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Masters Degrees (Human Rights Education)

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The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses. Read more
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses.

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Practice engages students in a critical and nuanced examination of this paradox, while providing them with the practical skills necessary to apply global norms at the local level.

Why study International Human Rights at York?

The LLM in Human Rights Law and Practice provides the knowledge, skills and networks necessary for mid-career professionals and recent graduates to work in the human rights field. The LLM is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Our LLM is distinctive because students:
-Work on real human rights issues, which gives practical skills, hands-on experience and improved job prospects
-Get the opportunity to work alongside human rights defenders during a two-week field visit to Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or placement in York
-Learn from international human rights defenders based at the Centre
-Explore how international human rights law interacts with national public policy in various states

LLM Structure

Three core modules cover international human rights law, policy and advocacy. Optional CAHR modules cover several topical issues through a human rights lens: culture, development, migration, and post-conflict justice.

The programme requires you to undertake a placement with human rights organisations in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or the UK. This is an important part of the degree programme and will develop your practical skills and provide hands-on experience, both of which will prepare you for working in this field and improve your career prospects.

The LLM is taught in weekly lectures and seminars covering specific case studies and including skills training on oral presentations, advocacy, report writing, and memos.

Compulsory Modules
The compulsory modules reflect the three sides to human rights activism: law, policy and practice.
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Applying international human rights law (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits; term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits; terms 3-4)

Optional Modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Four optional modules taught by Centre staff will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also choose optional modules taught by other departments, from the list below.

Optional modules taught at CAHR
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught at the York Law School
-Corporate responsibility and law
-Financial citizenship and social justice

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Placements
A key part of the LLM is exposing students to the practice of international human rights law at the domestic level. Thus students have the opportunity to pursue a placement and related project with our NGO partners in Malaysia and York. The fieldwork takes place over a two week period in weeks 9 and 10 of the autumn term in either Kuala Lumpur or York. Please note that the Malaysia trip/placements will only run if there are sufficient student numbers.

Students will be expected to work together in small groups in partnership with a human rights organisation. This will include:
-Extensive background research on country context, the host organisation, relevant thematic issues etc.
-Devising a project prior to the field visit, in collaboration with the host organisation
-Two weeks of intensive work in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or York in November and December
-Ongoing discussions about project completion once students return to York

Where after the LLM?

Our LLM provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian organisations, charities, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

For example, recent graduates are working with:
-Foreign and Commonwealth Office
-UK-based bar association
-Egyptian human rights NGO
-Development NGO in West Africa
-East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Network
-Human Rights Watch
-Pakistan's judicial sector
-UK-based NGO working with sub-Saharan children affected by HIV/AIDS

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention
• Rights Based Approaches to Development
• International Human Rights Law
• Approaches to Political Theory
• International Security in the Asia Pacific
• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism
• Critical Security
• War, Identity and Society
• Civil Society and International Development
• European Union Governance and Policy Making
• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.
- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.
- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,
including:

• Development Studies
• International Communication
• Cultural Political Economy
• Software Studies
• Digital Theory
• Policy and Governance
• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.

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This Advanced Master of Laws has two distinguishing features. it takes a comparative approach to regional and global human rights systems and it consistently relates ‘the law in the books’ to ‘the law in action’. Read more
This Advanced Master of Laws has two distinguishing features: it takes a comparative approach to regional and global human rights systems and it consistently relates ‘the law in the books’ to ‘the law in action’. This approach allows the programme to provide our students with the flexibility to work in different human rights settings at national and international level and with the ability to choose between different options for promoting human rights in different political, social and cultural environments.

Visit the website: http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/programmes/european-and-international-human-rights-law-advanced/en/introduction

Course detail

In the contemporary world, the coexistence and interaction of regional, national and international legal regimes has become a characteristic feature, which is also true for human rights. In many cases where human rights are at risk, different human rights protection mechanisms may be applicable.

In addition, human rights supervisory bodies increasingly take each other’s work into account, which enhances the development of an all-embracing and cohesive human rights culture. It is for this reason that in this Advanced Master of Laws, you will study human rights law in a comparative perspective.

Format

Our programme is characterised by small-scale teaching, which encourages intensive interaction between students and lecturers. We pride ourselves on being able to offer contributions from renowned human rights experts who bring the most recent developments and issues to the class room.

A study trip to human rights organisations in Strasbourg and/or Geneva is an integral part of this programme and will add to a genuine understanding of human rights law by helping you to put theory into practice. After graduation, you will have gained the necessary international experience and skills you need to work in the field of human rights law anywhere in the world.

For whom?

- talented law graduates
-talented graduates with a sufficient background in law
- The students in the Advanced Studies programme come from different continents and countries, which contributes to a truly international study environment.

Careers

We aim to provide our students with the knowledge and flexibility to work in different human rights settings at national and international level. Our graduates, therefore, meet the requirements for a range of positions with organisations including:

- national and European governmental bodies and public administration;
- national, regional and international non-governmental human rights organisations;
- national human rights institutes and equality bodies, judiciary or Ombudsman institutions;
- law firms and companies involved with human rights.

[[How to apply: ]] http://en.mastersinleiden.nl/arrange/admission

Funding

For information regarding funding, please visit the website: http://prospectivestudents.leiden.edu/scholarships

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The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.). Read more
The MA focuses on the use of rights discourse and tools within the human rights mainstream and in a range of related fields (development, humanitarianism, conflict transformation, the environment, public health etc.).

As such, it is designed for practitioners and would-be practitioners across this spectrum who wish to engage with applied human rights.

Overview

Our MA in Applied Human Rights is distinctive in five main ways:
-Tt is uniquely applied, exploring how human rights can advance social justice in law, policy and social activism
-It is interdisciplinary and holistic (integrating knowledge of human rights, development, conflict, and more)
-Students will acquire relevant knowledge but also skills that are vital for a career in human rights e.g. project management skills
-The lecturers are both academics and experienced practitioners, and the international human rights defenders hosted by the Centre will attend and lead classes
-An international field trip to South Africa takes place in the first term (student numbers permitting), enabling students to work alongside local NGOs and human rights defenders on concrete projects

Course content

The MA structure has two components: compulsory modules, and optional modules. In total, students need to complete five modules (two compulsory, in the first term; one compulsory, running over two terms; two options in the second term). A dissertation will fulfill the requirements for an MA. This structure has been chosen so as to maximize the choice available to students, but to guide the selection process in a constructive way eg: indicating where modules are practice-based and where they are not.

Continuous assessment of applied skills is a feature of the programme.

Compulsory modules
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Social sciences and human rights practice (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits, term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits, terms 3-4)

Optional modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Those offered by CAHR will share the characteristics of the MA (practice based and interdisciplinary) and will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also select from optional modules listed below taught by other departments.
Optional modules taught at CAHR:
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

*Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Careers

Our MA provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian and development organisations, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

Recent graduates have secured work with:
-Government departments, e.g. working on health equality and trafficking in the UK, Finnish Centre for Human Rights (NHRI)
-Human rights organisations, e.g. Freedom House, the Terrence Higgins Trust, the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organisation, the Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute (Washington, DC), Freedom from Torture (Yorkshire & Humberside), International Services and Brave New Films (USA)
-Development and humanitarian organisations, e.g. Norwegian People's Aid and Merlin
-Inter-governmental agencies, e.g. the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation in The Hague, UNDP in Bangladesh, UNRIC in Brussels and Quaker UN Office in Geneva
-Research posts, e.g. PhD positions and Research Assistant on Corporate Social Responsibility at the American University, Beirut
-Think-tanks, e.g. Involve, London
-Businesses, e.g. Ethical Trade Coordinator at New Look Retailers

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Birkbeck's School of Law is proud to offer this exciting and innovative Master’s programme, leading to the award of an LLM or MA Human Rights. Read more
Birkbeck's School of Law is proud to offer this exciting and innovative Master’s programme, leading to the award of an LLM or MA Human Rights. The distinctive focus of the programme is on theoretically informed and multidisciplinary approaches to human rights. It is also practical, setting out the impact of human rights on business, with some case studies. It aims to expose you to a critical and contextual engagement with the subject. You will study human rights in their political, legal, sociological, anthropological and philosophical contexts.

Human rights has emerged as the dominant discourse through which political, social and economic challenges are articulated. Is the rise of human rights as emblem of resistance and political horizon a reflection of the exponential rise of human need and suffering, or is it a convenient means of deflecting more radical political demands and transformation? What are the mechanisms through which various crises are made intelligible through human rights? What about the convergence of human rights and corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the implications of the growth of 'business and human rights' in international media? These are among the questions taken up in this programme.

You will be introduced to a wide variety of approaches to research across a range of disciplines, and to the theoretical frameworks for advanced legal scholarship. You will also take specialist courses, choosing from a wide range of subjects in the area of human rights.

The programme has close ties to a number of leading human rights NGOs and is informed by critical engagement with, and analysis of, human rights practice.

This programme will be attractive to those who wish to develop a career in the human rights field. It is especially aimed at more established participants in human rights practice across the spectrum of professional, NGO, governmental and inter-governmental activity, as well as CSR professionals in the private sector, who wish to take time to reflect and to deepen their understanding.

Preliminary reading is sent to new students in January, with the first block of intensive, face-to-face teaching in March/April.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Our new intensive programme is ideal if you are unable to follow a weekly course of study (for example, due to your work or family circumstances).
Designed for students who are interested in exploring in depth the major contemporary debates in human rights.
Unique programme, focusing on the study of human rights from a critical, contextual and multidisciplinary perspective.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
We use IT resources, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. For example, it provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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Many believe that international human rights law is one of our greatest moral achievements. However, there remain huge gaps between the theory and the practice of human rights implementation. Read more
Many believe that international human rights law is one of our greatest moral achievements. However, there remain huge gaps between the theory and the practice of human rights implementation.

You’ll study the interconnection of international human rights law with regional, European and national systems of human rights protection. Through the study of legal texts such as treaties, declarations and case law, you’ll examine the legal context behind contemporary issues.

Many of our staff engage in interdisciplinary human rights research, and this is reflected in our approach to teaching and learning on the course. You may also have the opportunity to work with real clients, on real issues, through the Human Rights Law Clinic.

How will I study?

You’ll learn through core modules and options in the autumn and spring terms. In the summer, you undertake supervised work on the LLM dissertation.

You will be assessed through coursework, a portfolio, essays and a 10,000-word dissertation.

Human Rights Law Clinic

When you’ve successfully completed the International Human Rights law core module, you can apply for The Human Rights Law Clinic option.

The Clinic gives you the chance to build on law and theory through the preparation of pro bono legal opinions for real clients. You’ll gain practical insights, work on research, and formulate advice and recommendations on contemporary human rights challenges.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

Faculty

The Sussex Centre for Human Rights Research was established to foster a vibrant research culture for human rights researchers within the Sussex Law School.

Our work has a global as well as national focus and we adopt a range of different approaches to human rights research, for example:
-Doctrinal
-Critical
-Theoretical
-Practical
-Interdisciplinary

We hold regular research seminars, workshops and debates, which all students are welcome to attend. Listed below are faculty with particular expertise in human rights.

Careers

This LLM is ideal if you wish to achieve a law-oriented postgraduate qualification in human rights and want to go on to a career in law or human rights advocacy.

The international and comparative nature of this course means that you will be well placed to seek employment in the UK and overseas in organisations such as:
-International law firms
-Governments
-International organisations
-NGOs

Read less
The School of Law is proud to offer this exciting and innovative Master’s programme, leading to the award of an LLM or MA Human Rights. Read more
The School of Law is proud to offer this exciting and innovative Master’s programme, leading to the award of an LLM or MA Human Rights. The distinctive focus of the programme is on theoretically informed and multidisciplinary approaches to human rights. It aims to expose you to a critical and contextual engagement with the subject. You will study human rights in their legal, political, sociological, anthropological and philosophical contexts.

Political, social and economic challenges are frequently articulated through the language of human rights. Is the rise of human rights discourse an emblem of hope and a political horizon, mobilising resistance to human need and suffering? Or do human rights claims deflect more radical political demands and block real transformation? Can the manifold crises of contemporary life be made more intelligible through the frame of human rights? These are some of the questions taken up in this programme.

You will be introduced to a wide variety of approaches to research across a range of disciplines, and to the theoretical frameworks for advanced legal scholarship. You will also take specialist courses, choosing from a wide range of subjects in the area of human rights.

The programme is particularly attractive to legal professionals, and to non-lawyers who work, or would like to work, in the field of human rights, allowing them to reflect critically on their role as human rights activists and practitioners.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

The programme has close ties to a number of leading human rights NGOs and is informed by critical engagement with, and analysis of, human rights practice.
Designed for students who are interested in exploring in depth the major contemporary debates concerning the theory and practice of human rights.
Unique programme, focusing on the study of human rights from a critical, contextual and multidisciplinary perspective.
Critical introduction to the vibrant world of human rights practice.
The School of Law is an internationally recognised centre for critical and interdisciplinary legal research. It provides an exciting and innovative environment for a wide range of research with a strong theoretical and policy focus. The School is the home of Birkbeck Law Press and publishes Law and Critique: The International Journal of Critical Legal Thought.
We use IT resources, such as electronic learning environments, to enhance teaching and learning. Birkbeck Library has an extensive teaching collection of books, journals and electronic resources in law and related disciplines, such as economics, politics and sociology. For example, it provides access to over 17,000 electronic journals, which are available online 24 hours a day. Find out more about our teaching and learning resources.
You can also take advantage of the rich research collections nearby, including those of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, Senate House Library, the British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library) and the British Library.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

We are among the top 10 law schools in the UK and in the top 3 in London in the Times Higher Education 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) rankings, while our research environment was judged conducive to producing research of the highest quality.

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Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field. Read more
Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field.

You will develop advanced professional skills and knowledge, enhancing your specialist career within non-government organisations, government sectors, community groups or human rights-related organisations such as international development agencies. You will also gain an understanding of the Australian legal system and will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

As one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia we offer this course at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers choice from a broad range of human rights law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such discrimination, international refugee law, advocacy, genocide and the law, human trafficking, humanitarian law and children's rights —to name a few, you will gain specialist knowledge and understanding of recent developments in areas of human rights law and the practice of human rights law. It provides the flexibility to tailor a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study allows to you to continue to work and meet personal commitments while you study.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Human Rights law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Human rights law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas human rights law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of human rights law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to human rights law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights. Read more
Developed in association with the renowned human rights barrister, Geoffrey Robertson, QC, and distinguished colleagues of the world-famous Doughty Street Chambers, this innovative programme examines some of the key challenges in the field of International Human Rights.

International law and human rights have been at the heart of teaching and scholarly work at Regent’s for many years: this new programme offers a truly unique opportunity to be guided by special guests from Doughty Street alongside our talented team of academics.

You will be introduced to a range of topics in the field including, a history of human rights law, international relations, humanitarian intervention, free speech, prohibition of torture and inhumane treatment and international criminal law, with all theory supplemented by cutting edge research and case studies.

Why should I choose this programme?

The issues covered within this programme have never been so pertinent and in demand. The programme will enable you to address some of the contemporary challenges faced in operational environments which aim to protect and promote human rights. The programme informs those already in professional practice or those aspiring to work in this field with the skills and knowledge and the ability to introduce changes that will improve human rights policies at an international, regional and domestic level.

This programme is unique in its close link with practising professionals and real life cases, allowing you to really explore and understand what’s happening in the world today. We have an exceptionally talented team of lecturers including:

‌•Dr. Sara Bazoobandi, an author on food security and Associate Fellow of Chatham House.
‌•Dr. Mireille Hebing, an expert on migration and refugees.
‌•Dr. Neven Andjelic, recently elected to the Advisory Committee on the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities.
‌•Professor Yossi Mekelberg, expert and author on human rights issues ranging from right for self determination, gender, freedom of speech, refugees, collective punishment and house demolitions, rights of minorities and others. Professor Mekelberg has been a member of the London Committee of Human Rights Watch for the last 7 years and is regularly asked to write in international media about abuses of human rights.

As well as being guided by our team of experts, you will benefit directly from visiting lectures from renowned barristers from the Doughty Street Chambers who include:

‌•Geoffrey Robertson, QC
‌•Kirsty Brimelow, QC
‌•Professor Marc Weller
‌•Graeme Hall
‌•Edward Fitzgerald OBE, QC
‌•Professor Geraldine Van Beuren, QC
‌•Andrea Saccucci
‌•Jen Robinson

Engaging with these distinguished professionals will really bring the subject to life and provide you with a deep and comprehensive understanding of human rights law.

Key skills, aims and objectives

You will gain:

A systematic and comprehensive knowledge of international human rights law
The ability to identify and critically evaluate contemporary issues relating to international human rights
An understanding of how theory relates to practice, with extensive use of current and relevant case studies
The ability to interpret principal source materials as well as understanding relevant concepts, cases, statutes and treaties
Exposure to world renowned human rights lawyers who will share their knowledge and experience of working on landmark cases in the field

Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a number of careers, in areas such as diplomacy, international relations, domestic and international legal practice, international charities, and non-governmental organisations, as well as practising professionals in law, journalism, politics and economics.

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/ma-international-human-rights-law.aspx#tab_course-overview

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The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts. Read more
The LLM in International Human Rights Law offers the opportunity to gain a critical understanding of the history and theoretical underpinnings of international human rights, international and regional human rights systems, and the practical application of human rights norms in a range of contexts.

This course combines rigorous legal education with a contemporary and global perspective and is ideally suited to students from a law, history, politics, or other social sciences background.

It is designed to provide the specialist skills and in-depth knowledge that will be attractive to employers in the areas of international legal practice and international development as well as those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/llm-in-international-human-rights-law/

Why choose this course?

- It enables you to specialise in areas such as international criminal law, the laws of armed conflict, humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction, international development and globalisation, refugee and migrant law, and the promotion and application of human rights as part of legal reform in the developing world.

- It is ideal for those who intend to pursue careers in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, as well as in government and academic posts. Recent graduates from this course have gained positions in international organisations, such as UNICEF.

- You can enhance your CV and career prospects by developing specialisations that go beyond the standard human rights law subjects of a LLB or other law degree.

- Your course tutors, fellow students and alumni are drawn from countries around the world giving you the opportunity to build a truly international network of contacts.

- All members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

- Special support is provided for international students, particularly those whose first language is not English, to ensure that they find their feet quickly and are able to participate fully.

- The 2015 Times/ Sunday Times Good University Guide places the School of Law at Oxford Brookes in the top 30 of all the UK’s university Law Schools.

- You will benefit from a range of teaching and learning strategies, from case studies to interactive seminars, presentations and moots.

- Oxford has much to offer lawyers and as one of the world's great academic cities, it is a key centre of debate, with conferences, seminars and forums taking place across a range of international law topics within the University, the city of Oxford and in nearby London.

Teaching and learning

A wide diversity of teaching methods are employed throughout the LLM courses in order to provide a high-quality learning experience. These include lectures, seminar discussions, individual and small group tutorials, case studies, and group and individual presentations.

Particular emphasis is placed on skills training, with opportunities provided to acquire and practice legal reasoning as well as research and IT skills. Assessment methods include coursework and individual and group presentations.

All the members of the LLM course team are active researchers and encourage students to become involved in their respective areas of research by teaching specialist modules in which they have expertise and by supervising dissertations in their specialist subjects.

Careers

Graduates from the LLM succeed across an impressive range of careers from policy makers and human rights activists through to high flying diplomats and commercial lawyers. LLM staff can advise you and direct you to possible careers and employers depending on your particular needs and ambitions.

"I have joined a corporate law team at a leading multinational law firm in Beijing, thanks to my LLM."
- LLM Alumna, Lin Zheng

- Pursuing an academic career in law
Research is fundamental to the Law School - one of the reasons we performed so well in the latest REF. Your own interests will be reflected in the modules you choose and many students feel moved to continue their academic studies and become specialists themselves. Several former LLM students have chosen to become researchers, publishing and lecturing on their work and graduating to do a PhD.

"The grounding that I now have in international law has allowed me to take on work that I would not previously have been qualified for. For example, I am currently developing a programme of litigation on the issue of counter-terrorism and human rights for an international organisation. I have lectured at Harvard Law School and been invited to contribute to an edited volume produced by Harvard."
- LLM Alumnus Richard Carver, Associate Lecturer and Human Rights Consultant

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Peter Edge researches in the interaction of religion and law, and the law of small jurisdictions including International Finance Centres. Recent projects exploring these at the transnational level have included a study of foreign lawyers working in small jurisdictions, and a comparative study of the status of ministers of religion in employment law. Past PhD students have worked on projects such as a comparison of the European Convention on Human Rights and Shariah, and a comparative study of how criminal law treats religion.

Professor Lucy Vickers’ research into the religious discrimination at work has led to consultancy work for Equality and Human Rights Commission, as well invitations to speak at United Nations with the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion and Belief.

Sonia Morano-Foadi, interviewed and quoted in The Economist, secured £12,000 from the European Science Foundation to fund exploratory work into the effects of EU directives on migration and asylum.

Professor Ilona Cheyne has been invited to participate in the EU COST group on 'Fragmentation, Politicisation and Constitutionalisation of International Law', working on standards of review in international courts and tribunals.

Research areas and clusters

Oxford Brookes academics are at the forefront of a wide range of internationally recognised and world-leading research and projects. In the 2014 REF 96% of the School of Law’s research was internationally recognised. The LLM course team consists of researchers working within the International Law and Fundamental Rights and Equality research groups. LLM students can attend the programmes of research seminars and other events that underpin the research culture of the School of Law.

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This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. Read more

Why this course?

This programme offers graduates in law and related disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels.

The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture.

There are three potential exit points from the course, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification. Likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the certificate or Diploma.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/humanrightslaw/

You’ll study

The Human Rights Law programme may be completed over two years (part-time), or over one year (full-time).

The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted on the last day of the academic year.

- Field dissertation
A recent innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for you to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus. It can be either in the UK, or more likely, overseas.
This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements.
Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of your dissertation.
LLM students on the programme have travelled to countries such as India, Guatemala and Uganda to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly.
The University of Strathclyde provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have tended to be in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from home, including all the major legal databases.

Student competition

There is an annual LLM Human Rights Dissertation Prize sponsored by Taylor and Kelly (a leading human rights law firm in Scotland).

International students

If English is not your first language you’ll be required to provide evidence of your English language proficiency before you can begin the course.
The LLM in Human Rights entry requirements are IELTS 6.5 (with no category below 6).

Pre-Masters Preparation Course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

This course is taught mainly through face-to-face teaching. Each class is delivered through two-hour weekly seminars, which students are required to attend.
Full-time students are required to take three modules per semester, with part-time students taking three modules over two semesters. The face-to-face seminars will normally be held in the evening from 6pm to 8pm. A few classes may be held during the day.
The teaching and extra-curriculum activities on the LLM are supported by the Law School’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

In addition to regular Law School staff, external staff teach on the programme including:
- Alan Miller, the current Chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission
-Tony Kelly, a prolific human rights lawyer

Both are visiting professors in the Law School. Our faculty also includes experts in human rights and transitional justice, immigration law, equality, employment and labour law.

Assessment

Classes will be assessed by a mixture of written exams, presentations and course work comprising research essays typically of 3,500-4000 words. There will be two-hour weekly seminars for each class. Although coordinated by a tutor these will be student-led and interactive.

Careers

Our graduates can, and have progressed to research studies like MPhil and PhD in Human Rights Law leading to an academic career.
Students may also go on to work with international non-governmental organisations in the area of human rights advocacy, practice and promotion like Amnesty International.
Qualification from the course is also relevant to careers in international human rights organisations, like UN agencies for example.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Human rights is a multidisciplinary area that incorporates political theories, anthropology, philosophy, education, social work, development studies and legal frameworks to build a broad and critical understanding of human rights. Read more
Human rights is a multidisciplinary area that incorporates political theories, anthropology, philosophy, education, social work, development studies and legal frameworks to build a broad and critical understanding of human rights.

If you do not have a relevant degree, this course is an entry pathway to the Master of Human Rights. The graduate certificate is for human rights workers, those who hope to work in the human rights field, professionals who wish to apply human rights principles to their practice, development workers, non-government organisation workers, activists, teachers, mediation and conflict workers, and community workers.

The course involves the study of human rights theory and philosophy across different cultural, religious, philosophical and political traditions, and how these ideas can be translated into practice in the contemporary world. This course is for those working either in Australia or internationally. It is multidisciplinary, and provides an opportunity for those from different cultural backgrounds, professions and disciplines to dialogue about human rights and develop ideas and skills in human rights practice.

Upon successful completion of the graduate certificate, you can enrol in the masters degree.

Career opportunities

Our graduates work in jobs that aim to realise and protect human rights or to raise community awareness about human rights issues, in professions such as education, health, law, social work, development work, in both the public and private sector. Others work for human rights in a voluntary capacity, advocating social justice, peace and a sustainable future.

Credit for previous study

Applications for credit for recognised learning (CRL) are assessed on an individual basis.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. Read more
The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. It meets the increasing demand for a postgraduate qualification in Children's Rights, explicitly focused on interdisciplinary research and child rights-based research methods, delivered flexibly through a blended format of online and face-to-face learning.

The aim of the MSc Children's Rights is to provide high-level knowledge and skills in children's rights law and practice of value to those working with and for children, including public officials and NGOs as well as educators, social workers and health care providers.

The programme is linked to the Centre for Children’s Rights, an innovative inter-disciplinary centre with an international reputation for advancing understanding of children’s rights, promoting children’s participation and developing children’s rights-based research methods. This new and unique MSc incorportates the Centre's expertise and will develop students’ knowledge and skills in two distinct but interconnected areas:

- Children’s Rights - using the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international standards to evaluate the laws, policies and practices which affect children.
- Research with Children - evaluating the best methods of conducting research into children’s lives with a particular focus on approaches which involve children actively in the research process. The CCR has a particular expertise in relation to children’s rights-based research.

The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide students with a thorough grounding in these two areas and the opportunity to explore a range of contexts in which these perspectives can be used to better understand children’s lives and secure improved outcomes for children. Professionals will have the opportunity to improve aspects of their practice and career development.

The Centre for Children’s Rights has extensive links with Northern Ireland charities and NGOs and can provide some opportunities for students to undertake relevant research. This may be of particular interest to students seeking to gain experience in the children’s sector, perhaps to secure a job or to change position. The Centre has a vibrant community of students undertaking PhD research in a range of issues and in several countries. The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide a good foundation for students wishing to pursue their own research through doctoral study.

Why Choose Children's Rights at Queen's?

◦As a prestigious Russell Group University, Queen’s is ranked 8th within the UK in relation to research intensity;
◦Education at Queen’s has been ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’ (REF, 2014);
◦The programme features input from leading international children’s rights scholars;
◦There will be some opportunities available to develop advanced workplace skills by collaborating with community organisations to undertake research to help them improve their services for children and young people;
◦The programme incorporates the Centre for Children's Rights expertise in interdisciplinary work and rights-based approaches to research methods. This will empower students to undertake research with children and young people in a range of contexts;
◦The programme is part of an innovative university wide initiative ‘Improving Children’s Lives’ which will give students access to interdisciplinary research and education which aim to improve the quality of life for children in Northern Ireland and beyond;
◦The interdisciplinary nature of the programme reflects the real-life practices of many child-related services;
◦If you don’t want, or need, to study for the research dissertation, flexible exit awards are available (PG Diploma/ PG Certificate);
◦You may also undertake individual course modules without completing a full degree.

“The best thing about studying children’s rights at Queen’s is that it provides you with the opportunity to reflect on your professional practice with academics who are leaders in their field. This has equipped me to return to my workplace and be a better informed and more analytical practitioner. I have taken the learning from this course and applied it directly into my professional practice with positive outcomes for service users and colleagues. It is the sort of training that has given me the confidence and skills to go further and make a real difference." Gerry Marshall (Children’s Services Inspector)

Programme Content

The award of MSc requires the accumulation of 120 credit points from the taught modules and a 15,000-20,000 word dissertation, equivalent to 60 credit points. Modules include:

Core modules

Childhood and Youth Research in Practice
Children's Rights
Children's Rights-Based Research Methods
Perspectives on Childhood and Youth
Research Methods

Optional modules

Childhood Adversity
Children's Rights and Disability
Children's Rights and Education
Children's Rights and Health
Children's Rights and Social Care
Children's Rights; Philosophical Approaches
Qualitative Research in Childhood and Youth
Quantitative Research in Childhood and Youth

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods eg multiple choice exam, essays, project reports, and contributions to an online forum. Students will have the option of undertaking research work for external organisations to submit as part of their dissertation.

Opportunities for Careers

There is increasing demand for postgraduates with high-level skills in interdisciplinary research, participatory research methods and knowledge of children's rights.

Professionals within children/human rights-focused NGOs, public officials, educators, social workers and health professionals who work with children should find this degree beneficial.

Special Features

Flexibility: this programme is designed to meet the needs of local and international professionals and is delivered via blended and online learning.

Choice: there are several entry and exit points to this programme, please see School website.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education. Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education.

Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Schools (and other educational enterprises in universities, businesses and communities) are part of a global network. This programme explores important issues about what it means to be a citizen in a global world - what could and should be done by educators to respond to the needs of individuals and groups in nation states and the new global society. We discuss issues about rights and duties and communities in the UK, Europe and globally and explore learning, teaching and assessment methods in schools and beyond.

This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in social studies education. This includes political and ideological education, moral education and education for diversity. This is a broad field that includes global education, comparative education, international education, intercultural understanding and citizenship education. In particular, the programme explores how to help people understand society and develop the skills to take part in it. This includes investigations of European citizenship and global citizenship education and focusing on learning and teaching methods. The programme will be of interest to those who see themselves as current or future teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students. Examples of what our graduates have done include PhD research in Australia; becoming and academic in a university in Japan; being an international student advisor at a university in the USA; working in business and in higher education in China.

Programme Aims

The MA programme aims to:
-Provide advanced-level study of forms of education appropriate for global citizens
-Illuminate the nature of citizenship and global education through insights into comparative education
-Link citizenship and global education to wider issues in society (history, politics and culture) and education via rhetorical and other perspectives
-Develop personal, academic and professional language skills in English
-Develop basic research capabilities in the field of citizenship and global education

Programme Content

Term 1
In term 1 there are 2 compulsory modules:
-Citizenship Education (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) which may be chosen from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Education and Social Justice
-Intercultural Communication in Education
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and Learning in Schools

Term 2
-Teaching and Learning Citizenship & Global Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Contemporary Issues in Teaching
-Cross-cultural Perspectives on Language and Discourse
-Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits, classes spread over Terms 2 and 3)

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September. Previous studies have included an examination of global education; universities as sites of global citizenship; studying the media.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education and higher education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Others find employment opportunities in the civil service, NGOs and other international organisations.

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This programme offers a thorough academic analysis of one of the most salient and pressing issues in the contemporary world. the place of individual human rights in a system of international relations in which states’ rights have traditionally been paramount. Read more
This programme offers a thorough academic analysis of one of the most salient and pressing issues in the contemporary world: the place of individual human rights in a system of international relations in which states’ rights have traditionally been paramount.

Why this programme

-If you plan a career with non-governmental organisations, in related domestic, European and other global institutions, or in higher education, or want to learn more about human rights and international politics, this programme is designed for you.
-You will have the opportunity to participate in a 5-day study trip to Geneva to visit the UN and non-governmental human rights organisations.
-The degree is genuinely interdisciplinary in content and structure, and is designed to ensure that you will encounter both legal and political perspectives, unlike most other human rights programmes which are exclusively focused on law. You can choose to focus on one domain more than the other.
-The programme draws on recognised expertise in international institutions, security, gender, political philosophy, theories of rights, and ethics and normative theory, as well as a wide variety of country and regional expertise.
-You will benefit from access to a number of organisations within and beyond the University, including the Glasgow Human Rights Network; The Glasgow Refugee, Asylum & Migration Network; The Glasgow Centre for International Development; and the annual International Human Rights Documentary Film Festival.
-If you wish to combine the study of this subject with additional advanced training in research methods, you should consider the closely-related MRes in Human Rights & International Politics.

Programme structure

You will take 4 core and 2 optional courses. Courses will be delivered via lectures and seminars. Some courses contain an exam. You will also submit a dissertation at the end of the programme.

Core courses
-Critical perspectives on human rights (Politics)
-Fundamentals of international law (Law)
-Human rights and global politics (Politics)
-Qualitative research methods OR Social science statistics

Optional courses (two chosen, one from politics and one from law)
Politics
-Challenges in international politics
-China's international politics
-Chinese politics and society
-Comparative European politics
-Ethics in global politics
-EU in international politics and development
-Foreign policy of the United States
-Freedom of expression
-Globalisation and European integration
-Institutions and policies of the European Union
-International relations theory
-International security and global politics
-Internet and civil society
-Media and democracy
-Political institutions, crisis and communication
-Political legitimacy: contemporary perspectives
-Politics of gender in development.

Law
-British constitutionalism c1600-1800
-Freedom, security and justice in the European Union
-Globalisation, constitutionalism and human rights
-Law and democracy
-United Nations law

Note: Some courses might not be available every year. You may also be able to choose from courses in the other subjects in the School of Social & Political Sciences and the School of Law.

Dissertation
The dissertation, written during the final phase of the programme, is your opportunity to explore your own specialist interest in human rights and international politics and to demonstrate the research and writing skills you have developed during the programme.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in higher education, government/foreign ministry, intergovernmental organisations, non-governmental organisations and think tanks.

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