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Rather than withering away under the impact of globalisation, borders have become privileged sites today for investigating the contemporary transformation of European governance, sovereignty, territory and identit(ies). Read more

Master's specialisation in Europe: Borders, Identity and Governance

Rather than withering away under the impact of globalisation, borders have become privileged sites today for investigating the contemporary transformation of European governance, sovereignty, territory and identit(ies). The masters specialisation Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance will focus on b/ordering processes occurring within Europe’s internal cross-border regions (or Euregions), taking into account the context of shifts in state sovereignty, territoriality, and cultural identity in Europe’s borderlands. Courses within this program will also train attention on the external bordering dimension of the European Union (ie, Eastward Enlargement, European Neighbourhood Programme), while also addressing the EU’s search for a broader role in the world. Key themes raised in this master specialisation are e.g.: cross-border governance, transnational and multi-level governance, European citizenship and ‘cosmopolitical’ identit(ies), critical border geopolitics, biopolitical b/orderings and border securitisation, European post-colonial b/ordering and ‘othering’, and the search for an ‘ethical’ dimension to European borders.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ebig

Career prospects

The Master's specialisation Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance provides graduates entry into rapidly growing sectors of the job market, be it government, business or academia. Students will be able to apply the scientific insights and practical skills acquired to topics as varied as Europeanisation, internationalisation, borders, identities, cross-border governance and international cooperation and politics.
With expertise gained through this master a graduate may work for a local, provincial, or national (e.g. Foreign Affairs section) government, becoming responsible for, sharing expertise in and delivering advice on cross-border cooperation, international mobility, the attraction of international firms and investments, or the acquisition of European Union funds.
Another major category of employment may be found in the field of consultancy.As a consultant or advisor, a graduate may help promote the internationalisation of a city or region, or assist regional and city governments in obtaining and managing EU- funded projects.
The master is also very well suited as preparation for an international career. A graduate may find employment with the European parliament, European Commission or related institutions, or work as a programme officer with a European organisation or as an International/European affairs expert in a firm. Opportunities also abound within the rapidly growing job market for academic researchers and/or lecturers with one of the many Dutch or international research institutes and schools focusing on European issues.

Our approach to this field

The Master's "Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance" is an engaged and inspiring master that offers state-of-the-art knowledge and skills in the field of European studies. As the European Union is a construction of politically engaged human beings, we will focus on this construction process first and foremost. We will try to find answers to questions like: why do we wish to have a European Union and in what form then, where are the borders of the European Union, how do the policies of the European
Union affect our daily lives, our national identities and national borders and how do the policies of the European Union affect the people outside the European Union, that is the neighbour countries as well as countries further away. You will be taught by distinguished and internationally recognised professors who
study these issues and publish their findings in international academic journals and contribute to the public debate. Our goal is to help you gain up-to-date insights and exchange views on this important knowledge field in a spirit of curiosity, openness and thoughtfulness. You will study theories, methods and instruments, but above all you will develop a knowledge-seeking and critical attitude.

The Master's ‘Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance’ includes a variety of cases, individual and group assignments, international excursions, lectures and seminars. This unique programme gives you the opportunity to share experiences with other students and to link theory Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance with practice. You can select the elective courses that you find interesting and important and you can choose your own topic for your master thesis. Furthermore, we offer to find an exciting and
challenging national or international internship in the field of your own interest.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ebig

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If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching. Read more

Overview

If you’re a practising professional in applied linguistics, this course will allow you to work on topics that reflect the multidisciplinary nature of the field, and that go beyond classroom-based language learning and teaching.

You’ll be introduced to dynamic and challenging concepts and methods that reflect the role language plays as a communication tool in everyday life, and use these to reflect critically and constructively on your current experience and context.

The course is split into two distinct stages. In stage 1, you’ll create a research portfolio consisting of three 7,000-word papers. In stage 2, you’ll produce a 59,000-word thesis, based on original research linked to your professional practice.

For both stages, you’ll be assigned a subject specialist supervisor. Our supervisors are experienced in most areas of applied linguistics, including contemporary approaches, like corpus-driven studies on testing or material compilation, and issues relating to sociocultural adaptation and social cohesion in a migration context.

We’ll provide you with a collaborative environment with strong links to research networks in the University. We host and take part in many research oriented events for staff and postgraduate students, including regular Faculty and departmental research seminars and international conferences. Our staff contribute to the Research Unit for Intercultural and Transcultural Studies (RUITS), Anglia Research Centre in Media and Culture (ARCMedia) and Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), who organise many events that you’ll be welcome to attend. These events, along with our online environment, will help you connect with other research students from a range of disciplines.

All your subject-specific studies will be enhanced and supported by our University-wide training sessions, where you’ll gain important research expertise in areas like ethics, presentations, intellectual property and digital scholarship.

Research staff

Our permanent supervisory staff members are recognised experts in their field, and have produced a number of influential books, journal articles and edited collections. Our research expertise includes:

Dr Sebastian Rasinger, BA, PG Cert, PhD: sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, multilingualism, linguistic and cultural identities.

Melanie Bell, MPhil (Cantab), MA (Cantab), DipTEFL: quantitative and corpus linguistics, discourse in the professions, design of language courses.

Dr Bettina Beinhoff, MPhil (Cantab), PhD (Cantab): sociolinguistics, acquisition of speech and discourse patterns in second/foreign languages, social psychology in language (esp. attitudes, stereotypes and identity construction).

Careers

This Professional Doctorate will give you the unique opportunity to research an issue or problem of particular significance to your practice, demonstrating your leadership and developing your expertise.

We’ll provide you with many opportunities for career development and training, in areas like writing up a paper for publication; placing an academic article; giving a conference paper; doctoral writing style; updates on research methods and literature searches; internet training; editing skills for doctoral research; subsequent monograph publication; and dealing with festivals, agents, and publishers.

In conjunction with the University’s research support, you can request specific support for writing-up, conference papers, general research methods and other research skills if you need it.

Specialist facilities

You’ll receive access to our fully-equipped language centre, the University of Cambridge Library, and our own on-campus library, as well as our Faculty’s PhD room, where all our doctoral students can meet up to work and take an active part in our postgraduate student community.

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The course is rooted in an appreciation of the fact that it is almost impossible to understand society without first understanding the place of sport. Read more
The course is rooted in an appreciation of the fact that it is almost impossible to understand society without first understanding the place of sport. As our Chancellor, James Nesbitt, noted at a recent honorary degree ceremony for Sir Alex Ferguson, "sport matters". For example, sport plays a central role in identity construction and it is a socially constructed phenomenon that is embedded in the very fabric of cultures. It is also increasingly associated with issues like poverty, labor migration, crime, development, gender and social inequalities as well as being seen increasingly as a tool to address these.

Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/201617/sports-development-and-coaching-8993

Course detail

- Description -

The programme is delivered by an interdisciplinary team with experience of working in the highest echelons of sports development and coaching, and with considerable research expertise in the social sciences of sport. The programme has attracted many students from leading governing bodies and development agencies and several graduates have gone on to progress in their career as a result of pursuing this course. It has attracted students from across the island of Ireland and the UK, with many coming from diverse backgrounds (community sport, disability sport, elite sport etc). This eclectic mix allows for the transfer of knowledge and an enhanced understanding of best practice.

- Purpose -

The programme is designed to:

• enhance students' knowledge and understanding of the myriad facets of sports development and coaching and how ideas and policies can be effectively implemented;

• develop in students the ability to understand the ways in which professional practice in sports development and/or sports coaching can be informed by a social scientific understanding of sport;

• provide opportunities for students to enhance their abilities in a range of transferable skills required in the fields of sports development and coaching;

• produce graduates who have gained experience of an in-depth, independent investigation of current issues in sports development and/or coaching using appropriate research methodology, and;

• produce graduates who can demonstrate increased capacity for understanding and evaluating the concepts, complexities and current issues in sports development and coaching.

- Teaching and learning assessment -

Classes are taught via lectures, seminars, tutorials and online delivery. Assessment is by means of assignments, group tasks and presentations.

Career options

The specialist knowledge and transferable skills provided on this programme have enhanced opportunities for obtaining employment in the sports development, sports coaching and related sectors.

Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) statistics provided by Ulster University's Careers Service show that a significant cohort of those students graduating from Ulster (with sports related undergraduate awards) go on to full-time employment in the broad field of sport and leisure. This Masters programme at the School of Sport continues this excellent track record of producing multi-skilled graduates who are attractive to a range of employers.

How to apply: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/how-to-apply#pg

Why study at Ulster?

1. Over 92% of our graduates are in work or further study six months after graduation.
2. We are a top UK university for providing courses with a period of work placement.
3. Our teaching and the learning experience we deliver are rated at the highest level by the Quality Assurance Agency.
4. We are an international university with more than 2,000 international students from over 80 countries and Alumni from 121 countries.
5. More than 4,000 students from over 50 countries have successfully completed eLearning courses at Ulster University.

Flexible payment

To help spread the cost of your studies, tuition fees can be paid back in monthly instalments while you learn. If you study for a one-year, full-time master’s, you can pay your fees up-front, in one lump sum, or in either five or ten equal monthly payments. If you study for a master’s on a part-time basis (e.g. over three years), you can pay each year’s fees up-front or in five or ten equal monthly payments each year. This flexibility allows you to spread the payment of your fees over each academic year. Find out more by visiting http://www.ulster.ac.uk/learnyourway

Scholarships

A comprehensive range of financial scholarships, awards and prizes are available to undergraduate, postgraduate and research students. Scholarships recognise the many ways in which our students are outstanding in their subject. Individuals may be able to apply directly or may automatically be nominated for awards. Visit the website: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/apply/fees-and-finance/scholarships

English Language Tuition

CELT offers courses and consultations in English language and study skills to Ulster University students of all subjects, levels and nationalities. Students and researchers for whom English is an additional language can access free CELT support throughout the academic year: https://www.ulster.ac.uk/international/english-language-support

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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. Read more
The MA in Heritage Practice offers students an in-depth opportunity to gain a thorough understanding of the heritage sector from the perspective of different disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology and history. It also enables students to gain critical acumen in exploring the meanings of heritage as a concept and how such concepts are applied in the UK and on a worldwide basis, thus providing valuable insights and an understanding of a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a wide range of heritage issues. It combines broadly based compulsory modules with two distinct and specialised optional pathways in Cultural Heritage and Museums and Archives.

The Cultural Heritage pathway consists of two modules, focusing upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, is also composed of two modules, which explore many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

In both pathways, students are encouraged to undertake a work placement at a museum or heritage site of their choice, while those on the Lampeter campus can undertake their placement in the Roderic Bowen Research Centre.

Students therefore gain understanding and appreciation in a broadly defined field of heritage in addition to a more concentrated and specialist knowledge based on a particular strand. Running through all these modules is a focus upon the practice based, employability side of heritage. The work placement module permits students to enter the work place, taking with them the knowledge and understanding from the course which they apply in a practical, hands-on setting.

Modules

Part 1
Compulsory modules:
-Research Methodologies (20 credits)
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation (20 credits)
-Heritage Tourism Contexts (20 credits)

Optional modules:
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage (20 credits)
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage (20 credits)
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment (20 credits)
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World (20 credits)
-Work placement (20 credits)
-Independent project (20 credits)

Part 2
-Dissertation (60Credits)

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Research into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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The two-year full-time study programme (120 ECTS) aims at providing problem-oriented courses by addressing questions and issues such as the political and socio-economic aspects of the European integration and construction process, the construction of social and cultural identity throughout Europe, intra- and extra-European migration and Europe’s relations with other areas in the world. Read more

About the course

The two-year full-time study programme (120 ECTS) aims at providing problem-oriented courses by addressing questions and issues such as the political and socio-economic aspects of the European integration and construction process, the construction of social and cultural identity throughout Europe, intra- and extra-European migration and Europe’s relations with other areas in the world.

With the European institutions a stone’s throw away from the Campus, students have privileged access to documentation in the European institutions, to the digital and media library of the Centre Virtuel de la Connaissance sur l’Europe (CVCE) as well as the EIB archives on Campus. The study programme puts special emphasis on Digital Humanities and Public History thus offering a unique blend of historical theory and practical application.

Aims

As a student, you will

• benefit from a high-level education in European history
• study in a multicultural, multilingual and European environment
• learn to put contemporary European issues into a historical perspective
• act as an expert in Digital Humanities and Public History

Course modules

• Decoding Europe
• European history in the long haul
• Europe and “the others”
• European history from the 19th century to the 20th century
• Political and institutional history
• Electives

Career

Successful completion of the Master‘s degree in European Contemporary History will prepare for a career in secondary education, senior civil appointments, political and cultural institutions (particularly at European level), archives and libraries, media and cultural management, diplomatic services. The degree also prepares for an academic career (Phd).

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Want to further your career in language teaching? Learn the latest linguistics theories and apply them to your classroom practice. Read more
Want to further your career in language teaching? Learn the latest linguistics theories and apply them to your classroom practice. Gain critical and analytical skills that will boost your career prospects.

If you’re involved with any aspect of foreign language teaching, this course will further your theoretical understanding of language learning and give you a chance to develop your teaching skills.

CORE MODULES

Second Language Acquisition

You’ll focus on the major themes that have emerged from literature on second language learning over the last three decades. You’ll examine some of the research on the second-language acquisition process, look critically at reports of second-language research, and examine some of the theories which endeavour to interpret research evidence. You will be encouraged to use your own language learning and teaching experience to assess the relative merits of such materials.

Discourse in Society

You’ll examine the relationship between language and society, and the construction of discourse in various domains. In the first part of the module you’ll explore sociological and sociolinguistic models and theories, such as speech communities, communities of practice and ethnolinguistic vitality, with a particular focus on social variation and stratification across various linguistic levels (phonology, lexicon, syntax). The second part of the module expands the discussion, and you’ll explore the notion (or notions) of discourse in both its linguistic and wider meaning, and its construction in and through society and language use. Throughout the module, you'll study methods for the collection and transcription of data, and discover various approaches to linguistic and discourse analysis. These methods and approaches will then be put into context and used in the analysis of the relevant social spheres and domains, such as educational or institutional discourse. By the end of the course, you’ll become more familiar with some of the theoretical foundations on which the study of language use is built, and you’ll be able to apply the practical techniques of sociolinguistic and discourse analysis.

Research Methods in Applied Linguistics

This module will provide you with an introduction to research methods in preparation for the MA dissertation. Fortnightly sessions will familiarise you with the basic processes of conducting research, including general methodological approaches as well as research ethics. You’ll analyse and discuss both qualitative and quantitative data, in order to develop your critical-evaluative skills

Major Project

This module will support you in the preparation and submission of a Masters dissertation, allowing you to explore in-depth a particular topic that reflects your academic interest.

OPTIONAL MODULES

Materials and Course Design

You will explore the factors involved in the design of language courses and teaching materials, reflecting on one possible process of course design. You will start with an analysis of the context in which the course will take place, the needs of the learners, and current theories of language and language learning. You will move on to consider how course content can be selected and ordered in a principled way, how assessment relates to course design, and how and when courses should be evaluated. Finally, you will consider the evaluation, adaptation and creation of course materials.

Classroom Theory and Practice

You will examine current research on modern classroom operations, exploring key concepts and issues through relevant professional and academic literature. A more practical element will be realised through live and filmed observation of teachers in practice. You will also be encouraged to reflect on your teaching and learning experience, and analyse and discuss your beliefs and attitudes towards learning and teaching.

Impacts of Migration

You will explore the push and pull factors which stimulate migration to Europe, and investigate the impact of cultural difference and interconnectedness at national, regional and local level, including the workplace. While taking account of global trends in migration and diaspora, you will focus on the situation in key European countries, in particular Britain, France, Germany and Spain. Local case studies from various organisations will allow you to conduct an in-depth analysis of the processes of integration and alienation, including patterns of mutual – cultural, racial and/or gender – discrimination, as well as linguistic adaptation. You will give special attention to the dynamics of cultural interaction, which consider the role of religion, male and female codes of honour, patriarchal mentality and potential clashes in expectations from and by contemporary leadership. You will further consider the subjectivity of this experience by exploring selected stories of migration as reflected in migrant film and literature.

Language, Identity and Policy

You will explore the psychological and social intricacies of language and interaction both in general and within the EU. You will examine the question of language within the EU, identifying the points of tension for a community of nations who seek to work together increasingly closely and to achieve intercultural understanding while at the same time making a strong commitment to cultural and linguistic diversity. You will assess how far EU policy confronts the language issues identifiable within its current frontiers and the likely way forward as more countries and more languages join, comparing the situation in Europe with those experienced in other countries. Finally, you will explore how developing language technologies might facilitate future intercultural communication and help to resolve some of the current difficulties.

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Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?. Read more
Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to the components of food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do food choices affect the quality of our diet? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How does food behaviour change, and how can it be changed?

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on human nutrition and related behaviour and consumption from the perspectives of public health nutrition, nutrition physiology and the social sciences. The programme is built around human nutrition, food behaviour and consumership, as well as related research methods.

The goal of the Master’s programme is to enable you to:
-Understand the significance of nutrition to bodily functions and health.
-Understand the social and cultural aspects that affect the food choices of individuals and communities and know how to influence them.
-Form an opinion about the multifarious issues regarding nutrition and consumption.
-Be able to analyse and solve nutritional issues and related cultural questions in an ecological and socially sustainable manner.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://www.helsinki.fi/en/masters-programme-in-human-nutrition-and-food-behaviour-master-of-science-2-years/1.2.246.562.17.53446974973

Programme Contents

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour focuses on:
-The role of nutrition and other lifestyle factors in promoting health and preventing illness.
-The mechanisms through which food impacts our body at the level of molecular biology.
-Food services and their management.
-Consumption behaviour and food choices, and means of influencing them and communicating about them.
-Food culture, food politics and social movements.
-Research methods in the fields of nutrition and food behaviour.
-The Master’s thesis.
-Other studies, which you can choose according to your interests.

The multidisciplinary nature of the Master’s Programme at the University of Helsinki provides numerous options for other studies. You can choose studies at other Finnish or international universities.

The courses incorporate different methods of study, such as:
-Contact teaching, lectures.
-Group work.
-Oral presentations.
-Written reports (individual, pair, group).
-Independent study.
-Laboratory work and other assignments and related reports.
-Learning journals, oral group examinations, written examinations, take-home essays.
-Seminars.

The diversity of learning methods enhances your development and application of critical thought, argumentation and problem-solving skills.

Selection of the Major

In the Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour, you can choose between three focal areas:
-Nutritional physiology: The impact of nutrition and other lifestyle factors on bodily functions and health, as well as the underlying mechanisms at the level of molecular biology.
-Public health nutrition and food services: Insight into the nutritional factors affecting the health of a country’s population and population groups and the use of this insight to promote health, as well as nutritional questions related to food services and the food industry.
-Food behaviour in a changing society: The ways in which food choices are linked to individual, cultural and social factors, the construction of identity, the consumption society, as well as food and health policies.

Programme Structure

With a scope of 120 credits (ECTS), the Master’s programme can be completed in two academic years. The degree comprises:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including the Master’s thesis (30 credits).
-60 credits of other studies, which can include studies from your own degree programme or other degree programmes, a practical training period or international studies.
-Career orientation and career planning.
-A personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme qualifies you for work in expert, teaching, research and managerial positions in the public sector, NGOs and companies, and as an independent entrepreneur. The education provides you with profound field-specific competence and skills in knowledge work, as well as a solid professional identity.

Examples of duties available to graduates include:
-Expert in nutrition and food.
-Product manager.
-Product development manager, development manager.
-Director of food services.
-Researcher, special researcher.
-Planning officer.
-Senior inspector.
-Senior teacher or lecturer at a university of applied sciences.
-Growth entrepreneur.
-Journalist, press officer, content provider.

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The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. Read more
The MRes in Heritage Practice is a programme with a 60-credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits, which has an allowance of up to 30,000 words. The taught element enables students to engage critically with concepts of heritage and its practice in Wales as well as in other parts of the world. It enhances your skills, enabling you to develop research strategies for use in exploring your chosen angle on a sector that is gaining increased significance in today’s world.

Course Overview

The programme of study offers students a unique opportunity to explore a targeted range of heritage issues because the taught modules lead to a programme of research devised by the individual student, under the direction of a supervisor. All MRes students take the Research Methodologies module, but then their routes diverge as they select one module from each of two distinct and specialised pathways, one in Cultural Heritage and the other in Museums and Archives. This preparation leads to the student’s own dissertation project.

The Cultural Heritage pathway focuses upon the notion of heritage as cultural practice. It enables students to explore important questions, for example where does heritage come from, how is it constructed, what does it do, how does it relate to the past and present, and what are its potential uses for the future? This pathway also encourages students to investigate relationships between heritage and the construction of identity, as well as the role of landscape, architecture and monuments in determining and embedding heritage.

The second pathway, on Museums and Archives, explores many of the issues surrounding the management, conservation, practice and legislation surrounding the operation of museums and archives.

Students who complete the MRes programme are equipped with a sound basis for undertaking a research degree. Alternatively they may take their specific knowledge and understanding to apply in the workplace or in other settings.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Research Methodologies
-Heritage: Representation and Interpretation
-Heritage Tourism Contexts
-Exhibiting the Past Museums, Collections and Heritage
-Documenting the Past Archives: Libraries and Heritage
-Heritage and Architecture: Heritage and the Built Environment
-Heritage Project Management in the Modern World
-Work placement
-Independent project

Key Features

Teaching staff who deliver this programme rely upon their established research and expertise in heritage and heritage related concerns. The range of projects they have undertaken over a number of years, sometimes with partners in other institutions, includes:
-The excavation and conservation of the Newport Ship, Wales
-The excavation of a medieval bishop’s palace at Fetternear, Scotland, as well as the post-excavation research on and exhibition of the finds
-The development of a collaborative museum exhibition of Egyptian scarabs
-The excavation of the medieval abbey site at Strata Florida, with community and schools engagement
-Landscape heritage and interpretation
-The construction of social memory through war remembrance and memorials
-The Tregaron Elephant project, with its community engagement
-Tesearch into ancient Andean textiles in association with the British Museum

This considerable bank of knowledge and skills underpins the programme, contributing to a high quality educational experience. As part of their research and project management, staff have worked with bodies including CADW, Historic England/English Heritage, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, RCAHMW, UNESCO, Qatari Museums Authority, the British Museum, Blairs Museum (Aberdeenshire) and St Fagans National History Museum.

This experience feeds into teaching that offers unique insights into the heritage sector, its organisations and structures, its operational procedures and regulation, as well as its ethical and conservation considerations. It provides students with strong opportunities for entering heritage-related employment.

For residential students, most of the teaching takes place on the Lampeter campus, where the university is built round an archaeological site. Old Building is a listed building which backs onto a medieval motte.

Assessment

A range of assessment methods are used from essays and short written evaluation, to the creation of publicity flyers, feasibility reports on a heritage site, project designs, an exhibition, oral presentations and reflective pieces.

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This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/. Read more
This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

language and ideology
linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
language and the media
talk at work
English in a multilingual world
intercultural communication
multilingualism and code-switching
varieties of English
You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Modules & Structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules:
Core Issues in English Language & Linguistics- 30 credits
Language in its Sociocultural Context- 30 credits

Option modules:
You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

Option modules from other departments:
You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection. Please note that your choice of option module from another deparment needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance.

Dissertation:
You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included:

discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
language and gender in dream narratives
pauses and silences on Talk Radio
attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
political debates on Irish TV
lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
the language of text messaging
language and literacy practices on Facebook
attitudes to non-standard language use
discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends
The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize.

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures for our option modules and introduce you to a number of linguistics talk series across the University of London.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation.

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/. Read more
This Masters gives artists, practitioners, teachers and educators, in informal and formal learning environments, the opportunity to extend, enrich and consolidate the overlapping practices and theories of contemporary art and learning and teaching through individual and collaborative research- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-artist-teachers-contemporary-practices/

Why study MA Artist Teachers & Contemporary Practices (MAAT) at Goldsmiths?

Engaging with practice and theory, you will create new work; develop innovative research approaches and outcomes; critically debate the changing nature of contemporary art, gallery/exhibition practices and art education; and sustain these practices and ideas as artist teacher beyond the MAAT.
You’ll be taught by staff who are nationally and internationally renowned and published artist researcher teachers.
You’ll draw on the international scope of contemporary art practices in London through partnerships with international galleries including Tate Modern, The Whitechapel Gallery and The Showroom Gallery.
You’ll be part of a student body with a rich diversity of backgrounds and experiences, and have the opportunity to develop and maintain collaborative peer networks and support.
You’ll have access to an extensive programme of guest lectures, presentations and projects that has included: Grayson Perry, Yinka Shonibare, Sonia Boyce, Susan Pui San Lok, Danny Devenny, Mark Ervine, Marty Lyons and John Matthews, hosted through our Centre for Arts and Learning (CAL).
The MAAT can be a pathway before or after the completion of a UK QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) programme, such as the PGCE (Secondary): Art & Design.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact John Johnston

Overview

The programme places a strong emphasis on student-centred and directed learning, where teaching sessions and personal tutorials draw on the critical reflection and development of your artist teacher practices: including artistic, theoretical, political and learning and teaching concerns.

The modules of the programme are all underpinned with theories of contemporary art, learning and critical and dialectical pedagogical theories and philosophies.

You'll attend all lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials where you'll engage in questioning the political, ideas, practices, theory and philosophy related to the specific topics of: contemporary art practice, teaching and learning, identity and place/space construction, dialectical pedagogical theories and practice, social-engagement, and research led practices where you'll be encouraged and expected to critically discuss and debate the issues raised.

But this is just a small proportion of what we expect you to do on the degree. Independent learning/research (practice with theory) is expected throughout the MAAT, this typically involves critical reflection and development of your practices as artist teacher including: additional readings, preparing topics for discussion/presentations, working with fellow students, producing essays, artist teacher statements, research, planning, organising and producing practice-based work and/or projects, curating exhibitions and presentations, both individually and collaboratively.

This emphasis on independent learning is very important at Goldsmiths. We don't just want you to accept what we tell you without question. We want you to be deeply engaged with theory and practice to develop and sustain your own ideas and practices as artist teachers.

Structure

To enable greater flexibility for you and a more equitable experience for full-time and part-time students, the MAAT programme has a modular structure, with the majority of teaching sessions usually conducted in the evenings.

This also enables part time and full-time students to attend the same evening teaching sessions and therefore form a collaborative and supportive learning environment.

For you to obtain the postgraduate degree of MAAT you will need to complete 180 CATS at Masters level.

The MAAT comprises five core modules (150 CATS) and one option module (30 CATS).

You may also take advantage of two exit points:

Postgraduate Certificate in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (60 Credits)
Postgraduate Diploma in Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices (120 Credits)

Assessment

The MA Artist Teacher and Contemporary Practices utilises a number of complementary assessment strategies. These have been devised to appropriately assess the range of learning outcomes and are underpinned by the ethos of the programme these include, exhibition/presentation/performance, essay, viva voce.

Download the programme specification for this degree to find out more about what you'll learn and how you'll be taught and assessed.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills
Through the programme, you’ll develop independent thinking, understand theoretical underpinning, and the ability to question and have confidence in your ideas and practice - skills that will benefit you throughout your chosen career. You'll also develop:

critical and analytical skills
creative and practical skills
ability to express complex and sophisticated ideas with clarity and confidence
the ability to work independently and collaboratively
IT skills
As a MAAT alumna, you’ll continue to research and engage in the presentation of your practices through practice, exhibitions, socially-engaged projects, international conferences and international journals.

Careers

Our graduates have an outstanding employment record in the fields of education, galleries/museums, social work/charity, health, public administration and welfare with the majority of graduates gaining full-time employment in a variety of careers including:

Teacher, lecturer, tutor
Heads of Faculties/Departments
Community artists
Gallery educators/curators
Practicing artists/photographers

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Read more
This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Engaging with recent developments in theoretical and critical practice, the course will develop your knowledge and understanding of English literature and will sharpen your skills of literary research, writing and analysis.

Key features

-This course enables you to become part of a vibrant postgraduate community and attend lectures and events organised by the London Graduate School and the Kingston Writing School.
-Capitalising on our location, several modules are complemented by field trips (for example, to the British Library, museums and theatres) to enhance and support your learning experience.
-The English department is home to two archives relating to the work of Iris Murdoch, as well as the Sheridan Morley archive of theatrical life writing and ephemera. It also contributes to the Cultural Histories and Suburban Studies at Kingston, the Life Narrative Research Group, the Iris Murdoch Centre and the Victorian Popular Fiction Association.

What will you study?

The core module, Transgression and Dissidence, introduces the course's central themes by focusing on texts that explore the limits of human experience and contravene cultural boundaries. You will explore how literature, through such transgression, has provided opportunities for dissent and resistance, and will consider the extent to which writing has acted as a catalyst for social and political change. You will then study various conceptual approaches to literature through your choice of option modules, which provide the opportunity to analyse and discuss a range of contentious issues across a number of historical periods and with respect to different genres.

The option modules involve the study of traumatic experience, human rights work and life narrative (Trauma and Justice); the complex relationships between desire, embodiment and writing (Sex and Text); gender, culture and international exchange in early modern Europe (Markets and Materiality); the construction of place and identity in 19th-century travel writing and adventure fiction (Mappings and Crossings); and the 'post-human' and interspecies interaction in recent global literature (Humans and Animals).

The MA programme has been devised to allow you to study diverse topics and periods or, if you prefer, to focus on areas in which the Department of English Literature has particular research strengths: Renaissance literature and culture; Victorian literature, 20th-century and contemporary writing; literature, sex and gender; and writing, space and the environment.

Your 15,000-word dissertation will allow you to research a subject of your choice, produced under the supervision of a specialist academic member of staff.

Assessment

Essays and other written coursework, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-English Literature Dissertation
-Transgression and Dissidence

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Humans and Animals
-Mappings and crossings
-Markets and Materiality
-Sex and Text
-Special Study: American Dreaming: Suburbia, Literature and Culture
-Special Study: Bruce Springsteen and Contemporary American Culture
-Special Study: Monsters: Theory, Fiction, Culture
-Special Study: Music and Theory
-Special Study: Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama
-Special Study: Writing Women in the 20th and 21st Century
-Trauma and Justice

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The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit of a doctorate. Read more
The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit of a doctorate.

The course is modular in structure and includes training in urban design and in research methods and methodology.

Research staff are drawn primarily from the Joint Centre for Urban Design and the Department of Planning but with some contributions from the School of Architecture and the Department of Real Estate and Construction, and the wider university community.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/urban-design-mres/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes is renowned internationally for its research in town and country planning. In REF 2014 69% of our research was rated as either world leading or internationally excellent.

- Staff feed their research directly into the teaching and studio work.

- You will have the opportunity to become involved in research projects of Brookes' Joint Centre for Urban Design.

- Visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, and consultancies and research bodies provide external input.

- Site visits will give you direct experience of some of the most important issues in urban design.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with urban design and research, and include lectures, studio sessions, seminars, workshops, practical project work, field trips and research project shadowing.

The course includes site visits that provide students with direct experience of some of the most important issues in urban design.

The majority of assessment is based on coursework, such as essays, seminars, project work, presentations and the dissertation.

Careers

Our graduates have very high success rates in gaining employment and have secured posts in the public sector, private consultancy, the voluntary sector, and research and teaching areas.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research areas and clusters

Staff are engaged in world-leading research which feeds directly into the teaching and studio work. Recent topics include:
- place-identity
- heritage led regeneration
- sustainable cities
- place-making
- aesthetic appreciation of buildings, streets and open spaces
- retrofitting cities
- community engagement
- new pedagogy of teaching urban design.

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Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. Read more
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK, combining the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School.

We’ve successfully trained over 300 graduates who have left to work successfully in a wide variety of multinational and international organisations, particularly in the fields of advertising, international management, media and public relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Communication and International Marketing programme equips students with a critical understanding of communication in contemporary international marketing contexts in order to address the market needs of the international business environment.

The programme comprises six compulsory modules and two optional modules covering a wide range of disciplines. These offer numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

It is ideal for marketing and communications professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, languages or business disciplines wanting to deepen their insight into marketing across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research Methods
-Marketing
-International Marketing Management
-Marketing Communications
-Strategy
-Interpersonal Communication
-Global Diversity in Language and Communication
-Professional Communication
-Identity: Marketing and Communication in Practice
-Globalisation: Theories, Discourses and Practices
-The Language of Advertising
-Organisations and Written Communication
-Dissertation

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overall purpose of the programme is to:
-Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of communication and marketing communication
-Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area of (Marketing) Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:
-Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the (inter)cultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
-Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
-Impart the knowledge and skills of communication and marketing necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (human resource management, advertising, international marketing), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
-Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Communication

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to-face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of models of consensus-generation, agenda-setting, opinion-formation and communicative interaction
-Demonstrate an awareness of the issues and concerns involved in strategic communication, in marketing communication and intercultural communication
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and content and methods of the marketing function, both within corporations and as a service industry
-Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
-Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role of marketing with particular reference to international case studies
-Demonstrate an appreciation of the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation (this would involve the collection, analysis and manipulation of data of diverse kinds from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives, an awareness of the (dis)advantages of each frame and/or method and, consideration of the ethical issues involved in data collection and storage relative to the (sub) cultures examined)

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
-Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
-Demonstrate the capacity to evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement marketing communication policies

Key / transferable skills
-Demonstrate the capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
-Demonstrate an ability to manage learning self-critically

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK and combine the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. Read more
Our communication programmes were among the first in the UK and combine the research and teaching strengths in the School of English and Languages with the expertise of Surrey Business School. We’ve successfully trained over 300 graduates who have left equipped for a range of careers in communication and intercultural consultancy, many within government overseas agencies, international diplomatic organisations and business consultancies.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Masters in Intercultural Communication with International Business combines linguistic studies, cultural studies, international business components and training in research methods.

You will take six compulsory modules, two optional modules and write a dissertation where you have the opportunity to specialise according to your personal interests. The programme includes numerous opportunities to apply and develop your skills through practical tasks.

The programme is ideal for business professionals who wish to enhance their profile with a postgraduate qualification; and for graduates of humanities, English language or business disciplines who would like to deepen their insight into business across linguistic and cultural boundaries.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research Methods
-Organisational Behaviour
-International Business Management
-Intercultural Communication for Business Purposes
-Teaching Intercultural Communication
-Interpersonal Communication
-Global Diversity in Language and Communication
-Theories of Professional Communication
-Identity: Marketing and Communication in Practice
-Globalisation: Theories, Discourses and Practices
-The Language of Advertising
-Organisations and Written Communication
-Dissertation

CAREER PROSPECTS

This degree will prepare you for a career in the areas of communication and intercultural consultancy, particularly, though not exclusively, where the use of English is required.

More specifically, the programme will appeal if you are seeking to work in multinational and international business, in particular in the fields of intercultural training, human resource management, and communication and marketing.

It will provide valuable preparation for careers in government overseas agencies and international diplomatic organisations, the voluntary sector, local government community initiatives and business consultancies, as well as in the communication industries.

Many of our graduates go on to find employment in a wide range of international organisations and businesses; others choose to take research degrees in their subject.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT

As a student of the School of English and Languages, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics. You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year.

These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

The business component of the programme will also allow you to benefit from the close affiliation with the Surrey Business School, a leading provider of internationally recognised postgraduate vocational management degrees.

The School has strong links with industry and has established a number of high-profile partnerships with multinational organisations. You will be supported by a team of international staff with a wealth of global experience and specialist expertise. Programmes available to all students include:
-Oral Skills
-Academic Listening
-Contemporary British Society
-Pronunciation
-Critical Thinking
-Legal English
-Academic Reading and Note-Taking
-Grammar Revision
-Essay Writing
-Essay Writing for Native English Speakers
-Thesis / Dissertation Writing

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overall purpose of the programme is to:
-Provide a comprehensive and differentiated understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary socio-cultural contexts
-Supply the tools enabling students to apply this understanding to the task of addressing the market needs of the international business environment
-Instil in students the capacity for carrying out advanced supervised research in an area ofIntercultural Communication

In particular, the programme aims to:
-Develop students’ awareness of the linguistic and cultural differences arising from the intercultural encounter of Anglophone culture(s) with the diverse cultures subject to its influence
-Sensitize students to linguistic and cultural difference in the construction of everyday and institutional discourse resulting from the increased marketization of private and public services, as well as to the issues and concerns of the rapidly growing media industries
-Impart the knowledge and skills of intercultural communication and international business necessary to enable students to compete for jobs/research opportunities in fields relevant to their degree (intercultural training, human resource management, government local/overseas agencies and agencies for international co-operation, business consultancies), as well as PhD opportunities in this area
-Develop students’ abilities to evaluate and judiciously apply scholarship in Intercultural Communication

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-A critical understanding of different types of communication, in particular intercultural, cross-cultural, non-mediated (face-to- face) and mediated (telephone, internet,etc.) communication
-A critical awareness of the issues and concerns involved in mediated and non-mediated intercultural communication
-A comprehensive knowledge of the strategies and processes of social interaction either spoken or written
-A detailed understanding of business organisations, their management challenges, and the changing external environment in which they operate

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate an ability to create and carry out a project in the field of (non) professional communication of significant complexity
-Demonstrate an ability to reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Critically appreciate the different frames for analysing social interaction to be applied to the research work required for the writing of the MA dissertation

Professional practical skills
-Create appropriate strategies for effective communication with members of the same and/or other (sub)cultures
-Evaluate communication processes already in place in different contexts and implement communication policies

Key / transferable skills
-The capacity to work both independently and with others in order to achieve common goals
-An ability to manage learning self-critically

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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