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Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. Read more
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is concerned with the design and use of computer and mobile technology, focusing on the interfaces between people and systems. This interdisciplinary degree programme sits at the intersection of engineering, behavioural sciences, and design. It combines academic rigour with practical and professional skills highly valued by employers.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the relevance and application of human physical, cognitive, social and affective knowledge to the design of interactive systems. They learn to analyse and test user performance, preferences and experience in relation to human-centred interactive systems. Students will be able to characterise and apply range of human-computer interaction and user-centred design styles.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two compulsory 30 credit core modules, four 15 credit optional modules and a 60 credit research project.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months or flexible up to three years is offered) consisting of two compulsory 30 credit core modules and four 15 credit optional modules. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), full-time three months or flexible up to two years is offered. This consists of one 30 credit core module and 30 credits of optional modules.

Core modules
-Interaction Science
-Interaction Design

Optional modules
-Accessibility and Assistive Technologies
-Affective Interaction
-Future Interfaces
-Human Factors for Digital Health
-Persuasive Games
-Physical Computing and Prototyping
-Socio-technical Systems

Dissertation/report
The MSc project gives you the opportunity to conduct research in the area of human-computer interaction under the supervision of a member of UCLIC staff. A broad range of topics and questions are offered and you will work closely with your supervisor in selecting and carrying out your project. Many former projects have contributed to publications at leading international conferences, such as the ACM SIGCHI conference.

Teaching and learning
Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Modules are assessed through a mixture of coursework and exams. Coursework is varied and includes design portfolios, presentations, videos, reflective reports, and online peer learning tasks as well as more traditional academic essays.

Careers

Our graduates are employed by technology multinationals, start-ups, government agencies, consultancies and in academia. They take up roles such as User Experience (UX) Researchers, Interaction Designers, Usability Specialists and Information Architects. Many progress to senior roles within a few years of graduation.

Employability
This degree is highly regarded by our colleagues in industry. Along with developing HCI research skills, the programme allows students to demonstrate skills in presenting, writing and collaboration that are valued by employers. We have a large network of alumni working in London and across the world. Many of them are involved with our industry speaker series and careers events, and they regularly send opportunities to our jobs mailing list for recent graduates.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is taught by the UCL Interaction Centre (UCLIC), a world leading Centre of Excellence in Human-Computer Interaction, working collaboratively with industry and the research community. UCLIC, and before it the UCL Ergonomics Unit, have provided training in this field for over thirty years. We have excellent links with industry partners, offer students a weekly indsutry speaker series and run visits to consultancies and field sites.

Our modules use a combination of lectures and practical activities. Activities are often structured around individual or group projects, such as the evaluation of a system or the creation of a prototype. Assessments are varied and include design portfolios, presentations, videos and reflective reports as well as academic essays and exams.

The MSc research project allows students to undertake cutting-edge research in human-computer interaction. Many former projects have been published and presented at leading international conferences.

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Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. Read more

Program overview

Human-computer interaction (HCI) addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing and computing-based systems for the benefit of human use. HCI research is driven by technological advances and the increasing pervasiveness of computing devices in our society. With an emphasis on making computing technologies more user-friendly, HCI has emerged as a dynamic, multifaceted area of study that merges theory from science, engineering, and design––as well as concepts and methodologies from psychology, anthropology, sociology, and industrial design––with the technical concerns of computing.

The master of science degree in human-computer interaction provides the knowledge and skills necessary for conceptualizing, designing, implementing, and evaluating software applications and computing technologies for the benefit of the user, whether the user is an individual, a group, an organization, or a society. Human, technological, and organizational concerns are interwoven throughout the curriculum and addressed in team- and project-based learning experiences.

Plan of study

The program is comprised of four required core courses, up to three program electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), two application domain courses, and a capstone project or thesis.

Core courses

The core courses provide knowledge and skills in the conceptual and methodological frameworks of HCI and HCI research. Emphasis is on understanding human cognition as it applies to information systems plus interaction design, interface prototyping, and usability evaluation.

Electives

Student choose up to three electives, depending on which capstone option they choose to complete.

Program electives

Students will select two courses from the program electives list. In select cases, students can petition for approval to include a course complementray to the degree program as a program elective. See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Application domain courses

To gain breadth in a technical area to which HCI concepts can be applied, students complete two courses in any of the following application domain areas. A special topics option is also available, with faculty approval, for individuals with interest in other HCI-related areas. See website for further details of available domain courses: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Thesis/Capstone project

Students may complete a thesis or capstone project. (Student who choose the capstone will complete one additional elective.) This experience is meant to be an empirical study of a HCI problem, which can be the development of a software product through user-centered design processes. The results are either published in a peer-reviewed journal or publicly disseminated in an appropriate professional venue.

Curriculum

Course sequence differs according to selected thesis/project option, see website for further details of a particular option's modules and electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/human-computer-interaction-ms

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0* (B average).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Have prior study or professional experience in computing; however, study in other disciplines will be given consideration.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required.
-Applicants with undergraduate degrees from foreign universities are required to submit GRE scores.

*Applicants with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered, but are required to submit standard Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
The program requires strong technical and social science skills. Knowledge of quantitative statistical methodologies is important since students review research studies as well as analyze the results of their own usability evaluations. Students are also expected to have a solid background in computer programming. These competencies may be demonstrated by previous course work, technical certifications, or comparable work experience. Bridge courses are available to fulfill any gaps in an applicant's qualifications. Applicants will be made aware of any areas where additional course work may be necessary.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

Online option:
The program can be completed on campus or online.

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This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career. Read more
This course provides students with advanced knowledge, industry-valued skills and new design perspectives, empowering them to succeed in a User Experience (UX) career.

Who is it for?

This course is for people who share our ethos of wanting to design technology that meets user needs - interactive systems that are useful, easy-to-use and engaging. It is for people who get frustrated when they interact with unnecessarily complicated Websites, mobile apps or other interactive systems and think 'I want to be able to improve this.' It is for people that want to design technology based on an understanding of users' needs and to ensure that the products they and others design meet those needs. We welcome students who share this user-centred ethos.

Objectives

This course will equip you with the latest academic research, theories and techniques in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), User Experience (UX), usability and Interaction Design and encourages you to think about design in new ways - recognising that there are many 'right' ways to design interactive systems.

You will gain a mix of theoretical and practical knowledge, along with the necessary skills and experience to create engaging user experiences. You will study modules that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process; from understanding user needs, to designing interactive systems that meet those needs, to evaluating the usability of those (and existing systems) through user research.

Placements

You will have the option to undertake a six month UX internship, after the taught part of the course has finished.

All internships are paid and provide valuable work experience, enhancing employability. As an internship student you can apply the HCI/UX knowledge and skills you have developed on the course in real-world projects and build a UX work portfolio. This supports you in standing out in the job market. You will also get the opportunity to conduct your independent research project on a topic of interest to both you and the internship company. This helps ensure the practical importance of the research.

Previous internships include positions at:
-London UX agencies (e.g Webcredible, Foolproof, Bunnyfoot)
-The BBC
-The Telegraph
-Nature.com

Academic facilities

You will benefit from the use of the City Interaction Lab - a combined commercial and research lab, where we have undertaken UX consultancy for prestigious companies including Virgin Atlantic. The lab is fitted with the latest technologies including a usability testing suite, mobile testing station, eye-tracker, interactive tabletop, brain interaction technology, 3D printer and more. We employ student consultants on some projects, providing the opportunity to work on real client projects.

Teaching and learning

The course is delivered by distinguished academics from City University London's Centre for HCI Design, who all have a passion for user-centred design. Industry professionals also participate in teaching and learning - by giving guest lectures, running practitioner tutorials and even by providing feedback on students' design outputs and input into module content, ensuring that students learn the knowledge and skills most valued by industry.

Assessment

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. It is assessed in a variety of ways, including:
-Examinations (which focus on applying HCI theory in realistic situations).
-Coursework (which range from written reports and essays, to posters, presentations and design documentation - e.g. wireframe prototypes). A range of both group and individual courseworks are set during the course. Group courseworks are often centred around realistic design projects.
-Independent research project (dissertation). The independent project allows students to conduct original research on an HCI topic of their choice.
-Each of these account for around one-third of the total course assessment. However, the exact balance varies according to the chosen elective module.

Modules

You will study seven core modules and one elective module that cover the entire user-centred design and evaluation process. Modules are delivered through a combination of lectures, online activities and interactive workshops and tutorials. These include sessions delivered by guest lecturers from industry. Full-time students spend eight hours/week in lectures and four hours/week in seminars/tutorials. Part-time students spend half this time in classes. Overall workload is around 36 hours/week for full-time and 18 hours/week for part-time students.

You will also undertake an independent Research Project, for which our module on Research Methods and Professional Issues will prepare you.

A series of optional, but recommended, practitioner tutorials supplement the taught modules. These include talks, workshops and field trips. Previous tutorials have featured HCI/UX practitioners from prestigious companies including Foolproof, Futureheads and eBay.

Taught Core Modules
-Interaction design (15 credits)
-Creativity in design (15 credits)
-Information architecture (15 credits)
.-Evaluating interactive systems (15 credits)
-Inclusive design (15 credits)
-Cognition and technologies (15 credits)
-Research, methods and professional issues (15 credits)

Taught Elective modules
-Web applications development (15 credits)
-Data visualisation (15 credits)
-Telemedicine (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course empowers students to succeed in a variety of User Experience (UX) roles in leading digital agencies, business consultancies, IT companies and commercial/government organisations.

Roles include:
-UX Designer/Consultant
-User Researcher
-Information Architect
-Accessibility Specialist.

There is an increasing need for specialists with a deep knowledge of Human-Computer Interaction design. As the industry continues to expand, there is no better time to become a Master in this field. The course is also an excellent starting point for those wanting to pursue a PhD in HCI.

Our course is highly respected by industry, with exceptional employability; Over 90% of students are employed within six months of graduating (City Graduate Destinations), in prestigious companies including Samsung, Tesco, Thomson Reuters and Google.

The median annual salary for our recent graduates is £34,000 per year (City Graduate Destinations).

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For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired. This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars. Read more

Application for EU graduates until 30 September 2016

For Details see below. The deadline for Applicants who graduated outside of Europe allready expired.

About the Program

This international oriented 2-year master’s degree programme is based on the following pillars:
▪ The study of a range of topics within the field of human-computer interaction: usability, user-centred design and user interface testing and research, and innovative interface technologies such as virtual reality, mobile systems, adaptive systems, mixed reality, ubiquitous computing and graphic interfaces.
▪ Acquisition of key skills and competences through a project-based study approach.

In the English-language Human-Computer Interaction M.Sc. programme, students focus on theoretical and practical issues in current computer science research in the fields of user-centered design, interactive system development and evaluation. In addition, this technically-oriented HCI master offers the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary projects and attend courses from Architecture and Urbanism, Art and Design, Media Studies and Media Management.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or minor in computer science. The medium of instruction for all mandatory courses is English. The program has received accreditation by Acquin until 30.09.2020 in April 2015.

More Information under https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/human-computer-interaction-msc/

Program Structure

The programme comprises 120 ECTS, distributed into the following components:
▪ Four compulsory modules (Advanced HCI, Information Processing and Presentation, Virtual/Augmented Reality and Mobile HCI), each comprising 9 ECTS.
▪ Elective module (24 ECTS in total).
▪ Two research projects (15 ECTS each).
▪ The Master’s thesis module (30 ECTS).

In accordance with the Weimar Bauhaus model, research-oriented projects contribute towards a large proportion of the master’s programme. The elective modules allows students to incorporate courses from other degree programmes such as Media Studies, Media Management, Architecture and Urbanism, and Art and Design alongside the general Computer Science and Media course catalogue. Graded language courses up to 6 ECTS may also be included, or an additional HCI related project. The fourth and final semester is dedicated to the master’s thesis.

Further information on the curriculum : https://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/curriculum-master-hci/

Career Perspectives

The HCI Master was developed based upon our experiences with the long-standing Computer Science & Media Master program. CS&M graduates have all readily found employment in industry and academia, in R&D departments at large companies (e.g. Volkswagen, BMW), research institutes (e.g. Fraunhofer), as well as at universities, with many continuing into a PhD.

Usability is becoming more and more important for computer systems as computers are embedded in many aspects of everyday life. The ability to design complex systems and interfaces with regard to usability and appropriateness for the usage context increases in importance. HCI graduates can work both in software development, in particular in conception and development of novel interface technologies, and in the area of usability and user research, which both grow in demand on the job market. Our unique project-based study approach provides graduates with a skill set that qualifies them both for research and industry careers.

Studying in Weimar

The Bauhaus, the most influential design school in the 20th century, was founded in 1919 in our main building. A tie to this history was established in the renaming as Bauhaus-Universität Weimar in 1996. We are an international university in the unique, cultural city of Weimar. We are a vibrant institution, not a museum. Experimentation and excellence prevail throughout the 4 faculties where transdisciplinary projects and co-operations in research and education are conducted.

Weimar is a medium-sized city with UNESCO World Cultural Heritage sites. It is known for its connection to literature, the arts and music and also has a music university. The affordable living costs in this area of Germany and the rich cultural program of Weimar make it a very attractive location for students.

Application Process

Applicants who graduated outside of Europe apply online at: http://www.uni-assist.de.
Applicants who graduated in Europe and do not require a visa apply online at: Online-Application.

For details see http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

Many typical questions about the program, application process and requirements are answered in our FAQ http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification:

Students need a school leaving certificate for studies completed at secondary education level. The formal entrance qualifications for international students are checked by uni-assist (see application process).

Academic Background in Computer Science (CS):

You need some academic background in CS, such as a bachelor's degree in CS, business informatics, HCI or related areas with a focus on CS and HCI. Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) may apply, here, decisions are on a case-by-case-base.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not suffice to qualify you.

Sufficient Marks from previous studies:

If the converted credit-weighted average grade of your Bachelor's degree is between 1.0 and 2.0 in the German system, your chances of acceptance are very good. Uni-assist does the conversion into the German system.

Language Requirements:

See http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/application-master-hci/

The medium of instruction is English, some electives can be taken in German. B2 level (CEFR) of English proficiency is needed. We require a standardised language certificate (unless your bachelor degree was done in a native-English speaking country). We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

TOEFL (80 internet-based, 550 paper-based at minimum)
IELTS (6.0 minimum)
ESOL Cambridge First Certificate in English

To be admitted, international students have to provide proof of German proficiency at level A1 (CEFR). This is required for registration to the program. You can apply before having the A1 certificate, but might need to show you are registered for the exam for your visum.


Motivational Letter and CV:

We highly recommend a detailed CV and motivation letter. Please do not send lengthy standard letters. Make clear you know our curriculum and point out why you chose our programme, and describe your specific interest in HCI i and why you want to specialize in this area.

Further information

Please check our FAQ
http://www.uni-weimar.de/en/media/studies/computer-science-and-media-hci/faq-application-hci/


link to Video by an international Master student (from the sibling program) talking about her experiences: https://vimeo.com/77485926

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The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems. Read more

About Mobile and Embedded Systems

The future of information and communication technology (ICT) is driven by mobile and networked embedded systems: tomorrow’s digital cities, Industry 4.0, cyber-physical systems (CPS) and the Internet of Things (IoT) will all depend on embedded sensing of real-world phenomena, in-situ computation as well as automated information exchange and data distribution using machine-to-machine (M2M) com­munications between local and distributed control systems and machinery.

The ‘smart grid’ is one example of an application for future embedded systems, as it uses real-time sensing of the available renewable energy to determine where energy is to be routed across the power grid and controls intelligent machinery to increase production during peak times; this requires that internet-connected smart meters are installed in industrial plants and private homes alike to facilitate real-time sensing and control of technical systems.

Another exciting area of application for embedded systems is mobile and wearable technology, which allows users to access and manipulate information ‘on the go’ as the system provides relevant and timely information — indeed, this is one of the main purposes of mobile information technology such as smartphones and tablet computers. Additional meaning for this Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is generated by the context of the device, the user, the location and many more factors, all of which are sensed and computed by a plenitude of embedded sensors and collocated or connected systems.

Wearable devices such as fitness trackers and smart watches collect bio-physiological and health-related data to facilitate novel applications, including smart contact lenses and feedback systems for the learning of physical activities. At the same time, increasing cross-device interoperability means that users of head-mounted augmented reality and virtual reality displays can, for instance, use their entire smartphone screen as a keyboard and have the typed text displayed on augmented reality glasses.

Programme content

The programme is divided into three module groups with core and elective modules. These are:

1. Human-Computer Interaction
2. Systems Engineering
3. Data Processing, Signals and Systems

Features

- Excellent rankings for computer science, e.g. in U-Multirank and the CHE rankings
- A strongly research-oriented two-year programme with a modern, broad range of subjects
- Allows flexible interest-based selection of modules from the groups ‘Human-Computer Interaction’, ‘Systems Engineering’ and ‘Data Processing, Signals and Systems’
- A fully English-taught programme
- An outstanding staff-student ratio
- Participation in cutting-edge research projects
- Excellent research and teaching infrastructure
- An extensive network of partnerships with academic institutions and businesses worldwide
- A great student experience in Passau, the ‘City of Three Rivers’

Language requirements

Unless English is your native language or the language of your secondary or undergraduate education, you should provide an English language certificate at level B2 CEFR, e.g. TOEFL with a minimum score of 567 PBT, 87 iBT or ITP 543 (silver); IELTS starting from 5.5; or an equivalent language certificate.

To facilitate daily life in Germany, it would be beneficial for you to have German language skills at level A1 CEFR (beginner’s level). If you do not have any German skills when starting out on the programme, you will complete a compulsory beginner’s German course during your first year of study.

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The Masters in Software Engineering provides you with a thorough grounding in professional software development, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry. Read more
The Masters in Software Engineering provides you with a thorough grounding in professional software development, together with experience of conducting a development project, preparing you for responsible positions in the IT industry.

Why this programme

◾The School of Computing Science is consistently highly ranked achieving 2nd in Scotland and 10th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017)
◾You will have opportunities to meet industrial speakers who contribute to our professional skills & issues course. Employers also come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾The School of Computing Science is a member of the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA). This is a collaboration of Scottish Universities whose goal is to develop and extend Scotland's position as a world leader in Informatics and Computer Science research and education.
◾You will have opportunities to meet employers who come to make recruitment presentations, and often seek to recruit our graduates during the programme.
◾You will benefit from having 24-hour access to a computer laboratory equipped with state-of-the-art hardware and software.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Software Engineering include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Enterprise cyber security
◾IT architecture
◾Research methods and techniques
◾Safety critical systems
◾Masters team project.

Optional courses

◾Advanced networking and communications
◾Advanced operating systems
◾Algorithmics
◾Artificial intelligence
◾Big data: systems, programming and management
◾Computer architecture
◾Computer vision methods and applications
◾Cryptography and secure development
◾Cyber security forensics
◾Cyber security fundamentals
◾Distributed algorithms and systems
◾Financial software engineering
◾Functional programming
◾Human-computer interaction
◾Human-computer interaction: design and evaluation
◾Human-centred security
◾Information retrieval
◾Internet technology
◾Machine learning
◾Mobile human-computer interaction
◾Modelling reactive systems
◾Software project management
◾Theory of computation
◾Web science

Depending on staff availability, the optional courses listed here may change.

If you wish to engage in part-time study, please be aware that dependent upon your optional taught courses, you may still be expected to be on campus on most week days.

Accreditation

MSc Software Engineering is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Institution of Engineering & Technology (IET).

Our specialist MSc graduates in Computing Science, Software Engineering and Information Security are recognised by the British Computer Society (BCS), The Chartered Institute for IT, for the purposes of fully meeting the further learning academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP Further Learning) and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Scientist (CSci). These programmes have also been awarded the Euro-Info Master Label.

Industry links and employability

◾This programme enables students to meet the demanding schedule of a software engineer. It provides students with improved ability to analyse and design software systems.
◾Overall the programme provides students with the knowledge and skills to deliver robust, advanced, on-time and in-budget software systems for their organisation.
◾The School of Computing Science has extensive contacts with industrial partners who contribute to several of their taught courses, through active teaching, curriculum development, and panel discussion. Recent contributors include representatives from IBM, J.P. Morgan, Amazon, Adobe and Red Hat.
◾Employers are interested in graduates who have a combination of good technical skills and well-developed personal skills, and in this respect graduates of the MSc in Software Engineering from the University of Glasgow are particularly well placed.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the IT industry.

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The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. Read more
The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is a full-time, one-year taught course that is intended for students seeking a professional career related to human-computer interaction, user experience, usability or related fields or those wishing to pursue research in the area. The course is intended for students who already have a good first degree in a computer science or an appropriate discipline related to human-computer interaction or have equivalent industrial experience. The course covers a range of topics associated with designing interactive systems for good usability and enhancing the user experience. The course has been specifically designed for students wishing to specialise in the design and evaluation of interactive technologies.

The MSc Human-Centred Interactive Technologies course was updated for October 2016 entry. The course had been running successfully for eight years, but in that time the landscape of interactive systems has changed considerably, with the growth of iPhones and apps and the introduction of tablet computers. We have also responded to feedback from students who have asked for more integrated modules and more opportunities to practice interaction design.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are:
-To provide a specialist education in the theories of and methods for designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide an opportunity to engage in a rigorous and scholarly manner with a range of current research topics around designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To provide practical experience of designing and evaluating interactive technologies
-To develop the skills necessary to conduct research, particularly with users, into the design, engineering or science of interactive technologies
-To provide experience of undertaking a sizeable individual project, on a subject related to research in human-centred interactive technologies
-To prepare students for entry into research degrees or industry-based projects

Learning Outcomes
A fundamental objective of the course is to provide students with a sound theoretical knowledge and practical experience of the skills essential to the design and evaluation of interactive technologies. Having completed the course, students will be able to understand theories of the design of interactive technologies and critique individual technologies from a theoretical viewpoint. In particular they will be able to:
(a) choose appropriate methods for empirical investigations for the design, prototyping and evaluation of interactive technologies, including both quantitative and qualitative methods

(b) plan and undertake a range of empirical investigations of existing or proposed interactive technologies at all stages of the development lifecycle

(c) analyse, draw conclusions from and present the results of such investigations, and

(d) conduct a range of expert and theoretical analyses of interactive technologies to investigate their usability, accessibility and appropriateness for different user groups.

Graduates completing the course will be equipped to play leading and professional roles related to the designed and evaluation of interactive technologies in industry, commerce, academia and public service. The MSc in Human-Centred Interactive Technologies is also intended to provide a route into a PhD or research in this rapidly expanding field.

Project

The dissertation project undertaken by students over the summer is carried out individually, which might involve collaboration with another organisation. A collaborative project is still supervised by a member of the Department.

Projects are worth 50% of the total mark for the MSc. Examples of previous projects include:
-A Gesture Language for Interaction with Art and Cultural Artefacts in Museums
-Analysis of WCAG 2.0 Techniques and Remote Evaluation by People with Visual Disabilities
-Cultural issues in design of online banking websites: a Chinese case study
-Evaluating Human Error through Video Games
-Have the Same Image in Mind? Investigation of Personas in Web Design
-Inattention and Immersion in Video Games
-Measuring User Experience of Mobile Phones: a Study with Retrospective Protocol and Emotion Word Prompt List
-The Application of Game Mechanics to a Virtual Learning Environment
-The Design and Evaluation of NHS Pharmacy Dispensing Computer Software
-Using User-Generated Content as Discourses on the Gaming Experience

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Read more
For most companies, understanding the complex web of relationships between people, technology and design the 'user experience' is vital in acquiring the competitive edge. Especially when considering the development and production of technology based devices and services. MSc User Experience Engineering brings together knowledge and skill sets into a single programme focused on the user experience where computing technology is the heart of the devices and services.

Why study MSc User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

The importance of human computer interaction and good interface design is increasingly recognised as the key to the future of successful software development.

At the University of Dundee we provide students with the knowledge skills and support necessary to become move into a career in user experience engineering. The University of Dundee is at the forefront of computing and as such you will have the opportunity to learn from leading researchers.

What's great about User Experience Engineering at Dundee?

This course is designed to:
Give you a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of user experience research and implementation in the domain of computing and technology.

Enable you to acquire advanced knowledge and skills in the professional procedures necessary to ensure that user experience research and requirements-gathering is both valid and actionable in technology implementation contexts.

Enable you to understand and engage with contemporary debate about the role, ethics and utility of user experience research in commercial and other settings.

An additional aim for overseas students is to provide you with educational and cultural experiences which are unique to the UK.

Our facilities:
You will have 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

The start date is September each year. The MSc course lasts for 12 months and the PGDip lasts for 9 months.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered principally by a mix of traditional lectures, study of academic background texts, lab and studio based practice sessions, and field and project based learning. These will be supplemented by seminars and workshops on key areas of practice

What you will study

The course will be taught in 20 credit modules plus a 60 credit dissertation. Students will be required to complete 180 credits for the award of the MSc (including 60 credits for the dissertation). Students completing 120 credits (without the dissertation) will be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma.

Semester 1 (Sept-Dec)
Computing the User Experience (20 Credits)
Elective Module- one from:
Internet and Computer Systems
Software Development
Software Engineering
Agile Engineering
Technology Innovation Management
Secure e-Commerce
Computer Graphics
Computer Vision
Multimedia Audio
International Marketing
Eye Movements & Cognition (10 Credits)
Quantitative Methods (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (Jan-Mar)
Research Methods (20 Credits)- experimental design requires researchers to understand the context of the research being undertaken and being able to apply appropriate methods to measure and compare data. This module aims to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of research methods relevant in the context of computing.
Research Frontiers(20 Credits) - Students select a total of four units from available units which currently include:
Accessibility & Computing (AC)
Applied Computational Intelligence (ACI)
Constraint Programming (CP)
Games (G)
Intelligent Agents (IA)
Aspects of Assistive Technology (AT) and Augmentative and Alternate Communication (AAC)
Interactive Systems Design (ISD)
Space Systems (SS)
What Computer Eyes Can Do (CE)
Eye Gaze Tracking
Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) (20 Credits) - the aim of this module is to provide you with a broad introduction to human-computer interaction through study of the components, both human and machine, which make up interfaces and the ways in which they interact, illustrating this with examples of good and bad practice.

Semester 3 (Apr-Sept)
Research Project or Field Project (60 Credits) - this module will provide you with a professional level experience of specifying, conducting and presenting a substantial piece of user experience research.
Please note that some of the modules in the programme are shared with other masters programmes and some of the teaching and resources may be shared with our BSc programme.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be a mix of continuous or coursework assessments and exams, with group and individual projects assessed by set deliverables and final presentation.

Careers

This programme is intended to enhance the employability of graduates in the following ways:

For technologists and computing professionals, this programme should build their skills in implementing technology that are appropriate to the needs and wishes of users in the relevant usage context

For human factors specialists, this programme should build their understanding of the fit between users and technology and should enhance their methodology skill set when exploring beyind the understanding of the human factors towards the deployment of appropriate or enhanced user experiences.

For design specialists, this programme should build their skills in marrying technologies and materials to the requirements of users and in blending this within appropriate aesthetics.

For UX team managers this programme should enhance their insights and give them practical experience of the skill sets of all members of their teams in order to direct their work so as to optimize the user experience within real business and technical constraints.

For all professionals, this programme should enhance their ability to communicate the impact of the user experience investigations on their work and the impact of their work on the user experience, not only within the UX team but also to other business functions such as senior management and marketing.

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Degree. Master of Science (two years) with a major in Computer Science and Engineering. Computer science and technology play a key role in every part of the modern world. Read more
Degree: Master of Science (two years) with a major in Computer Science and Engineering.

Computer science and technology play a key role in every part of the modern world. The Computer Science master's programme is centred on the need for computer scientists to master the theoretical foundations of the field and be able to apply and integrate them with other technologies.

The first semester of the programme comprises mandatory core courses in theoretical computer science and programming such as Theory of Computing and Database Technology.

The second and third semesters include elective courses based on students areas of specialisation such as: artificial intelligence, databases and data mining, internet computing, the design and programming of computer games, information security, language technology, human-computer interaction, theoretical computer science or the design and implementation of computer languages.

As the courses given during the programme address both theoretical and practical issues, applicants are expected to have an adequate background in computer science and good programming skills, see the specific requirements.

The Computer Science master's programme focuses on the acquisition of skills necessary for a career at the frontline of modern software technology such as operative system designer, Internet security specialists or game engine programmer. The programme also prepares students for a career in research or continued studies towards a doctoral degree.

The programme is taught at Linköping University, the home of one of the largest centres of computer science and engineering in Northern Europe with 175 employees, including 20 full professors, and internationally renowned for the high quality of its research and education. The research at the Department of Computer Science covers a broad spectrum of topics such as artificial intelligence, cognitive science, security, databases, distributed systems, embedded and real-time systems, human-computer interaction, software engineering.

Welcome to the Institute of Technology at Linköping University

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This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Read more
This MSc forms the second year of the dual Master's degree of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT). The programme offers an advanced ICT engineering education together with a business minor focused on innovation and entrepreneurship. Students will spend their first year at one of the EIT's partner universities in Europe, and can elect to spend their second year at UCL.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/ict-innovation-msc

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 15 February 2016
Fees note: UK/EU full-time fee available on request from the department

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Good
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The thematic core foundations together with modules on Innovation and Entrepreneurship will be taught during the first year. In the second year at UCL, the programme focuses on the two thesis projects and on specialised taught modules. Students at UCL will choose either Human Computer Interaction and Design (HCID) or Digital Media Technology (DMT) as their major specialisation.

This two year dual masters degree has an overall credit value of 120 ECTS.

Students take modules to the value of 60 ECTS (150 Credits) in their second year at UCL, consisting of four taught modules (60 credits), a minor thesis (15 credits) and a master's thesis (75 credits).

- Core Modules
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Ergonomics for Design
Affective Interaction
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Virtual Environments
Advanced Modelling, Rendering and Animation
Computational Photography and Capture
Minor Thesis on Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Master's Thesis

- Options
Technical Major: Human-Computer Interaction and Design:
Affective Computing and Human-robot Interaction
Societechnical Systems: IT and the Future of Work
Interfaces and Interactivity
Qualitative Research Methods
Virtual Environments

Technical Major: Digital Media Technology:
Machine Vision
Geometry of Images
Image Processing
Computational Modelling for Biomedical Imaging
Acquisition and Processing of 3D Geometry
Multimedia Systems
Network and Application Programming
Interaction Design
Professional Practice

- Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake a minor thesis and a master's thesis, in collaboration with an external partner. For the master's thesis, students will spend at least two months in the external partner's environment.

Teaching and Learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, practical sessions, case studies, problem-based learning and project work. Assessment is through coursework assignments, unseen examinations and the two thesis projects.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site ICT Innovation MSc http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/admissions/msc_ict_innovation/

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

- Brown Family Bursary - NOW CLOSED FOR 2015/16 ENTRY
Value: £15,000 (1 year)
Eligibility: UK students
Criteria: Based on both academic merit and financial need

- Computer Science Excellence Scholarships
Value: £4,000 (1)
Eligibility: UK, EU students
Criteria:

More scholarships are listed on the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships

Careers

Graduates of this programme will have the key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship necessary for the international market, together with a solid foundation in the technical topics that drive the modern technological economy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The EIT Digital Master School is a European initiative designed to turn Europe into a global leader in ICT innovation, fostering a partnership between leading companies, research centres and technical universities in Europe.

The school offers two-year programmes where you can choose two universities in two different European institutes to build a curriculum of your choice based on your skills and interest. We offer double degrees, which combine technical competence with a set of skills in innovation and entrepreneurship. While you get an excellent theoretical education, you also get the opportunity to work with leading European research institutes and leading business partners.

Student / staff ratios › 200 staff including 120 postdocs › 650 taught students › 175 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
This programme is suitable for students with a relevant degree who wish to develop key skills in innovation and entrepreneurship together with an advanced education in ICT engineering, for a future career or further study in this field.

The admission procedure for the EIT ICT Labs Master's programme is organised centrally from Sweden by the KTH Admissions Office. Please read the admission requirements and application instructions before sending your documents. For further details of how to apply please visit http://www.eitictlabs.masterschool.eu/programme/application-admission/application-instructions.
Please note that applications after the deadline may be accepted. Late applications will be processed subject to time, availability and resources.

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The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. Read more
The hunger for the digital visualisation of architecture and urban environments has grown exponentially in both the Architectural and Film Industries. As the need for skilled modellers and animators with an awareness of architectural, as well as cinematic, issues increases in both Architecture and Film, the MA in Architectural Visualisation builds on the connections between these two industries. This MA programme develops skills to communicate architecture and urbanity for a variety of applications and audiences.

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture (http://www.kent.ac.uk/architecture/) and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/).

The School of Engineering and Digital Arts successfully combines modern engineering and technology with the exciting new field of digital media. The School was established over 40 years ago and has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

Kent School of Architecture is a young school that has built an excellent reputation, based on high quality teaching and excellent resources. For architecture graduate employment prospects, Kent was ranked 6th in the UK in The Times Good University Guide 2014 and 7th in the UK in The Guardian University Guide 2015.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/245/architectural-visualisation

Course structure

The MA in Architectural Visualisation is jointly taught by Kent School of Architecture and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts. Building on the successful Master's programmes in Computer Animation and Digital Visual Effects, this MA enables students to develop at an advanced level the skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling which will equip them to become highly skilled professionals in architectural visualisation.

Drawing influence from both architecture and film, this programme offers a progression route into both industries, highlighting the different requirements needed for each profession while exploring the similarities of these markets. In this programme, the professions of architecture, film and animation fuse together, providing students with the ability and understanding to work in each or all of them.

Modules

Stage 1
AR821 - Film and Architecture (15 credits)
AR822 - Virtual Cities (30 credits)
AR823 - Digital Architecture (15 credits)
AR846 - Architectural Photography (15 credits)
EL837 - Professional Group Work (15 credits)
EL868 - High Definition Compositing (15 credits)
EL869 - Film and Video Production (15 credits)
Stage 2
Either
EL870 - Visual Effects Project (60 credits)
OR
AR845 - Independent Research Project (60 credits)

Assessment

Modules are taught over three terms, concluding with a Major Project Visualisation, which accounts for one third of the programme. The content of the visualisation is agreed with programme staff and you build a showreel to a professional standard. Each module is assessed by practical assignments. The project work is assessed on the outcome of the project itself.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- enable you to develop advanced level skills, knowledge and understanding of digital simulation and 3D modelling, which will equip you to become a highly skilled professional in architectural visualisation

- train you in the requirements and skills needed for work in high definition

- produce professionally-trained architectural visualisers who are highly skilled in using state-of-the-art 3D modelling and visual effects software

- provide proper academic guidance and welfare support for all students

- create an atmosphere of co-operation and partnership between staff and students, and offer you an environment where you can develop your potential.

Research areas

- Digital Media

The Digital Media group is a multidisciplinary group with interests in many areas including social computing (eg, social networking, computer mediated communication), mobile/ubiquitous computing, human-computer interaction and digital arts (eg, computer games, 3D animation, digital film). Our work is applied across a wide range of domains including e-health, cultural heritage and cyber influence/identity.

Current research themes include:

- interface/interaction design and human-computer interaction
- cyber behaviour/influence
- social computing and sociability design
- natural user interfaces
- virtual worlds
- online communities and computer-mediated communication
- mobile applications
- digital film-making and post-production.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers seek, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Make your input really count as a postgraduate student in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Traditional computer science research covers the hardware and software of computer systems and their applications. Read more
Make your input really count as a postgraduate student in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Traditional computer science research covers the hardware and software of computer systems and their applications. Computer science programs at HKUST emphasize an integrated approach to the study of computers and computing methods to collect, process, analyze and transmit information to support relevant and useful applications in modern life.

The Department's goal is to offer a full range of postgraduate courses and research projects to meet the needs and interests of our students and to help solve relevant problems for society. Our world-class faculty members engage in cutting-edge research at the heart of the information technology revolution and our postgraduate students are involved in both applied and fundamental research. The Department has 50 full-time faculty members and 180 postgraduate students.

Computer science is still a young field. The world is only just beginning to realize the potential of information technology. The Department and its programs prepare students to meet the exciting challenges that await and to generate new advances in computing that will fuel future progress.

The MPhil program seeks to strengthen students' knowledge in computer science and expose them to issues involved in the development, scientific, educational and commercial applications of computer systems. Students are required to undertake coursework and successfully complete a thesis to demonstrate competence in research.

Research Foci

The Department's research involves many different areas:
Artificial Intelligence
Machine learning, data mining and pattern recognition, knowledge representation and reasoning, robotics and sensor-based activity recognition, multi-agent and game theory, and speech and language processing.

Data, Knowledge and Information Management
Large-scale data management, modeling and distribution encompassing web query processing, information retrieval and web search, data mining, enterprise systems, high-performance data management systems on modern computers, and database support for science applications.

Human-Computer Interaction
Augmented reality, multi-touch interaction, crowdsourcing, multimodal communication, affective computer, visual analytics of big data, intelligent interface for robots, E-learning, healthcare and e-commerce.

Networking and Computer Systems
Pervasive computing and sensor networks, peer-to-peer computing, grid computing, high-performance switches and routers, video delivery and multicasting, multimedia networking, MAC protocols for ad-hoc networks, web cache management, DDOS detection and defense, and resource management and allocation in optical networks.

Software Technology and Applications
Software engineering, data mining for software analysis and debugging, computer music, cryptography and security, internet computing.

Theoretical Computer Science
Combinatorial optimization, performance analysis techniques, computational geometry, formal languages and machines, graph algorithms, and algorithmic combinatorial game theory.

Vision and Graphics
Computer vision, computer graphics, medical image analysis, biometric systems, and video processing.

Facilities

The Department has excellent facilities to support its programs and is committed to keeping its computing facilities up to date. There are about 700 workstations and PCs, including those in four teaching laboratories, three MS Windows Labs and one Linux lab. The Department also runs several research laboratories with specific facilities, including the computer engineering, database, Human-Computer Interaction Initiative, vision and graphics labs. Specialized project laboratories include:
-The HCI lab, has a 360 degree circular CCD-camera capturing system with a 4x3 large display array and 120" rear projected 3D active stereo system, and large-sized multi-touch panels, linked with various physiological sensors for gesture/body tracking;
-The Human Language Technology Center, with various corpora and a Linux cluster;
-The System and Media Laboratory, partially funded by Deutsche Telekom, focusing mobile computing and any interesting topics related to social network; and
-The Networking group, that maintains different sets of network cluster for Data center and cloud computing research.
-Different research groups maintain their own CPU/GPU cluster customized for different research need.

In addition, the Department manages a pool of Linux servers as CPU/GPU cluster for general research projects demanding significant system resources, and acquires a GPU cluster for the whole University. The file servers are connected with one HDS AMS2100 and one HDS HUS110 Storage Area Network (SAN), with a total capacity of more than 60TB. There is also a pool of high performance servers with GPUs dedicated for undergraduate courses on parallel computing and Big Data analysis.

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Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. Read more
Interaction Design is a highly sought specialist skill enabling the creation of compelling user experiences that keep individuals engaged with interactive computing products. This course is ideal if you have existing programming skills and want to understand software users and work with them to create positive user experiences. The MRes Interaction Design course will help you stand out from other graduates by providing you with the skills and theoretical understanding needed to create successful products in industry or go on to further postgraduate study in a Interaction Design/User Experience/HCI related research field. There is a vibrant international research community developing new methods and theories that underpin this discipline within the broad field of HCI (Human-Computer Interaction) and more specific Interaction Design (IxD ) and User Experience (UxD) areas.

INDUSTRY LINKS

As part of the course you will have opportunities to work with external partners. At UCLan we work with a range on businesses and organisations, many of which provide work experience opportunities and project briefs to enable to you gain real work experience whilst you undertake your postgraduate programme.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

We aim to provide a challenging and stimulating environment in which you can develop and learn new skills. As an MRes student you will be supported in exploring your full potential through taught modules and an extended project. Teaching is done in small groups with plenty of opportunities for practical work, networking with students and staff, and to get involved with research activities.

Assessment methods will include individual and group assignments, presentation and seminars.

FACILITIES

The course is delivered in the Computing and Technology Building at the City Campus in Preston at which students have access to the latest technology, and can study in a supportive environment. Facilities include a purpose built Human-Computer Interaction Suite which is used for the evaluation of software products.

OPPORTUNITIES

The goal of the course is to guide you, depending on your interests, to either go out into Industry or to progress to an academic research career. We aim to produce Interaction Design practitioners who understand how to create excellent interaction designs for a range of different scenarios.

Placement opportunities are available as an option for students who want to gain some work experience as part of the course.

We also aim to give you a thorough grounding in the Interaction Design research area so you are ready to start a PhD. After completing the MRes there will be opportunities for students to continue to MPhil or PhD study.

Our alumni have gone on to work a range of destinations including UX specialists, the BBC, and Tata.

FURTHER INFORMATION

Interaction Design is a branch of Computing concerned with how users interact with computer systems. This includes the roles of users in analysis, design and evaluation of systems, as well as methods for the system developer to create usable and useful interactive products for people, and extends to consideration of social aspects of computer use. In fact it is often more helpful to regard the computer program and its users as each being a component of a system. Many systems fail because of problems with the user interaction, rather than problems with the underlying code. This is because the human is the most complex component of the system, and the least well understood.

This course is suitable for:
-Those who wish to enter a career in Interaction Design or User Experience Design
-Those who wish to enhance their appeal to employers and stand out from other computing graduates.
-Those who wish to go on to study at PhD level
-Those in employment who wish to use the MRes project to develop a product for their employer and develop personally

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This programme is for students who have a background in digital media, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, interaction design, composition, architecture and art or design practice, and wish to extend their study through a series of practical, research-led projects. Read more

Research profile

This programme is for students who have a background in digital media, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, interaction design, composition, architecture and art or design practice, and wish to extend their study through a series of practical, research-led projects.

Students work in collaborative contexts to develop skills in conceptualising and implementing creative projects that make extensive use of digital technologies.

The compulsory element of the course is Digital Studio Practice, which is supported by postgraduate research methods training and a series of optional, lecture-based courses, reading courses and a final dissertation.

On completion of the degree graduates will be able to contribute knowledgeably and critically to practice-led research that involves advanced technologies. The programme provides an opportunity for you to test your aptitude for PhD study in the area.

Training and support

All of our research students benefit from ECA’s interdisciplinary approach and all are assigned two research supervisors. Your second supervisor may be from another discipline within ECA, or from somewhere else within the College of Humanities & Social Science or elsewhere within the University, according to the expertise required. On occasion more than two supervisors will be assigned, particularly where the degree brings together multiple disciplines.

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