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This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Read more
This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Bringing together the study of medicine and humanities, the course provides an inclusive approach that mirrors the reality of aid operations and informs the reflexive processes of both analytical and applied disciplines. Students will be able to draw synergies from an exceptionally wide breadth of disciplinary traditions and research expertise.

Aims

1. Provide critical insights into competing perspectives on how Humanitarianism and Conflict Responses can be understood, analysed and explained - from both an historiographic and contemporary viewpoint.
2. Develop analytical skills in critically evaluating the idea of humanitarianism and the ways that responses to conflict are organised, justified and implemented. This includes competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources and depending different approaches.
3. Develop skills in gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources. This will be complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials.
4. Enable students to apply research skills to a relevant research area.

Students should be able to show a critical understanding of :
1. Key issues and debates in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.
2. Both the range of social science topics associated with Humanitarianism and Conflict Response and the normative and historiographic assumptions which underpin these issues.
3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of the causes of conflict, reconstruction, ethics and international governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.
4. A detailed and extensive understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, of the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject; and of how to produce an original piece of academic research, all through their dissertation.

Special features

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Course unit details

Course units may include:
-Humanitarianism and conflict response: inquiries
-Emergency humanitarian assistance
-Fundamentals of epidemiology
-Humanitarian responses to crises: case studies
-The history of humanitarian aid
-Research & evaluation methods
-Global health
-The Arab revolts and post-revolutionary state formation
-Anthropology of violence
-Performance in theory and practice
-The ethics of killing
-Ethics in world politics
-Conflict analysis
-Democracy: theory & practice
-Reconstruction and development
-Global governance

Career opportunities

As a hard-working, ambitious Manchester postgraduate, a wide range of exciting careers are within your reach. Students at the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute come from a broad range of backgrounds, with varying levels of experience. Many who already have work experience will be able to harness the knowledge gained from their course to progress within their field of expertise, reaching senior roles in government and non-governmental organisations. Others will be able to use the course as a starting point to progress onto careers within NGOs, HR consultancies, financial institutions, academic institutions and more. Whatever your level of experience, you can access support from your tutors, the University Careers Service and an extensive alumni network to boost your career prospects further than ever before whilst at Manchester.

Associated organisations

A close link has been formed with the humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize, it delivers emergency aid in over 60 countries to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural or man-made disasters or exclusion from healthcare through its staff of 25,000 health professionals, logistics experts and administrators. The HCRI is also building a network of associate fellows based in relevant organisations and academic institutions around the world.

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War and humanitarianism are deeply embedded in the modern experience. Be it in the 19th-century calls for civilising war or the contemporary attempts at saving distant strangers, the conduct of organised violence and the defence of human rights cannot be separated out. Read more
War and humanitarianism are deeply embedded in the modern experience. Be it in the 19th-century calls for civilising war or the contemporary attempts at saving distant strangers, the conduct of organised violence and the defence of human rights cannot be separated out. This new interdisciplinary degree analyses the complex interaction between war and humanitarianism from multiple historical, geographical, political and cultural perspectives. It approaches war as a social totality that encompasses all manner of human processes and structures, and considers humanitarianism as an increasingly pervasive ideology, informing all sorts of collective social and political activity across the world. Taught by leading scholars in the fields of history, geography, politics, philosophy and psychosocial studies, the programme will give you advanced knowledge of the concepts, theories, histories and policy implications of war and humanitarianism in the world today.

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The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. Read more
The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies.

The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development.

This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.

Why choose this course?

This programme has an international reputation for excellence. It is based on the expertise developed at Oxford Brookes University in the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice. You will have the option of going on a field trip. Previous trips have been to Asia, Africa and Latin America. Many graduates go on to secure senior positions with international development or emergency organisations.

This course in detail

This Course requires 200 hours of student input, up to 40 hours of which will be devoted to lectures, seminars, or individual tutorials. The remainder of the time is devoted to self-led study. For the postgraduate certificate it is compulsory to pass the core module, Critical Inquiry, Development and Emergencies: Theory and Policy, and pass other modules to achieve a total of 60 credits. For the postgraduate diploma you must pass 120 credits from the taught modules, including both compulsory modules. For the MA you must gain at least 180 credits, including the dissertation.

As courses are reviewed regularly the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here.
-Critical Inquiry Development & Emergencies: Theory and Policy (compulsory 20 credits)
-Human Rights & Governance (optional 20 credits)
-Disasters, Risk, Vulnerability and Climate Change (optional 20 credits)
-The Refugee Experience: Forced migration, protection and humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Conflict, Violence and Humanitarianism (optional 20 credits)
-Shelter after Disaster (optional 20 credits)
-Programming and Partnerships (optional 10 credits)
-Improving Humanitarian Action: Responding to crisis in 21st Century (optional 10 credits)
-Working with Conflict (optional 10 credits)
-Independent Study (optional 10 credits)
-Research Methods (optional 10 credits)
-Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

Teaching and learning strategies are grounded in theory, case studies and field based experience. The programme concentrates on the development of intellectual knowledge and the cultivation of academic skills including synthesis, analysis, interpretation, understanding and judgement. The programme also focuses on the practitioner’s approach, with reference in particular to:
-The setting in which they work (poverty, conflict, power, vulnerability, capability, risk, urbanisation, environmental change and the history and dynamics of particular places, their people and their society).
-The set of approaches they adopt (community mobilisation, aid, human rights advocacy, governance, risk reduction, livelihoods, humanitarian protection, accompaniment and empowerment).
-Themselves (the personal motivations that drive and shape their own vocation, their particular personality, temperament, strengths, abilities and weaknesses).

The intention is that a deeper understanding of these factors will enable students to move beyond rigid professional boxes to become more self aware, knowledge based practitioners able to work flexibly around a variety of problems in different situations of poverty, armed conflict and disaster.

Careers and professional development

The course is an ideal platform for you to develop your career in, or move into, international development and emergency organisations. Many graduates are able to secure senior positions.

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*Subject to approval*. This programme provides participants with the opportunity to develop and expand knowledge, understanding and judgment in theoretical and practical disaster management and humanitarian action. Read more
*Subject to approval*

Programme Aims

This programme provides participants with the opportunity to develop and expand knowledge, understanding and judgment in theoretical and practical disaster management and humanitarian action.

Programme Characteristics

‌•Designed to equip students with advanced knowledge, and to continue their personal development in disaster risk management and humanitarianism;
‌•Underpinned by a multidisciplinary approach that enables graduates to conduct theoretical and practical analysis, as well as evaluation to support disaster management and humanitarian action in global health contexts;
‌•Conducted by experienced disaster teaching team members who are trainers for continuing education courses and postgraduate programmes in disaster management;
‌•Collaborates with the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute at The University of Manchester, a leading global centre for the study of humanitarianism and international disaster management;
‌•Provides students with hands-on field placement experience to support their future career development; and
‌•Offers flexible online* study that enables part-time students to obtain a master's degree without residency and boundary restrictions.

* The Ministry of Education of the People’s Republic of China reserves the right to recognise the qualifications of online programmes.

Programme Structure

Compulsory Subjects

‌•Advanced Research Methods (Qualitative Research)
‌•Advanced Research Methods (Quantitative Research)
‌•Dissertation

Core Subjects

‌•Disaster Preparedness
‌•Emergency Humanitarian Assistance
‌•Introduction to Disaster Risk Management
‌•Recovery and Rehabilitation in a Disaster
‌•Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience Assessment

Elective Subjects

‌•Community Approach to Health
‌•Disaster and Mental Health
‌•Field Placement
‌•Humanitarianism and Conflict Response: Inquiries

Enquiries

For further programme information, please contact:
The General Office, School of Nursing
Tel: (852) 2766 4369;
Fax: (852) 2364 9663;
E-mail:

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Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. Read more
Religion has become a force to be reckoned with in the contemporary global geopolitical landscape and as such demands a reassessment of once predominant understandings of processes of secularisation, as well as the meanings of, and tensions inherent within, secular assumptions and secularist positions. The so-called ‘resurgence’ of religion in the public sphere in recent decades is now a significant area of interdisciplinary scholarship eliciting a complex array of responses, ranging from vehement opposition to the very idea that religious concepts and commitments have a right to expression in political debates, to a reassessment of the origins and implications of divisions between the secular and the religious and their relationship to the nation state. The notion that there is no singular secularism, but rather a plurality of secularisms, and of ‘religion’ as an invention of European modernity and colonial interests are two of many emerging efforts to reconceptualise the meanings of religion and the secular and the entangled relationship between them.

About the MA

The MA Religion in Global Politics offers an opportunity to examine these questions and issues at an advanced level by studying the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international) of the regions of the Asia, Africa and the Middle East. A core objective is to challenge the Eurocentrism of current debates around secularism, secularisation, the nature of the public sphere within modernity, by indicating the plurality and contested nature of conceptions of both religion and the secular when considered in a global framework.

The programme is unique: it has a regional focus and disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes in the subject area, draws on a wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives (Law, International Relations and Politics, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and Gender Studies, amongst others) and has a rigorous theoretical basis built in, such that students will be familiarised with the current state-of-the-art debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, postsecularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues of democracy, war, violence, human rights, humanitarianism and development, multiculturalism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism, and free speech amongst others. The range of course options available on the programme is unparalleled, ensuring that students will benefit from a truly interdisciplinary, intellectually rigorous, and regionally focused programme.

Course detail

Designed as a professional development qualification as well as a platform for doctoral research, this programme will give you the opportunity to examine the complex relationships between religion and politics in the histories and contemporary political contexts (both national and international), across the globe.

You will engage in current topical debates regarding religion in the public sphere, secularisms, post-secularism, and political theology and their relevance to issues including democracy, war, human rights, humanitarianism, nationalism, sectarianism, religious extremism and free speech.

You will have access to a wealth of study resources including the SOAS Library, one of the world's most important academic libraries, attracting scholars from across the globe.

A global perspective

The unparalleled range of course options available will allow you to benefit from an intellectually rigorous and globally focused programme which provides a disciplinary breadth rarely addressed in similar programmes. A wealth of multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives are drawn upon including Law, History, Philosophy, Development, Anthropology and Diaspora Studies.

Expert at where the world is changing

With our highly diversified expertise, our comprehensive resources and our interdisciplinary approach, we offer a unique learning and research environment for a truly inter-cultural approach to systems of belief and thought.

Programme Aims

The programme’s inter-disciplinary focus aims to provide students with advanced training in the area of religion and politics through the study of a wide range of theoretical and regional perspectives. It will serve primarily as a platform for professional development and further (MPhil/PhD) graduate research. The programme offers students:

• Advanced knowledge and understanding of significant approaches, methods, debates, and theories in the field of religion and politics, with particular reference to the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East;

• Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in and theorisations of religion and politics;

• Advanced skills in the presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religion and politics as they pertain to regional, international, and transnational contexts

Format

Students are required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words. Courses are assessed through a variety of methods including short and long essays, examinations, oral presentations, and response papers. An overall percentage mark is awarded for each course, based on the marks awarded for individual assessment items within the courses.

The MA may be awarded at Distinction, Merit or Pass level in accordance with the common regulations for MA/MSc at SOAS.

Postgraduate Open Evenings

You’ll be able to have one-to-one discussions with academics and current students. You can also attend specialist subject talks and take a tour of our campus.

Book now: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/openevenings/

Webinars

Our webinars give you an opportunity to hear and ask questions about the subject you’re interested in studying. We also cover topics such as making an application, Tier 4 Visa entry, fees and funding, scholarships, accommodation options as well as career related information.

Book now: https://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/webinars/

How to apply

Find out how to apply here: http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme focuses on understanding the dynamics of humanitarian and complex emergencies as well as providing a solid foundation in development issues such as poverty reduction, wealth creation and the expansion of human capabilities. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme focuses on understanding the dynamics of humanitarian and complex emergencies as well as providing a solid foundation in development issues such as poverty reduction, wealth creation and the expansion of human capabilities. This is a flexible programme that provides students with an academically rigorous graduate level interdisciplinary training in the fields of international development and humanitarianism. While the core course, Key Issues in Development Studies, and Managning Humanitarianism provides an excellent overview of the key issues and debates in international development, optional courses enable you to shape your studies to your own needs and interests.

A valuable part of the programme is the humanitarian consultancy project, where you work in a small team on a current policy issue for a humanitarian, development or emergency based organisation. Past clients have included UNICEF, UNHCR, the UK Disasters Emergency Committee, DFID, International Alert, the ICRC, MSF, NATO, the UK Army and Save the Children. This exposure to the real world of organisations and practitioners is an excellent experience which will boost your employability.

Graduate destinations

Recent graduates have secured promising professional careers in public, private and voluntary agencies dealing with development and humanitarian problems at both national and international levels.

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The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more
The International Multimedia Journalism MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates of universities outside the UK who aspire to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology located in dedicated radio/television studios and multimedia newsrooms you work to real deadlines to make news programmes and upload your work to the internet. Your tutors are award-winning journalists with decades of front-line experience in national and international news. Every day starts with an editorial conference and the degree programme balances focus on journalism as practical reality with intense academic study and reflection.

This programme is especially designed for those students who do not intend to practise journalism in the United Kingdom.

About the Centre for Journalism

The Centre for Journalism is leading the development of journalism as an academic discipline rooted in professional newsroom practice. It was established in 2008 to achieve top standards in teaching and research.

A lively and welcoming community spirit exists within the Centre. There are regular social events, seminars and masterclasses. Recent visitors have included: Allan Little, BBC correspondent; Sarah Ivens founding Editor-in-Chief of OK! Magazine USA; Gavin Esler, former presenter of Newsnight; Jon Snow, presenter of Channel 4 News, Mark Thompson, former Director General of the BBC, Alex Crawford three times RTS TV journalist of the year, Stephanie Flanders former Economics Editor BBC and Stuart Ramsay Sky News chief Correspondent. Thanks to the range of research and professional interests in the Centre, we can offer wide scope for research supervision.

The Centre enjoys strong links with other academic departments including the School of History, Kent Law School and the School of Politics and International Relations. It encourages collaborative and interdisciplinary research and joint supervision.

Course structure

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Journalism and Free Expression and Practical Multimedia Journalism introduce you to the intellectual and professional challenges of reporting for newspapers, radio, television and the internet. You choose optional academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Reporting Conflict; Communication and Humanitarianism, Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

You may choose to complete a dissertation.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year.

JN800 - Reporting (45 credits)
JN802 - Practical Multimedia Journalism (45 credits)
JN804 - Dissertation in Multimedia Journalism (30 credits)
JN814 - Journalism and Free Expression (30 credits)
JN815 - Political Reporting (15 credits)
JN816 - Propaganda-Media, Manipulation and Persuasion (15 credits)
JN806 - Reporting Conflict (15 credits)
JN807 - Advanced Multimedia Storytelling (15 credits)
JN808 - Communication and Humanitarianism (15 credits)
JN813 - Sports Journalism (15 credits)

Assessment

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- teach the professional and academic skills required to practise multimedia journalism to those wishing to pursue a career in the news industry

- educate you to think critically about the ethics, duties and responsibilities of journalism in democratic societies and in emerging democracies and thus improve the quality of journalism as a profession

- produce graduates with a courageous and principled vision of the purpose of journalism and its constitutional value in contemporary democratic societies

- develop a detailed and systematic understanding of particular forms of journalism and their historic and contemporary role in the shaping of culture and society

- develop a systematic understanding and critical awareness of the impact of new technologies on journalism

- develop an appropriate range of cognitive, critical and intellectual skills and research skills

- foster lifelong learning skills that will enable you to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to journalism and society

- bring scholarly and critical insights to bear on the subjects, activities and processes associated with multimedia journalism

- provide teaching and learning opportunities that are informed by high quality research and scholarship from within the Centre for Journalism and elsewhere.

Research areas

History of journalism, political reporting, environmental journalism, conflict reporting, documentary film, journalism technology, democracy, propaganda, global media

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The Centre is based in state-of-the-art multimedia newsrooms equipped with the latest audio and video-editing technology, a radio studio and broadcast-quality television facilities. A dedicated postgraduate newsroom opened in September 2010. Newsroom computers offer a wide range of software for teaching and research support. Students have access to Press Association news wires, Sky News Radio and Reuters World Television News feeds. They use the Centre’s dedicated multimedia website, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk which offers live publishing facilities in text, audio and video. The site is a forum for debate about issues in journalism and the news industry involving students and practitioners in Britain and abroad.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff regularly contribute to newspapers, magazines, journals and books. These have included: This is Today – a Biography of the Today Programme, The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Mirage in the Desert? Reporting the Arab Spring, Face the Future: Tools for the Modern Media Age and Afghanistan, War and the Media (Tim Luckhurst); What do We Mean by Local? (Ian Reeves), Specialist Journalism: Journalism Studies; Journalism: Theory, Practice & Criticism; Ethical Space; British Journalism Review; Parliamentary Affairs; Journal of Language and Politics; Environmental Communication; The Guardian; Media History; Political Quarterly; The Daily Telegraph; Independent; The Times; Sunday Telegraph; Toronto Globe and Mail; Los Angeles Times; The New Republic; The Word; Prospect.

Our students have obtained jobs at places such as Sky News, The Daily Mail, BBC Newsround and the Huffington Post.

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The MSc in International Humanitarian Affairs is unique as an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary postgraduate programme that examines the changing nature of humanitarianism that is offered exclusively online. Read more
The MSc in International Humanitarian Affairs is unique as an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary postgraduate programme that examines the changing nature of humanitarianism that is offered exclusively online. The Department of Health Sciences delivers the MSc in collaboration with experts on humanitarianism from the United Nations, IFRC, INGOs, academic institutions and community groups in Africa, Asia and the Middle East and many other individuals working throughout the world on humanitarian policy and delivery.

The MIHA

The MIHA provides an academic setting for professionals:
-To develop how they understand and respond to humanitarian needs in complex operational contexts such as violent conflict, natural hazards and political crises.
-To examine and analyse contemporary issues, challenges and dilemmas using social, political, cultural, economic and environmental perspectives, lived experiences of crisis-affected communities and changing policy debates as well as the technical approaches of the main humanitarian sectors.
-To gain advanced academic and policy skills, and learn how to use theory to maintain good practice.
-Teaching will be led by the dedicated MIHA team of experienced academic staff and will also be provided by academics, policy makers and practitioners in the field of humanitarian affairs.

Learning Experience

As a MIHA student you will be able to access the in-depth knowledge base at the Department of Health Sciences through a unique learning and teaching experience whilst gaining a globally recognised postgraduate qualification.

Learning Tools
Students can enjoy the use of a wide variety of learning tools, available to them throughout the duration of their study. The dynamic range of learning tools includes:
• Participatory learning and teaching methodologies;
• Experiential and problem-solving approaches;
• Interactive online discussions;
• Collaborative exercises and case study materials;
• Webinars for each module with leading academic, policy or practice experts;
• Bespoke study materials;
• Private study exercises; and
• Access to extensive online library at the University of York

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https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/. The MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates who are determined to pursue a career in the news industry. Read more

This course will be held at the Medway Campus

https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/medway/

The MA programme teaches multimedia journalism to graduates who are determined to pursue a career in the news industry. You learn to report for newspapers, websites, radio and television in a live newsroom environment. Using state-of-the-art technology and working to real deadlines, you upload your work to the internet.

Key benefits

- fully accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists

- guaranteed work placements for all students.

- Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/108/multimedia-journalism#!overview

Course detail

- Description -

This is an academically challenging Master's qualification that teaches you the skills required to report for radio, television and the internet as well as newspapers and magazines. Students are taught by award-winning journalists in state-of-the-art newsrooms, and all have access to industry-leading equipment including Canon HD video cameras and Edirol audio recorders whenever they need them. They learn crucial newsgathering skills, as well as production skills which allow them to edit video and audio, design print pages and create complex interactive multimedia packages. They produce newspapers and magazines, news programmes for television and radio, and entire news web sites in our regular newsday exercises. The centre's unique web site, http://www.centreforjournalism.co.uk, provides a live publishing enviroment and a discussion forum for the industry. All of this is backed up by the rigorous academic disciplines of law, politics, history that all good journalists need.

- Format and assessment -

Compulsory modules in Reporting and Writing, Media Law and Ethics, and Principles and Practice of Convergent Journalism introduce you to the professional challenges of modern reporting and prepare you to pass the National Council for the Training of Journalists’ Diploma in Journalism (this involves passing papers in shorthand, public affairs, law and reporting). You choose academic modules from a range including: History of Journalism; Communication and Humanitarianism; Political Reporting and Propaganda - Media, Manipulation and Persuasion.

The degree is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, masterclasses, news days, tutorials and editorial conferences. Assessment is by coursework (including essays, reporting exercises and presentations) and examinations. The optional dissertation counts for a third of the final grade.

Careers

This degree will prepare students for employment in broadcast, print and online media as well as enabling them to take advantage of the new opportunities the awareness of media power has created within campaign and pressure groups, online information providers and businesses.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Why study at The University of Kent?

- Shortlisted for University of the Year 2015
- Kent has been ranked fifth out of 120 UK universities in a mock Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) exercise modelled by Times Higher Education (THE).
- In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, Kent was ranked 17th* for research output and research intensity, in the Times Higher Education, outperforming 11 of the 24 Russell Group universities
- Over 96% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2014 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.
Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/why/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more

About the course

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

Working with and for young people in the Global South offers an exciting career full of challenges and rewards. This MA provides a varied programme with a global perspective that equips students for roles at senior levels in international development organisations, government ministries and global agencies.

The programme equips you with:

The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare you for employment, further study and civic engagement.

Course Content

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Compulsory Modules:

International Development, Childhood and Youth
Young Lives in the Global South
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Researching Children, Childhood and Youth
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

Sociology of Youth and Youth Work
Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work
Social Policy
Anthropology of Education and Learning
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Psychological Development
Applied Learning (via placement)

Special Features

High value placements: Students may opt for the ‘Applied Learning’ module which involves a short placement (one or two days a week for 10 weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community work, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Pioneering research: In both core and specialist option modules, students will be exposed to innovative high profile research in the field of children, youth and international development.

Eramus Exchange: An Erasmus agreement exists between the Brunel University’s MA in Children, Youth and International Development, and the MPhil in Childhood Studies at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The exchange programme has two places for students from the MA Children, Youth and International Development. The exchange period is the second term / semester (approximately January to May). Erasmus students do not pay tuition fees at NOSEB, and are entitled to an Erasmus grant (€375/month) to cover any additional costs.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The MA also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this - through tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and all students are assigned to a tutorial group. Regular tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more
The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

Degree information

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules
-Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
-Health Policy and Reform
-Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules
-Bioethics Governance
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Global Justice and Health
-Illness
-Madness
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Ethics and Regulation of Research
-Contemporary Political Philosophy
-Normative Ethics
-Public Ethics
-Health Inequalities over the Life-course
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disability and Development
-Introduction to Deafhood
-Global Health and Development
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Medical Anthropology
-Modules from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the Course Director and timetabling constraints.
-Or any other suitable module from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the course Director and timetabling constraints

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Journal development manager, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
-Doctorate of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
-Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
-PhD Critical Theory, University of Brighton
-Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability
The programme gives students the ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the course teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

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All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. Read more
All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. This is especially true in the developing world, where large-scale disasters can result in enormous loss of life as well as considerable economic damage.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is designed for participants who want to increase both theoretical and practical management skills in enhancing resilience to disasters through prevention, preparedness, response and recovery from natural and man-made disaster events. Within the HCRI, this will take place through multidisciplinary study focusing on the critical analysis of current trends in global policies, particularly those related to international disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, climate change adaptation and humanitarian action tools commonly used by disaster risk reduction professionals. To this end, the core curriculum brings together the realms of disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, climate change adaptation and humanitarian action. The interdisciplinary team of researchers at the HCRI will also support academic study through practical applications of theory to disaster resilience, prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

In this way, the MSc in International Disaster Management is unique as it incorporates a wide variety of available course units from history, politics, development studies, the arts and medicine. This results in a course that is suitable as a way to development initial skills in disaster risk reduction or support continuing education for disaster risk reduction professionals.

Aims

On completion of the course, you should be able to show a critical understanding of:
1. Key issues and debates related to the theory and practices of disaster risk reduction. Students will show familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of polices at international and national levels, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Sustainable Development Goals, 21 st Conference of Parties on Climate Change (COP21) and the outcomes of the World Humanitarian Summit.
2. The range of environmental, health and social science topics which influence disaster risk reduction and management (including political, historical, anthropological understandings). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.
3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of disaster risk reduction including environmental/geological studies, emergency management structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGO's and other civil institutions.
4. An understanding of common approaches to disaster risk reduction (i.e. risk matrices, disaster typologies), including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with disaster prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in both industrialized and developing countries.
5. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferable skills through both independent and group-based work.
6. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of disaster risk reduction along with implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. Delivered via a dissertation.

Special features

HCRI also offers bespoke training in International Disaster Management and Continuing Professional Development courses.

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will be done through face-to-face teaching at the University of Manchester. This will be supported by streamed lectures, discussion boards and other e-learning elements.

Coursework and assessment

Graduation requirements will be the completion of 180 credits. A total of 120 credits of module coursework will be required for students to move on to dissertation writing. A passing dissertation will lead to the final 60 credits needed for MA completion.

Career opportunities

Students completing this programme may consider a wide range of career choices, including careers with:
-Civil Service (working within various government ministries, including the foreign office, international development office and local resilience forums)
-International Institutions (such as the UN Peacebuilding Commission, Department of Peacekeeping Operations and regional bodies such as the European Union, African Union, Organization of American States)
-NGO's (local and international) working on peacebuilding initiatives
-Academia/Research Institutes/Think-Tanks

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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Read more
This MSc takes a unique cross-disciplinary approach to global health and attracts students from a range of academic and professional backgrounds. Students can craft a programme of study that suits their interests and which will help them become better global health practitioners wherever they work in the world.

Degree information

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, fostering critical thinking, and building transferable skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, nine months full-time, two to five years flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits) and four optional modules (60 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, three months full-time, two years' flexible study) is offered. Students take four core modules (60 credits)

Core modules
-Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
-Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
-Power and Politics in Global Health
-Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules - IGH reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. Options may include the following:
-Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Climate Change and Health
-Disability and Development
-Economic Evaluation in Health Care
-Essentials of International Child Health
-Evaluating Interventions
-Global Health Promotion
-Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
-Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
-Key Principles of Health Economics
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Nutrition and Public Health
-Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
-Research in Action: the Qualitative Approach
-Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
-Social Determinants of Health
-Urban Health

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation.

Careers

The programme equips students with the knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Research Assistant, University of Oxford
-Research and Policy Assistant, British Medical Association (BMA)
-Director of Citizen Participation, Morelos Ministry of Sustainable Development
-Health Policy Analyst, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation
-Statistical Information Officer, Cancer Research UK

Employability
This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by the programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL offers a multidisciplinary approach to studying global health. Students work alongside teachers, researchers and other students from a diverse range of disciplines and are taught by experts from several of UCL's faculties. These include health policy specialists, economists, philosophers, lawyers, political scientists, geographers, clinicians, nutritionists, anthropologists, and epidemiologists.

We place particular emphasis on research-based teaching, and our academics use their current research as case studies.

The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes where working in teams is important. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work, and the written dissertation.

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Global Health and Development. tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. Read more
Global Health and Development: tropEd is a route through the Global Health and Development MSc, which combines UCL modules with modules taken at tropEd network institutions in the UK, Europe and around the world. This route maximises professional and educational networking opportunities and international experiences that enhance employability.

Degree information

The programme challenges students to understand the complex forces that shape health worldwide, by developing their understanding of the principles underlying research, policy and practice in global health, and their ability to critically evaluate the issues that are important for today's developing countries and common to the whole world.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core UCL modules (60 credits), optional modules taken at UCL and partner trop-Ed institutions (60 credits), and the research dissertation completed at UCL (60 credits). All UCL taught modules are 15 credits. To gain the tropEd MSc you should take 15 credits (6 ECTS) of optional modules outside UCL in a partner tropEd institution.

UCL core modules
-Concepts and Controversies in Global Health
-Research Methods and Evidence for Global Health
-Power and Politics in Global Health
-Health Systems in a Global Context

Optional modules - IGH reserves the right not to run modules with less than 10 students registered. There are more than 150 modules available that have been approved and accredited by tropEd. UCL module options may include the following:
-Anthropological Perspectives on Global Health
-Climate Change and Health
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Collecting and Using Data: Essentials of Quantitative Survey Research
-Disability and Development
-Economic Evaluation in Health Care
-Essentials of International Child Health
-Evaluating Interventions
-Global Health Promotion
-Health Management: Planning and Programme Design
-Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
-Key Principles of Health Economics
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Nutrition and Public Health
-Perinatal Epidemiology and Maternal Health
-Research in Action: The Qualitative Approach

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an individual research project on a topic relevant to future work in global health and development which includes a presentation and culminates in a dissertation of 7,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught with an emphasis on collaborative and co-operative learning. This is to ensure that students enter the workforce capable of joining projects and programmes with a supportive network of peers. Assessment is through written assignments, unseen written examinations, projects, oral presentations, group work and the written dissertation.

Careers

The programme equips students with knowledge and transferable skills they will need in their future careers in global health. Career routes include research, programme management, policy advice and advocacy, at national and international levels, and in public, private and not-for-profit sectors.

Employability
This wide-ranging programme strives to create students who will be able to look at health problems from different angles and think analytically and critically – all key transferable skills in the job market. The diversity of approaches to global health taken by this programme helps expand students' employment horizons and options.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Education at the UCL Institute for Global Health is cross-disciplinary, with teaching led by experts drawn from health policy, economics, philosophy, political science, anthropology, epidemiology and medicine.

The tropEd MSc consists of core and optional modules and a dissertation. The tropEd degree allows for optional modules to be selected from tropEd network affiliated institutions around the world that the Global Health and Development MSc does not.

tropEd provides networking opportunities and international experiences which enhance tropEd graduate employability. Mobility across leading international institutions prepares students for effective work in multicultural and multidisciplinary environments. Students also experience diverse learning styles and perspectives on global health problems.

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