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Masters Degrees (Humanitarian Assistance)

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The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including. anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. Read more
The course will appeal to graduates from a variety of backgrounds, including: anthropology, sociology, economics, politics, geography, law and development studies. It will provide the necessary training to enable students to seek employment with NGOs (such as Oxfam and Save the Children Fund), international agencies (such as the World Health Organisation and the World Food Programme) and the civil service (such as the UK Department for International Development). It will also provide a useful stepping stone for those seeking to undertake doctoral research in international development.

Over the last ten years, global aspirations to reduce the suffering of the "bottom billion" have led to unprecedented attention on international development. International agencies, governments and NGOs are working more intensely than ever before to deliver appropriate policies and interventions.

Anthropology has played a key role in the emergence of new perspectives on humanitarian assistance and the livelihoods of populations caught up in extreme circumstances such as famines, natural disasters and wars. On the one hand, this has led to a radical re-thinking of what has been happening, but on the other hand, it has led to anthropologists sometimes playing controversial roles in agendas associated with the "war on terror".

This course examines these contemporary issues and debates, and explores their implications. It also sets them in the context of anthropology as a discipline. In so doing, students will discover how the apparent insights and skills of anthropologists have a long history associated with ethnographic work on economics, education, health, deprivation and conceptions of suffering dating back to the origins of the discipline

Typical Core Modules (subject to change) include:

Anthropology of International Development
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Ethnographic Research Methods

There is a wide range of optional modules. Apart from those offered by the Anthropology Department, students can choose from Health Sciences and Social Care, Politics and History, Law and Business modules.

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This distinctive masters in Disaster Healthcare is the only course of its kind and is aimed at experienced healthcare professionals working in the humanitarian field, or those who aspire to do so. Read more
This distinctive masters in Disaster Healthcare is the only course of its kind and is aimed at experienced healthcare professionals working in the humanitarian field, or those who aspire to do so.

A key element of this disaster healthcare degree is its strong international and trans-cultural focus. This degree involves studying via distance learning, plus an annual two-week residential Summer School at the beginning of the course.

You will study the key areas of theory and practice that are relevant to healthcare in complex humanitarian disasters, from resilience and response to mitigation and recovery. The course will prepare you to provide high quality care to vulnerable populations in conflict zones, and disaster emergencies through humanitarian assistance. You will also develop your knowledge on how to reduce disaster risks and improve public health.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/319-msc-disaster-healthcare-online-delivery

What you will study

Modules

Year One:
- Summer School (14 days attendance required).
- Personal Preparation for Disasters
- Principles and Concepts in Disasters
- Protecting Public Health in Disasters

You can exit the course in year one with a Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert).

Year Two:
- Professional Development for Disaster
- Evidence-based Practice in Disasters
- Promoting Public Health

You can exit the course in year two with a Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip).

Year Three:
- Professional Practice in Disasters
- Researching and Evaluating Disasters

Learning and teaching methods

Each year begins with a two week residential summer school in either the UK or in Finland. Summer School includes a week of simulation exercises in the field followed by a week of classes to introduce the forthcoming modules.

The remainder of the year involves studying online learning materials, engagement in online discussions and exercises, and self-directed study.

The final year includes a 12 week placement in either disaster response, humanitarian assistance of disaster risk reduction.

You will be taught by an international teaching faculty from a range of backgrounds with field expertise in disaster and emergency response, public health, and humanitarian assistance.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Graduates find work with national healthcare providers, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and inter-government organisations.

Some of our graduates have taken up key posts with the International Federation of Red Cross (IFRC) and Red Crescent Societies, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Department of Health, the armed forces and with NGOs in Sudan, Iraq, Angola and Afghanistan.

Assessment methods

Modules will be assessed throughout the course using essays, research proposals and field work study. Field placements scheduled for August/ September form a central and compulsory feature of the course structure.

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On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity. Read more
On this cutting-edge course, we specialise in giving our students an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the relationship between conflict, displacement and human insecurity.

We will help you to develop the skills and understanding to prepare for employment in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives. The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

You will work with academics involved in the latest research and have access to wide-ranging expertise in our research centres, covering human rights in conflict, social justice and change, migration, refugees and belonging and gender research.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

This course will help you to develop important skills for a key role in the area of conflict, displacement and human security.
By the time you complete it, you should have acquired advanced critical and evaluative abilities, research management skills, the ability to design and deliver substantial written reports and social research projects, and high levels of competence in library and bibliographical research.

You will also have gained skills in data collection and analysis. You will have enhanced abilities in verbal presentation, familiarity with means of dissemination and mobilising research findings, and an advanced ability to collaborate in research groups and teams.
The course provides an inter-disciplinary approach to the study of the conflict, generalised violence and social inequality in contemporary global contexts. It examines the complexities of global, regional and local structures, and the relationships to the changing character of conflict.

Your studies will focus on two core modules: Conflict; Displacement and Human Security, and Research Methods and two specialist option modules in the areas of displacement, development, human rights, global environmental politics and community development. This will prepare you to begin a dissertation during the summer term for submission in September.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Our course is specifically aimed at giving you the skills, knowledge and understanding for a career in the fields of conflict management and resolution, humanitarian assistance and displacement, human rights and development initiatives.

You will develop the critical thinking skills and flexibility for a role in an NGO or in a government department or agency, both in developing and developed countries.

The course will also develops your skills for further academic research in conflict, displacement, development and human rights fields, as well as in associated areas of social and political theory.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

• Conflict, Displacement and Human Security ( Core)
• Qualitative Research Methods (Social Sciences) (Core)
• Dissertation (Core)
• Introduction to Forced Migration (Option)
• Development in the International Context (Option)
• Current Issues in Forced Migration (Option)
• Global Environmental Politics (Option)
• War and Human Rights (Option)

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This MA is ideal for those considering employment in the field of humanitarian assistance and post-conflict reconstruction. It is also relevant to practitioners wishing to study the politics of aid. Read more
This MA is ideal for those considering employment in the field of humanitarian assistance and post-conflict reconstruction. It is also relevant to practitioners wishing to study the politics of aid. The programme builds on critical policy research and consultancy that has been completed for a wide range of international organisations.

It addresses the increasing overlap between ‘development’ and ‘security’ and explores the significance of globalisation for the emergence of internal, regionalised and networked forms of conflict and instability.

This analysis will broaden your understanding of the present crisis in global security as you go on to study the recent and current responses in humanitarian, developmental and security terms, particularly the links between aid and politics.

Core Modules
• Theorising Security and War
• Theory and Method in Postgraduate Studies
• Dissertation (20,000 words)

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The last three decades have seen a substantial rise in the number and frequency of disasters. Global warming, together with its associated extreme weather events make it likely to see this trend continue. Read more
The last three decades have seen a substantial rise in the number and frequency of disasters. Global warming, together with its associated extreme weather events make it likely to see this trend continue.

It is becoming increasingly important to foster resilience and a capacity to withstand disaster events, as a part of reducing and managing risk within a broader context of sustainable development.

The course aims to provide students with the research skills, knowledge and management expertise to deal with future crises, emergencies and disasters in the developed and developing world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Courses in disaster management have been offered at Coventry University for over ten years.
-Provides an understanding of theory and practice and their application within local, national and international contexts
-Designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary for successful disaster intervention in the UK, and elsewhere across the globe
-Emphasis on academic content and on application of theory and principles
-Uses case studies to ensure that applied and theoretical knowledge complement each other
-Appropriate for professionals who wish to further their careers in the areas of disaster management, risk assessment, community development, humanitarian assistance and capacity building
-Staff teaching on the course have a wide range of practice based and research skills and form a cohesive multi-disciplinary team with a strong commitment to advancing disaster management research and practice

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course covers a range of subject areas, such as:
-Disaster risk reduction and development
-Humanitarian theory and practice in disasters
-Communities - approaches to resilience and engagement
-Risk, Crisis, and continuity management
-Management of natural and environmental hazards
-Technology for disaster and emergency management
-Research design and methods
-Dissertation

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

Qualified disaster professionals are in high demand. Our part-time students are often sponsored by their employers and our graduates are much sought after by a range of organisations, including, governments, NGOs and private sector organisations.

The Programme’s goal is to enhance graduates’ employability by giving students the knowledge and skills necessary to critically evaluate and apply key elements of disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, including the ability to conduct assessments of hazards, risks, vulnerability and capacity. Also, through providing students with an understanding of approaches that may be used internationally to reduce and manage risk, the Programme aims to prepare students for employment in a wide range of careers focused on disaster intervention.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA/PGDip International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) programme is designed for those engaged in, or planning to embark upon, a professional career requiring international expertise in government, not-for-profit, corporate or academic environments.

ISD aims to prepare students for a variety of roles, such as working within a Foreign Service or other government department; international civil service (such as the United Nations or European Union); international NGOs (working in fields such as development, humanitarian assistance and conflict resolution); multinational corporations and international media. The programme also suits those engaged in or considering research roles within a policy think tank, risk analysis organisation or doctoral programme and seeking to deepen their academic and practical understanding of international affairs and contemporary diplomatic practice.

The programme has a multi-disciplinary structure and draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. Students choose a combination of modules to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Geneva.

Programme Objectives

- Excellent inter-disciplinary understanding of key concepts, theories and debates in the study of international affairs

- Excellent knowledge of international policy debates and principle issues from perspectives of both the global North and South

- Ability to undertake critical analysis of contemporary international policy issues and challenges

- Development of module specific practical skills such as policy analysis and policy advocacy, negotiation, mediation, communication and media relations.

We welcome applications from academically strong individuals from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds; however, it is not necessary to have a first degree in a discipline directly related to the programme.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/

Duration: MA: One calendar year (full time). Two or three years (part time). PGDip: One academic year (full time). Two academic years (part time).

Structure

Students take taught modules to the value of 3 full units plus 10,000 word dissertation

1. One unit (or two half units) from A
2. One unit (or two half units) from A or B
3. One unit (or two half units) from A, B or C
4. Dissertation (compulsory) on a topic related to the programme’s core themes

Postgraduate Diploma candidates take modules as the MA, excluding the dissertation.

A). International Studies and Diplomacy Modules
General Diplomatic Studies and Practice
International Politics of Transitional Justice
International Relations 1; Foundations of World Politics
International Relations 2; Contemporary World Politics
International Law 1; Foundation
International Economics
International Security
Sport and Diplomacy: "More than a Game"
History and Future of the United Nations
Global Advocacy

B). Additional modules available within CISD
Energy Policy in the Asia-Pacific
Global Energy and Climate Policy
Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising world – Economic and Legal Perspectives

C). Electives
Please note that acceptance onto an elective module is subject to availability of places, timetabling, and the approval of the convenor of that course.

Suggested electives for International Studies and Diplomacy students
Full Unit modules (1.0):
China and International Politics
Chinese Commercial Law
Comparative Politics of the Middle East
Economic Development of South East Asia
Economic Dynamics of the Asia-Pacific Region
Economic Problems and Policies in Modern China
Government and Politics in Africa
Government and Politics of Modern South Asia
Government and Politics of Modern South East Asia
International Politics of East Asia
Modern Chinese Law and Human Rights
State and Society in the Chinese Political Process
Taiwan's Politics and Cross-Strait Relations
Theory, Policy and Practice of Development

Half-Unit modules (0.5):
Economic Development of Modern Taiwan
International Political Communication
Japanese Modernity I
Japanese Modernity II
Power in World Politics
The Making of the Contemporary World
The Transnational News Environment: Production, Representation and Use
Topics in the Chinese Economy

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 234kb) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/mapgdipisd/file80889.pdf)

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time (MA only), with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full-time employment. Participants may choose a combination of modules to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the modules for International Studies and Diplomacy (ISD) accessible to part-time students. Where possible the majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00; however, lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some modules (between evening and daytime slots) so that part-time students will have access to as many modules as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each ISD module taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:
- Wide range of modules: Diplomatic Studies and Practice, International Relations, International Economics, International Law, and International Security
- Wide choice of electives: Global Energy and Climate Policy, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a module offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law, Languages)
- Interaction with diplomats, policy makers, NGO officials and other international practitioners.
- Training in negotiation, policy analysis, policy advocacy, communication and media and other skills through practical exercises including strategy, communication and media workshops, moots courts, and negotiation and mediation workshops.

Further activities:
Included in the degree programme:

- Week long study trip to United Nations organisations in Geneva
- Media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners, and policy conferences (visit the CISD website to listen to the podcasts)
- Opportunities to actively participate in Centre research programmes (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/pg/research)

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations. Read more
Our programme gives you the opportunity to delve into one of three specialist areas of International Relations.

You will master key skills in political science that enable you to explore the links between local, national and international structures, and critically evaluate key contemporary debates in the field of international relations.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MSc International Relations programme is offered via two pathways. The International Relations pathway examines key issues in the contemporary international system and processes of global governance.

Secondly, the innovative International Intervention pathway deepens your understanding of this complex area and includes a placement option, allowing you to spend three months working in international politics.

There are a set of common compulsory modules for all pathways, in addition to two compulsory modules for your chosen pathway, and three optional modules from a range of international or European politics topics.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year, until a total of eight is reached. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation or placement. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Research
-Research in Practice
-Theories of International Relations
-Dissertation
-Placement
-Key Issues in International Relations
-Politics of International Intervention I
-Politics of International Intervention II
-Global Governance
-Critical Studies on Security and Terrorism
-International Political Economy
-International Security and Defence
-European Social Dimension
-EU External Relations
-EU and Neighbourhood
-International Trade
-Extractive Industries and Society: Problems and Policies
-Extractive Industries and Society: Case Studies
-Environmental Management, Development and Sustainability
-EU Counter-Terrorism Law
-International Human Rights Law
-Law of international organizations
-Law of Armed Conflict Optional
-Institutional Architecture of EU

CAREER PROSPECTS

Our MSc programme in International Relations is a great stepping stone in your career development, whatever your plans.

Through its assessed, three-month placement, the International Intervention pathway offers an excellent opportunity to enhance a wide range of transferable skills and build personal networks which will significantly enhance your employment opportunities upon graduation.

Students from the School have gone on to a wide range of employment choices. These include working for international organisations, national and local government, lobby groups and non-governmental organisations, as well as private businesses and media organisations.

We also offer doctoral supervision in a wide range of political subjects for talented students who wish to continue their studies.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to:
-Enable students to understand and evaluate contemporary debates in the study of international relations, concerning global governance and/or terrorism and security and international intervention
-Deepen students’ knowledge of theoretical aspects of international relations, including theoretical developments in the sub-fields of terrorism and security and international intervention
-Enable students to develop their knowledge and understanding in at least three sub-fields of international politics: students take three programme compulsory modules, two pathway compulsory modules specific to their pathway (International Relations, International Intervention, Terrorism and Security), and two further modules from a list of optional modules particular to their pathway
-Provide students, with the opportunity, through the International Intervention pathway, to spend three months working in a field related to their degree (this will not only provide students with new insights into International Intervention but will also develop a broad array of transferable skills – such skills include self-management and development; managing tasks; communicating effectively and clearly; working with and relating to others; the application of specialist knowledge; the application of initiative and reflecting on one’s own learning outcomes)

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-Critical knowledge of contemporary debates in the study of international politics, particularly in relation to the international system and global governance, differing forms of intervention in response to poverty, humanitarian crisis, abuses of human rights, state failure and armed conflict
-In-depth understanding of international structures of governance and their impact on regional, national and local structures; and of theories of international relations
-Detailed knowledge and understanding within at least two sub-fields of international politics, for example development and humanitarian assistance; peace-making; peace-keeping and peace- building; use of international legal institutions and processes; and coercive military intervention to secure regime change
-Understanding of processes of knowledge creation and contestation within international politics
-Understanding of techniques of research and enquiry and their application to the study of politics

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a range of different sources
-Analyse and synthesise a wide range of material in verbal and numerical formats
-Deal with complex issues systematically and creatively
-Make sound judgements on the basis of incomplete evidence
-Demonstrate self-direction and originality in solving problems and analysing evidence
-Construct reasoned argument
-Apply theoretical frameworks to empirical analysis

Professional practical skills
-Make appropriate use of information and communications technology
-Carry out an advanced literature search
-Form effective arguments
-Organise own workload to meet deadlines
-Formulate research questions
-Design and conduct a research project, selecting appropriate methods of data collection and analysis
-Design and pilot questionnaires
-Design and conduct interviews
-Use software packages to analyse qualitative and quantitative data
-Present research findings orally and in writing

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Use information and communication technology for the retrieval and presentation of material
-Organise and plan their own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Collaborate with others to achieve common goals
-Deploy a range of relevant research skills
-Make decisions in complex situations
-Take responsibility for their own learning

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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From natural and human-made disasters, complex emergencies and conflict to environmental sustainability and community development, this globally-focused course explores real-world problems and how to conceptualise and address them. Read more
From natural and human-made disasters, complex emergencies and conflict to environmental sustainability and community development, this globally-focused course explores real-world problems and how to conceptualise and address them.

You will learn how to prepare for, and respond in a crisis. You will develop the planning skills to help minimise impact and avert problems where possible. You will develop advanced knowledge, project management and analytical skills whilst developing a specialism in an area of your choice.

The course is supported by the Disaster and Development Network (DDN) hosted by Northumbria University , which can lead to placements across the world. Our highly employable graduates have moved into a range of exciting careers, including in the UN, governments, development, humanitarian aid organisations, charities and local authorities.

Learn From The Best

Our MSc was the first of its kind in the world. Over the last 16 years our staff and graduates have informed policy at an international level, regularly advising and researching with the United Nations and national development organisations.

With many modules directly relating to the research expertise of teaching staff, you will learn from lecturers who lead knowledge creation in their specialist fields. Through collaborations with scholars, practitioners and senior policy makers across the world, our academics have connections with organisations such as the United Nations, the World Bank, national Emergency Management and Environment Agencies, as well as international and national charities and governments in a range of countries around the world.

You will benefit from our outstanding links with research groups and networks including the University-hosted Disaster Development Network (DDN) which is involved with research and enterprise activities on a global scale.

Teaching And Assessment

In this rapidly expanding field, you will learn through real scenarios and case studies, live research projects, developing your personal and professional responses to disaster and development challenges.

Guided through lectures, seminars and workshops by staff with vast experience in applying their expertise to current world issues, you will develop the knowledge and practical skills needed to prepare for, take action within, and recover from a crisis. You will develop research and methodology skills. You will also develop a specialism in an area such as health and wellbeing in disaster management, integrated emergency management, or exploring a specific thematic subject of your own choice. The course culminates in a Masters dissertation which can take the form of a traditional research dissertation or a work related project.

Assessment is designed to provide an authentic learning experience, using techniques and approaches common in professional practice and subject-based academic research and consultancy. We provide constructive ongoing and forward feedback to develop your understanding within and between modules.

Learning Environment

If you’re looking for specialist software packages or group study areas, our facilities have been developed to help you through your studies.

We also make use of technology in module delivery. Modules take a ‘virtual field study’ approach where real-world examples are brought into the classroom via video clips, podcasts and online discussions with external experts and practitioners.

Lecture materials, learning resources and assessment details are accessible on the eLearning portal (Blackboard), a university-wide system that also provides access to discussion boards where you can communicate with your fellow students and lecturers.

Module Overview
KE7001 - Approaches to Project Management (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7003 - Subject Exploration in Disaster and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)
KE7004 - Themes in Sustainable Development (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7005 - Disaster Risk Reduction and Response (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7006 - Health and Well-being in Disaster and Development (Core, 20 Credits)
KE7007 - Integrated Emergency Management (Optional, 20 Credits)
KE7015 - Research or Work Related Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
KE7022 - Postgraduate Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

Research-Rich Learning

Research-led teaching and learning is used to guide you from the start to the end of the course. We embed research into lectures, seminars and workshops, drawing on staff and visiting lecturers’ research findings and consultancy.

You will be encouraged to debate key readings and actively engage in critical discussion of research strategies in interactive seminars and workshops. This is reinforced by assessments where you critically evaluate case studies, concepts, applications and research outputs.

Our research into Disaster and Development was ranked by judges representing UK Government Departments and Research Councils among the top 20 impact case studies within the Research Excellence Framework for contribution towards global development. DDN has been researching and facilitating the implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies to improve community resilience in some of the world’s poorest communities since 1994, working with communities in Bangladesh, Mozambique, Nepal, Pakistan and Zimbabwe.

Northumbria is one of three Europe wide groups to represent Europe and Africa in the new Global Alliance of Disaster Research Institutes, and a leading member of a new UK national research network for implementing the UK research strategy for the Sendai Framework.

Our contribution is supported through the global MSc, doctoral alumni and the annual Dealing with Disasters conference.

Give Your Career An Edge

This postgraduate course is designed to support the development of those seeking to enter a career in the disaster and development fields, as well as to broaden and deepen the career options of those already working in the field. Our connections with professionals working in the sector ensure that the course content is aligned with current practice and relevant to the world, while staff research helps to inform new innovations, reflected in modules on the MSc also.

The course is supported by the Northumbria-based Disaster and Development Network (DDN) and there are also links to the Gender and Disaster Network. Connections that could lead to placements in countries such as Sri Lanka, Myanmar, the Philippines, India, Nepal, Australia and a number of African countries as well as with EU and UK-based organisations.

Your Future

Our graduates are highly employable, equipped with the skills to address hazards, disasters, risks, vulnerabilities and complex emergencies, working with/in relief and development organisations, national authorities and emergency services at a local or global level.

Graduates go on to careers in a diverse range of related areas.

Our graduates work in roles, for example, as a: Emergency Planner or Emergency Planning Manager; Disaster and Development Academic and/or Researcher; Business Contingency Manager; Humanitarian and United Nations Consultant; Deputy Head of Field Officer of the Office of the United Nations for Humanitarian Assistance (OCHA); and are often working for the Environmental Agency, Local Authorities and International, National, Regional and Local Non-Governmental Offices - often at managerial level.

A number of students who already worked in the sector have subsequently progressed to senior roles in United Nations bodies, World Vision and UK Emergency Planning. Others have successfully gone on to PhD research before pursuing a career in academia in a range of countries around the world, both so-called developed and developing.

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Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk and Disaster Reduction MRes is a research-intensive programme, which aims to meet the rapidly growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to complex issues relating to risk and disasters.

Degree information

Students will learn about and explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk and disasters, and their associated impacts, from a diverse range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. They will acquire advanced levels of knowledge of empirical, theoretical and practical aspects of risk and disaster reduction, and will gain research experience and the ability to effectively communicate research findings through the independent research project.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two skills modules (30 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and an independent research project (105 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered. See separate entry for further details.

Skills modules
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-Research Appraisal and Proposal

Optional modules - students choose three of the following modules:
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Natural and Anthropegenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Emergency and Crisis Management

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a substantial research project of 15,000 to 20,000 words, which culminates in an independent research report and oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading, practical problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is through coursework, examination, essays, project reports, oral and poster presentations, and the research dissertation.

Fieldwork
There are a number of UK-based day fieldtrips as part of the programme. These look at the multiple facets of disaster risk including the physical hazard, vulnerability of structures and communities, and mitigation measures and management.

There is also a NGO-led disaster scenario exercise.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR careers and opportunities forum for students has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, local government and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Examples of previous graduate students' employment within the field of risk and disaster reduction include working for an international economic consultancy based in London in the area of micro-finance, working as a consultant in disaster risk for a key player in the London insurance market and working for Rescue Global, a NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL. UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with NGOs, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Read less
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk and Disaster Reduction Postgraduate Certificate offers students the opportunity to gain a sound grasp of the characteristics of risk and disasters and their past, present and future impacts on society.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to assess risk and disaster potential and appreciate and propose risk and disaster management and mitigation strategies. They gain the knowledge and skills required to make more effective decisions based on the creative and critical analysis of a broad spectrum of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of four compulsory modules (15 credits each). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Emergency and Crisis Management

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical problem-solving exercises. Assessment is by oral and written examinations, group exercises, and assessed practicals and coursework. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR careers and opportunities forum for students has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, local government, academic institutions, and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Employees of previous graduates include an international economic consultancy based in London in the area of micro-finance, a large London insurance firm, and London-based NGO Rescue Global. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) leads multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well-placed to lead research and teaching in this field, with at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with NGOs, industry and government department based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Read less
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. Read more
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. The Risk and Disaster Science MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained in disaster science in sectors ranging from finance to humanitarian response.

Degree information

In a science-led programme, students will explore the characterisation of risk from a fundamental understanding of hazard, statistical modelling, appreciation of causes of vulnerability, and quantifying exposure to the management and reduction of disaster risks. There is an emphasis on scientific analysis and statistical methods. Students will enjoy a wide range of taught modules covering scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Earthquake Hazard Risk
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks

Optional modules - choose options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
-Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Seismic Risk Assessment
-Statistical Computing

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading and problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in industry and commerce, research, research communication and public policy including insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, business continuity, humanitarian assistance, engineering and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and headhunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction.

Employability
This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is currently available. Career destinations of recent IRDR graduates include: a London-based international economic consultancy in the field of micro-finance; a consultancy role in disaster risk for an insurance company; a PhD studentship; the World Food Programme; and Rescue Global - an NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across twelve departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policymakers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

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This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Read more
This multidisciplinary degree course focuses on response to crises originating from both conflict-zones and natural disasters. Bringing together the study of medicine and humanities, the course provides an inclusive approach that mirrors the reality of aid operations and informs the reflexive processes of both analytical and applied disciplines. Students will be able to draw synergies from an exceptionally wide breadth of disciplinary traditions and research expertise.

Aims

1. Provide critical insights into competing perspectives on how Humanitarianism and Conflict Responses can be understood, analysed and explained - from both an historiographic and contemporary viewpoint.
2. Develop analytical skills in critically evaluating the idea of humanitarianism and the ways that responses to conflict are organised, justified and implemented. This includes competency in developing a reasoned argument, critically considering data sources and depending different approaches.
3. Develop skills in gathering, organising and using evidence and information from a wide variety of sources. This will be complemented by guidance on how best to manage workloads and obtain research materials.
4. Enable students to apply research skills to a relevant research area.

Students should be able to show a critical understanding of :
1. Key issues and debates in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of policies at international and national levels.
2. Both the range of social science topics associated with Humanitarianism and Conflict Response and the normative and historiographic assumptions which underpin these issues.
3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of the causes of conflict, reconstruction, ethics and international governance structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGOs and other civil institutions.
4. A detailed and extensive understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of Humanitarianism and Conflict Response, of the implications and limitations of research findings on this subject; and of how to produce an original piece of academic research, all through their dissertation.

Special features

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Course unit details

Course units may include:
-Humanitarianism and conflict response: inquiries
-Emergency humanitarian assistance
-Fundamentals of epidemiology
-Humanitarian responses to crises: case studies
-The history of humanitarian aid
-Research & evaluation methods
-Global health
-The Arab revolts and post-revolutionary state formation
-Anthropology of violence
-Performance in theory and practice
-The ethics of killing
-Ethics in world politics
-Conflict analysis
-Democracy: theory & practice
-Reconstruction and development
-Global governance

Career opportunities

As a hard-working, ambitious Manchester postgraduate, a wide range of exciting careers are within your reach. Students at the Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute come from a broad range of backgrounds, with varying levels of experience. Many who already have work experience will be able to harness the knowledge gained from their course to progress within their field of expertise, reaching senior roles in government and non-governmental organisations. Others will be able to use the course as a starting point to progress onto careers within NGOs, HR consultancies, financial institutions, academic institutions and more. Whatever your level of experience, you can access support from your tutors, the University Careers Service and an extensive alumni network to boost your career prospects further than ever before whilst at Manchester.

Associated organisations

A close link has been formed with the humanitarian organisation Médecins Sans Frontières. Recipient of the 1999 Nobel Prize, it delivers emergency aid in over 60 countries to people affected by armed conflict, epidemics, natural or man-made disasters or exclusion from healthcare through its staff of 25,000 health professionals, logistics experts and administrators. The HCRI is also building a network of associate fellows based in relevant organisations and academic institutions around the world.

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Our Master of Public Health (MPH) course offers an innovative approach to learning that meets the training needs of health professionals interested in a career in public health or those seeking new skills in this area. Read more
Our Master of Public Health (MPH) course offers an innovative approach to learning that meets the training needs of health professionals interested in a career in public health or those seeking new skills in this area.

Contemporary public health practice requires practitioners to be adaptable and flexible, with a broad experience of a range of subject areas.

This programme will equip you with:
- the skills and knowledge to apply to public health concerns at local, national and international level;
- the ability to apply relevant theory and scientific principles to practical situations;
- the capability of meeting core-competencies in public health.

We offer a number of different pathways including:
- postgraduate certificate;
- postgraduate diploma;
- Master of Public Health.

Those with an interest in a more specialised approach to public health can opt to take one of our MSc degree streams in Health Promotion, Primary Care, Global Health, and Global Health and Emergency Humanitarian Assistance.

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The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claim, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/

Programme Specification

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 117kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/msc-conflict-rights-justice/file80043.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Knowledge:
Learning outcomes acquired in the following ways:

1. Students are required to attend all classes (lectures and seminars), study extensively on their own and prepare assessed as well as non-assessed work regularly.
2. Through core course lectures and seminars as well as through assessed work including group discussions.
3. Through teaching in core and optional courses

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. These are fostered in all courses offered in the program where the information students receive needs to be assessed critically and conflicting interpretations arising from the same information discussed.
2. Students are encouraged not simply to summarise evidence and arguments but through application of critical questioning to develop their own assessments of the relative value of a range of arguments/sources of evidence.
3. Through the structure and content of the core course in conflict, rights and justice and other program and optional courses.
4. Students will prepare class presentations on topics selected from the core course and options reading lists.
5. They also carry out individual, independent dissertation work, including refining a broad ‘topic’ into a narrower, manageable and more precise research question/hypothesis.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Subject-based practical skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through independent work for dissertations and preparation for class presentations.
2. Through work on own, departmental dissertation guidance notes and meetings, meetings with supervisor.
3. Through required regular readings for weekly seminar discussions.
4. Through demonstration in lectures, through discussion in seminars, through questions in exams.

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation..

Transferable skills:
Learning outcomes as above acquired in the following ways:

1. Through seminar presentations, discussions, group work and essays.
2. Through essays, project and dissertation
3. Through group project work.
4. Through classroom participation in seminars

Assessment: Through unseen examinations, assessed coursework essays and a dissertation.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

-Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk, Disaster and Resilience MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to these complex issues.

Degree information

Students will learn about and explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk and disasters, and their associated impacts, from a diverse range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. They will benefit from a wide range of taught modules which form the focus of the programme.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits).

A postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, 6 core modules and 2 optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, 6 core modules and 2 optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
All 6 core modules must be taken.
‌•Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
‌•Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
‌•Emergency and Crisis Planning
‌•Emergency and Crisis Management
‌•Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
‌•Research Proposal and Appraisal

Optional modules
‌Choose two options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
‌•Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability and Disaster Risk Management
‌•Post Disaster Recovery
‌•Adapting Cities to Climate Change
‌•Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
‌•Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazards
‌•Decision and Risk (Statistics)
‌•Risk and Contingency Planning (Security and Crime Science)
‌•Risk Power and Uncertainty (Anthropology)
‌•Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health

Dissertation/report
‌•All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
‌•The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Fieldwork
‌•A series of one-day UK based field trips are available.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Risk, Disaster and Resilience MSc

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field. The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Several students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Employers of previous graduates include:

‌•a London-based international economic consultancy working in micro-finance
‌•insurance companies market,
‌•the World Food Programme
‌•a London council
‌•London-based NGO Rescue Global
‌•and continued academic study through a PhD studentship.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

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