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Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically. it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Read more

Introduction

Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically: it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Explore the strategic thinking underlying brands and look at how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Content

Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, this programme encourages students to challenge what is understood about the meaning of graphic branding. It explores the strategic thinking underlying brands and focuses on how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Look around you and you will see examples of the power of brands - on the High Street, within organisations and in the media. From Coca Cola to Virgin, the most successful brands are worth billions.

This MA course focuses on the role of visual identity within branding. The aim is to produce versatile and creative practitioners who understand design within a business, social and cultural context.

It addresses the subject from a broad perspective, covering individual, group, cultural, national, international, corporate and commercial identities. You will be encouraged to look critically at the graphic elements which make up a contemporary visual identity. The emphasis is on practical design, supported by theoretical components and the application of clear research methodologies. As well as developing a deeper knowledge of branding and graphic design, you will gain an understanding of how to develop brand strategies and propositions. An important part of the course involves developing an independent personal project that investigates these principles and their application.

Learning at this level will be about research, intellectual engagement, discovery, interaction and change. The final product for us is not in itself the goal - it is the research, exploration, evaluation and intellectual understanding of branding and identity that makes this MA distinctive.

Structure

Phase 1

Unit 1.1 Design Literacy
Unit 1.2 Research Methods (Visual Research)
Unit 1.3 Major Project Proposal

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 Workshop Options Project
Unit 2.2 Design + Rhetoric
Unit 2.3 Research Methods: Major Project Definition

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Major Project Resolution: Practical and Report or
Unit 3.2 Major Project Resolution: Thesis

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This MA is designed for anyone working in education or a related field. Read more
This MA is designed for anyone working in education or a related field. It aims to enhance your understanding of educational theory and practice by focusing upon issues of culture, language and identity, and it is taught by internationally-renowned experts- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-education-culture-language-identity/

The programme aims to develop an inclusive and inter-cultural approach to teaching and learning across a wide range of educational styles, by interrogating current educational policies, curriculum frameworks, teaching practices and theoretical perspectives.

Its modular structure allows for specialisation in the areas of equity and social justice, curriculum policy and practice, language and culture in education, and the arts in education.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Carrie Paechter.

Modules & Structure

You'll develop new perspectives on education through a process of reasoned critical reflection, and you will be encouraged to apply your developing understanding of educational practices and issues in your own institution and elsewhere.

You have to complete 180 credits, made up from:

-a compulsory core module, Culture, Language and Identity in Education (30 credits)
-option modules (30 credits each)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

All sessions run in the evenings to accommodate professional teachers and educators with substantial existing commitments and workloads.

You may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate if you exit after completing two modules (one third of the programme) or a Postgraduate Diploma if you complete four modules (two thirds of the programme).

Practitioners who already have existing M-level credits from any institution may transfer these on to the MA.

Assessment

Assignments; dissertation.

The programme will enable you to develop:

-enhanced understanding and critical awareness of educational theory and practice
-critical reflection skills
-research skills

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. Read more
The postgraduate programme in Cultural History, Memory and Identity is concerned with the cultural practices and media of ‘history-making’; with the cultural representation and interpretation of ‘history’; and with the role of constructions of ‘the past’ within cultural and social formations. It is grounded in current interdisciplinary methodologies informed by cultural and critical theory, and draws on the course team’s specific areas of expertise within social, cultural and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies and the history of ideas. The programme develops a connection between critical understanding and analysis of the past, with a practical, ‘hands-on’ emphasis upon the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. The programme incorporates interests and expertise spanning a wide range of cultural forms and practices, including oral history, life-story work and auto/biography, drama and performance, material artefacts, monuments, exhibitions, museums, written histories, imaginative literature, archival documents and records, painting, graphic design, photography, film, television, video, digital media, commemoration, and heritage.

These concerns are developed in relation to three pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus: Cultural Memory; Making Histories; ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity. MA students enrol on one of these pathways; not all run every year. [For further details of the three pathways, see separate entries under these titles on this website.]

Each pathway comprises four component elements:

1: A compulsory core course unit that runs throughout the year and establishes the themes, issues and questions that characterize the field of enquiry, the theories and methods of its investigation and applies these to particular case studies:

For Cultural Memory the core course comprises: Cultural Memory: Concepts, Theories and Methods; Holocaust Memory; and Cultural Memory in Ireland.

For Making Histories the core course comprises: Public History, Heritage and the Representation of Brighton & Hove; Making the History of Slavery in the Atlantic World; and Making the History of the Second World War

For ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity the core course comprises: Constructions of Britishness: Histories, Cultures and Identities; The Making of the Black Atlantic; and Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures.

2: Two optional units of 20 credits each, or one optional unit of 40 credits. These are usually taken from within the MA Humanities Programme, or from MA Programmes running elsewhere in the School of Humanities.

NB: these units may vary, and not all will be available in any one year. For up-to-date information, contact the Course Leader.

3. A Research Methods unit introducing relevant methods in cultural studies, historical inquiry, literary (textual) analysis, and cultural and critical theory; and guiding the formulation of a research topic with clear aims, methodology, sources, and a rationale for the intended treatment of the topic.


4: The Research Project enables students to investigate in depth a topic of their choice - a critical debate, or a body of cultural material, or an historical context - relevant to the broad concerns of the MA. Research normally leads to the production of a 20,000-word dissertation. The use of alternative modes of presentation - for example, the production of a video, an exhibition or a CD-Rom - may also be negotiated
.

Full-time students usually take two elements per term, part-time students usually take one. The pattern of study is flexible in order to allow all students to take advantage of the full range of options. Potential applicants are advised to discuss their particular interests with the Course Leader to explore how these might be accommodated. In cases where students’ preferred pathways or units are not available, there is usually scope to pursue these interests elsewhere on the programme, whether in relation to other units or through the Research Project.

A part-time student should expect to dedicate some 20 hours a week to their studies and a full-time student some 40 hours, mostly taken up by independent reading and writing. Teaching for all Core Courses normally takes place on weekday evenings and lasts 2 - 3 hours. Research Methods timetabling is negotiated with each group. The Research Project involves individual tuition at times agreed between student and supervisor.

The interdisciplinary course team are active researchers and leaders in their respective research fields. Please see their individual staff pages for further details of areas of research expertise and interest.
Visit Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA page on the University of Brighton website for more details!

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The opportunity to gain a theoretical grasp of different dimensions of ‘cultural identity’. Explore the ways such dimensions are represented in one or more of the cultural traditions of France, Germany, Italy, Latin America, the Middle East, Russia, Spain. Read more

MLitt in Cultural Identity Studies

• The opportunity to gain a theoretical grasp of different dimensions of ‘cultural identity’.
• Explore the ways such dimensions are represented in one or more of the cultural traditions of France, Germany, Italy, Latin America, the Middle East, Russia, Spain.

Additional Entrance Requirement: one language taught at the School of Modern Languages (Arabic, French, Italian, German, Persian, Russian, Spanish) to Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework Level 7, Common European Framework Level B1, or equivalent; English language proficiency with a minimum of 7.0 in IELTS or equivalent.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/modlangs/prospectivepostgraduates/taughtprogrammes/

Features

* There are six language departments (Arabic and Persian, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish) providing discipline-specific programmes plus collaborative programmes in Comparative Literature and Cultural Identity Studies.

* Strong international collaborations through the Erasmus Mundus Masters programme (with partner universities in England, France, Italy, Portugal, Poland, Spain, Canada, Argentina and Mexico).

* Current postgraduate population of 35 PhD students and some 20 students on various taught programmes.

* A diverse and international student body from across Europe, North America, the Middle East, the Far East, and Africa, as well as the UK.

* Strong emphasis on integration of taught and research postgraduates, in particular through the postgraduate seminar series, postgraduate organised workshops, and the annual postgraduate conference – all postgraduates are encouraged to participate in all of these.

* Strong emphasis on students’ personal development, as programmes are designed specifically to promote the transition from undergraduate to more autonomous postgraduate approaches to study and research.

* The recently revised structure of the MLitt programmes combines an integrated interdisciplinarity with subject specific contextualisation, and a broad-based knowledge is developed towards in-depth specialism as the course progresses.

* Particular attention to more practical personal development in the core module Research and Professional Skills, which provides instruction and training in a range of skills useful for an academic career and transferable to other professions.

Postgraduate community

Whilst the six departments in the School of Modern Languages retain their individuality, the School as a whole is very well integrated, with collaborative teaching within and across departments, and this is reflected in the postgraduate community as well. Students on different MLitt programmes will all take some core modules together, and all postgraduates, MLitt, Mundus, and PhD students are encouraged to attend the large number of research seminars and workshops which take place in the School, as well as organising their own specific events. The size of the School and the number of postgraduates provides a friendly informal setting conducive to interdisciplinarity and discussion of ideas and issues in a thought-provoking but relaxed and supportive environment.

Class sizes

Class sizes vary as some modules are common to a number of programmes and so have more students in them, whilst others may be more specialised and therefore smaller.

Careers

Many of our postgraduates go on to careers in the academic field, as university teachers, researchers or administrators. Others find employment in other areas, for example as cultural advisors, translators, or in the public or civil service. Recent graduates have secured posts such as university teachers in the UK and Germany, research assistants, a postgraduate recruitment officer, at GCHQ, a professional translator, an adviser to the CBI, and a subtitler for television.

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The MA in Modern History can be studied following one of five strands. British Intelligence History. Read more
The MA in Modern History can be studied following one of five strands:

British Intelligence History
This strand explores the history of intelligence in the 20th century through the medium of the British intelligence community, particularly, though not exclusively, the Secret Intelligence Service (popularly known as MI6). The pathway convenor is Professor Keith Jeffery who has recently completed the official history of SIS.

Religion, Identity and Conflict in History [new for 2012]
This strand explores the role played by religion in various forms and modes of historical conflict and identity, from the rise of Reformation to the global age, in Europe and the World. It looks at how religious convictions have intersected and interacted with the historical dynamic, how it fostered social, cultural, and political discord as well as acted as a mediator and a mitigator for peace.

British History
This strand focuses on British history from the mid-nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. It provides an introduction to the latest historiography being employed in political history, cultural and social history and examines domestic British history and the nation’s relationship with the wider world.

American History
This strand focuses on the history of the United States, and especially the American South, in the last two centuries.

Medieval and Early Modern History
This strand gives students the opportunity to explore medieval and early modern history in depth, drawing on the wide range of expertise of staff within the School.

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Rather than withering away under the impact of globalisation, borders have become privileged sites today for investigating the contemporary transformation of European governance, sovereignty, territory and identit(ies). Read more

Master's specialisation in Europe: Borders, Identity and Governance

Rather than withering away under the impact of globalisation, borders have become privileged sites today for investigating the contemporary transformation of European governance, sovereignty, territory and identit(ies). The masters specialisation Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance will focus on b/ordering processes occurring within Europe’s internal cross-border regions (or Euregions), taking into account the context of shifts in state sovereignty, territoriality, and cultural identity in Europe’s borderlands. Courses within this program will also train attention on the external bordering dimension of the European Union (ie, Eastward Enlargement, European Neighbourhood Programme), while also addressing the EU’s search for a broader role in the world. Key themes raised in this master specialisation are e.g.: cross-border governance, transnational and multi-level governance, European citizenship and ‘cosmopolitical’ identit(ies), critical border geopolitics, biopolitical b/orderings and border securitisation, European post-colonial b/ordering and ‘othering’, and the search for an ‘ethical’ dimension to European borders.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ebig

Career prospects

The Master's specialisation Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance provides graduates entry into rapidly growing sectors of the job market, be it government, business or academia. Students will be able to apply the scientific insights and practical skills acquired to topics as varied as Europeanisation, internationalisation, borders, identities, cross-border governance and international cooperation and politics.
With expertise gained through this master a graduate may work for a local, provincial, or national (e.g. Foreign Affairs section) government, becoming responsible for, sharing expertise in and delivering advice on cross-border cooperation, international mobility, the attraction of international firms and investments, or the acquisition of European Union funds.
Another major category of employment may be found in the field of consultancy.As a consultant or advisor, a graduate may help promote the internationalisation of a city or region, or assist regional and city governments in obtaining and managing EU- funded projects.
The master is also very well suited as preparation for an international career. A graduate may find employment with the European parliament, European Commission or related institutions, or work as a programme officer with a European organisation or as an International/European affairs expert in a firm. Opportunities also abound within the rapidly growing job market for academic researchers and/or lecturers with one of the many Dutch or international research institutes and schools focusing on European issues.

Our approach to this field

The Master's "Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance" is an engaged and inspiring master that offers state-of-the-art knowledge and skills in the field of European studies. As the European Union is a construction of politically engaged human beings, we will focus on this construction process first and foremost. We will try to find answers to questions like: why do we wish to have a European Union and in what form then, where are the borders of the European Union, how do the policies of the European
Union affect our daily lives, our national identities and national borders and how do the policies of the European Union affect the people outside the European Union, that is the neighbour countries as well as countries further away. You will be taught by distinguished and internationally recognised professors who
study these issues and publish their findings in international academic journals and contribute to the public debate. Our goal is to help you gain up-to-date insights and exchange views on this important knowledge field in a spirit of curiosity, openness and thoughtfulness. You will study theories, methods and instruments, but above all you will develop a knowledge-seeking and critical attitude.

The Master's ‘Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance’ includes a variety of cases, individual and group assignments, international excursions, lectures and seminars. This unique programme gives you the opportunity to share experiences with other students and to link theory Europe: Borders, Identities and Governance with practice. You can select the elective courses that you find interesting and important and you can choose your own topic for your master thesis. Furthermore, we offer to find an exciting and
challenging national or international internship in the field of your own interest.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ebig

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The Literature. Politics and Identity MA is distinctive for its combination of innovative and traditional approaches to the subject. Read more
The Literature: Politics and Identity MA is distinctive for its combination of innovative and traditional approaches to the subject. Through a choice of modules you will have opportunities to explore key contexts for English Literature and to apply your learning in practical ways.

A core module enables you to develop and practice research skills, while optional modules explore contemporary and classic texts from a range of perspectives. As well as analysing literary texts you will also have the chance to respond to them in creative ways.

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The MA Irish History is studied through the Culture, Politics and Identity strand. This is a general strand, with an emphasis on the relationship between culture and politics in the history of modern Ireland from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Read more
The MA Irish History is studied through the Culture, Politics and Identity strand. This is a general strand, with an emphasis on the relationship between culture and politics in the history of modern Ireland from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Designed as a flexible means of pursuing modern Irish history, it can be individually tailored to allow students to focus on specific research interests beyond the core themes of culture and politics, including Migration, (taught in collaboration with staff from the Centre for Migration Studies) and Women's History and Gender. Further information about the MA Irish History in general is available from the co-ordinator, Dr Fearghal McGarry ()

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This course gives you the opportunity to work at the centre of the most dynamic, powerful and influential areas of professional design. Read more
This course gives you the opportunity to work at the centre of the most dynamic, powerful and influential areas of professional design. You will learn how to plan and create brands that will speak with power and persuasion. At the start of the course you'll work on short projects which are aimed at challenging conventions. You'll then focus on a subject of your choice through research and development. You will also build a Professional Journal which explores current thought and practice.

Key features:

Develop a project tailored to your own personal interests and career aspirations.
Engage with industry by undertaking short internships and studio visits.
Work in our dedicated Art and Design postgraduate studio.
Benefit from regular lectures from leading figures in the design industry.
Attend workshops covering typography, visual language, branding, storyboarding and life drawing sessions.
Opt for an additional advanced research module if you’re thinking of progressing to PhD or Professional Doctorate study

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Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Read more
Open for 2016 entry, Royal Holloway's MA in Political Philosophy offers advanced training in key issues and thinkers in contemporary political thought, from both Anglo-American and Continental perspectives. Our political philosophers have research and teaching interests in applied analytical political theory (with issues including immigration, citizenship and the politics of recognition), post-Nietzschean theories of identity and post-identity politics, democratic theory and pragmatist philosophy.

Subject to validation.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/philosophy/coursefinder/mapoliticalphilosophy.aspx

Why choose this course?

- the programme allows you to specialise in political philosophy while addressing questions from both analytic and European perspectives

- the course brings together staff and students working in contemporary Continental philosophy, normative political theory, and American pragmatism

- we offer some studentships and bursaries in support of students taking the MA

- the course offers a wide range of options both within political philosophy and outside of it

- the programme has close connections to the Department of Politics and International Relations which hosts a vibrant international community of postgraduate students working on a wide range of issues in politics, political theory, and international relations.

Department research and industry highlights

- Members of the teaching staff have a wide range of expertise, having published major works in a number of areas and on a number of figures, including Adorno; Aesthetics and Subjectivity; Altruism; Hegel; Deleuze; French and Continental Philosophy; Greek and Roman Aesthetics; the Holocaust and the Postmodern; Music, Philosophy, and Modernity; Richard Rorty; Romanticism to Critical Theory; Scepticism; Schelling; Time and Politics.

Current projects include:
- examining at the possibilities offered by aesthetics, and music in particular, for developing a non-cognitive model of thinking

- investigating the coherence of the notion of tacit knowledge, and its implications for knowledge more generally

- tracing the development of modern French thought to its origins in German Idealism

- imagination in ancient aesthetics

- a pragmatist theory of deliberative democracy

- arguments in defence of associative duties

- psychoanalytic and post-Nietzschean conceptions of agency and selfhood.

Programme structure

Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)

Two Courses from Among: Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit); Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ Unit); and Political Concepts (½ unit).

Two half-unit option courses from available options

Dissertation (1 unit)

Core course units:
- Advanced Topics in Philosophy (1 unit)
The aim of this course is to allow students to engage with cutting edge research from across the range of philosophical sub-fields. The course also allows students to develop their understanding of the nature of philosophy and the diversity of philosophical methods, as well to further improve their abilities at written and oral communication of philosophical ideas and arguments. The course will be taught by a number of philosophers who teach on the wider MA programmes, and will be divided into four parts, each presenting a five week introduction to a topic researched by the academic. It will allow students enrolled on the different MA Philosophy streams to compare approaches, and see their own specialism within a wider philosophical context. The module will be taught via a two hour weekly seminar.

- Anglo-American Political Theory (½ unit)
You will be given an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in contemporary Anglo-American political theory, enabling you to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Attention will be paid to some of the main paradigms through which such debate is structured (e.g. individualism v. community, and democracy v. justice), as well as the practical implications of more abstract ideas.

- Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)
The course addresses key questions and arguments concerning the relationship between identity, power, meaning and knowledge, through examination of key figures in contemporary Continental political thought and philosophy. Specific content varies from year to year, but may include key texts from Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno, Sartre, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ranciere, and Deleuze & Guattari.

- Political Concepts (½ unit)
The course aims to give an advanced grounding in the central ideas and concepts in applied political theory, enabling students to engage in its ongoing debates, to gain knowledge of some of the key authors, books and articles, and to acquire a sense of the state of the discipline as a whole. Seminars will be based on short pieces of key reading thus fostering skills of interpretive analysis and focussing discussion.

Dissertation on Political Philosophy (1 unit)

Elective course units:
Anglo American Political Theory (½ unit)

Contemporary Continental Political Thought (½ unit)

Continental Aesthetics (½ unit)

The European Philosophical Trajectory (½ unit)

The Frankfurt School (½ unit)

The Future of Phenomenology (½ unit)

Human Rights (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Political Theory (½ unit)

Legacices of Wittgenstein (½ unit)

Neo-Platonism (½ unit)

Identity, Power and Radical Political Theory (½ unit)

Post-Holocaust Philosophy (½ unit)

Twentieth Century French Thought (½ unit)

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a knowledge of the broad range of approaches in contemporary political philosophy from Anglo-American and Continental traditions

- detailed understanding of philosophers and texts in key traditions in political thought

- an ability to read complex philosophical texts with an appreciation of the role of style and context in their composition

- an understanding of the broader philosophical landscape, and the place of political philosophy within it.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and would be prepared for careers in a wide range of areas. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This is an artist-led masters programme, open to theatre makers of all styles and disciplines, We provide an unparalleled opportunity for emergent and established… Read more
This is an artist-led masters programme, open to theatre makers of all styles and disciplines, We provide an unparalleled opportunity for emergent and established artists who want time and space to make high-¬¬quality theatre work and establish or refine their creative and professional identity.The programme also helps you develop skills and abilities to work in FE/HE contexts or continue to advanced study (PhD).

Our Performance programme has 2 pathways, “Theatre” and "Theatre Collectives”, and is designed especially for both emerging and established theatre and performance artists or groups. A part ‘taught’, part ‘research’ model, the programme is centred on core modules in postgraduate research methodologies, around which you create a new piece of work, an artists portfolio, business plan, and a practice-led-research project, as well as opportunities to establish a professional artistic identity and platform your own work in National and International markets, and develop prospects for continuing higher education, both in terms of teaching and in terms of continuing study.

Key Features:
* Professional mentoring, with key international theatre artists
* Opportunities to present work at National events, platforms and Festivals
* Industry training and Business planning with staff in our Business Centre
* Cutting edge spaces and resources
* A vibrant and active community

Course Content:
This programme is designed to be extremely flexible, reflecting the diversity of approaches to making artwork. It can be studied full-time or part-time. Students are expected to develop two parallel projects: a work-in-progress piece informed by an extensive critical agenda and a major performance event. These projects are underpinned by extensive (written) critical study and the development of a ‘professional (business) portfolio’ that helps define the nature and purpose of the creative projects in an external context.

“Groups" and “Individuals"
A key feature of the programme is the ‘Theatre Collective’ strand: we welcome block-applications from groups of artists, who are keen to develop their creative identity as part of a shared collective. Individuals are, of course, welcome, either as solo performers or as individuals looking to share practice in new contexts.

Chichester: Working Environment
Students will be entering into one of the most vibrant and connected environments and communities for making contemporary theatre and performance. The Department of Theatre at Chichester has an established reputation for working with a wide range of established performance artists who recognise the opportunities of creative research and development within an applied university context. Much of the work developed by students Department is presented in our ShowRoom Theatre, a key venue in the national touring network, with a reputation for programming innovative and radical work, but we also have firm links with venues and festivals in Brighton, London, Bristol and Edinburgh.

Our Facilities
During the last two years we have considerable refurbishments to both our Chichester and Bognor Regis campuses. These renovations include a purpose-built Assembly Theatre, used by Theatre students for rehearsals and performance. We also have a number of soundproofed practice rooms for rehearsals and lessons, as well as lecture and seminar rooms. Our Chapel is also a fantastic venue for performances and rehearsals, and is the centre piece of the campus. There are also several dance studios, a fully-equipped 250-seat theatre, and a 110-seat studio theatre.

Our new award-winning Learning Resource Centre is at the heart of the campus, and we offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. Also situated in our LRC is Costa Coffee and nearly 100 open-access work stations. An equipment loans centre offers laptops, tablets and other electronic devices for short and long term loans.

where this course can take you
You will be encouraged to think about your own future within theatre along with the help of our academic lecturers, many of who are professional artists with links to hundreds of theatres across the UK. Your own new work will be stimulated by a continuous programme of professional performances from a wide range of international artists, many of whom support the work of the department through teaching and mentoring.

Work Placements
Every year we offer students the chance to work with the technical, marketing, or outreach departments of our local theatres in art centres and other venues, theatre companies, independent producers, schools/colleges and various other related contexts. These programmes are designed to help get your foot on the ladder on graduating within an established organisation or professional context.

Indicative modules:
This programme constitutes 180 Credits and is broken into five compulsory modules:

* Developmental Project (Practice led Research and Development, including a written dissertation, 60 credits)
* Production (Practical Project, 60 credits)
* Professional Portfolio (Professional development and representation, 30 credits)
* Research Methodology (Critical Studies, 15 credits)
* Cultural Identity and Performance (Critical/Practical Research Project, 15 credits)

Teaching and Assessment:
Our programme is run by a team of highly dedicated academics and artists, who also teach on the highly successful BA Theatre Programme and on the Performing Arts MPhil/PhD programme. We work very closely with a wide range of established artists and performance collectives – both members of Faculty and Associate Artists – who recognise the unique contribution Chichester makes to supporting new theatre work. All these artists are working – or have worked recently – with our students.

Associate artists include;
Dickie Beau, Ira Brand, Rosana Cade and Nick Anderson (BUZZCUT), Simon Casson (Duckie), Karen Christopher, Clerke and Joy, Ed Collier, Abigail Conway, Jo Crowley, Tania El Khoury, Ju Row Farr, Andy Field, Sheila Ghelani, Chris Goode, Amanda Hadingue, Helena Hunter, Bryony Kimmings, Stacy Makishi, Rachel Mars, Ursula Martinez, Lucy McCormick and Hester Chillingworth (GETINTHEBACKOFTHEVAN), Hannah Nicklin, Terry O Connor, Kira O Reilly, Deborah Pearson, Syliva Rimat, Scottee, David Sheppeard and Abby Butcher (Marlborough Theatre), Tassos Stevens, and Simon Vincenzi

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Graduate Diploma Photography will give you the practical skills you'll need to define yourself as a leading photographer and by encouraging the development of a strong conceptual approach to your personal practice, achieve a defined identity in you work. Read more

Content

Graduate Diploma Photography will give you the practical skills you'll need to define yourself as a leading photographer and by encouraging the development of a strong conceptual approach to your personal practice, achieve a defined identity in you work.

The course will give you an invaluable understanding of the photography industry and the business aspect of professional photography, as well as introduce you to key contacts and help you build relationships.
Building on the rich heritage of photography teaching at London College of Communication, Graduate Diploma Photography will open a variety of career opportunities in professional photography.

During your studies, you'll work towards developing a high quality portfolio suitable for presentation when approaching clients for future commissions or industry roles. In addition, you'll work on set and self-initiated projects which promote learning through discovery, interaction and response to change.

For those wishing to continue their study the theory and research elements of the course will also prepare you for continued learning at a higher level of study. The Graduate Diploma in Photography is taught within the School of Media at LCC.

STRUCTURE

During the first two weeks, there will be an induction programme in which you will:
Get an overview of the structure of the course and the structure of each unit
Get to know the facilities on offer to you at course, College and University level, including those provided by the Learning Resources department, Student Services and Students' Union
Learn how to use the technology in the Library and open access
Get to know your tutors and colleagues
Learn about the difference between working at postgraduate and undergraduate levels
Discover the ethos of the course

Autumn, Term One (11 weeks)

Unit summary:
Unit 1: Professional Photography in Practice (Photographic Technology and Applied Production Skills) (40 credits)
Through a series of workshops and project briefs this unit will to enable you to develop and utilise specialist photographic skills and knowledge to solve photographic problems. Through planning, implementation and review, and engagement with industry, you will be able to apply your photographic skills in a realistic professional context and identify areas in which you may wish to develop your practice.
Unit 2: Critical Approaches (Photographic Culture, History and Theory) (20 credits)
This unit will give you the opportunity to study major developments and critical approaches in photography. To enable you to gain an understanding of the contemporary significance of photography and to place your own work in a historical cultural context. This unit is particularly useful to those students wishing to bridge to Master level study.

Spring, Term Two (10 weeks)

Unit summary:
Professional Photography in Practice (continued)
Critical Approaches (continued)

Unit 3: Personal Project (Research and development) (20 credits)
Through the research and development of a comprehensive project you will be able to recognise creative influences in your own work and develop an understanding of your own creative ambitions.
Unit 4: Professional Identity and Portfolio Development (Professional Context and Progression) (40 credits)
This unit is a culmination of your previous units, offering you the hands-on opportunity to develop a professional body of work that showcases your personal identity. This is the most significant unit in that you are expected to produce a professional portfolio of work in which you will be required to demonstrate a rigorous and critical analysis of your interests in professional photography, strongly influenced by your area of specialism.

Summer, Term Three (10 weeks)

Unit summary:
Personal Project (continued)
Professional Identity and Portfolio Development (continued)

You will explore and gain working knowledge of contemporary business practice with an emphasis on operating as a freelance practitioner. The process for all units will involve you in original applications of knowledge, together with a practical ability to use and critically assess existing photographic techniques and formats. You will also, in the process of the critical evaluation of your own and others work, develop innovative solutions to creative challenges.

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Euroculture is an interdisciplinary master's specialization of excellence, focusing on the key challenges of contemporary Europe. Read more
Euroculture is an interdisciplinary master's specialization of excellence, focusing on the key challenges of contemporary Europe. Its strengths are a job-oriented approach and training in substantive research skills.

The master's specialization Euroculture is a unique, interdisciplinary and international programme consisting of 4 semesters (120 ECTS) and offered by a Consortium (8 European and 4 non-European universities). The status “Erasmus Mundus Master of Excellence" was granted to the programme by the European Commission in 2005 and again in 2011 thereby confirming the programme's outstanding quality. In 2015, Euroculture was, for the 4th time in a row, considered to be a "top" Master Programme by Keuzegids, an independent Dutch guide ranking university Programmes. In fact, the Keuzegids considered the Euroculture programme to be the best European Studies Master programme in the Netherlands.

The mission of the programme is to provide graduates with the following:

- a deep understanding of European identity, civil society, the ongoing European unification process in itself, its cultural and social dynamics and the consequences for its citizens and the wider world;

- the ability to identify and problematise what Europe, and the EU, represents for its citizens and for the wider world.

Why in Groningen?

Euroculture in Groningen is proud of being a founding member of the programme (1999), and of its achievements as Programme of Excellence. For three years in a row we have been selected as best European Studies Programme in the Netherlands (source: Master Keuzegids). Futhermore, the University of Groningen belongs to the global top 100 on the three most important ranking lists ('Shanghai, THE and QS World University Rankings).

The international staff of Euroculture hold doctoral degrees in a variety of disciplines, such as history, cultural studies, political science, European law, European studies and international relations. The academic and research focus in Groningen is the notion of cultural identity and its relation to European integration in all its dimensions. Concepts such as “Europeanisation” and “Citizenship” are important elements in seminars. Trans-Atlantic relations and East Asia feature prominently in Groningen too.

Groningen is also an excellent choice of residence because this university town is lively and pleasant, with about 1 out 5 inhabitants being a student. For students there are excellent facilities not only for studying (ICT, library, Placement Office, International Office), but also for sports, entertainment and leisure.

Job perspectives

Euroculture prepares graduates for professions and research careers where knowledge of contemporary Europe and the European Union institutions are of relevance.

Due to the multi- and interdisciplinary nature of the Euroculture programme, its graduates find work in a broad range of sectors where expert knowledge of present Europe and European integration processes is required. A number of our graduates have also undertaken further studies on doctoral level.

The focus of the programme is on cultural and social developments, the political process of European integration, values, citizenship and cultural identity within Europe and its correlations with the wider world. Euroculture teaches students the methods and skills required to identify the European dimensions of social problems, to critically assess and interpret information about European institutions and organisations, and to understand the cultural aspects and factors that play a key role in the process of European identity formation and integration.

Career Prospects

Euroculture alumni have found employment in the following areas/organisations:
- EU institutions
- International and national organisations (non-governmental, non-profit, foundations)
- Universities, education and research institutions
- Embassies and ministeries all over the world
- Media, journalism, publishing, libraries
- Cultural (management) organisations
- Foreign trade organisations
- Political parties, foundations and associations
- City and regional planning, local and regional cultural projects
- Centres for minorities and minority rights

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Learn to communicate effectively in an intercultural workplace. Advance your knowledge of language and cultural theory, as well as your business and professional communication skills, in a community of students from all over the world. Read more
Learn to communicate effectively in an intercultural workplace. Advance your knowledge of language and cultural theory, as well as your business and professional communication skills, in a community of students from all over the world. You’ll even have the chance to spend a semester on a European campus.

Overview

In our increasingly global world, contact between cultures is of vital economic and sociocultural importance. Our Master’s course will give you the skills and knowledge to build a successful career in an intercultural environment.

You’ll gain an understanding of how cultural differences impact on human interaction in both the workplace and society. With modules that focus on topics like migration, identity and cultural relations, you’ll advance your theoretical knowledge at the same time as improving your business and professional communication skills.

You’ll also learn to use different methodological tools that will help you understand language and communication, as well as sharpen your analytical skills. This will give you the confidence to think independently and innovatively around the interdisciplinary, and often multinational, challenges of the modern world of work.

As a full-time student, you can choose to spend one semester at a European university (the Eurocampus). At the Eurocampus, your studies will be equivalent to those of Cambridge-based students, and you’ll still work in English.

On both our Cambridge campus and the Eurocampus, you’ll be working alongside students from all over the world, including the USA, Canada, Germany, France, China, Japan, Taiwan, Spain, Italy, Finland, Turkey and Lithuania. This will give you additional experience and understanding of intercultural environments to support your academic studies.

Teaching times: Mondays and Thursdays from 6-8pm (full-time); Mondays or Thursdays from 6-8pm (part-time).

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/intercultural-communication

Careers

This course will prepare you for many roles in international companies, local government, European institutions, social work or education and training.

Our past students now enjoy careers like intercultural training (eg for Communicaid), intercultural mediation in educational and social contexts, work with non-governmental organisations (UNESCO, UNICEF), language teaching (both English and other languages in the UK and abroad), translating and interpreting (in agencies or community contexts), administration (in business, education or embassies), international property sales, and human resources.

Or you might choose to move on to a research degree, like our PhD English Language and Intercultural Communication.

Modules

Core modules:
Major Project

Optional modules:
Discourse and Identity
Impacts of Migration
Eurocampus
Language, Identity and Policy
Intercultural Relations and Communication
Independent Learning Module

Assessment

Our course gives you the option to spend one semester at a European university, or study in Cambridge only.

On the Cambridge-only route, you’ll show your progress through written coursework: 6,000-word essays for all modules except Impacts of Migration, which requires a 5,000-word essay and a presentation. You'll also complete a 15,000-word dissertation.

On the 'Eurocampus' route, you’ll be assessed through a combination of methods depending on the institution.

Awards and distinctions

By taking this course, you’ll be studying on a programme that has twice been awarded the UK Trade and Investment National Languages for Export award (for the Eastern region in the UK), in the category 'Innovative courses in adult, further and higher education which prepare students for working in, or with, people from non-English-speaking markets'.

Study abroad options

Every year, the Eurocampus takes place at a different institution. Participating universities include: Bayreuth, Germany: Universität Bayreuth; Cambridge, UK: Anglia Ruskin University; Jyväskylä, Finland: University of Jyväskylä; Lisbon, Portugal: Universidade Aberta; Lugano, Switzerland: Università della Svizzera Italiana; Paris, France: Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales; Tartu, Estonia: University of Tartu; Utrecht, Netherlands: University of Utrecht.

The Eurocampus location for the next two years will be:

2015: Cambridge
2016: Bayreuth

Events

You’ll be able to attend regular seminar papers by visiting scholars, organised by our Research Unit for Intercultural and Transcultural Studies (RUITS) network.

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