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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Environmental changes, ageing populations, the media and new technologies, asylum and migration, intergenerational justice, complex multilevel governance arrangements, the impact of trade and investment, poverty and inequalities, the rise of identity politics and the changing nature of the personal sphere are contemporary global challenges facing human rights calling into question the fundamental tenets of human rights law both in terms of its formulation and implementation through policy development and law-making.

Differentiated from existing LLMs, the LLM Human Rights explicitly focuses on these contemporary challenges and how best to respond to them though law, policy and practice. The Human Rights programme draws on the research strengths in the College of Law and Criminology, but also from other colleges, in its teaching; and, exploits strong relationships with external partners to integrate a distinctive applied focus to the Human Rights programme.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM Human Rights will benefit from a programme designed around high calibre research and impact in human rights. Human Rights students will also benefit from academics' strong relationships with external partners working in the field of human rights, giving the programme a distinctive approach centred on the implementation and application of human rights.

The focus on implementation and practice in human rights is complemented by a multidisciplinary approach. Human rights policy and practice often do not recognise disciplinary divides. The Human Rights programme allows students to experience teaching from other disciplines to enhance their knowledge and understanding of human rights as an integrated project (e.g. politics and international development).

Uniquely the Human Rights programme addresses diverse challenges in human rights faced by law and policy, and by practitioners at the global, regional, State and sub-State levels. The approach focuses on how these challenges might be effectively managed through law and policy. The Human Rights programme offers:

- The opportunity and choice to address a range of human rights topics and challenges across a number of thematic areas, with teaching by expert researchers in the field.

- A multidisciplinary approach reflecting the reality of human rights in practice.

- A practical and practice focused philosophy.

Modules

The LLM Human Rights is a modular programme, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts:

Part I consists of 3 taught modules, each 20 credits. Students will be required to undertake 2 compulsory modules, these are: International Human Rights Law and Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention. Students are also required to select 1 further optional 20 credit taught module from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Part II gives students a choice of 3 optional modules, each 20 credits, from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Students of LLM in Human Rights are also required to undertake a dissertation, which contributes 60 credits.

The following are examples of modules offered to Human Rights students (modules available for selection will be dependent on contingencies, e.g. whether a module leader is in study leave).

Human Rights and Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability

Trade, Investment and Human Rights

Human Rights and the Media

Human Rights and Family Law

Human Rights and Identities

Accountability for Human Rights Implementation

Impact Assessment and Human Rights

Children’s Human Rights

Human Rights and Poverty

Human Rights, Migration and Human Trafficking

Human Rights and Criminal Justice

Human Rights and Terrorism on-line

Human Rights and Medical Law

Human Rights and Employment

Extra-curricular Activities

Throughout their studies Human Rights students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities to enhance their practical understanding of human rights. These include:

Guest lectures by expert practitioners in human rights.

Workplace learning through voluntary work and/or placement.

Involvement in collaborative research projects with research partners.

Engagement with the College’s projects focussed on practical implementation and impact from research (e.g. Cyberterrorism Project, Wales Observatory, Centre for Environment, and the Sex Work Consortium).

Careers and Employability

The LLM Human Rights will open the door to a range of careers, including:

- Human rights institutions: increasingly international and regional human rights institutions are seeking to support, monitor and influence State policy and social arrangements. Potential graduate destinations include: the United Nations and the Council of Europe as well as other regional institutions.

- The public sector, including government at all levels. Potential graduate destinations include: civil service, regional, national and sub-national government, local authorities and other public bodies, and, political and policy advice work.

- The private sector: human rights are increasingly the concern of the private sector in the realm of socially responsible capitalism. Potential graduate destinations include: global business (including institutions such as the World Bank); the business sector (from large scale business such as the banking sector, to smaller concerns seeking to appeal to the ethical consumer).

- The NGO sector: non-governmental agencies are well-established stakeholders in human rights. Potential graduate destinations include: international NGOS (e.g. UNICEF); regional or local level NGOS.

- Research and academia: research on human rights is a well-established concern for academia.

The LLM Human Rights enhances student employability as:

- The Human Rights programme ranges across a broad spectrum of human rights topics relevant to law, policy and practice and encourages a practical approach in these areas.

- Students will have the opportunity to engage with projects providing opportunity for hands-on experience of human rights research as well as dissemination to support practical application.

- The Human Rights programme offers a range of work place learning opportunities.

- Entrepreneurial skills will be developed by encouraging students to contribute ideas to project work and project activities.



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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Social Research Methods at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This Master's degree in Social Research Methods aims to provide advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences.

Key Features of MSc in Social Research Methods

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of research areas and publishing in top international journals

- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities

- Specialist modules in criminology, social work and human geography, research leadership and management

- Emphasis on development of ethical, knowledgeable, skilful social researchers” through critical discussion, up to date information, debates and presentations

MSc Social Research Methods is a highly regarded and prestigious qualification which has been developed to:

- enable students to develop practical research skills and advanced methodological expertise (both qualitative and quantitative);

- instil familiarity with research ethics and governance, and

- gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Elective modules and a dissertation provide scope for specialisation in applied social sciences, including but not limited to: criminology, human geography, social work and health.

This Master’s degree in Social Research Methods has ESRC accreditation and provides advanced training in a range of research methods used in the social sciences. The degree instils familiarity with research ethics and governance, and students gain knowledge about theoretical research concerns across the spectrum of social science disciplines.

Students on the Social Research Methods course are encouraged to devise research dissertations themselves (supported by an academic supervisor).

Modules

Modules on the Social Research Methods programme typically include:

Qualitative Research Methods

Introduction to Research and Study Skills

Data Collection Methods

Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research

Quantitative Research Methods

Advanced Research in Human Geography

Research Leadership and Project Management

Case Studies in Applied Social Research: Social Work

Case Studies in Applied Social Res: Applied Research in Crime & Criminal Justice

Dissertation (Social Research)

Social Research Methods Course Structure

Teaching is in the form of lectures, seminars, group-project work and individual study. All Social Research Methods students are assigned a Personal Tutor and Dissertation Supervisor appropriate to their chosen area of study.

The Social Research Methods course is made up of six 20-credit modules (Part 1) and a 60-credit dissertation (Part 2).

Who should apply?

The Social Research Methods course is suitable for:

- students who want to prepare themselves for the challenge of MPhil or PhD study; who are already professionally involved in working with people in the social sector and want to develop their own skills and professional expertise

- students from different academic disciplines who are interested in conducting social research and are interested in seeking employment or already have employment in both public and private sectors

- previous students are those with backgrounds in social policy, sociology, law, criminology, human geography, politics, arts and humanities, ageing studies , psychology and health science

- anyone wanting to add a valuable qualification as part of developing a full academic career

- anyone who is interested in society, social behaviour, and social change and would like to learn more

- anyone working in, or wishing to work in, government or voluntary organisations, and commercial areas where social research is undertake

Career Prospects

Past Social Research Methods students have gone on to be employed in public and private sectors, research work, PhD , vocational work, the criminal justice system, social work, environmental health, teaching, local government, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) and health and social care.

Staff Expertise

Contributing lecturers are renowned nationally and internationally. For example, Professor David Hughes has published on the universal coverage healthcare reforms of Thailand and Turkey, Debbie Jones jointly led on The Student Sex Workers' project from Swansea University's Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology.

The MSc Social Research methods is serviced by research active staff, many of whom are leaders in their field of research. The team has strong links with Criminology whose staff have been awarded Howard league Research Medal 2013 for work on the Swansea Bureau Youth Scheme. Lecturers from the course also include those from the world renowned Centre for Innovative Aging and also Human Geography.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made. Read more

This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made.

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice. 

Human rights are carried by different actors:

  • grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
  • lawyers and judges
  • bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
  • journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be. 

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices. 

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance. 

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Modules & structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed. 

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign). 

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology. 

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use. 

Core modules

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in SociologyMedia and Communications, the Centre for Cultural StudiesEnglish and Comparative LiteratureAnthropologyPoliticsMusic and Educational Studies.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills & careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights. 

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights. 

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths.



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This multidisciplinary programme is aimed at professionals already working in child or adult services in health, education or social care in the UK and overseas who have an interest in developing research expertise and who have a motivation to carry out research in their workplace or a linked setting. Read more

This multidisciplinary programme is aimed at professionals already working in child or adult services in health, education or social care in the UK and overseas who have an interest in developing research expertise and who have a motivation to carry out research in their workplace or a linked setting.

About this degree

Students will gain knowledge and skills in applied research related to the client groups with whom they work. Key topic areas include qualitative and quantitative methods related to communication disorders research, and planning, implementing and managing research. Students undertaking the MRes will conduct a supervised research project in their area of professional interest.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

Both the MRes and the PG Cert include three compulsory (core) modules (45 credits) and one optional module (15 credits). The MRes also includes a research project (120 credits).

On the Postgraduate Certificate students take four modules (60 credits). This can be full-time over 15 weeks or flexible study over a period of up to two years.

Core modules

  • Research Evidence and Design I
  • Research Evidence and Design II
  • Research in Practice

Optional module

  • Students may choose any 15-credit module from Language Sciences or from the Institute of Health Informatics.

Dissertation/report

MRes students undertake a research project in the area of human communication disorders, which culminates in a dissertation of 8,000-10,000 words, a research impact plan and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme takes a strong experiential learning approach through the demonstration, exploration and application of new skills. The programme also utilises significant online learning resources which allow learning outside normal classroom hours. These are combined with lectures, and small-group working. Assessment is through written reports, presentations, and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Applied Research in Human Communication Disorders MRes

Careers

Now, more than ever before, continuing professional development (CPD) is linked to career progression. Gaining a PG Cert or an MRes in Applied Research in Human Communication Disorders will undoubtedly enhance your career opportunities within child and adult support services, and could act as a springboard to further research including study at doctoral level. In the long term, skills gained on this programme will place you in an exceptionally strong position to engage with research including contributing directly to research evidence.

Employability

Evidence of continuing professional development (CPD) is of major importance for professionals working with vulnerable populations, and this programme is likely to enhance employability. For example, on completion you will be able to demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and a range of skills that relate directly to your professional career, including how to source appropriate literature, evaluate research conducted by others, select and conduct appropriate research designs, analyse data, and write a research report.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Division of Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching. Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create a vibrant and interactive environment, taking advantage of first-class resources.

Academic staff in the division have a wide range of expertise in research methods and the management of people with communication disorders. Areas of expertise inlude:

  • Acquired Apraxia of Speech
  • Aphasia
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Children with Complex Special Needs
  • Deafness/Cochlear Implant
  • Dysphagia
  • Dyslexia
  • Language Disorders
  • Progressive Neurological Conditions
  • Speech Disorders in Children
  • Specific Language Impairment
  • Stammering
  • Written Language Difficulties

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment. Read more

Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment.

Master of Research (MRes) degree provides preparatory training for academic research, ideal if you want to eventually progress on to a PhD and develop a research career, or if you wish to gain research skills within specialist areas before committing to a PhD. This course is also highly suited to medical students who want to intercalate.

Through this course, you will develop broad biomedical research skills, but with an emphasis on application to cardiovascular science.

It is now widely recognised by employers and research councils that unravelling the basis of cardiovascular disease and developing new therapies is a high-priority area for investment, especially since the economic burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing.

However, it is becoming increasingly clearer that a gap has opened up between the skills possessed by new graduates and the skills normally expected on entry to a research degree or an industrial research career. This MRes has been specifically designed to fill this gap for those who wish to pursue a research career in cardiovascular sciences.

Our course is suitable if you come from a medical or science background and have little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our course is designed to provide you with:

  • specialist knowledge of the principles of the cardiovascular system in health and disease, with an emphasis on emerging technologies (taught lectures);
  • laboratory skills, research methodology and data analysis (two research projects);
  • critical analysis of scientific and medical literature (literature review);
  • intellectual skills for understanding and interpreting research problems (tutorials);
  • communication of scientific data and concepts (oral presentations and written reports).

Special features

Learn from the experts

The University is home to around 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields.

Additional course information

Research topic examples:

  • Coronary arterial contractility and endothelial function
  • Sick sinus syndrome and gene therapy
  • Can we un-stiffen arteries?
  • Cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias
  • Elucidation of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis
  • The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure
  • Mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy
  • Cell signalling in vascular smooth muscle
  • Cellular dysfunction and EC remodelling in heart disease and ageing
  • Development of a novel therapeutic approach to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

Teaching and learning

We have nearly 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields. There is a wide spectrum of research spanning clinical trials, whole organs, tissues, cells and single molecule studies.

Contributors to this course include:

You will learn through a range of teaching methods, including seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as through research projects (25 weeks).

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is through a combination of written reports (in journal format), literature review, problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and oral presentations.

This range of training methods aims to promote a stimulating and dynamic learning environment. The different course units will enable the development of key transferable skills in the critical analysis of research methodologies, data interrogation, communication and time management.

Course unit details

Clinical Masterclass course unit:

The Clinical Masterclass course unit is a 15 credit unit specifically designed for intercalated medical students. The unit consists of a series of seminars, workshops and e-learning.

This unit contributes to personal and professional development in the experience, knowledge and skills training required for effective clinical practice and success, with a strong emphasis on clinical academic research.

Areas covered include:

  • advanced Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • research governance and the regulatory framework for research
  • the Human Tissue Act
  • practical clinical ethics
  • patient and public involvement in research
  • diversity/equal opportunities in research/cultural competence
  • research creativity and entrepreneurialism
  • leadership (practitioner, partner and leader roles)

Facilities

Most of our researchers are housed within the Core Technology Facility and AV Hill, purpose-built research centres that have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. This close contact fosters collaboration and discussion and is an excellent environment for students.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office 

Career opportunities

After this course, many students continue their studies and register for a PhD.

However, the course is also of value if you want to progress in careers in the pharmaceutical industry or clinical research.

The MRes is also ideal for MBChB intercalating students who wish to undertake directly channelled research training in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Many of the skills and training provided by the MRes are generic and will have wide application to the study of other disciplines.



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Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Read more
Interested in a research-orientated career in psychology? Gain confidence in the acquisition, analysis and use of research information on our psychological research methods programme. Develop a sophisticated understanding of psychological research, from the creation of questions you’ll need to ask, through to the meaningful organisation of results. Be primed for a research role across a range of sectors, including consultancy and government agencies, and have the foundation for future PhD work.

Key features

-Designed to provide you with the understanding and skills to help you develop academic or commercial careers based on psychological research.
-Choose to study full time over one year, or take the flexible two year part-time pathway to fit in with your career plans or caring commitments.
-Be confident studying with us – this programme is provided by the School of Psychology, which was recognised in the latest Research Assessment Exercise with 85 per cent of activity judged to be of international standard, placing it in the top third of departments nationally.
-Benefit from a programme recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as providing the research training within the 1+3 framework.
-Receive thorough training in research methodology and design, as well as the philosophical issues that underpin your research decisions.
-Learn to analyse a problem, select the appropriate methodology and understand the implications of your choice.
-Gain the skills and knowledge to conduct research in a rigorous, appropriate and ethical manner, using a range of techniques (qualitative and quantitative) in a range of settings (experimental, observational, fieldwork, and focus groups).
-Hone your ability to communicate your research findings effectively to different audiences, both orally and in writing.
-Equip yourself, as part of the masters programme, with the skills and experience to design and conduct a major psychological research project.
-Learn from a teaching team with the in-depth knowledge of many areas of psychology and experience of publishing both fundamental and applied research in the best scientific journals. Their expertise, spanning from ethics to research design and statistics, offers you the ideal environment to develop your research skills.
-Immerse yourself in our school’s newly refurbished laboratory and teaching space, including electrophysiology (ERP), Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), virtual reality and eye-tracking laboratories.
-Benefit from our school’s research expertise. The Centre for Brain, Behaviour and Cognition attracts substantial external funding from UK research councils, the EU, charities and industry.
-Acquire skills that are highly prized by a wide range of employers, and be ready to join previous students employed in academia, consultancy, government agencies and non-governmental bodies.
-Contemplating a PhD in the future? This programme will provide you with the essential pre-requisites for research at this level, including a thorough grounding in research methodology, design and analysis as well as the philosophical issues that underpin research decisions.

Course details

You’ll cover the whole spectrum of psychological research skills and most research methods used by psychologists, and have the opportunity to study methods that are particularly relevant to you. We aim to equip you with high-level research skills and give you the opportunity to apply these skills in original psychological research. Early in the programme, you’ll begin a substantial independent piece of research and continue this throughout the year. Special emphasis is placed on practical research skills and communication - these are integrated in project work to achieve professional standards of psychological research. If you study full time the programme lasts one year starting in late September and involves attendance for at least two days a week over two 12-week teaching periods. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the postgraduate diploma award. If you want to study part time please discuss your requirements with the Programme Director.

Core modules
-PSY558 Evaluating Complex Interventions
-PSY556 Statistical Methods for Experimental and Clinical Research
-PSY561 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 1
-PSY557 Quantitative Analysis of Complex Clinical and Behavourial Data
-PSY555 Communication of Research for Psychology
-PSY562 Skills and Techniques in Psychological Research 2
-PSY572 Project
-PSY559 Experimental Research Design
-PSY560 Qualitative Research Methods for Psychology
-PSY571 Project Planning and Literature Search

Optional modules
-PSY567 Designing for Behaviour Change
-PSY566 Issues in Behaviour Change
-PSY568 Issues in Clinical Psychology
-PSY569 The Brain and its Disorders
-PSY564 Understanding Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
-PSY570 Issues in Cognitive and Brain Science
-PSY577 Foundations in Clinical Psychology: Children and Families
-PSY563 Understanding Risky Behaviour

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The Universe of Human Rights. Aims and objectives. We aim at providing you with the scientific knowledge and the practical skills to work as a human rights expert in different professional environments. Read more

The Universe of Human Rights

Aims and objectives

We aim at providing you with the scientific knowledge and the practical skills to work as a human rights expert in different professional environments.

Target group

We welcome students with at least a bachelor degree in a broad variety of academic disciplines from all world regions, with an open mind, empathy for human beings and a strong interest to experience the fascinating world of human rights.

Modules

We offer an innovative and interdisciplinary approach to human rights, with a strong emphasis on practice. We keep the class size small in order to provide you with the best possible support, so you can get the most out of the programme. Your interests are taken very seriously – you have the opportunity to determine certain contents of your courses.

Semester overview

Semester 1: Courses introducing human rights, its mechanisms and its interdisciplinarity

Semester 2: Courses focusing on specific human rights and specific groups

Semester 3: Internship / research placement

Semester 4: Simulation of a human rights body's session and thesis writing

Overview of the Modules

a) Introduction to Human Rights from an Interdisciplinary Perspective (7 ECTS)

b) International and Regional Human Rights Systems (16 ECTS)

c) Current Human Rights Issues from an Interdisciplinary Perspective (21 ECTS)

d) Selected Human Rights and Human Rights of Specific Groups (10 ECTS)

e) Practical Human Rights Skills (6 ECTS)

f) Scientific Competence (5 ECTS)

g) Internship Related Courses (30 ECTS)

A detailed desription of the Modules is available here:

http://www.postgraduatecenter.at/en/programs/international-affairs-business/human-rights/content/our-curriculum/

Our philosophy

As equal members of the interdisciplinary Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights, staff and students of the University of Vienna we welcome all academic disciplines and all cultures.

We are dedicated to supporting and maintaining a community in which the universal principles of human rights are shared through the common enterprise of intellectual curiosity and research as well as of the translation of the acquired knowledge into action for the betterment of the human rights situation.

Spirit and Culture of the Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights

We strive for a sense of community in which the individual growth of all members is advanced through the cultivation of mutual respect, tolerance, and understanding.

The Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights values and encourages individuality while also affirming the community dimensions of academic life. Our human rights community shall provide a structure within which individual freedoms may flourish without threatening the freedoms of other fellow students, teaching staff and the academic management team of this Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights.

The Master Programme is committed to honest, open, and equitable engagement with all, while respecting differences in religion, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, abilities and needs among others. We seek to promote an academic and social environment that in its diversity is integral to the educational purposes of the institution, by engaging in team building exercises, study trips and workshops while cultivating an open culture of communication.

Faculty

We offer you a broad variety of courses taught by university professors and academic lecturers from various disciplines as well as human rights practitioners working in international organisations, human rights institutes, the corporate sector, development agencies and civil society organisations.

Field trip

We provide you with an enlightening and memorable field experience in the post-conflict situation in Kosovo, where the UN, the OSCE, the EU, NATO and other international organisations are jointly operating an international administration with a strong human rights mandate. The trip will last for one week where you stay with a local family and get the opportunity to have lively discussions about Kosovo's human rights issues with international actors, national human rights institutions, NGOs, media, universities and politicians.

Job opportunities

We will train you for a career as a human rights expert to be employed by governments, international organisations, development agencies, business corporations, research institutes and civil society organisations. You might work as an election observer, officer for human rights monitoring and capacity building in the field, diplomat, trainer, mediator, consultant, researcher etc.

Vienna

- The Vibrant Heart of Europe

Not only is Vienna well known as the world city with the highest quality of life, but situated in the heart of Europe, it lies at the cross-roads of different cultures. People from all over the world come to Vienna to meet, to enjoy its charm and the sound of music, to study, to dance, to hold peace congresses and attend scientific conferences.

Many international organizations and agencies, including the United Nations, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Fundamental Rights Agency of the European Union, have chosen to be hosted in Vienna. After the end of the Cold War, the Vienna World Conference on Human Rights in 1993 laid the ground for the current human rights architecture of the United Nations. Combining tradition and modernity, arts and science, work and leisure, Vienna provides the ideal international environment to spend two unforgettable years studying the art of human rights. More information on Vienna is available here:

https://www.wien.info/en

Application Deadlines 05 March 2018 / 05 April 2018 / 05 May 2018 / Open Round

For more information please visit our website on http://humanrights.univie.ac.at



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Research profile. This programme's emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars who are leaders in their field. Read more

Research profile

This programme's emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars who are leaders in their field.

Research may be in any area of social, urban, environmental, development, political, economic, historical or cultural geography that is supported by the Human Geography Research Group. It is co-delivered with the University’s Graduate School of Social Science.

The programme can stand alone as a masters degree, or form the first year of a ‘1+3’ ESRC-backed PhD programme.

Students who successfully complete this programme will:

  • acquire transferable skills relevant to advanced researchers
  • develop skills in data acquisition and analysis
  • understand wider methodological and epistemological debates relevant to their research

This programme is affiliated with the University's Global Environment & Society Academy.

Programme structure

We offer a balance between general and specialist research training. The programme combines lectures, practical work, workshops, essays, seminars and one-to-one supervision of independent research leading to delivery of a dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Research Design in Human Geography
  • Methodological Debates in Human Geography
  • Core Quantitative Data Analysis 1 and 2
  • Research Skills in the Social Sciences: Data Collection
  • Dissertation in Human Geography

Option courses:

In consultation with the Programme Director, you will choose from a range of option courses. We particularly recommend:

  • Conducting Research Interviews
  • Contemporary Social Theory
  • The Documents of Life
  • Explanation and Understanding in Social and Political Research
  • Intermediate Inferential Statistics: Testing and Modelling
  • Listening to Children: Research and Consultation
  • Political Ecology
  • Qualitative Methods and Ethnographic Fieldwork
  • Survey Methods and Data
  • Values and the Environment

Independent research

The emphasis on independent research allows you to work closely with scholars at the cutting edge in order to advance your own research passions. A highlight of the programme is the postgraduate conference where you present your research to colleagues.

The University of Edinburgh has an unbroken record of teaching and research in the earth sciences going back to 1770, when Robert Ramsay became the first Professor of Natural History.

James Hutton and Arthur Holmes were prominent among those who set an academic tradition in Edinburgh that continues today with the University achieving top ratings in earth sciences teaching and research.

Our interactive and interdisciplinary research environment allows us to tackle difficult research questions, from causes of past glaciations to interactions of earth, climate and society. The ambition and quality of our research was reflected in the latest Research Assessment Exercise: 66 per cent of our research was rated within the top two categories – world-leading and internationally excellent.

Our location at the King’s Buildings campus – home to most of the University’s science and engineering research – benefits our work too. Our King’s Buildings neighbours include external institutes such as the British Geological Survey; our proximity to them strengthens these research links.

Training and support

As a research student, you will be affiliated to one of our research institutes, benefiting from an excellent peer-supported network.

As groupings of researchers with related interests, the institutes provide a forum for development of ideas, collaboration, and dissemination of results, and an environment for training, development and mentoring of research students and early career researchers.

Backed by industry

The School receives strong backing from industry, particularly in areas such as hydrocarbons and carbon capture and storage. We receive support from the EU and from major UK research councils, including the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council.



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Why study at Roehampton. Get first-hand experience in the promotion and protection of human rights on our annual international research study trip. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • Get first-hand experience in the promotion and protection of human rights on our annual international research study trip. (Cost of trip not included within course fees). 
  • Join our team of researchers in the internationally-renowned Crucible Centre for Human Rights Research.
  • We are ranked 6th in the UK for the impact of our social sciences research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Over half our research is ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

Become a skilled professional in the world of human rights promotion and protection by studying at Roehampton. You will gain a critical understanding of the central role that human rights has in current and controversial international debates.

This challenging programme will provide you with a strong knowledge in the complex roles that human rights and international relations have in global issues such as terrorism, struggles for democratic freedoms, genocide, the effects of defence policies, climate change, and social justice. You will graduate with the skills you need to succeed to enter into a highly competitive, international environment for international human rights advocacy and protection.

Our programme will provide you with a strong foundation of knowledge in human rights that draws upon a range of disciplines in law, politics, sociology, history, and philosophy. This holistic approach to human rights will enable you to choose a specialisation and tailor your own research project according to your interests.

Gain international experience in the field by taking part in our annual research study trip to learn about the promotion and protection of human rights.

You will be taught by active researchers who are committed to social justice and have made ground-breaking impacts on society. The Crucible Centre for Human Rights Research is a multidisciplinary research centre conducting research on a range of contemporary human rights, migration and related issues. You will benefit from the number of regular workshops and seminars that the centre holds as well as being a part of major EU-funded projects and activities.

London’s diverse international community is central to this programme which has an established network with human rights organisations to help provide you with opportunities for professional work placements for launching your career.

Content

The course engages you in the core issues in the study of international relations alongside the theory and practice of human rights from a variety of perspectives. It starts by introducing you to core international relations, historical, philosophical, legal, sociological and theological debates in human rights. You will be exposed to the latest methods in human rights research, equipping you with the foundations to conduct your own research in the world of human rights promotion and protection. 

You will have the opportunity to get first-hand experience in the field by choosing a work experience module working within a London-based human rights organisation. 

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Civil Society: Policy and Management
  • Human Rights Advanced Placement
  • International Human Rights and Criminal Law
  • International Relations and Human Rights

Career options

Graduates work for human rights campaigning, advocacy, and defending within national and international government and non-governmental agencies, charities, think tanks, or in journalism and the media.

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Why study at Roehampton. We are ranked 6th in the UK for the impact of our social sciences research (Research Excellence Framework 2014). Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • We are ranked 6th in the UK for the impact of our social sciences research (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Get first-hand experience of human rights on our annual international research study trip. (Cost of trip not included within course fees). 
  • Join our team of researchers in the internationally-renowned Crucible Centre for Human Rights Research.
  • Over half our research is ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Course summary

Gain a world view on the current debates within the theory and practice of protecting human rights at Roehampton. You will approach this complex subject from an inter-disciplinary perspective, drawing on sociological, legal, philosophical and political insight.

This programme is ideal for students who are pursuing careers as human rights defenders, preparing for training in international law, or keen to gain experience in campaigning. You will graduate with the skills you need to succeed in a highly competitive, international environment for human rights advocacy and protection.

Our programme will provide you with a strong body of knowledge in human rights, which draws upon a range of disciplines in law, politics, sociology, history, and philosophy. This holistic approach to human rights will enable you to choose a specialisation and tailor your own research project according to your interests.

Gain international experience in the field by taking part in our annual research study trip to learn about the promotion and protection of human rights.

You will be taught by active researchers who are committed to social justice and have made ground-breaking impacts on society. The Crucible Centre for Human Rights Research is a multidisciplinary research centre conducting research on a range of contemporary human rights, migration and related issues. You will benefit from access to its range of regular workshops, seminars and have the opportunity to take part in major EU-funded projects and activities.

London’s diverse international community is central to this programme which has an established network of human rights organisations to help provide you with opportunities for professional work placements for launching your career.

Content

The course is designed to give you the tools to kick-start your career in human rights. It starts by introducing you to core international relations, historical, philosophical, legal, sociological and theological debates in human rights. You will be exposed to the latest methods in human rights research, equipping you with the foundations to conduct your own research in the world of human rights promotion and protection. 

In the second term, you will be able to take a variety of modules to tailor the programme offering to your interests. You will have the opportunity to get first-hand experience in the field by choosing a work experience module working within a London-based human rights organisation. 

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • Human Rights: Discourses and Debates
  • Sociology of Human Rights
  • Human Rights Advanced Placement
  • International Human Rights and Criminal Law
  • Civil Society, Policy and Management

Career options

Graduates work for human rights campaigning, advocacy, and defending within national and international government and non-governmental agencies, charities, think tanks, or in journalism and the media.

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MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher. Read more

MSc Research Methods provides grounding in social science research methods, developing you as a well-rounded researcher.

You will graduate from the course able to access the full range of research in relation to your chosen specialism of human geography (pathways in education, international development, and planning and environmental management are also available), with the necessary practical skills to design, conduct and develop research studies.

The course complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award). The course is therefore ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

A distinctive aspect of the course is that the strong focus on developing your research skills is combined with the opportunity to study one of the four pathway fields of education, human geography, international development, and planning and environmental management.

We believe that developing deeper and new understandings of your chosen field requires a thorough understanding of research methodology. Conversely, developing a deeper understanding of research methods is inextricably linked to the context in which research is conducted.

You will therefore study four mandatory research methods units and four units taken from the human geography pathway - which will be a mix of mandatory and elective units.

You will study and learn alongside peers from the three other related fields - fields that share strong traditions of interdisciplinary and mixed methods approaches. The course will therefore allow you to develop interdisciplinary connections within SEED, and draw upon the significant expertise from our departments in Education, Geography, Global Development, and Planning and Environmental Management.

In addition, you will attend some of the introductory PhD research training lectures, which will be supported by seminars and tutorials. This will provide you with a taste of life as a PhD student.

Aims

  • Prepare you to evaluate, use and carry out research in a critical and self-critical manner.
  • Promote understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of different research approaches and of an applied social researcher.
  • Develop analytical skills appropriate to study at postgraduate level to enrich the academic community.
  • Enable you to develop a thorough understanding of the contextual and substantive issues in human geography, and how this relates to knowledge production within human geography.
  • Support the acquisition of cognitive, practical and transferable skills that are appropriate for postgraduate study and relevant to applied social research and practice in the UK and overseas.
  • Develop the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary for employment as a researcher or as a practitioner researcher in human geography, or for progression to postgraduate research (PhD).

Coursework and assessment

You will conduct a small scale piece of empirical research of relevance within your pathway field and use this as the basis for your dissertation. The emphasis of the dissertation will be on the use of methodology in the context of:

  • tracing the application of certain methods to the investigation of particular issues
  • discussing how that methodology functioned in practice
  • research reflexivity.

You will be expected to report on the findings of the study, although the scale of the work will necessitate modest aims and outcomes, given that you will require space to provide in-depth methodological critique and potentially also methods development as an outcome of their study.

It will also be possible you to choose to undertake a literature-based dissertation, in which case there will be an expectation that a formal review methodology will be used to conduct the review.

The form the dissertation ultimately takes will reflect the particular study conducted, and its structure will be negotiated and agreed your supervisor. All dissertations undertaken will be required to contribute to meeting the ESRC's research training criteria.

Scholarships and bursaries

MSc Research Methods complies with the research training requirements for ESRC scholarships for a PhD scholarship (commonly termed +3). It is also suitable as the master's year as part of an ESRC scholarship award that covers both the master's and PhD (commonly termed a 1+3 award).

It is ideal if you want to apply for an ESRC scholarship or School of Environment, Education and Development (SEED) scholarship, as 70% of the ESRC Core Training can be demonstrated prior to commencing a PhD.

It will also be of interest to people who are considering a career in research in one of the pathway fields.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The Genetics of Human Disease MSc aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of molecular genetics, quantitative and statistical genetics and human disease and how this can be applied to improve healthcare through the development and application of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents. Read more

The Genetics of Human Disease MSc aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of molecular genetics, quantitative and statistical genetics and human disease and how this can be applied to improve healthcare through the development and application of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents.

About this degree

The programme provides a thorough grounding in modern approaches to the understanding of the genetics of disease alongside the cutting-edge research methods and techniques used to advance our understanding of development of disease. Core modules provide a broad coverage of the genetics of disease, research skills and social aspects, whilst specialised streams in Inherited Diseases, Pharmacogenetics and Computational Genomics, in which students can qualify, and the research project allow more in-depth analysis in areas of genetics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits) and two specialist modules (30 credits) and a research project culminating in a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma consisting of six modules (four core modules in term one and two modules within the selected stream in term two) is offered, full-time nine months.

A Postgraduate Certificate consisting of four core modules in term one (60 credits) is offered, full-time three months.

Core modules

  • Advanced Human Genetics: Research Principles
  • Understanding Bioinformatics Resources and their Applications
  • Human Genetics: Core Skills
  • Basic Statistics for Medical Sciences

Specialist modules

In term two you will take specialist modules depending on the specialist stream you select: Inherited Disease (A); Pharmacogenetics (B); Computational Genomics (C). 

  • Applications in Human Genetics (A)
  • Either Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease or Genetics of Neurological Disease (A)
  • Clinical Applications of Pharmacogenetic Tests (B)
  • Anti-Cancer Personalised Medicine or Pharmacogenomics, adverse drug reactions and biomarkers (B)
  • Applications in Human Genetics (C)
  • Statistics for Interpreting Genetic Data (C)

Dissertation/report

Students undertake an original research project investigating topical questions in genetics and genetics of human disease which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 to 14,000 words and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of genetics of human diseases through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations and journal clubs. Taught modules are assessed by unseen written examination and/or, written reports, oral presentations and coursework. The research project is assessed by the dissertation and oral presentation. 

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the UCL Genetics Institute website.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Genetics of Human Disease MSc

Careers

Advanced training in genetic techniques including bioinformatic and statistical approaches positions graduates well for PhD studentships in laboratories using genetic techniques to examine diseases such as heart disease, cancer and neurological disorders. Another large group will seek research jobs in the pharmaceutical industry, or jobs related to genetics in healthcare organisations.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Laboratory Specialist, King Abdullah Medical Complex
  • Non-Clinical Research Associate, University of Oxford
  • Trainee Geneticist, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • PhD in Cardiovascular Science, UCL
  • Genomic Research Technician, Genome Centre

Employability

The MSc in Genetics of Human Disease facilitates acquisition of knowledge and skills relevant to a career in research in many different biomedical disciplines. About half of our graduates enter a research career by undertaking and completing PhDs and working as research associates/scientists in academia. Some of our graduates go on to jobs in the pharmaceutical industry, while others enter careers with clinical genetic diagnosis services, particularly in molecular genetics, in healthcare organisations and hospitals around the world. Those graduates with a prior medical training often utilise their new skills as clinical geneticists.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is in a unique position to offer both the basic science and application of modern genetics to improve human health. The programme is a cross-faculty initiative with teaching from across the School of Life and Medical Sciences (SLMS) at UCL.

Students will be based at the UCL Genetics Institute (UGI), a world-leading centre which develops and applies biostatistical and bioinformatic approaches to human and population genetics. Opportunities to conduct laboratory or computational-based research projects are available in the laboratories of world-leading geneticists affiliated to the UGI.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Biosciences

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Read more

The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Students are introduced to philosophical, legal and policy issues and encouraged to engage with them in a critical way.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of the central issues and problems in the formulation, defence, development, interpretation and application of human rights instruments, law, practice and policy. They gain knowledge of central disciplines and their contribution to human rights studies, and are equipped with key research skills in human rights.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • International Law and Human Rights (30)
  • Theoretical Foundations of Human Rights (15)
  • Human Rights: Politics and Practice (15)
  • Normative Methods, Legal Analysis and Research Skills (15)

Optional modules

Choose one of the following 15 credit methods modules:

  • Introduction to Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
  • Introduction to Quantitative Methods (15)
  • Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

Choose further modules up to a value of 30 credits in total from a list available at:

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/political-science/teaching/masters/ma-human-rights

The following are suggestions:

  • The Ethics of Poverty (15)
  • NGO, Non-Profit and Voluntary Sector Policy and Management (15)
  • Terrorism (15)
  • Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
  • Theories of International Relations (15)
  • Public Ethics (15)
  • Political Economy of Development (15)
  • Governing Divided Societies (15)
  • Foreign Policy Analysis (15)
  • Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
  • Rebellion (15)
  • Global Ethics (15)

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme has an integrated research and teaching approach, where key and cutting-edge areas are brought into the seminar room for discussion, and students are encouraged to carry out original research into these areas. Assessment is through essays, unseen examination, seminar presentations, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Human Rights MA

Careers

Graduates of the programme have secured employment in institutions and organisations including the UK Foreign Office, Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman UK, British Institute for Human Rights, the European Union, the Council of Europe, Amnesty International, ILGA, Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies. Some of our students are now human rights lawyers. Our students have also pursued PhDs and have become human rights academics.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Care Navigator, Age Concern UK
  • Communications and Campaigns Assistant, UNA (United Nations Association) UK
  • Consultant, COHRED (Council on Health Research for Development)
  • Legal Officer, Rights Watch (UK)
  • Advocacy Intern, Amnesty International

Employability

The Human Rights MA is a challenging, formative experience that provides the foundations for a variety of future careers in an impressive number of international, national, governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of human rights.

Students benefit from weekly seminars featuring distinguished external speakers, and regular high-profile events for policymakers and others. Each year the students have the opportunity to participate in a study trip to Geneva to visit the United Nations Human Rights Institutions and meet human rights practitioners.

The research preparation and tailor-made interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training students receive are of the highest standard available at one of the world's top universities, as reflected in UCL's performance in a range of rankings and tables.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Political Science

89% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons. Read more
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons.

Why study Social Research Methods at Dundee?

Social research methods are important not just to social scientists wishing to study a particular problem or to test a theory in a way that is be considered rigorous. They are also fundamental tools of value to government, service providers and to business. There are of course a diverse range of research methods available to social scientists.

The aims of the MSc/Diploma programme in Social Research Methods are:
To advance your knowledge and understanding of the nature of research in social science.
To enhance your skills in areas that will equip you as a social scientist for employment in a government, business or a public policy environment as well as in an academic context.

"I undertook the Social Research Methods MSc in 2009/2010. This was a really interesting course which not only helped me develop a range of research skills which have been extremely relevant and useful in my PhD, but also helped me to critically engage with broader issues of social justice. This sparked an interest in my current research field, and ultimately, has been invaluable in giving me a solid foundation for continuing onto an academic career. Beyond the academic knowledge however, this MSc also provides a useful set of practical and applicable skills which many employers value, such as in GIS and statistics"
Andrew Wooff, studied full-time 2009-10

Researcher, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Sheffield

Specialism in population and welfare

The MSc in Social Research Methods offers a specialism in population and welfare issues under the title MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare). This option is an accredited course for the ESRC Population Investigation Council funding. This specialism is particularly relevant for students interested in demographic and welfare issues.

What's so good about Social Research Methods at Dundee?

The staff teaching the MSc in Social Research Methods course have wide experience of both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and have deployed these skills not only to pursue frontline research in social science, but also as expert advisers to governments and as consultants to international organisations.

This course emphasises that it is important not only to understand how to use a particular research tool, but also to consider the wider meanings of how knowledge can be constructed in different ways and for diverse range of purposes. One particular feature of the course is the comprehensive and in-depth coverage of a variety of research methods including ethnographic and participatory tools; the analysis of large datasets plus GIS skills. The course seeks to encourage students to think critically not only about the methods they use, but also to reflect on the limitations of what is knowable from the evidence presented by others.

"As a part time student on the MSc Social Research Methods course, my experience was exceptionally inspiring. Coming from an arts background it was a real challenge, but one that allowed me to broaden my horizons and bring back to my day job teaching design in an art college an understanding of human geography and how it informs us of local and global social issues. My experience was invaluable in so many ways and staff were always very supportive"

Jackie Malcolm, studied part-time 2010-12
Lecturer in Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

There are core modules in:

Research Training
Social Theory
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Plus students choose one from:

Research in Practice (work placement)
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Population Vulnerability and Resilience

For students following the MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare) route, ‘Social Impacts on Population’ is a core module, and ‘Qualitative Methods in Social Research’ is an option module.

Students enrolled on the MSc programme also complete a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, practical classes, projects), examination and dissertation (for Masters students).

Careers

The course seeks to offer students a wide range of skills suitable for entry into careers as information officers and analysts, research assistants and geographical system experts working in a business or government environment.

Research by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that the demand for Social Science Masters students with quantitative research skills far outstrips supply. This degree programme course has strong emphasis in this area, but the optional modules allow you to tailor the course to your personal career ambitions.

Previous students from our other MSc programmes have gone on to work for local authority planning departments, the General Registrars Office Scotland (census office), GIS analysts for Tayside Police, ONS social analysis unit, and also as research assistants within the University sector.

"The course allowed me to develop on an academic and personal level through its range of critical thinking and skill based modules. I appreciated the broad themes set out by lecturers as it provided an opportunity to integrate my own research interests into class assignments and discussions, enhancing the individual relevancy it had for my classmates and I. Since completing the course in September 2012, I have started working towards a PhD in the Geography department at Dundee, incorporating many of the attributes that I learned at MSc level. The training, support and enthusiasm offered on the course gave me the confidence to undertake fieldwork overseas and inspired me to pursue a future career in academia"

Jade Catterson, studied full-time 2011-12
ESRC-funded PhD student, University of Dundee

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