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Masters Degrees (Humanitarian Intervention)

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This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation. Read more

This MA explores how contemporary politics, conflict and debates about human rights and security are informed by the processes of globalisation.

You will study topics including human rights and humanitarian intervention, the world economy and the changing global order, global governance and the United Nation system, the growth of global networks and movements, global security, conflict resolution and peace-building, international relations and law, global poverty and development, and the politics of sustainability and environmental decline. Because globalisation transcends traditional disciplinary boundaries, our MA takes an interdisciplinary approach to challenge conventional political and international relations approaches.

There are two core modules: Globalisation and Global Politics, and Conflict, Security and Human Rights. You can also select two optional modules to focus on an area of particular interest, for example human rights and humanitarian intervention, global environmental politics, the Middle East, conflict resolution, genocide, international relations theory, the nature of warfare, and global ethics. 

Course structure

On the Globalisation: Politics, Conflict and Human Rights MA, you will:

  • study key developments and issues in relation to politics, conflict and human rights.
  • consider these areas within the context of contemporary globalisation
  • be encouraged to develop an informed and critical understanding of contemporary globalisation
  • receive close tutorial support.
  • be able to pursue a wide range of careers as well as opportunities for further postgraduate research.

The programme is founded on the notion that politics, conflict and human rights must now be understood in the context of contemporary globalisation.

Modules

Globalisation and Global Politics

This module begins by examining a range of approaches to globalisation and global politics before exploring the processes, institutions and ideologies that are widely considered to be driving them. For example, economic globalisation is studied in relation to the financial crisis of 2008 and wider debates about global economic disorder. In particular, the emphasis is on fostering an informed understanding of contemporary globalisation through study of critical theories, debates about power, patterns of global poverty and inequality, and development responses.

In relation to claims about a shift in global power, the rise of China and its implications for the Asia-Pacific Region and the rest of the world are explored. At an institutional level, the Human Rights Council, the International Criminal Court and the European Court of Human Rights are examined. The politics of global sustainability is considered in relation to the formation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Finally, the politics of a transnational/global movement is investigated through the study of La Via Campesina.

Conflict, Security and Human Rights

This module examines contemporary conflict, security and human rights debates in relation to globalisation and the evolution of global politics. Areas and issues examined include: the relationship between global security and international relations theory; conflict resolution theory and the prospects of conflict resolution in Syria; state building and peace-building in Somalia; and a global NGO (Amnesty International) dedicated to monitoring conflict and human rights abuses.

Environmental security is considered within the context of global environmental decline, focusing in particular on Moscow’s apparent resource-based approach to international relations. As for human rights, the major theories and critiques are examined, with specific reference to humanitarian intervention and the emergence of the concept of human security. In this vein, the politics of movement under contemporary globalisation is explored by studying the Geneva Convention and the rights of refugees.

Modules

  • Globalisation and Global Politics
  • Conflict, Security and Human Rights
  • Research Methods
  • Dissertation

Two from:

  • Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
  • Cultural and Critical Theory (International Relations Theory)
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Conflict Resolution and the Irish Troubles
  • Legacies of Warfare
  • Global Ethics
  • A Learning and Teaching option

Careers and employability

This MA is relevant to careers in the public sector, teaching, the media, the legal profession, business, journalism, management and human resources, as well as to further research. You may also seek work in development, charities, non-governmental organisations and the environment, as well as the European Union and the United Nations.



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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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Course Structure. Read more

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules

  • Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
  • Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
  • Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
  • Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
  • Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules in previous years have included:

  • Religion, Culture and Conflict
  • Conflict Mediation
  • Fieldtrip
  • Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
  • Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
  • Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
  • International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities
  • Defence Engagement 
  • Conflict Analysis.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

 The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs. 

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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This programme will appeal to a wide range of students who have an interest in security issues and practices, including civilian and military officials who want to deepen their understanding and upgrade their qualifications. Read more

This programme will appeal to a wide range of students who have an interest in security issues and practices, including civilian and military officials who want to deepen their understanding and upgrade their qualifications. You will develop an understanding of the core concepts that inform the study and practice of international security.

This core pathway is designed for flexibility, allowing you to choose over half of the MA content from a wide range of optional modules.

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Course details

The politics of contemporary peace operations and humanitarian intervention are complex and challenging. Peacekeeping plays a key role in the prevention of war, in bringing and end to conflict and in the post-conflict reconstruction process. This Masters degree explores International Peacekeeping in the broader context of International Relations.

You can expect to gain an understanding of the wide-ranging nature of security studies, an appreciation of the historical importance of security issues, and an insight into future problems and debates that will affect the stability of the 21st-century world order.

You will develop an understanding of the core concepts that inform the study and practice of security, including:

  • The changing meaning of security and what issues are considered to be security issues
  • The different concepts that inform the study and practice of security, such as explanations of war, deterrence, balance of power theories, alliance formation and management, and collective security
  • The concepts that inform the use and control of military force, such as arms races and arms control, coercion, military intervention, and peacekeeping
  • Classical strategic thought
  • The range of the security issues of the post-Cold War and post-9/11 periods, including terrorism and local and global insurgency and the challenges these pose
  • The programme has at its core international peacekeeping, which aims to help you develop an advanced knowledge of the politics of contemporary peace operations and humanitarian intervention.

One of the real strengths of our masters programmes is the wide range of available modules, giving students the ability to tailor their course of study to their own academic interests.

Who is the programme for?

This programme will appeal to a wide range of students who have an interest in security issues and practices, including civilian and military officials (most probably junior or mid-level officials), who want to deepen their understanding and upgrade their qualifications. It will also be of interest to students who seek to develop a deeper understanding of these very important aspects of international relations and of the world we live in.

More information on: International Relations MA (with specialist pathways)

Learning and teaching

We advocate an enquiry-based approach to learning, which means that we encourage you to become an independent and self-motivated learner. Through the programme of study we offer, we will develop the qualities that employers value in today's university graduates - qualities that will set you apart in your future career.

To help you develop the above-mentioned skills, we adopt a range of teaching methods. They may include:

  • Lectures - listening to experts sharing their knowledge and discoveries in challenging and provocative ways. Students are expected to 'read-around' the subject matter of their lectures, adding to their understanding and developing their critical faculties and analytical skills.
  • Seminars - where you present and discuss your ideas and knowledge in smaller groups and debate interpretations and opinions with other students.
  • Tutorials - are your opportunity to discuss your work with your tutor, usually in small groups.
  • Workshops - are problem solving sessions facilitated by a member of academic staff; these sessions usually involve students working in groups.

Our lecturers and tutors will ensure you have all the resources you need to make the transition from A levels to the more rigorous demands of a degree.

More about teaching and learning at the University of Birmingham.

Enhancing your student experience

In the School of Government and Society we offer much more than a degree. As a student here, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, you have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of events, with some or all of the costs paid for by the School.

Some of these are targeted to help you build skills and experience for your CV, others are more open events designed to expose you to high-level speakers on current debates relevant to all Government and Society students.

Read more of our students' experiences and profiles on the school website.

Employability

Graduates from the School have gone on to work in a range of careers, with recent graduates working with organisations such as the United Nations, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, local authorities in the UK and overseas and the Department for International Development.

The School takes employability very seriously and as well as linking students to the central careers services, also incorporates opportunities to enhance their employment prospects, including highlighting work experience opportunities, encouraging volunteering in extra-curricular projects (such as student seminars and events) and by inviting backgrounds for students to meet.

More information about careers and employability

Careers Network

The Careers Network provides a dedicated service to help you find work experience or internship opportunities outside of your studies, either part-time during term-time, or over the summer vacation. Right from the start of your degree you will have access to our interactive careers service, through which many regional, national and international employers advertise their vacancies, and your college internship officers will go out and about to find vacancies that will be a useful addition to your CV. 

Find out more about support for work experience and internships, bursaries, or mentoring.



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This programme is designed for those interested in study of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Read more
This programme is designed for those interested in study of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Building on a thorough understanding of international relations theory, it trains you in how to apply and leverage methods and research design to answer the most pressing societal questions of our time.

Why this programme

-◾This programme offers comprehensive training in what international relations has to say about some of the most challenging problems in international politics and equips you with the appropriate methods and a good understanding of research design to analyse political data.
◾The programme draws on expertise in the fields of international relations theory, normative international theory, international security, international organisations, non-state actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, and international political economy.
◾You will have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of disciplinary approaches through courses across the School of Social & Political Sciences, School of Law, history and other subjects.
◾You will benefit from a number of research and teaching initiatives which touch on important international issues, including Global Security Roundtable, Global Security Network, Glasgow Centre for International Development, Glasgow Refugee, Asylum & Migration Network; and Glasgow Human Rights Network.
◾You will gain a wide range of transferrable skills, including how to convey complex ideas and information effectively both orally and in writing, or how to analyse problems in international politics to inform the public debate.

Programme structure

You will take three core and three optional courses. You will attend lectures, seminars and tutorials and undertake independent research.

Core courses
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾Research design OR Quantitative data analysis OR Qualitative methods.

Optional courses
◾China’s international politics
◾Chinese politics and society
◾Comparative public opinion
◾Critical perspectives on human rights
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾EU in international politics and development
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention
◾International organisations
◾International relations and development
◾International security and strategic thought
◾Internet and civil society
◾Media and democracy.

You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences (subject to programme convener's approval).

Career prospects

The programme provides you with key knowledge and analytical tools relevant to a career in a variety of settings related to international relations, such as international and domestic non-governmental organisations, international organisations such as the United Nations or the European Union, government agencies, media, think tanks, or for further academic training and research in a PhD programme. Our programme is supported by the College Employability Office to help students with collaborative dissertation projects, professionalisation of their web presence, job applications and placement. These offerings are supplemented by efforts to build active networks through speaker events, social activities, and alumni events.

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This ESRC recognised research-training programme provides a broad and in-depth grounding in the study and methodologies of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Read more
This ESRC recognised research-training programme provides a broad and in-depth grounding in the study and methodologies of the most challenging problems our world currently faces, such as international conflict and instability, terrorism, climate change, or rapid globalisation. Building on a thorough understanding of international relations theory, our programme trains you in how to apply and leverage methods and research design to answer the most pressing societal questions of our time.

Why this programme

◾If you are planning to pursue a research-intensive career or doctoral studies, including under the ESRC 1+3 scheme, this programme is designed for you. This degree provides a pathway to ESRC sponsored postgraduate fellowships.
◾This programme offers training in what international relations has to say about some of the most challenging problems in international politics and equips you with the appropriate methods and a good understanding of research design to analyse political data.
◾The MRes covers common material with the MSc in International Relations and provides in-depth methodological training for those who seek to continue their studies with a PhD degree at doctoral level. It draws on expertise in the fields of international relations theory, normative international theory, international security, international organisations, non-state actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, and international political economy.
◾You will have the opportunity to approach the subject from a variety of disciplinary approaches through courses across the School of Social & Political Sciences, School of Law, history and other subjects.
◾You will benefit from a number of research and teaching initiatives which touch on important international issues, including Global Security Roundtable, Global Security Network, Glasgow Centre for International Development, Glasgow Refugee, Asylum & Migration Network; and Glasgow Human Rights Network.
◾You will gain a wide range of transferrable skills, including how to convey complex ideas and information effectively both orally and in writing, or how to analyse problems in international politics to inform the public debate.

Programme structure

You will take five core and one optional course. You will attend lectures, seminars and tutorials and undertake independent research in the form of a dissertation.

Core courses
◾International relations research
◾International relations theory
◾Qualitative research methods
◾Quantitative data analysis
◾Research design.

Optional courses
◾China's international politics
◾Chinese politics and society
◾Comparative public opinion
◾Critical perspectives on human rights
◾Environmental policies and problems in China
◾EU in international politics and development
◾Human rights and global politics
◾Humanitarian intervention
◾International security and strategic thought
◾International organisations
◾International relations and development
◾Internet and civil society
◾Media and democracy
◾Politics of foreign policy.

You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences (subject to programme convener's approval).

Career prospects

The programme is ideal for students interested in pursuing studies at doctoral level and obtain a PhD degree. Outside academia, the programme provides you with key knowledge and analytical tools relevant to a career in a variety of settings related to international relations, such as international and domestic non-governmental organisations, international organisations such as the United Nations or the European Union, government agencies, media, think tanks. Our programme is supported by the College Employability Office to help students with collaborative dissertation projects, professionalisation of their web presence, job applications and placement. These offerings are supplemented by efforts to build active networks through speaker events, social activities, and alumni events.

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In this three-semester Master's programme you will strengthen your academic understanding of International Humanitarian Action. You will also acquire practical skills for working in the area of humanitarian aid, such as policy-making. Read more
In this three-semester Master's programme you will strengthen your academic understanding of International Humanitarian Action. You will also acquire practical skills for working in the area of humanitarian aid, such as policy-making.

The programme is an international Erasmus Mundus Master's programme. It is offered by nine European universities, namely in the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Germany, Ireland, Belgium and France. These universities are united in the Network on Humanitarian Action (NOHA).

In this programme you will learn to evaluate humanitarian emergencies. You will study the causes of conflicts and different coping strategies for conflicts and disasters. In addition, you will learn to plan and assess intervention and reconstruction programmes. Also, you will acquire practical skills such as management skills and cross-cultural communication skills.

You will take courses such as Geopolitics in Humanitarian Action and Comprehensive Security and Disaster Analysis. You will do a career-oriented internship in a humanitarian organization and write a thesis.

Why in Groningen?

- Erasmus Mundus Master of Excellence with double degree awards
- Erasmus Mundus scholarships
- Unique, multilingual, interdisciplinary and interuniversity programme
- Consortium of several European universities
- Unique combination of hands-on practice and theory
- Career-oriented internship in humanitarian organizations

Job perspectives

This programme prepares you for an international career. Most graduates work in the field of humanitarian action and international cooperation as representatives of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. They also work as managers, fundraisers, policymakers and researchers.

Job examples

- Manager non-profit organization
- Policymaker

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This ground-breaking MSc course offers online training for people working in humanitarian organisations, wherever they are in the world. Read more

This ground-breaking MSc course offers online training for people working in humanitarian organisations, wherever they are in the world.

Our distance learning course is aimed at people who are currently, or hope to be, engaged in humanitarian work in any country and who want the skills and knowledge to offer psychosocial support.

This involves helping people to maintain their positive psychological development in the face of challenges – often traumatic – being posed by their social environment.

Once you have completed this course you will be able to support others within your organisation, whether or not you are part of an established human resources department.

As well as ‘helping the helpers’, you will be equipped to offer direct psychosocial guidance to people who have suffered, or who continue to suffer, from the effects of a natural or man-made catastrophe such as famine, flood, epidemic or war.



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With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Read more

With conflicts becoming either increasingly drawn-out, asymmetric wars of attrition or normalise into states of no peace – no war, our understanding of conflict and conflict intervention is shifting. Conflicts are rarely determined by military victory, diplomacy or long-term development, but require to securing populations through a comprehensive approach that sees to their political, and economic, as well as their security-related needs. Their outcome will be determined by how well the different arms of government and civil society, both locally and internationally, can work together and how well they understand each others' perspectives.

This inter-disciplinary and custom designed MSc offers the unique opportunity to look at conflict, conflict intervention and post-conflict reconstruction through the lenses of defence, development and diplomacy.

The MSc is designed for graduates with a career in government, the armed forces, inter-governmental organisations, NGOs or academia in mind, and for practitioners looking to enhance their practical skills while placing these within a broader theoretical perspective.

Course structure

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules

  • Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
  • Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
  • Conflict Intervention: International Law, Counter-Insurgency and Conflict Diplomacy
  • Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Stabilisation, Development and State-Building
  • Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional module in previous years have included:

  • Religion, Culture and Conflict
  • Conflict Mediation
  • Fieldtrip
  • Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
  • Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
  • Conflict Analysis
  • Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
  • International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
  • Defence Engagement 
  • Policing Post-Conflict Cities.

Course Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through two-day induction events in which they are informed about the University, the School, the MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 60 credits of not more than15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays.

Formative assessment is given on seminar contributions, role plays, and formative essays. Students have the opportunity to meet their lecturers to discuss their marks and other issues arising from their course performance. Students also have the opportunity to attend ‘essay surgeries’ in which they can discuss the structure and content of their essays early in the course.

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute, which delivers this MSc programme and hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Throughout the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Career Opportunities

Our students go on to a wide range of successful careers including civil service and other government agencies, UN/INGOs/CSOs, journalism, media, teaching, law, banking and finance, diplomatic services and risk analysis.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The full-time International Relations course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research process module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• Critical Security

• War, Identity and Society

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Civil Society and International Development

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• War, Technology and Culture

• State of Africa

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• Development Studies

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and

Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA



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About the MSc programme. The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Human Rights is a unique multidisciplinary programme that provides a concentrated year-long engagement with the foundations of human rights and key human rights issues.

Human rights are not just an object of study, but also a matter of policy, intervention and practice. The programme links theory and practice in a multidisciplinary way and aims to equip you with knowledge of the key legal, sociological and philosophical issues relevant to human rights.

During the programme, you will engage in an academically rigorous way with some of the most compelling issues in contemporary human rights. The programme is unique in linking legal, philosophical, sociological and political perspectives on human rights though a rigorous and analytical approach.

The programme serves as an introduction to the core standards and structures of human rights and discusses a range of key issues in the current, ongoing debates about the role of human rights. While these may change from year to year, thematic issues that the compulsory course covers include: genocide, humanitarian intervention, militarism, war and warfare, religion, culture and human rights and transitional justice.

The programme is run by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights. In addition to teaching and research, the Centre runs a very active public events programme which includes public lectures, visiting speaker seminars and conferences involving world-leading human rights academics and practitioners. You also benefit from masterclasses and guest practitioner seminars organised throughout the year exclusively for students on the programme.

Graduate destinations

This programme provides an excellent foundation for a variety of academic and non-academic careers, including in: law, especially international law and advocacy (albeit usually with other qualifications); foreign policy; working for activist organisations in the humanitarian sector; international and domestic human rights; development; civil liberties; welfare; as well as in specialised agencies concerned with, for example, refugees; women's rights; torture victims or children's rights. 

During the programme, you will have opportunities to meet alumni of the MSc Human Rights who are working in a range of international, government and non-governmental organisations.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Relations (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Relations aims to open your mind and extend your skills.

Key Features of MA in International Relations

This MA in International Relations offers advanced research in International Relations, providing students with a detailed understanding of the international system, key issues, the crucial actors, and alternative ways of analysing and interpreting the subject.

With an appreciation of the global dynamics at work, you then have the opportunity to specialise in examining one specific area of the world: the Asia-Pacific.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

International Relations graduates have careers in Government and Politics, UN organisations, the Foreign Office and Diplomatic Corps, Humanitarian organisations, International business, media and PR.

The Extended MA (EMA) in International Relations is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA International Relations is The Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Founded in 1997, the Bush School is ranked in the top 12 percent of the 266 graduate public affairs schools in the USA, according to rankings published in U.S. News & World Report. Located in College Station, Texas, the School’s programmes are housed in the Robert H. and Judy Ley Allen Building, which is part of the George Bush Presidential Library Center on the West Campus of Texas A&M. This location affords students access to the archival holdings of the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, invitation to numerous events hosted by the George Bush Foundation at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center, and inclusion in the many activities of the Texas A&M community. Texas A&M is the sixth-largest university in the USA with 50,000 students. It holds membership in the prestigious Association of American Universities, one of only 61 institutions with this distinction.

Modules

Modules on the International Relations programme typically include:

• Approaches to International Relations

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• Critical Security

• War, Identity and Society

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Civil Society and International Development

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• War, Technology and Culture

• State of Africa

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Relations, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, International Business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Relations.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Relations graduates. MA degree holders in International Relations may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of International Relations including:

• International Relations & Security

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• Development Studies

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and

Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“The lecturers and other staff members of the International Relations Department are exceptional, they are friendly, helpful and understanding and they provide clarity and support. The range of modules available to MA students in International Relations is second to none; they are not only interesting and enjoyable but also highly academic and insightful. Study facilities are world class. The library and Information centre has rich collections of research materials; there is a dedicated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate study room and also a computer room with an unlimited access to the internet. Studying for an MA in International Relations at Swansea University is an amazing experience and one that I shall never forget. The teaching and non-teaching staff of the Department of International Relations are the best. I shall continue to enjoy this friendliness and understanding from the Department in the foreseeable future because, I have decided to study a PhD after the MA.”

Felix Oko. International Relations, MA



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Judged best in the field. The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2017 ranked Utrecht University’s Conflict Studies and Human Rights programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands. Read more

Judged best in the field

The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2017 ranked Utrecht University’s Conflict Studies and Human Rights programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands.

In this year's Elsevier Best Studies Survey, students have also rated Conflict Studies as the best programme.

WHAT DOES THIS MASTER ENTAIL?

Conflict Studies and Human Rights: Theoretical analysis and grounded research

Why has ’nationalist’ violence erupted in Ukraine? Will cities become the war zones of the future? How is the term ‘human rights’ used and abused in times of violent conflict? What role did social media play in the rise and subsequent collapse of the Arab Spring? What are the ethical and political issues associated with the use of drones in zones of conflict - and what impact does this have on the subjects of surveillance? Who defines ‘evil’ and what does ‘doing good’ mean? How do ‘humanitarian wars’ affect the everyday lives of the ‘victims’ they protect?

These are just some of the pressing questions arising from the complex interconnectedness of today’s world. A solution to these questions can only be found through systematic analysis of processes of inclusion and exclusion, mobilisation, and collective violence. Addressing these topics properly demands critical reflection on the national and international policies developed to contain, manage, resolve, or transform violent conflict.

Our Master's programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights is a selective, international graduate programme combining the study of theory with in-depth case study analysis.

The programme focuses on both the dynamics of violent conflicts and the problems associated with national and international military or humanitarian intervention by agencies such as the UN, NATO, or non-governmental organisations.

AFTER GRADUATION

The Master's programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights will equip you with the necessary analytical and theoretical skills to engage with global and local challenges in insightful and innovative ways. You will acquire solid theoretical, analytical, and methodological expertise in Conflict Studies and Human Rights, as well as field experience in conflict and post-conflict regions.

You will learn about and develop mastery in three key areas:

1. Subject knowledge 

You will gain in-depth knowledge of theoretical approaches to understanding and explaining contemporary conflict and human rights. You will also obtain a general understanding of international policy approaches to contemporary conflict and human rights, as well as an understanding of the political contexts in which they are used.

2. Evidence-based social research 

You will learn to undertake research that consists of systematic analysis and synthesis and is based on a dialogue between ideas and evidence. In the course of this dialogue, you will be able to identify “sensitising concepts” from theory to facilitate your data collection. You will also use theory to gain an understanding of the evidence you gather and to explain your findings.

3. Critical attitude towards received wisdom

You will have the conceptual and analytical skills necessary to question conventional ideas and accepted courses of action while defining your own viewpoint. You will also be able to assess the problem of violent conflict and human rights by considering interrelated issues of identity, perception, discourse, and practice.

Career prospects

The Master’s programme in Conflict Studies and Human Rights offers good preparation for careers in any sector involving conflict analysis, including the public sector, business, non-governmental and international organisations. Read more about possible career prospects.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study War and Society at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in War and Society is a unique degree that explores the most spectacular of historic events.

Key Features of MA in War and Society

War has been a catalyst for violent change throughout human history. It inflicts terrible suffering and degradation and yet evokes great bravery.

What is War? A simple, meaningful definition is not easily achieved. Simple explanations are insufficient. War needs to be analysed in political, social, cultural, technological, historical, military and media contexts.

War and Society is a collaborative, interdisciplinary MA Degree programme that utilises the range of research expertise in the College of Arts and Humanities.

The full-time War and Society course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study is available.

War and Society Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to war and society.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of study of war and society.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the course in War and Society typically include:

• War, Identity and Society

• War, Thecnology and Culture

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Critical Security

• Venice and the Sea

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Ghosts of the Confederacy

• State of Africa

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• Fascism and Culture

• War in Space

Who should Apply?

Students interested in War and Society from a history, politics, media or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to war and society.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for war and society graduates. MA in War and Society degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as military organisations; diplomatic corps; the foreign office; humanitarian organisations; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions and the civil service.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study International Security and Development at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in International Security and Development introduces students to issues and debates within International Security. This includes coverage of both ‘traditional’ security issues such as war and conflict and ‘non-traditional’ issues such as economic security, environmental security, health, identity and migration.

Key Features of MA in International Security and Development

Issues of security, violence and conflict have become central to international politics and to development policy and discourse. In order to comprehend the modern world, a full appreciation of the realities of conflict and violence, has become essential.

Drawing on the Department’s expertise in the field of security, International Security and Development students are also provided with an advanced introduction to key approaches in the study of security including realism, securitization theory, feminist approaches, critical theory and poststructuralism.

Students enrolled on the MA in International Security and Development benefit from the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including those in International Security and Development. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time International Security and Development course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. Students study four compulsory modules, the research module and one optional module. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study in MA in International Security and Development is available.

MA in International Security and Development Programme Aims

- To develop advanced knowledge and understanding of International Security and Development.

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills, improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills in International Security and Development.

Modules

Modules on the MA in International Security and Development typically include:

• Violence, Conflict and Development

• Critical Security

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Civil Society and International Development

• Approaches to International Relations

• War, Identity and Society

• Governance: From State Formation to Global Governance

• War in Space

• State of Africa

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

Who should Apply?

Students interested in International Security and Development, from a politics, international relations, development studies, law, humanities, social science, international business or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to International Security and Development.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for International Security and Development graduates. MA in International Security and Development degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of the

study of international security and development including:

• International Relations & Security

• Development Studies

• Cultural Political Economy

• Policy and Governance

• International Communication

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Student Quote

“I am now in my fourth year at Swansea University and can honestly say that I have enjoyed every moment. My undergraduate years were so good that I choose to stay on for another year to complete my Masters in International Security and Development and this is a decision I certainly do not regret. I feel like my degree has provided me with the tools needed to thrive in the world of employment, and the MA in International Security and Development I am now studying towards will only improve my chances of getting a high end job.”

Chris Harber, International Security and Development, MA



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