including those at the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Centre. Skills gained from research projects are therefore likely to be highly marketable in industry, academia and in the NHS. Students will be encouraged to join the British Society of Immunology and the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Immunotherapy (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will have many opportunities to work in industry. There are established industries working hard to develop cancer immunotherapies including Bristol-Myers Squibbs, MERCK, AstraZeneca and Roche. There are also an innumerate number of start-up companies appearing including Omnis Pharma, UNUM Therapeutics and Alpine Immune Sciences.

Students will also have ample opportunity for future postgraduate study either within the School of Human Sciences and the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Centre at the MPhil/PhD level or beyond, even with some of our research partners within the UK, Europe and beyond.

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The Department of Immunology provides a common forum for investigators in many areas of the University of Toronto and an interdisciplinary research experience in immunology. Read more
The Department of Immunology provides a common forum for investigators in many areas of the University of Toronto and an interdisciplinary research experience in immunology. Members and students in the department are located at the Medical Sciences Building; the Ontario Cancer Institute; and the research institutes of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto Western Ho​spital, the Hospital for Sick Children, and Sunnybrook Hospital.

The Master of Science degree program is offered in two distinct fields of study: Applied Immunology and Fundamental Immunology. The Doctor of Philosophy degree program is offered in Fundamental Immunology.

These degrees cover a wide range of immunological sub-disciplines including molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte development and selection, T-cell and B-cell receptors, cell interactions, growth factor receptors, cytokine networks, antigen processing and presentation, signal transduction in lymphocytes, V(D)J recombination, anergy, apoptosis, transgenic and knock-out models, immuno-targeting and vaccine design, autoimmunity, AIDS, diabetes, and transplantation.

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