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The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is your opportunity to engage the distinct yet complementary regimes of human rights law and humanitarian law. In studying the Human Rights and Humanitarian Law LLM you will tackle traditional subjects as well as new and emerging issues, such as the regulation of international society and the legal mechanisms of human rights during international and non-international armed conflicts. Your study will reflect the local, national and international nuances of this complex subject matter; and you will graduate with expertise highly sought-after in law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will be taught by staff who, as well as being active in research and publication, participate in national and international debate and policy-making in legal, criminological and other related fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/human-rights-humanitarian-law-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to humanitarian and human rights issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

The LLM in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law provides a comprehensive overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course balances the academic with the urgently practical – for example, combining the necessarily comprehensive detail of human rights legislation in conflict with the harsh reality of the threat posed to human rights by the same conflict. Other modules will tackle significant issues such as the ‘victory’ of democracy on the international stage and the ideological change that has shifted it in the West from a system of government to 'the only route to ensure peace and prosperity’ in places like the Middle East.

An important part of the course is the writing of a detailed dissertation within the specialism of your choice. This is your opportunity to select a project topic which has a direct bearing on your professional life. Previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have found this opportunity to be invaluable in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of Human Rights and Humanitarian law. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The Human Rights and Humanitarian Law LLM allows you to study from home — whether in the UK or overseas — and keep in contact with tutors by email, telephone, fax and/or post. Read more
The Human Rights and Humanitarian Law LLM allows you to study from home — whether in the UK or overseas — and keep in contact with tutors by email, telephone, fax and/or post. You can also maintain contact with one another, both during and after your studies, offering invaluable peer support and networking opportunities.

You are guided through each of the LLMs by a module handbook containing notes, reading lists and self-assessment questions. All the documents on the reading lists are provided either electronically through the University’s electronic resources, by direct links to the worldwide web, as digitised documents on Blackboard (the University’s on-line learning/teaching facility) or, exceptionally, as hard copy. Core text books are issued on loan with the module handbook and returned with the module assignment. Staff-student interchange is facilitated by coursework materials, telephone contact, email and written responses to coursework submissions.

The weekend residential schools provide the opportunity to meet with tutors, guest lecturers and fellow students and to reinforce students’ understanding of the subjects during lectures, discussion sessions and tutorials.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/human-rights-and-humanitarian-law-distance-learning-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance and practical relevance
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to humanitarian and human rights issues
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Course detail

There are two start dates for the Human Rights and Humanitarian Law LLM by distance learning in each academic year - 1 April and 1 October. Although students are allowed up to a maximum of five years to complete the course, it is possible to complete six modules per academic year. However, the flexible nature of the programmes means that you can work at your own pace through the modules. Each of the twelve modules is worth 10 credits and the dissertation is worth 60 credits. To gain the LLM qualification you will be required to complete 180 credits worth of study – 120 from taught modules and 60 from the dissertation. It will be possible to complete 60 credits (six modules) to gain a Postgraduate Certificate recognising your achievement. On completion of all twelve modules but in the absence of the dissertation, you will be eligible for a Postgradate Diploma in law. You can also choose to study individual modules to enhance your knowledge in a particular area. All the modules are assessed by an assignment of up to 5000 words.

The dissertation (13000-15000 words) provides you with an excellent opportunity to study an aspect of the law in your chosen area of study which is of particular interest to you. Students often, but not exclusively, select project topics which have a direct bearing on their professional lives. The standard of the work produced is very high indeed and several of our students have graduated with distinction..

Attendance at the bi-annual residential weekends is highly recommended. The programme of lectures, seminars and workshops at the residential school both stimulates and encourages, as well as providing an invaluable opportunity for debate and discussion with staff, visiting lecturers and fellow students.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of coursework essays (120 credits). Each student will complete then a master’s dissertation (60 credits) which deals with an area of chosen study.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of Human Rights and Humanitarian law. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal data regarding Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, and you will refine your professional practices by engagement with multiple case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within timeframes and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Our LLM International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law builds on the success of our long-established LLM International Human Rights Law, and our expertise with respect to the protection of human rights in situations of acute crisis such as war or displacement of refugees. Read more
Our LLM International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law builds on the success of our long-established LLM International Human Rights Law, and our expertise with respect to the protection of human rights in situations of acute crisis such as war or displacement of refugees.

This LLM should appeal if you looking to work with humanitarian organisations in the field or have experience and want to examine the legal aspects of your work in more detail. It would be of interest if you are a member of the military seeking to broaden your understanding of the international law pertaining to peacekeeping and other types of military operation, or a member of governments or international organisations responsible for establishing peacekeeping or other humanitarian operations.

You critically examine how international law protects individuals in such situations, with core modules exploring:

- Public international law most relevant to the study of human rights
- Humanitarian law and international peacekeeping
- The international machinery for the protection of human rights
- The international law of armed conflict
- International refugee law

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2017] for law.

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing.

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With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Read more
With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students.

This LLM course covers the concepts and enforcement of international criminal law, It focuses on international crimes that fall under the jurisdiction of international criminal courts and tribunals (genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). The core principles, law, and institutions of international criminal law are contextualised against international law and human rights, and international humanitarian law.

You'll study the following subset categories of International Law:International Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law and Humanitarian Law by exploring the contours of the duty to prosecute those who commit international crimes. And, focus on the application of domestic and international law to the question of jurisdiction over international criminal activities, including universal jurisdiction of national courts.

The course explores the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters, with particular attention to extradition and problems associated with obtaining evidence from abroad.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/international-criminal-law-procedure-llm

Modules

- International criminal law
- International criminal procedure and practice
- International law and human rights
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Plus two options from:
- International humanitarian law
- International human rights and development
- Terrorism
- Case management
- Advocacy
- Migration and development

Study modes

Full-time:
- 14 months; taught October-June; dissertation July-October
- Six modules plus a dissertation to be completed July-October

Part-time:
- 26 months: taught stage October-June year one and year two; dissertation July-October or July to January in year 2)
- Three modules a year for two years; plus a dissertation completed July-January, or, July-October. You can alternatively opt for the accelerated part-time learning mode (Saturday classes).

Employability

New international criminal law:
This programme is particularly relevant if you're looking for careers in the new international criminal law institutions such as the International Criminal Court or in agencies with rapidly increasing criminal justice competencies such as the UN or the EU.

You'll acquire in-depth knowledge of international criminal law and procedure, international human rights law and international humanitarian law. You'll have the necessary knowledge and skills to practice international criminal law before international tribunals or national courts.

This LLM will appeal to you if you're interested in the increasing trend in international human rights law to criminalize and prosecute mass human rights atrocities, both in domestic courts and international tribunals, like the International Criminal Court.

Non-governmental organisations

Other graduates may embark on careers in non-governmental organisations, such as Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch, or in the area of international legal practice. The LLM is also highly relevant for law graduates and criminal law practitioners both from the UK and abroad. Moreover it is particularly relevant for graduates from Commonwealth Common Law jurisdictions, wishing to study international criminal law and practice while developing their legal and professional knowledge and skills in the field of international litigation.

The LLM aims to produce reflective practitioners, capable of using their professional experience in combination with theoretical insights to contribute to public debate on international criminal justice policy and practice.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

A number of Visiting Professors and Lecturers will teach on the course. All are leading practitioners with a national reputation in the fields of international criminal law and human rights.

Recent guest lecturers:
- Ko Aung, Burma Human Rights Campaigner;
- Joel Bennathan, QC, Barrister;
- Sir Geoffrey Bindman, Solicitor;
- Imran Khan, Solicitor;
- Roger Smith, Director of Justice.

Teaching and learning

- Assessment
Content, knowledge and understanding is assessed through coursework, or coursework, presentations and on-line assessments.

Assessment methods reflect the development of legal skills within particular modules, for example the advocacy presentation within the Advocacy Module and the Case study within the Case Management Module. Oral assessments assess your ability to effectively and critically research, evaluate, write and present a coherent legal analysis of a particular issue drawing upon relevant law reform proposals, assessing conflicting interpretations of the International Criminal Law and proposing new hypotheses relevant to the topic being assessed.

- Coursework
Coursework can take many forms (based on the practical or theoretical content of the module) including essays and reports. Typically coursework pieces will be 6,000 words in length. Students will explore a topic covered in depth, providing a critical, practical, insight into the topic analysed.

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The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts. Read more
The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts.

This course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development as well as those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-human-rights-law/

Why choose this course?

- It enables you to specialise in areas such as international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction, international development and globalisation, refugee and migrant law, and the promotion and application of human rights as part of legal reform in the developing world.

- It is ideal for those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts. Recent graduates from this course have gained positions in international organisations, such as UNICEF.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard human rights law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practice legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the Law School - one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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The Aberystwyth LLM course in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict is designed to give you a comprehensive understanding of human rights law with a particular focus on armed conflict and criminology. Read more
The Aberystwyth LLM course in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict is designed to give you a comprehensive understanding of human rights law with a particular focus on armed conflict and criminology. Upon completion of the LLM International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict, you will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of basic law and criminological theory, as well as the ability to apply your learning to practical problems and authentic case studies. This pairing of theory and application will give you an impressive degree of expertise in this critical area of international law.

As a student at Aberystwyth, you will benefit from being taught by staff who are active in research, in national and international debate and in policy-making in legal and criminological fields. Under their personal tutelage, you will develop your rigorous analytical skills, your abilities in presenting clear and focused arguments and your capacity for independent thought.

Your mastery of this most urgent subject – criminology in international and non-international armed conflicts – will make you a highly sought-after asset to law firms, government departments, think-tanks, international institutions and non-governmental organisations alike.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/international-law-criminology-armed-conflict-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you want to study an area of law with urgent contemporary significance for human life and security
- If you wish to develop a critical appreciation of legal responses to conflict and criminality in conflict
- If you wish to nurture a legal career within government, non-governmental or corporate structures
- If you desire skills highly sought-after in any postgraduate workplace

Overview

The LLM in International Law & Criminology of Armed Conflict provides a thorough overview of international law and how it works in the contemporary world. The course builds upon this exhaustive academic foundation with the exploration of real case studies that underline the importance of this area of work – for example, it analyses the necessarily comprehensive human rights legislation and its violations in potentially harrowing detail in order to define the criminal activity ahead of prosecution. The teaching of this subject reflects the important truth that this area of law is rooted in the reality of life and death. Every study will take into account the humanitarian, economic and political perspectives.

This course will equip you with the skills and research practices required to assimilate, evaluate and critically appraise large sections of legal knowledge. You will have the opportunity to prove your newly-acquired expertise in writing your Master's dissertation. This is also your opportunity to select particular specialism – a major topic or issue in the field of international law and criminology of armed conflict. This project topic may have a direct influence on your career trajectory; previous LLM students at Aberystwyth have often reported that their dissertation was a significant asset in establishing a successful career.

The course will be particularly attractive to those seeking a career in government departments, international organisations, humanitarian and human rights advocacy, business organisations, international law firms and a range of non-governmental organisations.

The Department of Law and Criminology recently participated in the Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It found that 96.5% of publications submitted were of of an internationally recognised standard and that 98% of research activity in the department was rated as internationally recognised.

Assessment

Assessment takes the form of; research proposals including a related bibliographic element, case studies, oral assessments and essays. Each student will complete a Master’s dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words which deals with an area of chosen study in the third semester.

Employability

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. Your LLM will place you in the jobs market as a rigorous legal professional armed with impressive expertise in the latest legal developments in the field of international law and the criminology of armed conflict. In addition, this course will help you to master key skills that are required in almost every postgraduate workplace. You will be pushed to improve your approaches to planning, analysis and presentation so that you can tackle complex projects thoroughly and with professional independence, making you a highly-desirable candidate for a career in government, non-governmental and corporate contexts alike.

Key Skills and Competencies:

- Study Skills:
You will learn to quickly assemble, assimilate and interpret a wealth of legal information regarding criminology and armed conflict. You will refine your professional practices by engagement with challenging exercises and case studies. You will learn how to deploy your knowledge to assert your expertise and build your legal case. These skills in analysis and discourse, supported by your mastery of rigorous methodologies, will stand you in good stead for any legal or unrelated professional workplace.

- Self-Motivation and discipline:
Studying at LLM level requires discipline and self-motivation from every candidate. Though you will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff, you are ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your Master’s degree. This process will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
The LLM programme is designed to give you a range of transferable skills that you can apply in a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

Read less
The postgraduate taught programmes in International Human Rights Law are advanced courses of study which provide students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the far-reaching impact of international law on international relations, with a special emphasis on human rights issues and their relevance to domestic law. Read more
The postgraduate taught programmes in International Human Rights Law are advanced courses of study which provide students with an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the far-reaching impact of international law on international relations, with a special emphasis on human rights issues and their relevance to domestic law.

Active research interests of staff ensure specifically tailored and distinctive modules, and delivery sometimes takes place with visiting speakers invited to give seminars on the programme.

Please note that the programme code for the Postgraduate Certificate programme is LWHC, and the Postgraduate Diploma is LWHD.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We came 16th out of 67 submissions at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent), 88% 3* environment and 100% 3* impact.

Resources
The School houses an impressive custom built Moot Room, the setting for mock trials, lectures and visiting speakers. The Law Library (housed in the Sydney Jones Library) includes the main English, European and International Law reports, law journals, legal works and textbooks.

Flexibility
All our postgraduate taught programmes can be studied flexibly and you are able to change from one programme to another. To change programmes, you must have studied the required number of taught specialist modules from the programme you wish to move to.

Progression Routes
All our programmes are available to be studied at Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and LLM levels. Students can progress through these levels on successful completion of each stage.

Why School of Law?

Solid academic pedigree

We combine over a hundred years’ teaching experience with modern approaches to learning. Alumni include judges of the House of Lords, Court of Appeal, High Court and County Court, members of Parliament and legal practitioners, as well as accountants, social workers and bankers, who continue to make an important contribution to the learning experience and career prospects of our students. The first female High Court judge in the country was a Liverpool Law graduate.

Developing professionalism

Our students have the opportunity to develop their professional skills through the activities of the School’s Pro-bono Law Clinic. The Clinic is operated by the Law School in association with members of the local legal community and enables students to enjoy the professional experience of dispensing legal advice to real clients, under the guidance and supervision of Law School staff and practising members of the profession.

Mentoring

We also offer a Law School Mentoring Scheme, whereby students are assigned to a local barrister or solicitor who will act as their mentor. The mentor will provide careers advice and assistance to their mentees on a personal and individual basis. This is in addition to the wider careers advisory programme run by the Law School and the University.

Leading experts

Academic staff are leading experts in their fields and research feeds into teaching at a postgraduate level, keeping students informed of the latest developments.

Supportive environment

Pastoral care is very important in the School, and it aims to provide a supportive environment in which students can flourish.

Career prospects

The School of Law includes amongst its alumni Judges of the Court of Appeal, the High Court and the County Courts, as well as distinguished figures in branches of the legal profession. Legal study provides a mark of excellence in any qualification profile. Apart from judicial appointment or working within the legal profession, past graduates have gone on to undertake Government service, to work within International Humanitarian Organisations, the UN, institutions of the European Union, to pursue careers in commerce, management, banking, marketing, public relations and a whole host of other challenging and rewarding career opportunities.

Any of the Law postgraduate taught programmes offered additionally provide an ideal opportunity to gain advanced specialist knowledge in preparation for further postgraduate research. All programmes of study are designed to enhance academic profiles and to ensure that graduates leave us with highly marketable skills, whatever they decide that market to be.

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The majority of students interested in medical law and related issues use our postgraduate taught programmes in Law, Medicine and Healthcare as an opportunity to gain advanced specialist knowledge in preparation for medical legal practice. Read more
The majority of students interested in medical law and related issues use our postgraduate taught programmes in Law, Medicine and Healthcare as an opportunity to gain advanced specialist knowledge in preparation for medical legal practice.

The programme is also often of interest to medical practitioners and health service workers. Modules are designed to draw on the experience and research excellence of the teaching staff.

Please note that the programme code for the Postgraduate Certificate programme is LWMC, and the Postgraduate Diploma is LWMD.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We came 16th out of 67 submissions at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent), 88% 3* environment and 100% 3* impact.

Resources
The School houses an impressive custom built Moot Room, the setting for mock trials, lectures and visiting speakers. The Law Library (housed in the Sydney Jones Library) includes the main English, European and International Law reports, law journals, legal works and textbooks.

Flexibility
All our postgraduate taught programmes can be studied flexibly and you are able to change from one programme to another. To change programmes, you must have studied the required number of taught specialist modules from the programme you wish to move to.

Progression Routes
All our programmes are available to be studied at Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and LLM levels. Students can progress through these levels on successful completion of each stage.

Why School of Law?

Solid academic pedigree

We combine over a hundred years’ teaching experience with modern approaches to learning. Alumni include judges of the House of Lords, Court of Appeal, High Court and County Court, members of Parliament and legal practitioners, as well as accountants, social workers and bankers, who continue to make an important contribution to the learning experience and career prospects of our students. The first female High Court judge in the country was a Liverpool Law graduate.

Developing professionalism

Our students have the opportunity to develop their professional skills through the activities of the School’s Pro-bono Law Clinic. The Clinic is operated by the Law School in association with members of the local legal community and enables students to enjoy the professional experience of dispensing legal advice to real clients, under the guidance and supervision of Law School staff and practising members of the profession.

Mentoring

We also offer a Law School Mentoring Scheme, whereby students are assigned to a local barrister or solicitor who will act as their mentor. The mentor will provide careers advice and assistance to their mentees on a personal and individual basis. This is in addition to the wider careers advisory programme run by the Law School and the University.

Leading experts

Academic staff are leading experts in their fields and research feeds into teaching at a postgraduate level, keeping students informed of the latest developments.

Supportive environment

Pastoral care is very important in the School, and it aims to provide a supportive environment in which students can flourish.

Career prospects

The School of Law includes amongst its alumni Judges of the Court of Appeal, the High Court and the County Courts, as well as distinguished figures in branches of the legal profession. Legal study provides a mark of excellence in any qualification profile. Apart from judicial appointment or working within the legal profession, past graduates have gone on to undertake Government service, to work within International Humanitarian Organisations, the UN, institutions of the European Union, to pursue careers in commerce, management, banking, marketing, public relations and a whole host of other challenging and rewarding career opportunities.

Any of the Law postgraduate taught programmes offered additionally provide an ideal opportunity to gain advanced specialist knowledge in preparation for further postgraduate research. All programmes of study are designed to enhance academic profiles and to ensure that graduates leave us with highly marketable skills, whatever they decide that market to be.

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Under the programme, students must follow three compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered either through small group seminars. Read more
Under the programme, students must follow three compulsory modules, and choose from a range of optional modules. Modules will be delivered either through small group seminars. Attendance is mandatory for these seminars, which have been chosen as the primary means of delivering material to students due to the advanced nature of the course. Furthermore, small group seminars encourage participation and the development of communications skills. What is more, small group settings allow students to benefit from close contact with the academics teaching on the programme, many of which are also experienced practitioners and consultants in their respective fields of expertise.

The compulsory modules ensure students secure a grounding in the fundamentals of international law and governance, and facilitate in-depth understanding of the foundations of public international law and become familiar with the current debates in the field.

Optional modules then allow students to explore particular aspects of international law and governance, international and regional institutional law, international dispute settlement, international human rights and international humanitarian law and international economic law amongst others, in greater depth.

This continues to the end of the Programme, through the compulsory Dissertation module. In this way, optional modules, and the dissertation, allow for development of students’ subject specific knowledge as the Programme progresses. The development of the students’ skills is achieved mainly through the combination of the compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law, taught in Michaelmas term, and the students’ pursuit of the dissertation, supervision for which begins at the start of Epiphany term. It is through this that students can practise their skills much more intensely (whilst continuing to acquire a much deeper level of specialised knowledge on their chosen law topic).

An important objective of the LLM in International Law and Governance programme is to provide students with skills that will enable them to thoroughly analyse and interpret legal sources, literature, and cases, and to research and formulate an independent opinion on international legal questions. Students will also learn to clearly present your findings both orally and in writing to international legal specialists, to participate actively in academic debate, and to apply this advanced academic knowledge in public international law in a professional context.

As such, an LLM in International Law and Governance will provide students with an excellent foundation to pursue an international law career, whether it be in legal practice, employment in international institutions, or employment in non-governmental organisations. What is more, the LLM qualification will be an excellent vehicle for the further development of research skills and as such also offers entry into further postgraduate study and, in particular, doctoral research.

Core modules

-Fundamental Issues in International Legal Governance
-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation

Optional modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Law of the WTO
-International Investment Law
-International Dispute Resolution
-International Humanitarian Law
-International Peace and Security Law
-Global Environmental Law
-Law of the Sea
-International Human Rights and Development
-International Criminal Law
-History and Theory in International Law
-The European Union as a Global Actor

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

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The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses. Read more
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses.

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Practice engages students in a critical and nuanced examination of this paradox, while providing them with the practical skills necessary to apply global norms at the local level.

Why study International Human Rights at York?

The LLM in Human Rights Law and Practice provides the knowledge, skills and networks necessary for mid-career professionals and recent graduates to work in the human rights field. The LLM is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Our LLM is distinctive because students:
-Work on real human rights issues, which gives practical skills, hands-on experience and improved job prospects
-Get the opportunity to work alongside human rights defenders during a two-week field visit to Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or placement in York
-Learn from international human rights defenders based at the Centre
-Explore how international human rights law interacts with national public policy in various states

LLM Structure

Three core modules cover international human rights law, policy and advocacy. Optional CAHR modules cover several topical issues through a human rights lens: culture, development, migration, and post-conflict justice.

The programme requires you to undertake a placement with human rights organisations in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or the UK. This is an important part of the degree programme and will develop your practical skills and provide hands-on experience, both of which will prepare you for working in this field and improve your career prospects.

The LLM is taught in weekly lectures and seminars covering specific case studies and including skills training on oral presentations, advocacy, report writing, and memos.

Compulsory Modules
The compulsory modules reflect the three sides to human rights activism: law, policy and practice.
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Applying international human rights law (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits; term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits; terms 3-4)

Optional Modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Four optional modules taught by Centre staff will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also choose optional modules taught by other departments, from the list below.

Optional modules taught at CAHR
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught at the York Law School
-Corporate responsibility and law
-Financial citizenship and social justice

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Placements
A key part of the LLM is exposing students to the practice of international human rights law at the domestic level. Thus students have the opportunity to pursue a placement and related project with our NGO partners in Malaysia and York. The fieldwork takes place over a two week period in weeks 9 and 10 of the autumn term in either Kuala Lumpur or York. Please note that the Malaysia trip/placements will only run if there are sufficient student numbers.

Students will be expected to work together in small groups in partnership with a human rights organisation. This will include:
-Extensive background research on country context, the host organisation, relevant thematic issues etc.
-Devising a project prior to the field visit, in collaboration with the host organisation
-Two weeks of intensive work in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or York in November and December
-Ongoing discussions about project completion once students return to York

Where after the LLM?

Our LLM provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian organisations, charities, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

For example, recent graduates are working with:
-Foreign and Commonwealth Office
-UK-based bar association
-Egyptian human rights NGO
-Development NGO in West Africa
-East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Network
-Human Rights Watch
-Pakistan's judicial sector
-UK-based NGO working with sub-Saharan children affected by HIV/AIDS

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This exciting and timely multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry
-Research project
-Professional placement

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (including, foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (including, contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (including, macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGDip. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Non-law modules are expected to span such topics as:
-Development (eg foundational concepts, food security, gender)
-Political (eg contemporary diplomacy, conflict in the Middle East, terrorism)
-Economic (eg macro/micro-economics for developing countries, economics of public/social policy, climate change and economics) (MSc pathway only)
-Preparing for Floods

(MSc students will have economics modules and a broader selection of politics modules to choose from).

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less
Diplomacy and international law are critical components in addressing issues of seminal public concern. As populations flee repressive regimes and political issues have ramifications beyond any one state’s borders, the need for real-world solutions and the leaders who can implement them is paramount. Read more
Diplomacy and international law are critical components in addressing issues of seminal public concern. As populations flee repressive regimes and political issues have ramifications beyond any one state’s borders, the need for real-world solutions and the leaders who can implement them is paramount.

AUP’s Masters in Diplomacy and International Law aims to achieve concrete results, using the respective tools of each discipline to prepare you to develop real-world solutions. This interdisciplinary program will enable you to think critically about complex diplomatic and international legal issues in real contexts. By applying theory to practice, you will address some of the key questions facing public and non-governmental institutions around the world, such as ‘Why do states participate in international institutions that promote global cooperation?’ or ‘How do states and institutions interact when cooperation breaks down and conflict ensues?’

Gain a Global and Interdisciplinary Perspective

With increasing global interdependence, hard distinctions between foreign and domestic policy no longer exist. The Master’s program capitalizes on its location in the heart of Europe to train future public leaders to tackle today’s most pressing issues from an international perspective. The goal is to produce strong analytical thinkers and practitioners ready to be of service across cultures and national boundaries. Coursework in diplomacy and international law includes elements of international relations, economics, law, and political science to examine the problems of our day—and search for the best way to administer and manage innovative solutions. You will develop expertise in negotiation, strategic diplomatic thinking, and legal analysis to support your next career step.

Unprecedented Access to Prestigious Program Partners

A core component of the Master’s program in Diplomacy and International Law is the opportunity to work with our prestigious partners, applying classroom theory to challenging practical environments:
-Students in the MA program partner with the French War College in the annual Coalition Exercise, a polyvalent simulation of a military intervention during a humanitarian crisis. AUP students join the more than 500 officers and diplomatic participants to play the role of UN and international NGO humanitarian aid workers on the ground in a conflict zone, elaborating a humanitarian aid plan that provides relief to the tens of thousands of civilians caught in the crossfire.
-You will also earn a certificate from the University of Oxford International Human Rights Law Summer Program. Preparation for the certificate includes a practicum on international justice at The Hague, where you will engage in trial reporting and briefings with high level experts.
-As part of the MA in Diplomacy and International Law program you will participate in exciting, interactive modules with leading experts and practitioners from some of today’s most engaged NGOs.

Ensure your Professional Impact

Whether in the public or private sector, professionals need to be international and transnational in their outlook and vision. AUP’s MA in Diplomacy in International Law prepares you for exciting career paths to effect real change.

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This qualification is designed to consider the role and place of law in an increasingly globalised world, and is suitable for law and non-law graduates as well as lawyers wanting to develop their interests. Read more

Master of Laws

This qualification is designed to consider the role and place of law in an increasingly globalised world, and is suitable for law and non-law graduates as well as lawyers wanting to develop their interests. It takes a critical legal approach to study, using different perspectives and case studies to illustrate, explore, compare and contextualise topical legal issues. You will explore the interaction of law, law making bodies, institutions and regulators in an international context, the role and function of law in an increasingly global society, and the role of states, international institutions and multi-national companies. You will also consider contemporary legal issues such as corporate social responsibility, trans-national crime, humanitarian aid and security.

Key features of the course

• Explores methods of reasoning and analysis in law, and evaluates the complexities inherent in law, regulation and legal study
• Develops a range of transferable skills, including advanced legal research, that are attractive to employers
• Concludes with an in-depth piece of independent research on a topic within your chosen specialist subject area.

If you are interested in becoming a lawyer (solicitor or barrister) you need to study an undergraduate Bachelor of Laws (LLB) (Hons).

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

There is a choice of routes through the qualification. You can start your studies with either of the compulsory modules Exploring legal meaning (W820) or Exploring the boundaries of international law (W821). These modules provide core postgraduate skills in legal methodology and research and knowledge of international law and legal thinking. They include a comparative approach. Or you can start your studies with Business, human rights law and corporate social responsibilities (W822), or an optional module from list B. If you are claiming credit transfer from another postgraduate provider you may not need to study an optional module. Your final module to complete this masters degree will be The law dissertation (W800).

To gain this qualification you need 180 credits as follows:

60 credits of compulsory modules:

• Exploring legal meaning (W820)
• Exploring the boundaries of international law (W821)

Plus

30 credits of optional modules from list A:

List A

• Business, human rights law and corporate social responsibility (W822)

• Or the 30-credit module Continuing professional development in practice (UYA810)*.

*Please note that UYA810 is part of the Postgraduate Certificate in Advanced Professional Practice (Employment Law Advice) qualification only available to those working for ACAS. Therefore if you do not hold this qualification W822 is currently a compulsory module in Group A.

Plus

30 credits from the optional modules in list B:

List B
• Capacities for managing development (T878)
• Conflict and development (T879)
• Continuing professional development in practice (U810)
• Development: context and practice (T877)
• Environmental monitoring and protection (T868)
• Institutional development (TU872)
• Making environmental decisions (T891)


Plus

60 credits from the following compulsory module:

• The law dissertation (W800)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

Read less
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event. Read more
The number, intensity, and impact of crises, emergencies, conflicts and disasters are increasing. During the past ten years alone, an estimated 1.5 billion people have been affected by some form of disaster or conflict-related event.

This new and innovative multidisciplinary postgraduate taught programme examines the role of global law, policy and practice across the spectrum of possible crises, conflicts, and disasters. You will consider the complete disaster cycle of prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, and explore all types of crisis and conflict (civil, international, post-conflict peace-building, and terrorism) as well as disasters, both man-made (pollution and contamination) and natural (earthquakes, cyclones, tsunamis, health pandemics).

The programme reflects on current and changing global priorities such as the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-30; progressing the outputs of the UN Climate Change Conference 2015; UN Sustainable Development Goals 2015; and the World Humanitarian Summit 2016.

The aim of this programme is to equip you with many of the substantive, professional, practical, and personal transferable skills and knowledge necessary to operate effectively in inherently multidisciplinary crisis, conflict and/or disaster environments.

A number of schools will collaborate on the delivery of this programme: Law; Agriculture, Policy and Development; Politics, Economics and International Relations; Archaeology, Geography, and Environmental Science. There will also be input from other disciplinary perspectives too, together with practitioners drawn from across the conflict, humanitarian and disasters sectors.

As well as Law graduates, this programme will appeal to early to mid-career professionals working in roles dealing with different types of crises, conflicts and/or disasters, particularly governmental, intergovernmental, private/corporate, civil society/non-governmental who wish to broaden and deepen their existing areas of expertise. It will be also be suitable for recent graduates of any subject, those on career breaks, and career changers.

It is possible to take either an LLM or MSc pathway on the PGCert. Both are framed around the global architecture of crisis, conflict and disaster management with embedded multidisciplinarity. The key distinction is that an LLM route takes more optional law modules, whereas optional modules for the MSc are more multidisciplinary in nature.

WHAT WILL YOU STUDY?

Planned Law modules include:
-Global Architecture of Crisis, Conflict and Disaster Management
-Human Rights Law, Policy, and Practice
-Disaster Management
-Hazard, Risk, Vulnerability and Resilience
-Public International Law
-International Refugee Law
-International Law and the Regulation of Armed Conflict
-International Criminal Justice and Post-Conflict Peace-building
-Climate Change Disasters
-Technologies and Weaponry

Please note that all modules are subject to change.

A series of non-assessed, employability orientated, practical training events, inside and outside the classroom, will take place throughout the programme aimed at consolidating and applying substantive knowledge learnt as well as developing transferable professional and personal skills. This will include the opportunity to undertake a fantastic and unique practical ‘fragile/hostile environment training’ package delivered by external professional trainers*.

*Subject to payment of an additional fee, and a minimum number of students wishing to take this element.

EMPLOYABILITY

The skills gained by undertaking a postgraduate Law programme are in great demand from both legal and non-legal employers. As with any postgraduate taught Law programme, completion of the various entry points will be an asset for students seeking employment in international courts and tribunals, United Nations agencies, legal practice and advocacy in the international law field, international NGOs, the public service (in the areas of foreign relations, international development, etc), law reform agencies, the media (journalism and broadcasting), and academia (with further postgraduate study).

Graduates of this programme will be uniquely positioned and clearly distinguishable to prospective employers. In addition to acquiring knowledge of the key principles and topics associated with a traditional Public International Law and Human Rights related LLM programmes or a master's degree in crisis, conflict and/or disaster management issues, graduates of this programme will also develop a unique understanding of cutting edge law and policy, become more multidisciplinary conversant and therefore better equipped to work in inherently multidisciplinary environments.

The flexible nature of this programme allows students to select the degree qualification which best suits their background or area of expertise.

Read less

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