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What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?. The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from . Read more

What is the Master of Digital Humanities all about?

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities helps graduates from Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences programmes to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link these competencies to research questions, case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students.

Graduates of this programme will be able to bring their own domain expertise to a significantly higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the programme and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, graduates will be well placed to open many new digital applications to a much wider community. Moreover, those who wish to move to a professional profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are well prepared to do so.

Structure

The programme is organized around a number of clusters of course units. The central clusters are the Application Domains cluster and the Tools for the Digital World cluster. Supporting clusters are the Introductory Digitization Components cluster, the Advanced Digitization Components cluster and the Management Component. The heart of the research activities is situated in the Master’s thesis.

International and multidisciplinary

The Master’s Programme is conceived as a one year, international and multidisciplinary advanced master programme (master-after-master). The programme is unique in Flanders and one of only a few in Europe. The programme is firmly framed in an explicit collaboration between the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Sciences - Department of Computer Science. As such, it is supported by experts in Digital Humanities applications, who supply research expertise for the programme, as well as by experts in digital techniques and tools, who provide a sound technical basis for the students.

Objectives

Digitization affects in many ways how future scientists in Humanities and Behavioural Sciences will conduct their research. Also, graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs enter a professional world in which digitization becomes the standard, be it in publishing, arts, libraries, teaching and many others.

The Master of Science in Digital Humanities program aims to prepare graduates from Humanities and Behavioural Sciences programs for these challenges. It aims to help such graduates to develop digital competencies that will allow them to add digital dimensions to their own domain expertise. It aims to explicitly link this knowledge and these competencies to case studies and applications related to the domain expertise of the students. It will train them to master information structures and functionalities of data, programming structures and technique to produce scripts for digital applications, tools for improving access and interactive use of data and the development of new digital applications. It will train them how to manage projects related to digitization and introduce them to emerging new digital technologies and their applications.

As an advanced master program (master-after master), it is assumed that the students entering this program have already achieved the general academic competencies defined for any master's program. Nevertheless, it is also within the aims of the program to further strengthen these competencies, within the specific context that Digital Humanities offers.

More specifically, graduates understand the basics of Digital Humanities, databases and query languages, scripting languages, the role of IT in management and of some of the emerging technologies in Digital Humanities. They are able to formulate research goals, determine trajectories that achieve these goals, collect and select information relevant to achieve the research goals and interpret collected information on the basis of a critical research attitude. They are able to communicate scientifically. They are able to model a database and use SQL, to use a scripting language, to apply tools for Digital Humanities and to study applications in Digital Humanities. They have the attitudes of valuing and fostering creative, critical and independent thinking, of applying an interdisciplinary and participative approach in innovative development and of striving towards opening the digital world to a broader society.

Career perspectives

Academically, researchers in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Science are confronted with the need to apply digital tools to facilitate and enhance their research. The program enables graduates to enhance their research in the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences through non-trivial uses of digital tools and techniques. This may include modeling and querying databases, accessing data, interconnecting andquerying web resources, extending tools with scripts to provide extra functionality, text-encoding and e-publishing, mining repositories, data visualization, analyzing social networks, adopting, adapting and enhancing e-learning environments, improvingusability of human-computer interaction. As such, graduates are very well placed to take on the challenges that novel research positions require.

Professionally, graduates of the Humanities, Social of Behavioral Sciences enter professional environments where connecting the company’s business with digital tools and techniques has become standard. Here as well, the program enables its graduates to put to use non-trivial digital techniques in their professional occupations, including e-media, publishing, arts, history, culture, music, libraries, e-education or interactions for end-user applications. Thus, graduates who want to pursue a career in the usual sectors for graduates of the Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences will be much better prepared to cope with the digital techniques that are currently applied there.

More generally, graduates of this program provide society with professionals and researchers who are able to bring their own domain expertise to a higher level of functionality, using digital tools and techniques. Building both on the expertise they obtained from the program and their prior expertise in Humanities, Social or Behavioral Sciences, are well placed to take part in opening the digital world to a larger community.

Graduates of this program who wish to move to a job profile involving more advanced digital competencies, are prepared to do so and will help to close to gap in an IT-focused labor market. This will require extra training at the company and aims at positions such as project analysts, project managers, service managers.



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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The MA degree is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a computationally-enabled PhD in the arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

A number of funding options are available including two An Foras Feasa Taught Masters Bursaries, the University wide Taught Masters Scholarships and the Maynooth University Taught Masters Alumni Scholarships. Further details may be found at: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/foras-feasa/ma-and-phd-funding

Course Structure

90 ECTS are needed to complete the Masters. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

Project and Dissertation: 30 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Part-time students are advised to register for ‘Digital Humanities Theory and Practice’ in the first semester, while working for the ‘Digital Humanities Practicum’ in the second year of the course.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

The project and dissertation over the last semester of the course and will be individually supervised or co-supervised by an academic from one or both of the contributing departments. Student who wish not to write the final thesis have the opportunity to exit the course with a postgraduate diploma in Digital Humanities.

Career Options

Graduates of the MA in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and research projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50F/MH51F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are. Read more

This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are: What can the humanities contribute to healthcare? How do they differ from the sciences? And what can they tell us about illness?

Key benefits

  • Unrivalled central London location, giving immediate access to important medico-historical and cultural resources, including libraries, galleries, archives and museums, e.g. The Wellcome Collection and Library, the Hunterian Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the British Library etc.
  • World class expertise in a breadth of subject areas, including: History of Psychiatry, Literature & Medicine, Philosophy of Medicine and Mental Disorder, Medical Portraiture, Nursing and Film, Bioethics.
  • Taught at the Wellcome-funded Centre for the Humanities & Health, which supports the research activities of internationally renowned scholars in the field; has a vibrant and active post-graduate and post-doctoral community; and hosts a lively programme of seminars, conferences and events.
  • Close links between the Faculty of Arts & Humanities and one of the largest Schools of Biomedicine in Europe.

Description

The Medical Humanities are a growing field of scholarship that produces powerful, innovative analyses of today’s healthcare issues. You will study the fundamentals of the field and develop analytical and critical skills that will enable you to address questions such as:

  • Does studying the humanities make us more humane?
  • How are the humanities different from the sciences, and what new angles do they offer on old ethical dilemmas?
  • What is health? What is illness?
  • What kind of evidence about illness does literature provide?
  • What is narrative and how embedded are narrative ways of thought in health care practice?

You will leave us with a deep understanding of how a variety of humanities disciplines conceive of health and illness and of the contributions these can make to healthcare. The disciplines we cover include Philosophy, Literature, Film, Psychiatry, Art History and Nursing, leading to skills in the visual, bioethical, literary, historical and philosophical analyses of healthcare.

Based on our previous Literature & Medicine MA, this MSc allows you to choose from a broader range of modules, interact with a wider range of students, and gain a firm grounding in the medical humanities by following common required modules. Your fellow students will come from a wide variety of academic and health backgrounds, from biosciences such as medicine, nursing, psychology and from health law, social work and humanities such as philosophy, film and literary studies.

Course purpose

The MSc in Medical Humanities incorporates the previous King's MA Literature and Medicine programmes. The course allows students to choose a broader range of modules within their degree, interact with a wider range of students, and gain a firm footing in the medical humanities by following common core modules. Students will come from a wide variety of academic and health backgrounds: biosciences such as medicine, nursing, psychology; from health law and social work and humanities trainings in philosophy, film and/or literary studies. They will develop further skills in visual, bioethical, literary, historical and philosophical analyses of health care.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-tme student, we will give you five to nine hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 34 hours of self-study. .

If you are a part-time student, we will give you three to five hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars in your first year and two to four hours in your second year, and we will expect you to undertake 23 hours of self-study in your first year and 11 in your second year.

You will write your dissertation in your summer, for which we will give you four hours of supervision.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will normally assess you through coursework. Typically, 20-credit modules will be assessed through a 4,000-word essay and 40-credit modules through two 4,000-word essays. Your dissertation will be a 15,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Further academic study in medicine and/or the humanities, if you are hoping to study on a Medical Humanities PhD programme or a career in journalism or bioethics.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. Read more

Overview

Digital Humanities is a fast and growing interdisciplinary field at the cutting edge of 21st century research methods. It aligns traditional Humanities-based research with modern data-intensive computational methodologies to produce exciting new research avenues and questions in traditional fields of expertise. The postgraduate diploma is transformative in nature and allows graduates from Arts and Humanities, Social Science, as well as Computer Science backgrounds, to enhance and complement their existing research skills with modern digital methods vital for the cultural heritage and information sectors. It is also excellent preparation for those wishing to pursue a career in digital arts and humanities, digital preservation, or digital cultural heritage.

Students have opportunities to:

Use State-of-the-art equipment to digitise, analyse and 3D print cultural heritage objects.
Explore alternative methods, theories, and technologies for undertaking a range of digitally-enabled cultural heritage projects and research
Get real-life experience through an internship in a cultural heritage institution or collaborating on a Digital Humanities project.
Be actively involved in our Digital Humanities projects, such as the Letters 1916, the first crowdsourcing project in Ireland, and Contested Memories, a computer graphic simulation of The Battle of Mount Street Bridge.
Create virtual worlds and get an expertise in computer graphics for cultural heritage.
Learn programming and markup languages used widely in the field.
Get experience in encoding historical or literary sources and literature in the creation of Digital Scholarly Editions.
The course is delivered in our state-of-the-art facility in An Foras Feasa (Iontas Building, North Campus), which includes the MakersLab for Computational Imaging and 3D Printing projects, the Digital Humanities Lab with high-end desktop computers for computer graphics and image processing, and the Green Screen Studio for audio-visual recording.

Course Structure

60 ECTS are needed to complete the Diploma. The course is comprised of the following elements:

Required Taught Modules: 20 ECTS*

Elective Taught Modules: 40 ECTS

*Required modules include Digital Humanities: Theory and Practice and Digital Humanities Practicum (10 ECTS each). Both modules are integral to the building of practical and theoretical knowledge of the discipline, its development and its intersection with public projects. The Digital Humanities Practicum module guarantees students a work placement at a cultural heritage institution or on a Digital Humanities project.

Elective modules provide students with a variety of skills, methods, and theories. Students may choose to either specialise in a specific area, delving deeply into a specific set of methods, or to take a wider variety of modules hence gaining a broader understanding of the field.

Applicants with little previous programming experience, are advised to register for ‘Structured Programming’: an intensive 3-week 90-hour pre-semester laboratory-based programming course which runs in late August through to early September and counts as one elective module worth 10 ECTS.

Career Options

Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma in Digital Humanities at Maynooth University are ideally placed to use computational methods in arts and humanities research and projects. Graduates also take up exciting positions across the areas of museum curating, archiving and public history and heritage projects, while the technical and transferrable skills they develop can also lead them to the Industry and the IT sector.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH54F Full-time / MH55F

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This is a highly flexible, research preparation masters, which allows you to select modules from across the entire School of Humanities. Read more
This is a highly flexible, research preparation masters, which allows you to select modules from across the entire School of Humanities. It is an interdisciplinary degree with immense choice so you can tailor the degree to your own particular interests.

Why study Humanities at Dundee?

This course of study will allow you to construct a qualification from within the full diversity of specialisms taught in the School of Humanities.

You will emerge with a variety of enhanced study and research skills, selected to suit your interests. These may include a strong exposure to the latest Humanities theory (including critical theory, postmodernism and poststructuralism), archival skills, research by non-archival means (such as through statistical or database analysis, or oral-history interviewing). You will also gain in-depth expert knowledge in the content modules you choose, and in the research area in which you specialise. The lecturers are all active researchers, many of whom are nationally and internationally renowned in their fields, and they bring their front-line research and perspectives to their teaching.

What's so good about Humanities at Dundee?

The School of Humanities at Dundee is a centre of research excellence. Postgraduate students join a vigorous research culture led by world-leading scholars. The various disciplines within Humanities offer regular postgraduate forums, visiting speakers and postgraduate conferences.

The Arts & Humanities Research Institute (AHRI) is located within the School of Humanities. It serves as a forum for research activities across the School's principal disciplines: English Literature and Creative Writing, History, Philosophy and Aesthetics. The AHRI offers a regular evening lecture series.

Who should study this course?

This course is ideal for the return-to-study student who is looking for a breadth of learning, or perhaps is wishing to construct an interdisciplinary Masters (say, combining English with History, or Politics with Philosophy). It can also provide advanced-level study for those determined on the Humanities but with perhaps no inclination at the start as to the specialisation being sought.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our Humanities MLitt degrees have a common structure of 40 and 20 credit modules, and students must take one core module:

Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture
Plus other modules (80 credits in total) from a suite of option modules available from across the range of Humanities subjects. Check our module catalogue for more details of the currently available modules.

Students go on to undertake a dissertation of 15-20,000 words in a subject already studied as a content module.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, presentations, and practical exercises). There are no formal written examinations. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

A Masters is the entry route to doctoral (PhD) study in UK universities (including the University of Dundee). It is also important for a 'conversion' career change from a first degree subject, or a 'top-up' in knowledge and skills used for career enhancement. Professions entered with a Masters degree can be very varied - teaching in secondary, further or higher education, media and publishing, or work related to museums, archives and galleries.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Overview. If your undergraduate degree has left you with a passion for independent research, and an interest in a particular topic in one area of the. Read more

Overview

If your undergraduate degree has left you with a passion for independent research, and an interest in a particular topic in one area of the Humanities (Drama, English literature, History, Theology), this degree will allow you to advance both your subject knowledge and your research skills. Based around an individually devised and researched dissertation on the subject of your interest, it is designed to develop your understanding of high quality research within the Humanities and will give you the opportunity to research into a subject that you want to explore. Through this you will gain advanced knowledge, skills, and experience of conducting independent research.

Offered both full-time and part-time, the MRes includes a 90 credit independent research project with three supporting 30 credit modules: Research Methods in Humanities which will allow you to develop advanced research skills and reflective practice; Theory and Its Applications in which you will explore the shared concepts in Humanities which enable interpretations of text; Research Orientation which will be tailored to your individual project and focus on developing a sound project proposal and plan before starting the Dissertation module. In the Research Orientation and Dissertation modules we adopt a flexible approach allowing you to tailor learning and research to your specific interests. This provides the opportunity to become a well-rounded and critical researcher within the Humanities.

MRes Humanities in Drama

MRes Humanities in English Literature

MRes Humanities in History

MRes Humanities in Theology



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The MRes Pathway in the School of Humanities offers interdisciplinary training in critical, curatorial, historical and theoretical approaches to research in art and design. Read more

The MRes Pathway in the School of Humanities offers interdisciplinary training in critical, curatorial, historical and theoretical approaches to research in art and design. The pathway will foster experimentation, risk-taking and critical and creative thinking through humanities research, with a distinctive ‘art school’ ethos. Unique to the pathway is an emphasis on practice-led Humanities research: writing, curating, and designing research projects that are public-facing, contribute new knowledge and action around contemporary concerns, develop robust platforms for PhD and other subsequent research and can be applied across a rich range of professional careers.

MRes Humanities encourages interdisciplinary and experimental approaches to arts and humanities research. The broad base of expertise offered by the School of Humanities means that we can support research interests in art, design, photography, architecture and urban studies, fashion, the crafts, film, graphics, sound, performance, technology and emerging media. Given our location in a world-leading research intensive art and design university, our work is directly informed by our close relationship to contemporary practice and future-thinking in art and design. The School has an international network of partners, including museums, galleries and archives and arts, publishing and media organisations. Across professions, our graduates’ work is informed by critical practice, research and curatorial methods.

The Mres combines independent research and with training in research methods and skills. Students formulate and develop an independent study programme, supported by one-to-one tutorials with a personal research supervisor. Final outcomes for the independent study programme may include either a thesis or project. In addition, students will complete a portfolio of research outcomes. These might include devising arts proposals for exhibitions and public programmes, curating and programming live events, preparing texts for publication, and creating digital content such as blogs and podcasts. The portfolio will include a group project, designed and delivered collaboratively by the cohort of MRes. students.

MRes RCA Humanities students also undertake broad training in the research methods and skills used across research-led careers in the arts and humanities. Lectures, seminars, intensive workshops and projects led by the College and School’s internationally active faculty introduce students to a broad range of research practices and techniques which can be used in the independent study programme.

MRes Humanities will equip students to progress to doctoral research, or to pursue careers in the arts and the creative industries, whether through independent practice, consultancy or employment in arts organisations. The programme stresses entrepreneurial skills alongside intellectual growth. School of Humanities graduates have a strong track record in obtaining leadership roles in the arts, whether in academia, museums and galleries, cultural programming and management, journalism, publishing and criticism, or as independent practitioners. Our graduates shape as well as facilitate the future of practice, policy and strategy in cultural sectors worldwide.

The launch of the new MRes comes as we recognise the increasing role that research-informed thinking and practice plays in these fields internationally, and the RCA’s unparalleled ability to offer a training ground and networks to enhance developing careers. 

Key features of the programme:

  • Training and support for the development of a research career in academia and/or arts, business, policy and cultural enterprises
  • ‘Practice-led’ humanities in curating, writing and history as well as critical theory and research methods
  • A broad programme of interdisciplinary research methods training across art and design, at the interface of practice and research
  • Focus on the public value and contribution of research through understanding ‘impact’ agendas for arts and humanities research
  • A combination of time-tested and experimental research formats and approaches, including practice-led and practice-based research
  • Designed to nurture an individual research project (potentially leading to PhD or public project) and a portfolio of writing and research examples
  • Taught by Internationally-active, public-facing researchers
  • London research community, national and international partners including museums, arts organisations and academic subject specialist networks


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Medical Humanities is a new, but rapidly expanding field, both in Britain and the United States; it is ‘an interdisciplinary exploration of how humanities disciplines can engage and illuminate the nature, goals and practices of medicine’ (University of Connecticut School of medicine, programme in Medical Humanities). Read more
Medical Humanities is a new, but rapidly expanding field, both in Britain and the United States; it is ‘an interdisciplinary exploration of how humanities disciplines can engage and illuminate the nature, goals and practices of medicine’ (University of Connecticut School of medicine, programme in Medical Humanities). At Keele, extensive and established teaching and research connections between members of staff in Humanities and the Keele Medical School have shaped the development of this important new route through the MRes Humanities.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Humanities at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Digital Humanities at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Digital Humanities at Swansea has research strengths in innovative digital applications and critical studies of digital culture in several fields, where researchers in Arts, Humanities and Social Science areas are collaborating with Computer Scientists. These fields include applications and devices for the UK and international heritage sector, intellectual and literary history, digital editing, innovative mapping applications, applied linguistics and translation, digital mass media and experimental media, online cultures, digital pedagogy, digital security, war and crime, and societal impacts of digital technologies in both the rich and poor worlds. We are home to the Centre on Digital Arts and Humanities (CODAH), which connects arts and humanities, social science and computing researchers.

An MA by Research in Digital Humanities gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (typically in the private sector, the Civil Service, or education).

The MA by Research in Digital Humanities will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

You will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in Digital Humanities are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

Environment and Staff Expertise

Digital Humanities boasts a dynamic research and teaching environment which has already won attention and funding from outside bodies such as the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Wellcome Trust and the EU, most recently a multi-million EPSRC grant for “CHERISH-DE”.

COAH staff with relevant expertise are located within all the COAH Departments (Languages, Translation and Communication; English Language and Literature; History and Classics; Political and Cultural Studies). COAH staff work closely on digital research with staff in other Colleges, especially the College of Science (home to Computer Science, Geography), the College of Human and Health Science (Psychology, Public Health, Health Data), the College of Law (Criminology).

Computer Science research at Swansea has particular strengths in human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, devices for resource-constrained communities, medical applications and informatics, visual computing, data visualisation, theoretical computer science.



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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more

Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

About this degree

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is also offered.

Core modules

  • Illness
  • Madness

Optional modules

Students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors. Please note that some modules fill up very quickly, so places cannot be guaranteed.

  • Anthropology and Psychiatry
  • Classical Chinese Medicine
  • Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
  • Cultural Memory
  • Death, Dying and Consequences
  • Disease in History
  • German Literature and Psychology
  • Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
  • Global Justice and Health
  • Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
  • Health Policy and Reform
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
  • Science, Technology, and Identity
  • Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
  • From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
  • Medicine on Screen
  • Politics and Ethics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Health Humanities MA

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability

The programme gives students opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants. You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression. Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Research led teaching

This course draws upon both the School of Humanities and Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design's (DJCAD) diverse, unique and internationally acclaimed research. In the RAE (Research Assessment Exercise) DJCAD was rated as the top institution in Scotland for research in art and design, and one of the best in the whole of the UK.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices. It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Students should have interdisciplinary backgrounds at undergraduate level, and have demonstrated work in both creative (e.g. studio) and academic areas. For example, you may have an honours degree in English, Film Studies or Philosophy and have engaged in creative practices such as photography, video, drawing, sculpture, or painting on your own. Other students may have dual honours degrees or have taken our Art, Philosophy and Contemporary Practices BA.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

The start date is September each year and the course lasts 12 months full-time.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities
Or

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market. Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

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The new MA in Medical History and Humanities is run jointly between the Departments of History and English. The curriculum is directly informed by cutting-edge international research and scholarship that spans the fields of medical history, literature, sociology, philosophy, health sciences and policy. Read more
The new MA in Medical History and Humanities is run jointly between the Departments of History and English. The curriculum is directly informed by cutting-edge international research and scholarship that spans the fields of medical history, literature, sociology, philosophy, health sciences and policy. Students will have the opportunity to explore historical, literary, social and cultural understandings of illness and health, general well-being, public health and the history of medicine, as well as the links between history, the humanities and policy.

The MA brings together students and colleagues working across different disciplines, periods and geographical regions to offer a distinctively international and inter-disciplinary perspective on medical history and humanities. It draws on existing expertise in both departments, including the Wellcome Trust-supported Centre for Global Health Histories, which is the WHO Collaborating Centre for Global Health Histories and is based in the Humanities Research Centre. This allows our students and post-doctoral scholars to benefit from established connections with the scholarly networks associated to the World Health Organization’s Global Health Histories Initiative, as well as medical history and humanities programmes worldwide, including countries such as Brazil, Portugal, Denmark, Switzerland, India, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, Singapore, France, Chile, South Africa and the USA.

Programme of Study

The programme consists of four taught modules (20 credits each) and a dissertation of up to 20,000 words (100 credits). For students registered for full-time study they are organised across the academic year as follows:

Autumn Term (October-December)
All students take the core module, ‘Critical Studies in History, Humanities & Wider Interdisciplinarity’. The module, taught by weekly seminar, introduces students to the key concepts, methods and debates in medical history and humanities. It is taught by a variety of different staff members to allow students to engage with these questions from different disciplinary perspectives. In addition, students select an option module from a long list of possible areas in medical history and humanities and beyond.
-Core Module: Critical Studies in History, Humanities & Wider Interdisciplinarity
-Option Module 1
-Research Training (taught content)

Spring Term (January-March)
Students choose two optional modules. They can choose from a long list of modules in the areas of medical history and humanities but they may also follow up other research interests.
-Option Module 2
-Option Module 3
-Research Training (independent writing of dissertation proposal

Summer Term and Summer Vacation (April-September)
During the Summer Term and over the Vacation, all students will write a research dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a subject of their own choosing and under the supervision of a member of staff, and submitted at the end of the academic year. Students receive advice about topics, research skills and instruction in bibliography, plus additional specialist advice and guidance from a supervisor.

Part-time Students
Students registered for part-time study over two years take the Medical History and Humanities core module in their first autumn term plus an option in the Spring Term of their first year. This is followed by two more option modules in their second Autumn and Spring Terms respectively, with the planning, research, and writing of their dissertation spread over the two years of their registration.

Internships

The MA programme provides unique insights into health and medical policy (the Centre for Global Health Histories at York is the WHO Collaborating Centre for Global Health Histories). Students will have the opportunity to better understand the links between health and social and economic development, as well as cross-cultural policy-making, in certain optional modules. If they wish, they can also develop applications with the help of the course convenors at the end of their MA studies to take up an internship that will support select World Health Organization departments based around the world (this is dependent on WHO requirements at the point of application).

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Explore new frontiers for humanities research with this intellectually challenging and innovative MRes programme. Develop broad-based research skills in humanities, exploring a variety of approaches and methodologies. Read more
Explore new frontiers for humanities research with this intellectually challenging and innovative MRes programme.
• Develop broad-based research skills in humanities, exploring a variety of approaches and methodologies
• Focus on a substantial independent research project covering an original theme of your choice
• Deepen your understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of humanities
• Learn more about how digital technologies can be harnessed to shape humanities in the 21st century
• Benefit from the support of our highly experienced and influential team of published researchers
• Enjoy excellent professional development and networking opportunities
• Gain an impressive qualification that equips you for success in a wide range of careers
• Improve your research profile and build a platform for progressing to further postgraduate study, including a PhD

This is a new course starting in September 2017 (*subject to approval).

This programme will help you join a new generation of accomplished, confident, curious and strongly independent humanities researchers. It combines high-level research skills with a substantial investigation into a subject which reflects your personal interests and career aspirations.

Flexibility and choice

The MRes Humanities differs from other taught masters programmes because of its strong emphasis on research methods and skills. It will appeal to students seeking a greater degree of independence in their studies and who relish the challenge of intellectual rigour and self-development.

The MRes can be taken as a full Masters programme, a Postgraduate Diploma in Humanities or a named subject, or a Postgraduate Certificate in Humanities. At the Postgraduate Diploma and Masters level, it may be appropriate to add a named award reflecting your subject specialism, such as MRes in Humanities (Film Studies) or PGDip in Humanities (Liberal Arts).

The full Masters programme culminates in a dissertation or negotiated project in which you will pursue substantive independent research into a subject of your choice. This will either be through a more traditional postgraduate dissertation or through a negotiated research-based project which might involve different forms of assessment and scholarly activities.

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Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. Read more

What is Digital Humanities?

Digital Humanities is a field of study, research, and invention at the intersection of humanities, computing, and information management. It is methodological by nature and multidisciplinary in scope involving the investigation, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of information in electronic form.

Digital humanists do not only create digital artefacts, but study how these media affect and are transforming the disciplines in which they are used. The computational tools and methods used in Digital Humanities cut across disciplinary practice to provide shared focal points, such as the preservation and curation of digital data, the aesthetics of the digital (from individual objects to entire worlds), as well as the creation of the born-digital.

Why Take this Course?

This M.Phil. provides a platform for a technically innovative research path within the humanities giving students the opportunity to engage with a new and dynamic area of research. It provides them with the technologies, methodologies, and theories for digitally-mediated humanities providing a framework for new and bold research questions to be asked that would have been all but inconceivable a generation ago.

Course Outcomes

Those who complete this course will have highly specialised IT skills combined with an advanced understanding of how these skills can be applied to a wide variety of digital objects (text, image, audio, and video). It will also provide students with the theories and perspectives central to the field, including the aesthetics implicit in digital creation and migration, best practice in terms of the standards used for a number of data formats, as well as the growing concerns of digital curation and preservation. Through the internship programme students will get real world experience working with cultural heritage partners or digital humanities projects. Moreover, several modules will integrate content from these partners in their learning outcomes, providing opportunities for students to engage with cutting-edge issues and technologies.

What's on the course?

This MPhil consists of three core modules and three optional modules. There is also a dissertation module in which a research topic is chosen in agreement with your supervisor.

Core modules

Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities
Web Technologies
Internship at cultural heritage institution, library, or project
Optional modules (for the 2012-13 academic year):
Cyberculture/Popular Culture
Computational Theories of Grammar and Meaning
Corpus Linguistics
From Metadata to Linked Data
Programming for Digital Media (Full year module)
Contextual Media (Full year module)
Visualising the Past
Heritage Visualisation in Action
NB: Some optional modules require prerequisites

How is it taught and examined?

The taught component of the course begins in September and ends in April. Contact hours depend on the modules you take. Theory-based modules meet for two hours a week (such as 'Theory and Practice of Digital Humanities' and 'Cyberculture/Popular Culture'); practice based modules (such as 'Web Technologies' and 'Digital Scholarly Editing') typically meet for three hours a week to include lab time. Modules are assessed through a combination of essays, in-class presentations, assignments, and projects (either individual or group), depending on the module. There are no examinations. The supervised dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words is submitted by 31 August.

Applicants should have a good honours degree (at least an upper second, GPA of at least 3.3) in any of the disciplines of the humanities. The admissions process will be carried out in two stages. In stage I candidates will apply online and have the opportunity of submitting a sample of their own critical writing (3,000-5,000 words) and a cover letter. Those candidates passing this initial assessment will go onto to stage II that will take the form of interviews (either in person, telephone, video, or skype) which will be arranged by a member of the admissions subcommittee. Taken together, these stages will allow the admissions committee to assess the candidates' general suitability for postgraduate work as well as clarifying my query re on line application]

Applications are also welcome from professionals in the library and cultural heritage sectors. Those already in employment may opt to take the degree over two years: the first year all coursework is taken and the second year the dissertation is written.

Read less
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Read more
This highly interdisciplinary course will suit students who want the opportunity to work across the traditionally defined boundaries imposed by many fine art and humanities programmes. Each student is able to individually tailor their programme of study, and can choose to complete the course with either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation as the final project for this postgraduate course.

Why study Fine Art and Humanities at Dundee?

This programme combines studio art and masters level modules in the humanities (such as Philosophy, English or Film Studies). It embraces all forms of Fine Art practice - traditional and contemporary - and celebrates the inherent diversity in each year's participants.

You will be encouraged to read critically and analytically, and to develop abilities in conducting high level discourse in critical, contextual and theoretical thinking. This combination of skills is extended through lively debate, which strengthen each individual's self-evaluation, reflective practice and cumulative progression.

Throughout the course, you will be supported by a supervisor and dedicated tutorials, which add to the depth and breadth of your knowledge and understanding as personal study evolves.

Aims of the Programme

This course aims to develop your understanding, knowledge and skills in a personal programme of interdisciplinary study and to provide research skills and methods relevant to both Fine Art and Humanities research-based practices.

It encourages ambitious investigation and enquiry through individual research, planned from the outset to achieve either a creative exhibition or major written dissertation, either of which are informed by a synthesis of critical and conceptual studies in art and humanities.

Postgraduate culture

Students benefit from both the DJCAD and Humanities public lecture programmes. Speakers in collaboration with Dundee Contemporary Arts brings invited artists and professionals from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines. Students are also encouraged to attend speaker presentations in English, Film and Philosophy, a University wide Lecture Series and vibrant external community for events.

How you will be taught

A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, tutorial sessions, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, practical classes, studio tutorials and demonstrations.

In Humanities, one-on-one supervision of a literature review, initial outlines and drafts, leading to a dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, research assignments and feedback, and tutorial sessions.

In art, the basis of most exchange is conducted as individual and group tutorials, aided by studio demonstrations, guest lectures, peer critiques, and written reflections.

What you will study

The academic year is divided into three semesters each comprising teaching and assessment weeks. (The first week of semester 1 is entitled 'Induction Week, when activities for new students are planned and diagnostic workshops take place to establish students strengths and weaknesses.)

In Humanities, students may select a Masters level module from one of the following areas of study: English; Film Studies; Philosophy; Gender, Culture and Society; Theatre Studies; History or Comics. Specific modules are offered in topical and period areas of study.

In Art & Media studio practice, students may work in any area of specialisation, including: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Artist Books; Photography (digital or chemical); Sculpture; Installation; Performance Art; Sound Art; or Time-based art and Digital Film. Teaching will be provided on a tutorial basis from academic staff, all of whom are professional artists.

In addition, each student will take a general two-semester module entitled 'Applying Critical and Cultural Theory'.

Depending upon chosen outcome - either an exhibition of creative work or a major written dissertation - the following pattern would apply:

Option A - Studio-based Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in DJCAD, Semester 2 in Humanities

Option B - Written Output: Semesters 1 and 3 in Humanities, Semester 2 in DJCAD
Semester 3 occurs during the summer months, and is spent on realising the outcome that the student has selected (see Option A and B above). Assisted by an academic supervisor, either the dissertation or body of creative work will be produced and submitted for assessment.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be conducted for each module by module tutors. The assessors will employ a variety of styles specific to the module. Most commonly an oral presentation with the project and supporting work will be utilised for production and practice modules. Written components take the form of reflective reports, programme of study reports, essays and in the case of academic outcome, a formal dissertation (15-20,000 words).

Careers

Graduates of this course will find that their options are increased from having acquired several methods of research and learning. Two distinctive skill sets and areas of knowledge provide a real advantage in the employment market.

Careers for prospective graduates may include teaching, publishing, arts administration, community arts, curation, journalism and criticism, and professional art practices which are enhanced by academic challenge.

Read less

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