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This intensively taught programme is designed for artist filmmakers who want to develop their practice and their professional networks to a level that enables them to work within the art and film worlds. Read more

This intensively taught programme is designed for artist filmmakers who want to develop their practice and their professional networks to a level that enables them to work within the art and film worlds.

This course is a twelve-month, intensively taught practice-based MA aimed at graduates and/or artists working within the field of moving image who wish to achieve a professional level in their practice with the support of an Art Department that has an exceptionally high concentration of accomplished artist filmmakers.

The programme is centred around the individual experience and knowledge that each student brings to the programme toward developing them as highly reflective and committed practitioners, as artist filmmakers who want to innovate in the expanding field of moving image within the context of artists’ film production, exhibition, reception and distribution.

The programme aims to enhance students’ professional potential by subjecting the process of thinking about, making, and exhibiting moving image works to critical scrutiny, reflection and discussion. Applicants apply with a proposal for a moving image project to ensure that they are suitably equipped to benefit from a focused, practice-based, student-centred curriculum.

Students are encouraged and supported to develop their own areas of interest and research through their primary project and dissertation, the development of which is supported through one-to-one tutorials with core staff and guest lecturers, as well as through seminars, lectures, screenings, study visits and a professional development programme that includes mentoring, master classes and workshops with leading professionals and affiliated organisations from within the international field of artists’ film and moving image.

Modules & structure

How The Programme Is Structured

There is one route for successful completion of the MA Artists’ Film & Moving Image programme: one full time calendar year.

Students accepted onto the programme will already have outlined their key interests in their project proposal. It is from this starting point that you will be supported in developing your project through various teaching modes, including tutorials, seminar presentations, research skills training, workshops, mentoring and master classes with relevant professionals, which continue across the three terms of the programme.

Teaching is largely constituted of student-centred learning, guided independent research and studio practice, taking place across the Autumn, Spring and Summer terms leading to a final degree exhibition in July. The remainder of the summer is meant for completion of the dissertation, which is submitted at the end of August.

The programme has three core summative modules that run simultaneously. All parts of the programme are mandatory. There are no optional modules on the programme.

Modules:

What You Will Be Expected to Achieve

You will be expected to complete a significant moving image project over the duration of the programme, which will be exhibited in a Final Degree Exhibition, alongside a Research Portfolio and a Dissertation. By working on and realising these three achievements you will develop a unique combination of practical, cognitive and analytical skills that will enable you to critically and constructively analyse your own practice in relation to a wider historical and contemporary context, and act upon this understanding through your practice and writing.

You will be expected to integrate the various taught elements across the modules on the programme toward working independently to develop your project, and to engage with the opportunities afforded by the programme to develop your professional practice as artist filmmakers.

You will develop a body of historical and theoretical knowledge that enables you to think and write critically about contemporary artists' film, exhibition strategies, distribution networks and its social and cultural contexts.

Assessment

Students will be assessed by project presentations leading to three examination elements: Research Portfolio, Final Degree Exhibition, and Dissertation. All three elements must be passed to successfully complete the programme.

The degree of MA Artists’ Film & Moving Image is awarded to students who have successfully passed all three elements of assessment.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills & careers

The MA Artists’ Film & Moving Image is designed to provide you with an understanding and experience of artists’ moving image practice that has a breadth of outcomes and a variety of transferable skills in the knowledge that the professional field demands creative and practical flexibility.

Students completing the programme should be able to establish themselves as practitioners of significance in the field of contemporary art, film and moving image and related professions, including: independent artist filmmakers, academics, teachers, curators, writers, critics, as well as institutional and independent innovators.

Throughout the duration of the programme you will be introduced to and work alongside leading professionals from within the field of Artists’ Film, through workshops, seminars and one-to-one meetings. This will contribute to your establishing your own professional network, as well as providing significant experience and understanding of the processes of production, display and distribution of artists’ film and moving image.

The Department of Art has a long and continuing record of alumni establishing professional careers and achieving considerable success in the field, including nominations to and winners of the Derek Jarman Award, the Turner Prize and the Oscars, alongside and in addition to alumni who show their work internationally at museums, public and commercial galleries, as well as on national television, international film festivals and biennales.



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MRes Art. Moving Image focuses on the history, theory and practice of contemporary artist moving image. The programme is dedicated to the development of new discourses within an expanded field of practice, encompassing artists, curators, writers and scholars. Read more

Introduction

MRes Art: Moving Image focuses on the history, theory and practice of contemporary artist moving image. The programme is dedicated to the development of new discourses within an expanded field of practice, encompassing artists, curators, writers and scholars. As a collaboration delivered in association with LUX, the programme offers a critical engagement with, and the professional development of, ideas around artists' moving image, in terms of exhibition, distribution, publishing, education, and research.

Content

MRes Art allows you to address a specialist area of fine art research and to explore the relationships between your chosen specialism and the broader fine art community in the context of our Fine Art Programme.

Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating MA Fine Art, MA Art and Science, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

In its extended full-time mode MRes Art gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

MRes Art prepares you to work particularly in the academic and research contexts of professional environments, to undertake PhD study, or pursue independent research. The course benefits from links with relevant professional and academic organisations in London and internationally and from the varied expertise of its research staff.

The three pathways provide a focus for your study while also enabling you to explore shared ground and questions of disciplinary territories and boundaries.

MRes Art: Moving Image is the first course of its kind. Founded on a strong link with LUX, a key UK agency (based in London) for the support and promotion of artists' moving image practice, the pathway provides an opportunity to focus on theoretical and historical study of artists' moving image. Despite artists' moving image being one of the most visible and fastest growing contexts for visual arts practice, there is no existing centre of scholarship in this area and, at this time, practice runs far ahead of discourse. While huge amounts of work are being made and shown, the specific language to describe and respond to it critically remains underdeveloped.

MRes Art: Moving Image develops in-depth knowledge and exploration of artists' moving image as an evolving and discursive field of study. The postgraduate course presents an integrated series of screenings, seminars and set readings of key works, which together address a range of theoretical positions and historical contexts.

Structure

MRes Art: Moving Image lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode.'

MRes Art: Moving Image is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises four units:

Unit 1 (40 credits) and Unit 2 (20 credits) run concurrently and last 15 weeks.
Unit 3 (40 credits) follows after the completion of Units 1 and 2 and runs for a further 15 weeks up to the end of year one.
Unit 4 (80 credits) runs for 45 weeks, concurrently with Unit 3 to the end of year one, and then continuing to the end of year two.

All four units must be passed in order to achieve the MRes but the classification of the award of MRes is derived from the marks for units 3 and 4 only.

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Image appreciation is becoming a more significant feature of healthcare practice across a wide range of roles. This postgraduate certificate course is open to radiographers and a wide range of other healthcare professionals. Read more
Image appreciation is becoming a more significant feature of healthcare practice across a wide range of roles. This postgraduate certificate course is open to radiographers and a wide range of other healthcare professionals. It offers the opportunity to develop knowledge and expertise to enable qualified healthcare professionals to carry out clinical image appreciation, acting as autonomous professionals, and use the results in the overall management of the patient. The skills obtained are transferable to all NHS Trusts and are recognised overseas.

The course aims to equip you to meet the ever-changing needs of this fast-developing sector, and much of the course content is delivered by experienced radiologists and clinical specialists. You will also have ample opportunity to work in clinical settings with plenty of hands-on experience.

Throughout your studies, you will be immersed in all aspects of radiography practice (both practical and theoretical) that will help you gain invaluable skills that you will use in the further advancement of your profession.

Structure

The course is studied on a part-time basis, with students completing 60 credits in one year for the Postgraduate Certificate (Pg Cert) or 120 credits over two years for the Postgraduate Diploma.

All students undertake a compulsory 30-credit module and then choose a further module (PGCert) or a minimum of two modules (PGDip) from a possible three anatomical specialisations.

• Core module

Introduction to image appreciation and evaluation

• Optional modules

For a list of optional modules for the PGCert, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/image-appreciation-pgcert-part-time

For a list of the optional modules for the PGDip, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/image-appreciation-pgdip-part-time

Teaching

You will mainly be taught through workshops, image viewing, tutorials and seminars. Lectures are used in order to present material, particularly that pertaining to personal research activities or scholarship. However, this is followed up by appropriate opportunity to discuss and evaluate the ideas presented.

Self-directed study forms an important part of the course, and this will be tested in a formative way through discussion in tutorials and seminars.

Assessment

A variety of assessment procedures are used such as written assignments, oral presentations, reflective diary/case study, practical examination on image evaluation. This enables students to demonstrate their ability at analysing and evaluating a situation but also to use a variety of ways to present their ideas and abilities.

Career Prospects

Throughout your studies, you will be immersed in all aspects of radiography practice (both practical and theoretical) that will help you gain invaluable skills that you will use in the further advancement of your profession.

The course offers the opportunity to develop knowledge and expertise to enable qualified healthcare professionals to carry out clinical image appreciation, acting as autonomous professionals, and use the results in the overall management of the patient.

The skills obtained are transferable to all NHS Trusts and are recognised overseas.

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The pathway is delivered in partnership with key clinical specialists to ensure that it is clinically relevant and delivered using appropriate expertise drawn from the higher education and hospital sectors. Read more
The pathway is delivered in partnership with key clinical specialists to ensure that it is clinically relevant and delivered using appropriate expertise drawn from the higher education and hospital sectors.

A feature of this pathway is its clinical focus and its flexibility to support students who are reporting or planning to report in a range of imaging modalities and anatomical systems. By the end of the pathway, students will be able to apply their medical image reporting skills, of their chosen area of practice, within the clinical environment, ensuring that technically correct imaging reports are generated.
Typical areas of practice include reporting of the musculoskeletal system, chest, abdomen, cranial CT, and gastrointestinal system.

Students should be practicing in the area for which they intend to study, for example cranial CT students must have access to clinical CT facilities.

Why Bradford?

The University of Bradford has a long tradition in Medical Image Reporting education and this experience is utilised in the delivery of this pathway. The Radiographic Image Reporting (RIR) Certificate pathway was first validated in 1996 subsequently developing to support reporting across a wide range of Medical Imaging examinations and has proved to be a popular choice of study demonstrating its continued clinical relevance and benefit to healthcare professionals.

Modules

Principles of Image Reporting
Medical Image Reporting

Learning activities and assessment

The course sits within the MSc in Medical Imaging programme and the Faculty of Health Studies SSPRD framework, and upon successful completion of this MIR course students can continue their studies by registering for additional modules from the Medical Imaging or School module portfolio, to obtain a postgraduate Diploma or Masters Degree. This part-time pathway is designed to be studied over a one year period and consists of two 30 credit modules, commencing in early September with the Principles of Reporting module, followed in February with the Medical Image Reporting module.

A `block' attendance format is utilised as well as significant “directed” clinical study, with support from your host department and distance support from the academic team in the delivery of the clinical and academic learning. This is consistent with the other named pathways within the MSc in Medical Imaging programme and is popular with students who benefit academically from the concentrated period of time that can be devoted to their studies. There are two blocks of academic learning for the Principles of Reporting module and two blocks for the Medical Image Reporting module.

The module content and learning outcomes have informed the methods of delivery. Students will have opportunity to engage with learning through a range of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, group work, directed study, and, in the case of the clinical module, guided clinical learning.

This wide range of teaching approaches ensures that students can consolidate learning through a range of activities. In particular, small group learning and discussion of clinical cases promotes problem solving skills and peer education, skills necessary for clinical practitioners aspiring to work at an advanced level of practice. While away from the University, students can access course materials and engage in online discussions and learning activities through the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

A range of assessments are incorporated into the programme, but there is a requirement to complete a clinical audit of reports which must achieve 95% concurrence during audit, measured against the standard report of the host department.

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. Read more

About the course

The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences course and its four specialised pathways is designed to enable you to enhance your current knowledge and understanding in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic radiography and give you opportunities to challenge and critically evaluate your professional practice. The aim is to advance your skills as a professional and develop your career so that you can practice safely, effectively and legally.

The Image Interpretation pathway is designed for students who want to develop competency in the extended role of image interpretation and helps you specialise in this specific area of practice. Clinical modules are offered in musculoskeletal reporting. Other specialist reporting areas can be taken via the independent study modules.

See the website http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/msc-medical-imaging-and-radiation-sciences-image-interpretation

Course structure

The MSc Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences: image interpretation pathway is modular in structure. If you wish to collect credits towards and award or a qualification see below the award and credit requirements:
- Postgraduate certificate - 60 credits
- Postgraduate diploma - 120 credits
- Masters degree - 180 credits

To complete a Masters degree award for this course you need to collect the following credits:
- Research modules - 60 credits
- Image interpretation modules - minimum 30 credits
- Optional interprofessional modules - maximum 90 credits

Teaching methods

Modules are facilitated by a variety of experienced lecturers from the University as well as external lecturers.

Delivery of modules incorporates blended learning which aims to combine e-learning activities with campus based learning. You need to have access to a suitable personal computer and a good reliable Internet connection (broadband recommended). Most modern PCs or Macs (less than 3 years old) should be suitable. If you have any queries or need any additional support with IT skills, the School employs an e-learning technologist who will be pleased to help and advise you. Please contact the module lead for details.

Assessment methods include objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), clinical portfolios, case study presentations, oral presentations and written presentations.

Work Placement

A recognized clinical placement which provides access to medical diagnostic images is a requirement for the clinical competency modules within the image interpretation pathway. The University cannot offer to provide clinical placements for students.

Professional Accreditations

Accredited by the College of Radiographers

Find out how to apply here http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/msc-medical-imaging-and-radiation-sciences-image-interpretation#how-to-apply

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.herts.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-funding/scholarships/postgraduate

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MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. Read more
MA Moving Image is designed to develop creative conceptual thinkers, who can deliver ideas across media using a variety of methods. The project work undertaken is underpinned with research, analysis and evidence of strategic thinking as well as self reflection.

On this course you will be able to devise new means of attracting audiences, whether in the areas of promotion and advertising or within the exhibition and corporate sector, moving image for mobile devices, the web, and in every area of motion design and the world of moving image.

The course has been designed for those looking for innovative, creative and critical learning, as you will engage with video, environmental, digital editing, sound and animation to develop your creative ideas and build a strong conceptual and technical basis for your development.

As well as providing opportunities to engage with more traditional areas of moving image such as short narrative film, promotions and branding, animation, motion graphics and broadcast design, the pathway also covers areas such as 3D projection and video mapping and CGI.

You will be expected to respond to new ideas, where the screen is not confined to the movie theatre or the living room. You will be encouraged to extend your knowledge of creative, interpretative and critical approaches to moving image practices. MA Moving Image provides an intensive arena for the discussion, development and production of high quality original audio-visual work. You will also be encouraged to engage with the wider context of moving image practice, for instance through submitting work to festivals and competitions.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

There may be opportunities to work on 'live' industry briefs, as well as engage with tutors who are practitioners themselves or with ‘start-ups’ from the incubation area. You will be invited to attend guest lectures from industry professionals and participate in industry-focused projects, collaborations and study/industry visits. Taught sessions will include workshops covering areas of research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

In the Technology Issues unit, and Concept and Prototyping unit, you will have the opportunity to engage with industry standard software (for example: After Effects, Cinema 4D, Final Cut Pro, Flash, Illustrator, Photoshop).

Supported in particular by the Research Process and Technology Issues units, the pathway will enable you to deepen your conceptual thinking and technical application through the development of your individual practice.

New technologies have transformed the relationships between traditional film, video and digital formats, offering new opportunities for experimentation and the business context of this is explored through the Business and Innovation unit.

In the Concept and Prototyping unit you will develop your main concepts with reference to theoretical and business contexts; and this work will culminate in the Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The International Master Program in Image Processing and Computer Vision provides specialized training in a field of increasing importance in our daily lives. Read more

The International Master Program in Image Processing and Computer Vision provides specialized training in a field of increasing importance in our daily lives. It is essential in domains such as medicine, surveillance, industrial control, remote sensing, e-commerce and automation. The program covers a wide range of methods in computer vision thus guaranteeing highly-qualified graduates in this field. Three partner universities, with internationally recognized experience in these domains, have pooled their complementary expertise and developed this international postgraduate cooperation initiative.

The result is a high-quality, strongly recognized, triple Master degree that respects the 120 ECTS syllabus, and is well adapted to job market criteria. In order to benefit from the knowledge of these three partner universities and their professors, students spend an entire semester in each university.

Program structure

All students follow the same curriculum with some optional courses. The program is organized as follows:

Semester 1: PPCU, Budapest, Hungary

  • Functional Analysis (5 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Parallel Computing Architectures (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Numerical Analysis 1 (4 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Basic Image Processing Algorithms (5 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Data mining (5 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Stochastic Signals and Systems (4 ECTS) – Optional
  • FPGA-based Algorithm Design (5 ECTS) – Optional
  • Biomedical Signal Processing (4 ECTS) – Optional
  • Programming Methodology (5 ECTS) – Optional
  • Intelligent Sensors (3 ECTS) – Optional

Semester 2: UAM, Madrid, Spain

  • Applied Bayesian Methods (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Biomedical Image Processing and Applications (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Biometrics (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Video Sequences Analysis for Video Surveillance (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Tutored Research Project 1 (6 ECTS) - Compulsory

Semester 3: UBx, Bordeaux, France

  • Image and Inversion (6 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Variational Methods and PDEs for Image Processing (6 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Advanced Image Processing (3 ECTS) - Compulsory
  • Video and Indexing (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Image Acquisition and Reconstruction (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • IT Project Management (3 ECTS) – Compulsory
  • Tutored Research Project 2 (6 ECTS) – Compulsory

Semester 4: Internship in academic or industry laboratory

Strengths of this Master program

  • International program taught by experts from three different universities in Europe.
  • Triple Master degree.
  • International mobility period in three countries.

After this Master program?

After graduation, students have access to career opportunities such as engineers or further research as PhD students.

Their educational background makes them attractive candidates for companies in the following areas: E-commerce, Medical imaging, Personal assistance, Automation, Industrial control, Security, Post-production, Remote sensing, Software publishing.



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This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture. Read more

This MA gives practitioners and theorists the opportunity to research and develop the new boundaries of image-making made possible by technological change within the context of post-industrial culture.

This programme joins theory and practice, equipping you to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity.

The programme allows for specialisation in photography and/or electronic arts – which, in addition to still photography, can include interactive, durational and internet work – but encompasses a broader interpretation of practice.

You'll look at the meaning, production and distribution of images, and the relationship between theory and practice in the context of debates about post-modernism and beyond.

You also participate in enabling sessions in photography:

  • medium/large format cameras
  • portable and studio lighting technologies and their use
  • film technology
  • cinematography
  • digital imaging
  • output systems and processes

and/or in electronic arts:

  • computer and video graphics
  • post-production
  • computer-aided design
  • digital publishing
  • animation
  • animatics
  • 2D and 3D computer animation
  • still and durational image production and manipulation
  • web construction
  • interactivity

There is an MRes which follows the MA into a second year, in order to develop your work/voice. This will count as the first year of a PhD. Find out more about the MRes.

Modules & structure

This programme uniquely joins theory and practice in a way that will equip you with the tools and the vision to develop and achieve highly effectively in the new image media culture. Practice uses both digital and analogue technology, still and durational as well as the study and production of interactivity. 

You will study

  • Photography: Durational & Still; Analogue & Digital
  • Electronic Imagery: Motion & Still
  • Visualisation: Stand-alone & Interactive

The programme draws on a broad range of cultural references and technical practices. It offers the opportunity to take stock of evolving practices and developments in image media culture, and is structured to develop the intellectual imagination within each individual student. This is achieved through a combined study of practice and theory, with extensive instruction through ‘enabling sessions’ which engage technical familiarity; core tutorials; secondary tutorials; Issues in Media and Culture and additional theory course options.

Recognising the rapidly changing definitions and context of these practice areas,and the value/positioning of traditional practices, these categories may also be understood through a variety of practices which involve image construction and presentation both still and durational, including: film/video, animation, interactivity, installations, motion graphics, and hyperspace constructs, as well as evolving new exploratory categories.

The programme provides an opportunity to develop and/or research aspects of visual style, and draw on a broad range of cultural references as well as aesthetic and technical approaches engaged through ‘Practice Theory Sessions’, visiting lectures and the Issues in Media and Culture course. Fundamental to the programme is the space that it creates to make it possible for you to explore, question, change and consolidate your work and your ideas.

Assessment

Original portfolio submission; coursework and essays.

Learning & teaching

Tutorials

This course is interested in the development of the individual voice. To this end, there are two types of tutorial:

  • Core tutorials - which deal with overall development
  • Secondary tutorials - these are tutorials for each specific area of photographic media

Skills

You'll develop specific practice skills to a high level, and the articulation/understanding of the pleasures of media consumption.

Careers

Graduates from the programme are extremely successful, with finalists working commercially, developing as artists or continuing to enlarge their academic knowledge. During the course particular attention is given to the development of the individual voice. This, plus students' exposure to a range of technologies, means that our graduates can step into the arena of their choice, or sometimes of their making.

Here are just some examples of the sorts of careers graduates have gone onto:

  • Art Director
  • Artist
  • Animator
  • Senior Interactive Designer
  • Head of Creative Department
  • Head Technical Creative, Experimental Film and Dance
  • Commercial Photography (fashion, editorial, photobooks, social, advertising)
  • Director (commercial narrative)
  • Director Of Photography
  • Installation Artist
  • Interactive Artist
  • Producer
  • Curator

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production. Read more
Writing music for the moving image requires a unique combination of technical and creative skills. You will gain a solid grounding in the theories, techniques and practices essential for contemporary film and television music production.

You will work with award-winning composers from the film and television industry on real-life projects. After developing your composition skills in a range of genres, you will also have the chance to work with colleagues from other media courses to develop your portfolio of work.

You will have access to a suite of high-quality professional music studios approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We also have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations as well as our very own Northern Film School, ensuring you have plenty of opportunities to sharpen your practical skills.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: our University demonstrated strength in five emerging areas of research which it entered into the assessment for the first time, including in music, drama, dance and performing arts.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/musicmovingimage_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

Your course will give you the skills you need to help you create high-quality music for the moving image, film, television and media industries.

- Television Music Composer
- Film Score Composer
- Music Technologist

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will have access to a suite of high-quality, professional music studios, approved by JAMES, the accrediting body of the Music Producers Guild and the Association of Professional Recording Services.

We have links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, as well as our very own Northern Film School, which ensures that you get the most from your course. We also provide regular visiting speakers from the music and film industries and a highly-skilled and experienced teaching team.

Core Modules

Collaborative Practice
Experience the collaborative working environment and develop your skills in fulfilling complex briefs.

Composing to Picture
Address the challenges of producing music for the moving image.

Film Music Analysis
Develop analysis techniques to enhance your understanding of historical, musical, stylistic and functional developments in film music.

Creative Sound Design
Gain the knowledge and skills you need to develop audio-based artefacts in the fields of electro-acoustic music, sonic art and sound design.

Research Practice
Examine the methods and skills which are required in order to carry out research into the ideas and practice of music technology.

Sound, Music & Image
Evaluate the relationships between sound, music and image, and devise and create examples of audio-visual media to a professional standard.

The Major Individual Project
This major project gives you the opportunity to engage in research and advanced practice in an area of your own choosing.

Negotiated Skills Development
Work closely with your tutors, researching and applying current theory and practice alongside a learning plan that meets your own aims and objectives.

Electro-acoustic Music
Explore the techniques and methods employed in electroacoustic composition and use those techniques and methods to create an original composition.

Orchestration Arrangement & Programming
Study contemporary approaches to orchestration and arrangement of music for the moving image and create scores and MIDI realisations to a professional standard.

Facilities

- Music Studios
"Being able to work in such good facilities gave me a buzz – I loved working in the studios." Piers Aggett of chart-topping, MOBO award-winning Rudimental

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Headingley Campus
Our historic Headingley Campus is set in 100 acres of parkland with easy access to Leeds city centre.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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MA Moving Image and Sound . has an emphasis on the development of independent audiovisual projects - you will be encouraged to push and challenge your emerging practice as you refine your technical and conceptual skills. Read more

MA Moving Image and Sound has an emphasis on the development of independent audiovisual projects - you will be encouraged to push and challenge your emerging practice as you refine your technical and conceptual skills.

One of the most valuable aspects of MA Moving Image and Sound is being part of a community of practitioners and researchers with diverse specialisms. Depending on your specialism you may engage with a range of audiovisual methods including: animation (including 2D digital, CGI and stop motion); film and moving image production; motion graphics; scripting and narrative; pre-production and post-production skills and techniques; and sound design. Taught components will enhance your knowledge and understanding of both moving image and sound and you will be encouraged to explore wider historical and cultural contexts for your work.

You will be expected to demonstrate breadth, depth and originality in your experimentation with concepts, issues and materials relating to moving image and/or sound design. Through intensive study and comprehensive technical workshops you will refine the practical and conceptual skills necessary to create original and innovative work, to a high professional standard.

This Creative Skillset accredited programme accelerates individual practices within an inspirational and supportive industry-standard environment.

Creative thinking and innovation are at the core of the MA philosophy and you will engage with students from across the postgraduate community to share opportunities and debate contemporary issues.

We encourage our students to engage in critical discourse through course specific seminars, lectures and critiques; larger NUA symposia such as Dialogues (Fine Art) and Cowbird (Design); and attendance at national and international exhibitions and conferences.

Facilities

Sound Studio

Sound production/ edit rooms and recording studio equipped with Logic studio software.

Media Lab 1

For digital 3D production. Software includes the ZBrush, Silo, Autodesk Entertainment Creation Suite, Corel Painter and Adobe Creative Suite.

Media Labs 2 and 4

For video capture, edit, production and 2D animation: Adobe Premiere Pro, Maya and Adobe Creative Suite.

General Technical Sessions

Optional software inductions available to all students introduce you to a wide range of creative possibilities and output options.

Media Resource Centre

For digital cameras, tripods, 35mm DSLRs, 35mm film cameras and lighting equipment.

NUA Library

The largest specialist are, design and media collection in the East of England including 32,000 books, 1,300 journal subscriptions and 3,000 DVDs.

Applications

The offer of entry onto a Masters Degree (MA) is based on an expectation that you have the potential to fulfil the aims of the course of study and achieve the standard required to successfully complete the award. Entrants should normally have achieved a BA (Hons)/BSc Degree of 2:1 or above (or its equivalent), in a subject related to your proposed course of study.

Applicants who hold a Degree from another discipline may also be considered for entry, subject to the submission of a satisfactory portfolio of art, design or media-related work in support of their application.

The majority of applicants to courses at NUA will be invited to attend an interview. This provides an invaluable chance to meet face-to-face and is the major factor in determining the success of your submission. The interview is an opportunity to assess your work and the suitability of your application and also provides you with a chance to assess NUA’s staff, campus and facilities and ask questions. The key focus of your application process is on your portfolio. Some courses may require additional entry requirements or passes in specific subjects.

  • Complete the application form, including a well-prepared and considered 500 word statement indicating your intentions for MA study. The form should be word-processed not hand-written.
  • Detach the Reference Form and forward to your chosen referee with a request to complete and return to NUA at the address indicated.
  • Email the completed form to: or post to Admissions, Norwich University of the Arts, Francis House, 3 – 7 Redwell St, Norwich, NR2 4SN
  • We will endeavour to contact you within two weeks of receiving your application and reference from your nominated referee. If your application is acceptable we will arrange a date for interview.

For further information on this course, please visit our website - MA Moving Image and Sound.



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Image and signal processing affect our daily lives in an ever-increasing way. Participate in designing this fascinating technology and shape IT‘s future function in business and society. Read more

Image and signal processing affect our daily lives in an ever-increasing way. Participate in designing this fascinating technology and shape IT‘s future function in business and society. Today‘s networked devices for image and signal generation provide a historically unmatched volume of raw data for automated decision making and control systems. The demands are high: How can we design new tools and software in order to best distil useful information? A lot of interesting research and development projects in the private and the public sectors are calling for your expertise. Alternatively, this degree will open career tracks in universities and research labs.

The international Joint Degree Master Programme„Applied Image and Signal Processing“ is conducted in English. The standard period of study is four semesters. The full program is worth a total of 120 points according to the ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System). The academic degree of „Master of Science in Engineering“ (MSc) will be awarded upon successful completion of the programme.

From Theory to Practice (Curriculum)

The first semester is devoted to a concise study of the theoretical basis, the mathematical models and the algorithms used in image and signal processing. The second semester additionally focuses on geometric modelling, audio processing and digital media formats. Starting with the third semester, specific application scenarios are discussed and corresponding technologies are investigated in a number of elective courses.

Choose your Elective Courses

The elective courses comprise medical imaging, platform specific signal processing, data science, biometric systems, media security, computational geometry and machine learning.

Apply your Scientific Knowledge

In the third semester, students also start research on their master thesis and acquire profound IT-project management skills. The fourth semester is dedicated to the completion of the master thesis. An accompanying master seminar provides a forum for presenting and defending one‘s approach to a solution and the results obtained, i.e., for scientific discourse with faculty and peers.

Modules & Competences 

This Joint Degree Master Programme is designed to provide students with an in-depth professional and scientific training. Based on appropriate prior bachelor studies, this programme offers a thorough technical training in conjunction with research-driven teaching. It will make the participants familiar with introductory and advanced-level topics in the fields of image and signal processing, their formal and methodical basics, and with diverse fields of application. The sound knowledge and skills acquired in this programme qualify the alumni for diverse practical challenges in their professional work and empower them to contribute to future innovations in image and signal processing. A master thesis serves as a documentary proof of the student‘s ability to tackle scientific problems successfully on his or her own and to come up with a result that is correct with regards to contents and methodology. Furthermore the publication of Master Thesis is intended. Thus, this programme also paves the road to subsequent work in science and technology.



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Diagnostic Image Reporting is undoubtedly one of the most rewarding career progression roles to have developed for Diagnostic Radiographers in recent years. Read more
Diagnostic Image Reporting is undoubtedly one of the most rewarding career progression roles to have developed for Diagnostic Radiographers in recent years.

It not only offers exciting and challenging professional development opportunities to the individual but evidence based quality and economic benefits to the employer.

Following the Spending Review of 2010, the Department of Health in England and Wales stressed the need to encourage the NHS to train radiographers to report in line with best practice. Within Scotland, the importance of developing a robust Radiographer Reporting resource is reinforced in the 2012 AHP National Delivery Plan.

Reporting by radiographers is not an option for the future, it is a requirement.

Visit the website: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/health-professions/study-options/professional-development/health-professions-cpd/radiographer-reporting/

Module one

Principles of Diagnostic Image Reporting aims to provide you with the knowledge and understanding necessary to underpin the Reporting Radiographer role including pattern recognition, visual perception, sensitivity & specificity, clinical reasoning and decision making.

The module is delivered by a series of lectures, webinars, direct and online tutorials and interactive image viewing workshops.

Module two

Radiographic Appearances of Musculoskeletal Pathophysiology and Trauma helps you to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate the radiological appearances and the indicative signs of musculoskeletal and traumatic injury.

The module is delivered by a series of lectures, webinars, direct and online tutorials and interactive image viewing workshops.

Modules three and four

Diagnostic Image Reporting of the Appendicular and Axial Skeleton are work-based clinical modules, where you will learn the applied clinical skills of Radiographer Reporting within your own clinical workplace. These modules are delivered by online study combined with work based clinical practice under the supervision of a clinical mentor within your own clinical setting.

Format

Delivered over one or two academic years, this carefully designed suite of modules combines academic theory with work-based clinical practice. Minimal attendance on campus blended seamlessly with online study through our interactive e-Learning environment CampusMoodle, makes this an ideal study solution for busy health professionals.

Students may choose to study all four Radiographer Reporting modules exiting at Post Graduate Certificate level or alternatively study just the academic theory modules for CPD purposes.

How to apply

To find out how to apply, use the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/applyonline

Funding

For information on funding, including loans, scholarships and Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) please click the following link: http://www.rgu.ac.uk/future-students/finance-and-scholarships/financial-support/uk-students/postgraduate-students/postgraduate-students/

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Led by Dr Mel Jordan, Reader in Art & the Public Sphere, the Contemporary Art Practice programme has specialist pathway leaders in order to facilitate a distinct engagement with specific areas of contemporary art practice. Read more

Led by Dr Mel Jordan, Reader in Art & the Public Sphere, the Contemporary Art Practice programme has specialist pathway leaders in order to facilitate a distinct engagement with specific areas of contemporary art practice. The programme is delivered through four pathways: Critical Practice (led by Jeremy Millar), Moving Image (led by Jane Wilson), Performance (led by Professor Nigel Rolfe) and Public Sphere (led by Mel Jordan).

The Contemporary Art Practice programme enables us to incorporate practices that exceed the specificity of the well-established disciplines of Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. Contemporary Art Practice engages with contemporary modes of art production, dissemination and debate. It facilitates specialisation through its pathway structure enabling students to engage with a particular approach to developing their own art practice. The teaching methodology we employ is not technologically or materially determined however students are expected to utilise appropriate and specific means in which to manifest their ideas. Contemporary Art Practice students have access to all facilities within the School of Fine Art.

Critical theory has emerged as an essential intellectual framework for art criticism but what is its potential as a tool within the production of contemporary art? Studio-based and primarily focused on supporting the development of the artistic practice of its students, the Critical Practice pathway offers regular seminars exploring emerging ideas and bodies of theory as well as opportunities to work with organised forms of knowledge such as public archives and institutions.

Moving Image is aimed at artists using film and video, and practitioners working in the areas of documentary film, film and fiction cinema as well as practitioners who wish to draw upon, challenge and re-map established realms of Moving Image based practices. The diversity of approaches employed in the Moving Image pathway reflects the new reality of contemporary moving image.

Performance happens in the ‘here and now’ and not the ‘there and then’. Unlike many practices, where time is historic, and the image presented is necessarily an archive or record, ‘being and doing’ are more immediately significant in live time, and the expectation is that – in the contemporary – artists are often presenting work that is not made in advance but rather happening now!

Public Sphere is a major research area in the School, and the pathway supports expanded engagement with art and its publics as well as art’s social function. Social art practices have featured as a key force in the rise of the global biennale as well as being utilized by the Occupy Movement. Therefore questions about public space, participation, collaboration and collective action are becoming essential principles within the production of contemporary art both in terms of practice and theory.

Your application should be for MA Contemporary Art Practice and you will have to specify in which Pathway you wish to study: Critical Practice, Moving Image, Performance or Public Sphere. 

The programme offers:

  •  specialisation through its pathway structure enabling students to engage with a particular approach to developing their own art practice through the pathways of Critical Practice, Moving Image, Performance and Public Sphere   
  •  a commitment to developing and foregrounding the conceptual and social ideas in an individual students practice   
  •  a teaching methodology which is not technologically or materially determined that encourages students to utilise appropriate and specific means for making contemporary fine art now   
  • a teaching structure that incorporates content-led approaches to the teaching of Fine Art through lectures and seminars to enable students’ engagement with the histories, theories and expanded practices of Fine Art
  • individual and group tutorial and cross school group crits, facilitated by leading practitioners and thinkers
  • a critical discursive environment in which to discuss contemporary issues for thinking about, making and displaying contemporary fine art 
  • a flexible studio space that can be utilised collectively or individually 
  • access to a range of technical facilities across the school of Fine Art including the Moving Image Studio, traditional and digital printmaking, photography and wood and metal workshops 
  • access to college-wide technical workshops
  • an on-going programme of off-site events, exhibitions and commissions
  • opportunities for teaching placements, exhibitions, overseas travel and international exchanges (including Paris and Kyoto)


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The module develops the theoretical knowledge base required to interpret specified medical images, and to develop a comprehensive understanding of the factors to be considered in the construction of a clear and concise medical image report. Read more
The module develops the theoretical knowledge base required to interpret specified medical images, and to develop a comprehensive understanding of the factors to be considered in the construction of a clear and concise medical image report.

Typical areas of practice include reporting of the musculoskeletal system, chest, abdomen, cranial CT, and gastrointestinal system.

Lectures and seminars are used to enhance understanding and analysis of the roles of practitioners undertaking the role of medical image reporting.

Emphasis is placed on the medico-legal framework within which such roles have been developed and the transferrable analysis, decision making and communication skills involved in constructing medical image reports.

Assessment involves an assignment which focuses on the development of a scheme of work and protocol to support this development and a presentation showing the effect that this has on service delivery.

Why Bradford?

The medical image reporting pathway at Bradford was developed in the early 1990s and has run since 1996 with an experienced team of academic and teaching staff and invited clinical practitioners. The programme doesn't limit the scope of practice which can be developed and can be used to support any area or modality.

Modules

This module is provided as part of this interdisciplinary Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables students to create an individualised programme of study that will meet either their needs and/or the employers’ needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The modules and academic awards are presented in areas representing employment practice or work based or clinical disciplines.

Whilst some students can build their own academic awards by choosing their own menu of module options, other students will opt for a named academic award. The Framework also provides the option for students to move from their chosen named award to another award if their job or personal circumstances change and they need to alter the focus of their studies. The majority of named awards also offer students, the option of choosing at least one module, sometimes more, from across the Faculty module catalogue enabling them to shape their award more specifically to their needs.

Learning activities and assessment

Assessment involves an assignment which focuses on the development of a scheme of work and protocol to support this development and a presentation showing the effect that this has on service delivery. All assessments within a module must achieve 40% to pass.

Career support and prospects

Previous students have used the skills and knowledge gained in this module to progress their careers to advanced and consultant practitioner statuses.

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Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme. Read more

Address the image world, find out how images create meaning, and discover what you can do with what you see on this eclectic MA programme

If this degree were a film we’d be watching the beginning and the end. We think, like Walter Benjamin, that it’s in these moments – in their inception and their obsolescence – that you see the utopian possibilities of a form or social movement. 

The questions we ask

Are we in the midst of a beginning? What can we learn now from visual culture’s past? What’s happening to our bodies when we play a video game? What are the gestures involved in everyday life? How do our bodies relate to technology?

These are the kinds of topics we analyse on this MA. We want to go beyond the borders of a traditional film studies degree so we go back to the beginning of film history to explore what it meant to fashion yourself in an image, or for a society to see itself in an image. Then we explore how images gain meaning now, and where they’re going next. 

The processes we use

We’re interested in the evolution of the image, but also image culture. As photographs and films constitute more and more of our communication, we encourage students to try to put their thought into audio-visual form for some modules. 

For the MA’s Media Arts Pathway, you can make your own piece of work and submit it as part of the final project, the dissertation. Production values are not the focus for us. We’re interested in what you do with an idea.

The approach we take

We think learning is about trying to get hold of something you don’t know yet; wrestling with ideas you’re unsure of so as to work critically and imaginatively across multiple media forms. While we do look at films, we also investigate such things as contemporary gallery work, the city’s screens, computer and phone interactivity to reconsider our relationship to images.

We study our heritage of image taking and making not just to discover how that relationship has changed over time, but also to find jumping off points for own experimentation and try to create something new. 

As part of the University of London you also have the chance to explore one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other universities. Find out more on the Screen Studies Group website.

Modules & structure

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway

The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway

The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

  • two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
  • option modules to the value of 60 credits
  • a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

Our graduates go on to work in areas such as programming and curating, film and video distribution, and film and television criticism, but many also create their own careers. Twenty per cent of our graduates pursue PhD degrees. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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