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Masters Degrees (Human Right)

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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The LLM Human Rights and the Environment examines the political, legal and human rights issues that shape and inform environmental protection and regulation. Read more

The LLM Human Rights and the Environment examines the political, legal and human rights issues that shape and inform environmental protection and regulation. Jointly delivered by our prestigious Law School and the Lancaster Environment Centre, it enables you to explore the environmental aspects of the law and the legal regulation of the environment in the context of human rights.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice. The Lancaster Environment Centre, along with Rothamsted Research and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, is part of our world-leading Graduate School for the Environment. These influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching and you will have access to the much sought-after expertise of academics working at the forefront of research into natural and social sciences, legal and socio-legal issues.

The pathway for the LLM ensures a balanced duality: Law School modules, LEC modules, and a 20,000 word dissertation, enable you to pursue your own interests whilst becoming practiced at looking at issues from different perspectives.

Your core modules are Perspectives on Environment and Development, Environmental Law or International Environmental Law, the LLM Dissertation, and one from International Human Rights Law, Rights of Peoples, or The Right to Adequate Food as a Human Right.

You will study a further elective module in Law and one from the Lancaster Environment Centre. We pride ourselves on the breadth of options available and you can focus on the human rights, legal, environmental and sustainability issues that most interest you. Elective modules include: Chemical Risk Assessment, Climate Change and Society, Environmental Justice, Air Pollution and Climate, Law and Global Health, International Law, European Union Law, and the Law of International Organisations and Institutions.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal or environmental question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop: the skills required to critically evaluate cutting-edge research; inter-disciplinary skills; and, analytical and communications skills. All of which are a real boost in any sector and highly prized by employers. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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The LLM International Human Rights Law is your opportunity to explore the way that international law is used to protect human rights and enables you to gain expertise in a distinct yet relatively broad specialism. Read more

The LLM International Human Rights Law is your opportunity to explore the way that international law is used to protect human rights and enables you to gain expertise in a distinct yet relatively broad specialism. You will combine core and elective modules to gain an international perspective on this highly-relevant field of law. The degree is taught by the research-active academics based in our prestigious Law School and offers you the opportunity to engage with teaching staff who are working at the forefront of International Human Rights research.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

There are two pathways for the LLM, both of which enable you to pursue your own interests:

  • Studying five modules and completing a 20,000 word dissertation
  • Studying six modules and completing a 15,000 word dissertation

Your core modules are International Law, International Human Rights Law and the LLM Dissertation. The modules in International Law and International Human Rights Law will address key questions such as how international laws protect, govern and define your human rights and inter-state relationships. You will evaluate the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights protected through international instruments and explore the way that international law is used to shape the world in which we live.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the legal and academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant legal material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

We pride ourselves on the choice and breadth of elective modules available, offering you access to sought-after expertise in high-demand areas and growing fields such as The Rights of Peoples, Law and Global Health, International Terrorism and the Law, Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights, and International Environmental Law.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate research relating to international human rights law; skills which are highly prized by employers both here in the UK and overseas. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost in any sector. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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This engaging Masters degree combines two highly-relevant and challenging areas of legal study and explores the interplay between them. Read more

This engaging Masters degree combines two highly-relevant and challenging areas of legal study and explores the interplay between them. It provides you with an international perspective and is taught by the research-active academics based in our prestigious Law School. It is your opportunity to engage with teaching staff who are working at the forefront of international research into these fascinating legal and socio-legal issues.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these influential centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed.

There are two pathways for the LLM, both of which enable you to pursue your own interests:

  • Studying five modules and completing a 20,000 word dissertation
  • Studying six modules and completing a 15,000 word dissertation

Your core modules are International Law, International Human Rights Law, International Terrorism and the Law, and the LLM Dissertation. The modules in International Law and International Human Rights Law will address key questions such as how international laws protect, govern and define your human rights and inter-state relationships. You will evaluate the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights protected through international instruments and explore the way that international law is used to shape the world in which we live.

International Terrorism and the Law explores concepts relating to civil liberties, international law, criminal justice and human rights as you consider one of the greatest global challenges to peace, stability and security.

The dissertation is an independent, in-depth inquiry into a research topic of your choosing. The topic will link to a key legal question or issue and may also directly relate to your professional/career interests. This is your opportunity to make a contribution to the legal and academic community with new, original research and writing. A dissertation supervisor will provide you with support and introduce you to relevant legal material and research; their personal research interests will closely align with your chosen topic wherever possible.

We pride ourselves on the choice and breadth of elective modules available, offering you access to sought-after expertise in high-demand areas and growing fields such as The Rights of Peoples, Law and Global Health, International Criminal Law, Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights, and International Environmental Law.

Our teaching approach is international in scope and comparative by nature, and we actively encourage you to build a beneficial network of academics, peers and alumni during your time with us. All of this will help you to broaden your experience, deepen your understanding, and prepare for your next step.

Your postgraduate LLM degree opens doors to a huge range of careers. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate cutting-edge research; skills which are highly prized by employers both here in the UK and overseas. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost in any sector. The LLM is also an ideal stepping stone to PhD study and academia.

Course Structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

Assessment

Coursework and dissertation



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Who is it for?. The International Politics and Human Rights programme is for students who want to explore international politics and human rights more widely and then drill down to specialise their knowledge. Read more

Who is it for?

The International Politics and Human Rights programme is for students who want to explore international politics and human rights more widely and then drill down to specialise their knowledge. The MA is designed to give you the chance to create your own questions about the way the world works – and to shape arguments where you feel it doesn’t. These are some of the questions the course poses:

  • Do human rights offer universal protections, or do they provide ideological cover for neo-imperialist powers?
  • Can human rights provide protection to individuals in a way that supersedes the nation-state, or do they serve the interests of powerful states?
  • Should human rights be concerned with the minimalist needs of security and subsistence, or should they aspire to grander visions of global justice?

Objectives

This is a course where you will challenge your own point of view. We unpick the ideas that structure the way we understand the world, so we can identify how those understandings shape global events. We then focus on how the way we view things may, in itself, be ethically problematic.

International Politics and Human Rights is an evolving subject so you explore unique specialisms backed by real-world research. The department’s academics are actively shaping policy, sitting on the advisory board for the Corbyn shadow cabinet, hosting talks on the human right to housing in London, and engaging in study groups around the Obama presidency. This keeps the content of the course effective and current, giving you a contemporary lens from which to view rapid political change.

Placements

You have the opportunity to undertake a placement, but it is not a formal requirement of the course. We encourage you to create your own, by fostering connections offered by the Careers Service. There is also the International Politics Careers Day, which explores career opportunities with international politics degrees and includes:

  • Talks by speakers within the field (including alumni now working within the UK Department for International Development, the UK Ministry of Justice), UNESCO and the EU Commission
  • Talks by careers consultants and volunteering coordinators
  • Drop-in sessions with careers professionals focusing on CV writing, applications and volunteering.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by academics within the department with industry professionals offering insight in the form of talks for the Practitioner Series. This is a programme of talks from visiting speakers and alumni working within organisations such as The Refugee Council and Amnesty International.

Academic staff

The staff within our Department of International Politics are research active, enthusiastic and passionate about their work. Often this research and influence leads to policy change and many media appearances. Find out more about International Politics staff.

You can follow our staff’s activity through their Twitter feed: @cityintpolitics

Assessment

Each taught module is assessed by an essay, either a 5,000-word essay for 30 credit modules or a 3,000-word essay for 15 credit modules. Your final MA marks are derived from a combination of your essay and dissertation grades.

You are required to submit a dissertation of 15,000 words in an area linked to the MA degree. Your dissertation topic will be agreed with your personal tutor/supervisor.

Your work will be assessed by coursework alone, there are no exams. Many students develop their key interest first when they choose their elective modules, then when they write their essays, and finally when they write their dissertation over the summer term.

Modules

The structure of this MA means you can design your own degree. The first core module Human Rights and the Transformation of World Politics l is taught in the first term and Global Ethics: Principles, Power and Politics, is taught in the second term. Throughout the year you can choose elective modules that suit your interests. You can also opt to study across departments with optional modules from the Department of Sociology and The City Law School.

You take two 30-credit core modules, one in each term, totalling 60 credits. You will then take elective modules totalling 60 credits, which include 15 and 30 credit options, and complete your 60 credit dissertation in the third term as a student on the full-time programme (with submission in September of that year). You must also attend the dissertation workshops that are offered by the department, as it is a compulsory and important part of the MA programme.

Career prospects

The skills you will take away from this programme – those of research, analysis and presentation – are highly valued by employers. In 2016 70%  of City's International Politics graduates were in employment or further study six months after graduation. Current graduates now work within the following organisations:

  • UNESCO
  • Amnesty International
  • The Open Rights Group
  • The Grass Roots Group
  • The United Nations
  • US Embassy
  • International Crisis Group
  • Ministry of Economy and Finance
  • European External Action Service

From human rights organisations to NGOs and government agencies, the course gives you the perfect foundation to prepare for a career in a wide range of fields. You will graduate with the ability to undertake in-depth research, challenge received explanations of topics in social and political life and to examine and critically evaluate the complex structure of relationships between governments, transnational actors, transnational networks and intergovernmental or governmental organisations.



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Our LLM in International Human Rights will expose you to the fundamental aspects of the field, and provide you with the opportunity to critically examine the impact of the international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision. Read more

Our LLM in International Human Rights will expose you to the fundamental aspects of the field, and provide you with the opportunity to critically examine the impact of the international human rights standards on national constitutions and laws, with particular focus given to the conflict between international standards and national provision.

The LLM International Human Rights also provides you with an opportunity to assess how international human rights law offers protection to different categories of vulnerable groups.

Additionally, our LLM provides an opportunity to acquire, or build upon existing skills gained from your undergraduate course - enhancing employment opportunities in the legal profession and providing a basis for progression to doctoral studies. 

What's covered in the course?

You will analyse and critically evaluate principle features of international human rights law, including fundamental concepts, values, principles and rules, and the main institutions and procedures. You’ll also learn to evaluate complex legal issues, communicate complex and abstract ideas, and employ strategic transferable skills.  

Why Choose Us?

  • You will earn from a dedicated and passionate teaching team, who have experience with the international human rights institutions
  • This course is a conversion LLM – you don’t need a degree in Law to be eligible to study it.
  • The course covers transnational jurisdictions, so it is international in scope.
  • The course has flexible delivery methods to suit your location and when you are able to study. You can enroll as either an on-campus student, flexible/blended learning student or as a distance learning student
  • Studying of the LLM International Human Rights will provide you with an opportunity to engage with the work of the Law School’s Centre for Human Right
  • You will have an opportunity to enhance your employability skills by completing an internship
  • Birmingham City University has just launched the UK's first Centre for Brexit Studies, researching all aspects of the UK's vote to leave the EU, including the impact it has on domestic law and legislation.


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Grounded in critical thinking and positive action, this program provides a rigorous human rights education in the classroom and community. Read more

Grounded in critical thinking and positive action, this program provides a rigorous human rights education in the classroom and community. You'll graduate prepared to tackle—and to teach about—inequities based on race, class, gender, sexual identity, religion, and nation.

Program Details

Designed to support teachers of early childhood through college, as well as educators working in non-formal settings such as community organizations, Human Rights Education (HRE) entails understanding the promise of rights guarantees and the gap between rights and actual realities.

Courses examine the right to education, schooling with dignity and rights, and curricular efforts towards social justice and comprehensive human rights. Students engage with issues in local and global contexts, with emphasis on globalization, migration, social movements, and transnationalism.

Transformation is an essential element of HRE, and is done through a process of education that empowers people to make changes in their own lives, as well as in their families, communities, and institutions.

Program Delivery

The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). See Teaching Weekend dates.

A hallmark of the Masters in Human Rights Education program is its flexibility to work with diverse students. Students can complete the coursework requirements in as few as 18 months (two academic year semesters plus the summer term) and can extend the program as long as needed (up to 5 years). Most students complete the Masters program in 2 academic years with summer coursework often included.

COURSE DETAILS

The Master of Arts in Human Rights Education (HRE) consists of 30 credits. Requirements include 15 credits of core coursework, 9 credits of elective coursework, and 6 credits of Culminating Project. All classes are 3 credits, unless otherwise noted.

HRE FOUNDATIONS COURSES | 9 CREDITS

  • IME 618 - International Human Rights Law for Educators (3)
  • IME 620 - Human Rights Education: Pedagogy and Praxis (3)
  • IME 621 - Human Rights Education: History, Philosophy and Current Debates (3)

HRE TOPIC COURSES | 9 CREDITS (SELECT 3 OF 4 COURSES)

  • IME 616 - Social Movements and Human Rights (3)
  • IME 617 - Tools for Human Rights Practice (3)
  • IME 619 - Gender and Globalization (3)
  • IME 640 - Immigration and Forced Displacement (3)

HRE ELECTIVES | 6 CREDITS (SELECT 2 COURSES)

  • IME 602 - Linguistic Rights and Bilingual Education (3)
  • IME 605 - Re-conceptualizing Multicultural Education (3)
  • IME 606 - Critical Analysis of Urban Schooling (3)
  • IME 612 - Critical Race Theory and Praxis (3)
  • IME 625 - Contemporary International Issues (3)
  • IME 636 - Human Rights and Media (3)
  • IME 637 - Critical Pedagogy (3)
  • IME 639 - Cross-Cultural Literacy (3)

CULMINATING PROJECT | 6 CREDITS

  • GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3)
  • IME 649 - MA Thesis/Field Project (3)

The Human Rights Education Program Learning Outcomes:

The goal of the HRE program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in the following key areas:

  • Analyze the gap between universal rights and grassroots realities in local, global, and transnational contexts, with attention to issues of power, privilege, and marginalization. Explore the conditions and dimensions of empowering and transformative learning processes.
  • Describe and critique the differing approaches, perspectives, and models toward human rights education and how they impact the ways in which HRE is carried out in diverse settings.
  • Drawing on critical pedagogies, produce advocacy tools and curricular resources to be used in formal or non-formal educational contexts to address human rights violations.
  • Design, conduct, analyze and present findings from interviews, using diverse methods, such as oral history, in order to raise awareness about human rights issues.
  • Identify diverse methodological tools and skills needed to conduct ethical research in a range of contexts such as classroom teaching, community organizing, and curriculum development, among others.
  • Synthesize contextual understandings, reflective analysis, theoretical frameworks, and methodological training to inform either the production of a thesis or research-based field project.


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Why this course?. This programme offers graduates in law and other disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels. Read more

Why this course?

This programme offers graduates in law and other disciplines, or those with relevant professional qualifications, the opportunity to develop a detailed understanding of human rights law at UK, European and international levels.

The programme is intended to provide invaluable training and insights for those who have either a professional or academic interest in an evolving human rights culture.

There are three potential exit points from the course: Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma and Masters. Assuming satisfactory performance, it's possible to change between these exit points. For example, a student who initially registers for the certificate may opt to continue studying to the Diploma or Masters qualification; likewise, a student originally registered for the Masters can transfer to the Certificate or Diploma.

You’ll study

The Human Rights Law programme may be completed or over one year (full-time) or over two years (part-time).

The LLM is awarded on successful completion of six modules and a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Successful completion of six modules will qualify you for the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip). A Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is awarded on completion of three modules.

Dissertation

The dissertation is written over the summer and submitted in August or September.

Field dissertation

An innovative feature of this programme is the opportunity for a select number of students to undertake a field dissertation within a governmental or non-governmental organisation with an international focus (currently our focus is on providing placements in Ghana, Uganda and Zambia). LLM students have travelled to countries such as India, Peru, and Guatemala to undertake projects in areas including right to water, law reform, developing sexual harassment policy and freedom of assembly.

This opportunity is offered on a competitive basis and typically lasts for up to 12 weeks. It's delivered through our partnership with Challenges Worldwide, an organisation with extensive international experience in volunteer work placements.

Work completed for the placement will focus on a specific area of law relevant to, or actually form the subject of, your dissertation.

The University provides comprehensive travel and health insurance for all participants in the Field Dissertation. We also pay for the costs of your placement. Students are responsible for the costs of flights, visas, and accommodation and living expenses while overseas. Such costs have been in the region of £1,500 to £2,500 per student.

Centre for the Study of Human Rights Law

The Centre for the Study of Human Rights Law (CSHRL) is a hub for human rights law teaching, research and knowledge exchange. The CSHRL holds events and undertakes collaborative initiatives. We have strong links with a number of other universities in Scotland, and with a number of non-academic organisations.

As a student here, we will support you to become involved with the work of the Centre. We aim to facilitate interaction between students and staff, involve students in the work of the CSHRL and provide administrative support for events proposed by students.

One of the initiatives supported by the CSHRL is the LLM in Human Rights Law dissertation prize. The author of the highest-ranking dissertation in a year will receive a prize and be invited to attend the Law School’s annual prize-giving event. Visit the Centre’s homepage for news, including of previous prize-winning dissertations.

Facilities

Our library has a wide range of law reports, legislation, serials and monographs. It also has duplicate sets of key law report series, houses extensive collections in government publications and other related areas.

You'll have access to a wide range of electronic information sources which can be accessed from anywhere, including all the major legal databases.

Core module

You'll study the following core modules:

  • International Human Rights Law
  • European Human Rights Law
  • Human Rights Protection in the UK
  • International Migration Law

Compulsory module

  • Legal Research (LLM /PgDiploma only)

Optional modules

You'll undertake one optional module (LLM /PgDiploma only) which will be available from a timetable at the start of the second semester, including both daytime and evening modules. You may choose a class from other Law Masters programmes and/or relevant classes from non-law Masters programmes. Choices include modules such as Cybercrime or Business and Human Rights from:

  • LLM/MSc Criminal Justice & Penal Change
  • MSc Mediation & Conflict Resolution 
  • MSc/LLM International Relations, Law and Security
  • LLM in Internet Law & Policy
  • LLM in International Law & Sustainable Development

Learning & teaching

This course is taught mainly through face-to-face teaching. Each class is delivered through two-hour weekly seminars, which students are required to attend.

Full-time students are required to take three modules per semester, with part-time students taking three modules over two semesters. The face-to-face seminars will normally be held in the evening from 6pm to 8pm. A few classes may be held during the day. Although coordinated by a module leader, these will be student-led and interactive.

The teaching and extracurricular activities on the LLM are supported by the Law School’s Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

In addition to regular Law School staff, external staff teach on the programme including:

  • Professor Alan Miller, Special Envoy of the Global Alliance of National Human Rights Institutions and former Chair of the Scottish Human Rights Commission
  • Professor Tony Kelly, Summary Sheriff and solicitor-advocate with experience in high-profile human rights cases

Both are visiting professors in the Law School. The Faculty includes experts in migration, policing and security, family law, Scottish and UK constitutional law, equality, employment and labour law. 

Assessment

Classes will be assessed by a mixture of written exams, presentations and course work comprising research essays, typically of 3,500-4,000 words 



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Evolutionary theory has radically altered our understanding of human life. The Human Evolution and Behaviour MSc at UCL is designed to provide students with a solid practical and theoretical grounding in issues relevant to the evolution of humans and non-human primates. Read more

Evolutionary theory has radically altered our understanding of human life. The Human Evolution and Behaviour MSc at UCL is designed to provide students with a solid practical and theoretical grounding in issues relevant to the evolution of humans and non-human primates.

About this degree

Students develop the ability to generate, assess and synthesise empirical evidence and hypotheses related to human evolution and behaviour. They gain subject-specific skills, such as measuring skeletal material, interpreting and generating data related to human ecology, reproduction and genetics, and generating behavioural data of humans and non-human primates through observation.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

Students choose two of the first three modules in the list below. Postgraduate Methods/Statistics I is compulsory for all students.

  • Human Behavioural Ecology
  • Primate Socioecology
  • Palaeoanthropology
  • Postgraduate Methods/Statistics 1 (term one)*

Optional modules

Students choose three of the following optional modules:

  • Advanced Human Evolution
  • Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
  • Archaeology of Human Evolution in Africa
  • Primate Socioecology
  • Evolution of Human Brain, Cognition and Language
  • Evolution of Human Cumulative Culture
  • Evolution of the Human Brain and Behaviour
  • Primate Evolution
  • Variation and Evolution of the Human Skull
  • Advanced Statistics
  • Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures including weekly two-hour departmental seminars, and occasional attendance at non-departmental seminars. Assessment is through take-home examination, essays, lab-books, practical tests, and presentation. The dissertation is assessed by a project presentation and the thesis.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Human Evolution and Behaviour MSc

Careers

Many graduates are successful in entering fully funded doctoral programmes based on their training and achievements on the programme. Our graduates also go not o work in the media (TV, radio , publishing), in NGOs (community development, nature conservation), government organisations (national statistics, health programmes), in zoos and museums (overseeing collections, co-ordination research), or become school teachers. Moreover, numerous alumni have become notable academics in their own right, teaching as permanent staff in universities across the globe.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Archaeological Research Assistant, The Cyprus Institute
  • Business Director, CEB
  • Freelance Consultant, A Piece of Pie
  • PGCE Secondary Science - Specialised in Biology and Psychology, University of Exeter
  • Civil Servant, Ministry of Defence (MoD)

Employability

Graduates of the programme will be trained in the fundamentals of scientific inquiry including hypothesis generation, data collection and statistical analysis, data synthesis and reporting of results. Additionally, they acquire advanced training in computer-based quantitative methods, presentation techniques, and the public understanding of science. Students will also gain skills specific to their dissertation research that can include behavioural observation techniques, field data collection, computer modelling, and advanced shape analysis.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology was the first in the UK to integrate biological and social anthropology with material culture into a broad-based conception of the discipline. It is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK in terms of both staff and research student numbers, offering an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework identify us as the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Our results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. 

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Anthropology

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Queen’s Law School has more than 25 years’ experience in delivering an LLM in Human Rights Law. Read more

Queen’s Law School has more than 25 years’ experience in delivering an LLM in Human Rights Law. Throughout that period it has constantly reviewed and revised what it offers as part of the degree, shifting the content from time to time depending on the human rights issues that are most prominent and on the expertise of staff available to teach the various subjects. We will be harnessing as much of our joint expertise as possible to provide a vibrant and relevant course which will stimulate the hearts as well as the minds of students who are taking it. The focus will remain on international human rights law (including at regional levels in Europe, Africa and the Americas) but there will be concentration as well on the practice of human rights, especially in the contexts of discrimination, armed conflicts, terrorism and migration.

The protection of human rights at the international level is a relatively new branch of law. Since World War Two there has been a huge growth in the number and variety of human rights standards set out in international treaties and in other so-called ‘soft law’ documents. The problem is that these standards are not always fully implemented and the international mechanisms for trying to get them implemented are defective. This LLM provide students with an opportunity to gain an in-depth appreciation of what has gone right and what has gone wrong and to suggest ways in which human rights could be protected more effectively so that human beings everywhere can realise their full potential.

The programme is delivered through a series of taught modules and culminates in the submission of a dissertation on an original topic.

Compulsory modules

International Human Rights Law

Human Rights in Practice

Dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words

Optional modules

Equality and Discrimination

Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

Transitional Justice

Comparative Human Rights

Business and Human Rights

Compulsory Methodology modules

Theories and Methods of Human Rights

Approaches to Legal Research



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The Criminology & Criminal Justice MA/LLM is distinct in covering a range of criminal justice and criminological debates. It enables you to engage in more specialised socio-legal studies and offers the opportunity to explore discourse on international human rights, criminal law and transitional justice. Read more

The Criminology & Criminal Justice MA/LLM is distinct in covering a range of criminal justice and criminological debates. It enables you to engage in more specialised socio-legal studies and offers the opportunity to explore discourse on international human rights, criminal law and transitional justice. It opens doors to a wide range of careers.

Our Law School is home to the Centre for Crime, Law and Justice, the Centre for Law and Society, and the Centre for Child and Family Justice; these centres underpin our postgraduate teaching, which is research-led and research-informed. You will be taught by lecturers who are nationally and internationally renowned researchers.

The course of study is the same for the MA and the LLM apart from the final dissertation. Core modules are Crime & Criminal Justice in the 21st Century, Criminological Theory, and Criminological Research in Practice. You’ll also choose three from: International Criminal Law; International Human Right Law; International Terrorism and the Law; Gender, Sexualities and Human Rights; and Transitional Justice, Human Rights and Peace Building. You’ll complete your degree with either a Criminology or Criminal Justice Dissertation (MA), or a Law Dissertation (LLM).

Your postgraduate degree leads to research jobs in the Home Office, Probation Service, and Social Services, and to work with non-profit-making organisations, including the NHS, educational institutions and charities working with young offenders or victims of crime. You will develop the skills required to critically evaluate criminological research, which are highly prized by employers in both the public and private sectors. The analytical and communications skills developed through your studies are a real boost if you opt for a career outside of the criminal justice sector.

LLM

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.

MA

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Core

Optional

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research.



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The Certificate in Human Resource Practice (CHRP) is a foundation-level programme awarded by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). Read more
The Certificate in Human Resource Practice (CHRP) is a foundation-level programme awarded by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).

Whether you're just starting out in HR or looking to take your career to the next level, this course will give you the knowledge and skills you need to succeed. What's more, it also offers you professional recognition through membership of CIPD.

In a highly competitive market, employers recognise that employees with the right skills, experience and knowledge are essential to the success of their businesses.

Modules

The Units covered on the course are designed to enable participants to develop and update a range of skills and knowledge required in the practice of human resource management and to provide them with an understanding and appreciation of the role and range of activities undertaken by human resource management professionals

• Developing yourself as an effective human resources practitioner
• Understanding organisations and the role of human resources
• Recording, analysing and using human resources information
• Supporting good practice in managing employment relations
• Resourcing talent
• Delivering learning and development activities

These modules cover crucial areas and give a practical understanding of the behaviour of people within organisations and an appreciation of the scope and nature of human resources.

Employability

Students who successfully complete this Certificate in Human Resource Practice (CHRP) can progress into human resource management and related disciplines. You could rise to middle and even senior management positions upon attainment of further qualifications and experience.

Academic progression

For those wishing to progress onto LSBU's MSc Human Resource Management, but who do not meet the standard LSBU entry requirements to apply in their own right, there is a non-standard entry route which can be accessed by Certificate in Human Resource Practice (CHRP) students.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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When human rights are violated by a particular state, is it more effective to use the national, regional or international human rights protection mechanisms to address the issue? And what mechanism will probably be most effective in addressing specific types of human rights violations?. Read more

When human rights are violated by a particular state, is it more effective to use the national, regional or international human rights protection mechanisms to address the issue? And what mechanism will probably be most effective in addressing specific types of human rights violations?

What does this master's programme entail?

Human rights are at risk in all societies. Though various national, regional and international laws and treaties have been developed to protect the human rights of all people, some laws are more effective than others in particular situations. In this programme, you will compare the functionality of different protection mechanisms that are currently in place. You will also learn how to apply them successfully in different political, social and cultural settings.

Reasons to choose European and International Human Rights Law at Leiden University?

As a student of the European and International Human Rights Law Advanced Studies programme, you will benefit from:

  1. Expert instructors: In addition to learning from the expertise of our academic staff, you will participate in lectures, masterclasses and workshops given by renowned human rights experts working for the UN, the EU, NGOs or other organisations.
  2. Life-changing work: You will learn how to develop your own voice to speak for people in the world who may have otherwise been silenced. You will become an effective advocate for restoring the basic rights and fundamental freedoms that are inherent to all human beings.
  3. Excellent reputation: Leiden Law School has an excellent reputation in human rights research and education.

Is European and International Human Rights Law the right programme for you?

Would you like to actively work to protect the rights of people across the globe? Are you interested in applying your knowledge of human rights law to real-world political, social and legal settings? Then this is the programme for you. You should also have a sufficient background in law.



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Develop advanced business skills alongside valuable interpersonal skills with our online Postgraduate Diploma in Business with Human Resources. Read more

Develop advanced business skills alongside valuable interpersonal skills with our online Postgraduate Diploma in Business with Human Resources. This postgraduate programme encompasses modules including leadership, human resource management in context and many more.

Overview

Make your CV stand out from the crowd with our Postgraduate Diploma in Business with Human Resources.

This postgraduate programme will develop your ability to critically select effective information collection methods and competently apply appropriate analytical tools, synthesise and utilise management tools in the construction of business projects and decision-making and much more.

In addition to the subject-specific business skills that you will develop on this course, you will also discover how to critically examine the management and motivation of the human resource through approaches to performance management and reward, cultures of continuous development and improvement amongst diverse employees.

Upon completion of your Postgraduate Diploma, we offer the opportunity for you to progress to study for a full Masters (awarded after 180 credits).

Course structure

The Postgraduate Diploma in Business with Human Resources is made up of the following modules and, upon completion, is equal to a total of 120 credits at Level 7.

Level 7 modules:

 Optional modules

Upon completion of your PG Dip Business with Human Resources we offer the opportunity for you to progress on to study for an MSc Business with Human Resources (180 credits).

Learning and assessment

Introduction

Studying online gives you the freedom to study when and where it suits you – at home, during your lunch hour or anywhere else you have internet access.

All of our online courses have an indicative study duration which is a guide to how long your course will take to complete. The actual duration may be longer or shorter depending on your speed of study, study options chosen and module availability. It’s possible to complete your studies faster than the indicative course duration by doubling up on modules at certain times; however, minimum study durations do apply.

All of our courses have regular start dates throughout the year. Our academic year is organised into modules, typically with a one- or two-week break between modules and a structured three-week break for the Christmas period. Students will receive a course timetable during the application process.

Teaching methods and style

As we are a 100% online university, we utilise a virtual learning environment instead of a traditional campus. The system tracks and manages the learning process in real-time and provides you with immediate access to your learning materials.

This learning platform allows both students and tutors to actively take part in real-time conversations and you can listen to, and view, live lectures and seminars over the internet. All courses are delivered in English only.

You are supported throughout your course by a dedicated Student Adviser and have the opportunity to regularly interact with fellow students and your tutor. To ensure you receive the support you need from your tutor, we cap our class sizes at 20 students.

Assessment

We adopt an assignment-based approach to assessment instead of exams. Assessment for the Postgraduate Diploma in Business with Human Resources is based on a combination of written coursework.

You are always aware of your current provisional grade right from the start of the programme, allowing you to evaluate the success of your current study methods and clearly identify areas to improve. We believe that this transparency gives you the information you need to make the most of your course. We achieve this by:

  • showing your marks clearly in your gradebook, which can be viewed whenever you log onto the learning platform
  • the rapid turnaround of work assessed to ensure that your gradebook is always up to date
  • assessing your work throughout the module rather than waiting for end of year exams
  • ensuring you have regular contact with your Student Adviser
  • the simplicity and transparency in the design of our assessment criteria

We also have a policy of ensuring that work submitted by students is authentic. As well as the fact that all work is frequently assessed, we use a well-established electronic monitoring system to check for plagiarism.

Career prospects

We are dedicated to improving employability amongst our graduates. Our online courses give you the opportunity to improve your career prospects and earning potential with a mix of key skills that are directly transferable to the workplace.

Any postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and is greatly valued by employers seeking employees with a drive for self development.



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Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. Read more
Human rights law now permeates the study and practice of all areas of law, from our criminal justice processes, from planning appeals to privacy, terrorism to tort, health law to litigation. It is a fascinating and absorbing area of law in its own right, encompassing bodily integrity rights, such as the right to life, the right not to be tortured and the right not to be detained, procedural rights such as the right to a fair trial (both civil and criminal), and expressive rights such as freedom of religion, of assembly and of free expression itself.

Nottingham Law School has significant academic expertise in the areas of human rights and justice. The LLM Human Rights and Justice is based on the significant expertise of academic staff in Nottingham Law School, particularly from its Centre for Conflict, Rights and Justice. The course parallels the historical and contemporary significance of these aspects of law, in particular their growth as topics of both domestic and international importance over recent decades.

The course will help you develop a strong analytical understanding of the key legal issues in the area, with a particular focus on European and international human rights and key aspects of international justice systems.

Modules Include: Public International and Humanitarian Law; Terrorism and International Response; Victims' Rights and Restorative Justice; Human Rights in Europe; Theory and Principles of International Law; Expression Rights; Human Rights and Criminal Justice; Discrimination Law in Employment; International Human Rights; International Criminal Court and International Crime; and Data Protection and Privacy.

Scholarships are available, visit: http://www.ntu.ac.uk/scholarshipsnls for details.

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