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Masters Degrees (Human Origins)

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Explore what it means to be human. If you’re interested in what it means to be human, where we came from and how humans developed and adapted, the MA/MSc in Early Prehistory is for you. Read more
Explore what it means to be human

Why choose this course?

If you’re interested in what it means to be human, where we came from and how humans developed and adapted, the MA/MSc in Early Prehistory is for you. You will work alongside the UK’s foremost academics in early prehistory to delve into the origins of humanity and explore the evolution of cultures, customs, religions, art and technology. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular interests.

The archaeology of human origins is a fascinating and dynamic area of research, with new evidence and theories constantly changing our interpretation of who we are. The work of staff and researchers on this course regularly gains media attention, with recent studies of Neanderthal children and the origins of compassion attracting widespread coverage.
-Explore the archaeology and approaches to human origins
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in early prehistoric archaeology and human evolution
-Work on pioneering studies with the potential for significant media exposure
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of museum collections at the York Museum
-Visit Upper Palaeolithic rock art on a field trip to Creswell Crags
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course addresses fascinating questions such as: what makes us ‘human’? How did early human societies work? How different were Neanderthals from ourselves and why did they die out? What was life like in the Ice Age? We debate these questions and many others within a lively research environment as you build up your knowledge and experience of early prehistoric societies from three million to 5,000 years ago.

Who is it for?
This course is designed for anyone with an interest in human origins, human evolution and what defines us as a species. Most students taking the course have a degree in archaeology or a related subject. However, people with relevant experience or a passionate interest in the subject may also be admitted to the course.

What can it lead to?
This course does not lead directly to a specific vocation, but offers a broad range of essential skills and expertise, specialist knowledge and insight, which are relevant to a wide variety of careers or further study. Many of our students go on to pursue research at PhD level while others have taken up careers in heritage, conservation, the archaeology sector and academia.

Careers

By the end of your MA/MSc in Early Prehistory you will:
-Have developed an awareness of the scope of Early Prehistory and knowledge of key early prehistoric societies
-Be able to identify key transitions in human evolution
-Be aware of the issues of interpreting archaeological evidence for early prehistoric societies
-Have developed a critical understanding of the key debates in the period
-Have developed your ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner through writing essays and producing projects
-Have undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within early prehistory
-Have developed your presentational skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse themes

The skills, knowledge and insights gained on the course can provide a launchpad for a wide range of archaeological and heritage careers, as well as further study and research.

Course postgraduates have gone on to take up research degrees, academic posts and careers with prominent heritage, conservation and archaeological organisations.

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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Subject to validation. Summary. Read more

Subject to validation

Summary

The MSc Archaeology with specialist pathways in Bioarchaeology, Palaeoanthropology and Higher Archaeological Practicehas a strongly vocational emphasis, addressing skills shortages and preparing students for work in the booming archaeological and heritage sector, as well as subsequent PhD research. Students will engage with hands-on, real-world archaeological materials and situations, including opportunities to collaborate with a range of stakeholders and partners in the archaeological sector through a professional placement.

Students can choose to focus on the development of skills and specialisms in one of the pathways – Bioarchaeology, Paleoanthropology or Higher Archaeological Practice - or alternatively can acquire a broad range of skills across these specialisms. Programme content will vary depending on the specialism that students follow. Each specialism is consolidated by means of compulsory modules that offer firm foundations in a student’s chosen area. This is complemented by diverse optional modules that provide the flexibility to build a bespoke skill-set appropriate to a student’s chosen career path. Engagement with partners in the commercial sector will allow students to experience a range of approaches to archaeological practice and their articulation with research-based approaches.

The programme is embedded within Southampton Archaeology’s distinctive research culture, with world-class expertise, diverse practice, and contacts with the commercial environment and the heritage sector.

Modules

Compulsory modules:

  • MSc Archaeology (Bioarchaeology): Analysis of Archaeological Faunal Remains, Bioarchaeology of Human Remains.
  • MSc Archaeology (Higher Archaeological Practice): Professional Practice, Professional Placement in the Archaeological and Heritage Sector.
  • MSc Archaeology (Paleoanthropology): Contexts for Human Origins Research, The Analysis and Interpretation of Palaeolithic Stone Tools.

Typical optional modules for specialist pathways (indicative–list):

  • MSc Archaeology (Bioarchaeology): Osteoarchaeology and Paleopathology in Context, Themes in Bioarchaeology, Molecular Archaeology, Contexts for Human Origins Research, Ecology of Human Evolution, Digital Imaging Methods for Archaeologists, Professional Practice, Professional Placement in the Archaeological and Heritage Sector.
  • MSc Archaeology (Higher Archaeological Practice): Cultural Heritage Within Environmental Impact Assessment, The Analysis and Interpretation of Palaeolithic Stone Tools, Archaeological Ceramics and Stone, Analysis of Archaeological Faunal Remains, Bioarchaeology of Human Remains, Applied Maritime Archaeology, Terrestrial Survey, GIS for Archaeology, Maritime Museums and Heritage Management.
  • MSc Archaeology (Paleoanthropology): Ecology of Human Evolution, Analysis of Archaeological Faunal Remains, Bioarchaeology of Human Remains, Osteoarchaeology and Paleopathology in Context, Materials Technology and Social Life. Molecular Archaeology, Professional Practice, Professiona Placement in the Archaeological and Heritage Sector.

For more information visit the University of Southampton website



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Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Read more

Philosophy, science and religion are three endeavours that shape in far-reaching and fundamental ways how we think, what we value, and how we live. Public discourse, professional life, politics and culture revolve around the philosophical, scientific and religious ideas of our age; yet they and their relationship to each other are not well understood.

This programme brings together in an authentically interdisciplinary way leaders in the fields of philosophy, science and theology, based both in Edinburgh and across the world.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Students will develop logical acumen and analytical skills, and the ability to express themselves clearly in writing and in conversation with diverse groups of students from around the world. As well as being a leading research institution in philosophy, theology and the sciences, Edinburgh has lead the way in providing high quality, bespoke and intensive online learning at postgraduate level.

The innovative online format of the programme and the flexibility of study it offers make it accessible to those with family or professional commitments, or who live far from Edinburgh.

This MSc/PGDipl/PGCert in Philosophy, Science and Religion is designed to give you a rigorous grounding in contemporary work in the intersection of philosophy, science and religion.

The programme follows an integrated approach with leading researchers in philosophy, the sciences and theology proving teaching on, respectively, the philosophical, scientific and theological dimensions of the programme.

Students will be brought up to date with the relevant scientific developments – including quantum mechanics, relativity, cosmology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and human origins – the relevant theological issues – including the problem of evil, miracles, theological conceptions of creation, theological conceptions of providence, and eschatology – and the philosophical tools in philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language required to understand the relationship between them.

Online learning

This is an online only programme that will be taught through a combination of short video lectures, web discussion boards, video conferencing and online exercises.

You will have regular access both to faculty and dedicated teaching assistants, including one-to-one interactions. You will also interact with other students on the programme as part of a dedicated virtual learning environment.

Programme structure

You will take options from a wide range of courses offered by the Department of Philosophy and the School of Divinity both jointly and individually, and will be required to write a dissertation.

All students will be required to take two core courses: Philosophy, Science and Religion 1: The Physical World; and Philosophy, Science and Religion 2: Life and Mind.

Courses will include online lectures, tutorials, quizzes, discussion sessions and personal tutor contact.

At the dissertation stage, you will be assigned a supervisor with whom you will meet, through video conferencing, to plan and discuss your research and writing.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Philosophy, Science and Religion aims to develop students to:

  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the key areas in the current science-religion interface—including cosmology, evolution, and the psychology—and will be able to engage with them philosophically.
  • Demonstrate strong analytical skills and philosophical acumen in approaching debates between science and theology.
  • Engage critically with key textual sources in the field.
  • Engage constructively in cross-disciplinary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an openness to personal growth through a commitment to dialogue across intellectual and spiritual boundaries.

Career opportunities

This course is designed to prepare you for doctoral work in relevant areas of philosophy and/or theology.

However, the skills of analytical but creative thinking, clear writing, and the abilities to manage projects that require significant research and to engage in constructive conversations across disciplinary and cultural boundaries, are all highly sought after by employers in a diverse range of fields.



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Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology. Read more
Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology.

You gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the origins and functions of human behaviour and can select from a range of advanced topics such as evolutionary anthropology, primatology, human behaviour, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and intergroup relationships.

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad fields and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication-ready journal article. The MSc in Evolution and Human Behaviour is a perfect foundation for PhD research: it provides theoretical background, discipline specific knowledge and advanced, quantitative research methods.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/190/evolution-and-human-behaviour

Why study with us?

- A unique, interdisciplinary, combination of Evolutionary Anthropology and Psychology.

- Taught by expert, active researchers in evolutionary approaches to understanding behaviour.

- Select from a range of advanced topics such as Evolutionary Anthropology, Primatology, Human Behaviour, Developmental Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience.

- Perfect foundation for future PhD research: theoretical background, discipline-specific knowledge and advanced research methods.

- For students with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology or a related discipline.

- A research component that results in a publication-ready journal article.

Course structure

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad field and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication ready journal article.

Modules

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

SE992 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (15 credits)
SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SE993 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (15 credits)
SE994 - Advanced Topics in HUman Behaviour (15 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP856 - Groups and Teams in Organisations (15 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)
SE855 - Research Project (Evolution & Human Behaviour) (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by computing tests, unseen examinations, coursework and a project report.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for advanced study of human behaviour from an evolutionary perspective, combining approaches from both evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary psychology

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as an evolutionary scientist

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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What does it mean to be human? What are the origins of our species? Archaeological and palaeontological discoveries help us answer these fundamental questions and provide insights into human cognition, behaviour and life ways. Read more
What does it mean to be human? What are the origins of our species? Archaeological and palaeontological discoveries help us answer these fundamental questions and provide insights into human cognition, behaviour and life ways.

On this course you'll study human evolution by evaluating the ultimate source of information – the fossil record.

We'll teach you to think critically and train you in the analytical techniques required to describe and interpret the fossil evidence for early hominid and human evolution.

Our approach is both science- and humanities-based. You'll explore themes such as the evolution of bipedalism, cognition and the origins of modernity, providing you with a unique combination of biological anthropology, human and comparative anatomy, primatology and hominid palaeontology.

The course also offers an introduction to the use of innovative technologies for 2D and 3D imaging of skeletal and fossil materials in palaeoanthropological research. It's designed to appeal to those who want to create a strong platform for doctoral research in palaeoanthropology, as well as those who just want to deepen their understanding of our extinct ancestors.

You'll get unlimited access to excellent lab facilities and extensive collections of skeletons and replica casts of modern humans, primates and fossil hominins. A wide range of up-to-date resources are available in the department's palaeoanthropology and osteology teaching laboratories.

Core modules

The programme offers a range of closely integrated core modules in human anatomy and comparative osteology which enable you to develop your knowledge and understanding of the palaeoanthropological record.

Human Evolution: Theory & Practice in Research
Quantitative methods in anthropology and archaeology
Research design: planning, execution and presentation
Human anatomy
Human osteology
Evolutionary anatomy
Dissertation in Palaeoanthropology
Optional modules

Optional modules are available in philosophy, linguistics and other topics. Examples include:

Archaeobotany
Archaeozoology

If you study part-time, you'll take two 15-credit modules in each semester during Year 1 and Year 2, and either a dissertation or placement module over the summer of Year 2. We arrange for you to attend two days a week but we try to be as flexible as possible.

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Programme description. Joining our world-leading Language Evolution and Computation (LEC) research unit, you will investigate the origins and evolution of human language, tackling questions such as ‘what is it that makes us human?’, ‘how did our brains evolve?’ and ‘what are the origins of human language?’. Read more

Programme description

Joining our world-leading Language Evolution and Computation (LEC) research unit, you will investigate the origins and evolution of human language, tackling questions such as ‘what is it that makes us human?’, ‘how did our brains evolve?’ and ‘what are the origins of human language?’.

The LEC is at the cutting edge of research in this area and one of the world’s biggest research groups working on language evolution. You will have the opportunity to become involved with the unit’s research effort, and to make your own contribution to this dynamic field through your dissertation.

The programme focuses on a treatment of language as a dynamic evolving system, bringing together origins, acquisition and change.

It provides a broad introduction to the field of language evolution and cognitive evolution, and can form the basis for further (typically PhD) study for those wishing to continue their research.

The programme draws on many disciplines in the University, including archaeology, biology, linguistics, neuroscience, informatics, philosophy and psychology.

Programme structure

The programme involves two taught semesters and your own research dissertation. Four compulsory courses (in addition to the compulsory dissertation) provide a solid foundation, while optional courses allow you to explore your own areas of interest.

The taught element is delivered through a mix of lectures, tutorials, seminars and practical sessions. Assessment is by written/project work and examination.

Compulsory courses:

  • Current Issues in Language Evolution
  • Foundations of Evolution
  • Origins and Evolution of Language
  • Simulating Language

Option courses may include:

  • Brains and Cognition
  • Computer Programming for Speech and Language Processing
  • Concepts and Categorisation
  • Diachronic Linguistics
  • Dialogue
  • Experimental Pragmatics
  • First Language Acquisition
  • Human Evolution
  • Introduction to Phonology and Phonetics
  • Introduction to Sociolinguistics
  • Introduction to Statistics and Experimental Design
  • Introduction to Syntax
  • Language Behaviours
  • Linguistic Reconstruction and Language Classification
  • Pragmatics
  • Psycholinguistics
  • Psychology of Language Learning
  • Univariate Statistics and Methodology using R

You may also be able to take a course from other degree programmes in the School of Philosophy, Psychology & Language Sciences, and in some cases from elsewhere in the University.

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, you will have gained:

  • a comprehensive synthesis of the most recent scientific findings relating to the origins and evolution of human language
  • a firm basis for subsequent advanced specialised research
  • a broad awareness of issues and findings in the evolution of language and cognitive evolution across participating single-subject disciplines

Career opportunities

This programme provides solid grounding for further research in many associated areas, such as linguistics, cognitive sciences and human evolution.



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Biological Anthropology is the study of evolution and variation in human populations and of the interactions between human biology and environment. Read more
Biological Anthropology is the study of evolution and variation in human populations and of the interactions between human biology and environment. This combines our international reputation for anthropology, archaeology and biology, specifically including studies in primatology, evolutionary anthropology, human osteology, zooarchaeology, but also (paeleo-) ecology and behaviour.

This exciting course gives a core grounding in human evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, the origins of human behaviour and how hominines adapted to their environment, as well as human and animal skeletal analysis. Ultimately this course offers a uniquely wide range of suitable project topics that can prepare you for a career in a variety of aligned fields.

Core units:

Human Evolution
Human Functional Anatomy
Primate Behaviour & Ecology
Principles & Methods in Zooarchaeology
Research Project

Optional units (choose one of):
Principles & Methods in Human Osteology
Techniques of Archaeological Recovery & Recording

And one of:
Archaeology of Human Remains
Bodies of Evidence - Skeletal Changes Before & After Death
Humans, Animals & Diet

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Oxford Brookes is one of very few UK universities where social and biological anthropology are taught alongside each other. This course emphasises the holistic and comparative breadth of anthropology - studying humans from a variety of social, cultural, biological and evolutionary perspectives. Read more
Oxford Brookes is one of very few UK universities where social and biological anthropology are taught alongside each other.

This course emphasises the holistic and comparative breadth of anthropology - studying humans from a variety of social, cultural, biological and evolutionary perspectives.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/anthropology/

Why choose this course?

- We are one of the few universities in the UK to teach social and biological anthropology side by side

- You get opportunities to work alongside leading, research-active academics such as Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Jeremy McClancy and Professor Kate Hill.

- There are excellent learning resources, both at Oxford Brookes and at Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, the Pitt Rivers Museum and the Museum of Natural History

- We have a dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world-leading research

- The course flexibility in module choices enables students to follow their particular interests

- There is the option to join MSc students on a field trip to Apenhuel Primate Park in the Netherlands

- The Graduate Diploma in Anthropology enables graduates from other disciplines, and those with equivalent qualifications or work experience, to gain a qualification in anthropology at advanced undergraduate level.

Teaching and learning

We provide a broad range of learning experiences, including independent study, work in small groups, seminars and lectures.

We also use a wide range of assessment techniques, including essays, book reviews, class presentations, fieldwork reports and exams.

Field trips

You will be offered the opportunity to join MSc students on their annual trip to Apenhuel Primate Park in the Netherlands. The 3-day trip costs between £105 and £115, depending on numbers.

Careers

Many students choose the graduate diploma as a route to further study, continuing their education at master's and PhD level. However, anthropology graduates go on to a variety of careers including overseas development aid, environmental maintenance, education, eco-tourism, urban planning and the civil service.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Professor Anna Nekaris has been awarded a prestigious Leverhulme Trust grant of over £200k to undertake research in to why and how the seemingly cute and cuddly slow loris is the only primate to produce a biological venom. Understanding the nature of slow loris venom should also have implications for the conservation of this seriously threatened primate, a popular but illegal pet that is widely traded on the black market.

An international team of scientists, including Professor Adrian Parker, have revealed that humans left Africa at least 50,000 years earlier than previously suggested and were, in fact, present in eastern Arabia as early as 125,000 years ago. The new study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about man’s origins and how we became a global species.

Professor Jeremy MacClancy's latest book Centralizing Fieldwork, critical perspectives in primatology, biological and social anthropology, was co-edited with Augustin Fuentes of Notre Dame University and is published by Berghahn.

Research areas and clusters

Research can be undertaken in the following areas:
- Anthropology of Art
- Anthropology of Food
- Anthropology of Work, and Play
- Anthropology of Gender
- Social Anthropology of Japan, South Asia and Europe
- Social Anthropology of Family, Class and Gender in Urban South Asia
- Basque studies
- Culture and landscapes
- Environmental archaeology and palaeo-anthropology
- Environmental anthropology
- Environmental reconstruction
- Human origins
- Human resource ecology
- Human–wildlife interaction and conservation
- Physical environmental processes and management
- Primate conservation
- Primatology
- Quaternary environmental change
- Urban and environmental studies.

Research centres:
- Europe Japan Research Centre
- Anthropology Centre for Conservation, Environment and Development.

Consultancy:
- Oxford Brookes Archaeology and Heritage (OBAH).

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The MSc in Palaeoanthropology provides an up-to-date foundation in the study of human evolution for people interested in human origins. Read more
The MSc in Palaeoanthropology provides an up-to-date foundation in the study of human evolution for people interested in human origins.

The programme's especially suitable for graduates with a first degree in Archaeology, Anthropology, Earth or Life Sciences. You'll be able to tailor your studies to reflect you interests, by choosing from a diverse array of subjects such as:-

the archaeology of early hominin sites
African archaeology
hominid palaeontology
evolutionary theory
primate evolution
science-based techniques in palaeoanthropological investigation.
You'll complete your programme with a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words on an aspect of human evolution.

We aim to be flexible, supportive, encouraging and challenging in our approach to students. For example, if you're new to a topic you're very welcome to attend lectures offered in Year Three modules of the undergraduate programme in Evolutionary Anthropology.

Why Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology?

Academic expertise

Archaeology, Classics and Eygyptology has 39 full-time academic staff, who are all actively engaged in research ranging from early prehistory through to late antiquity.

Here are some of our particularly strong areas:-

- African archaeology
- ancient languages
- archaeology of the Mediterranean and the Near East
- archaeological science
- Egyptology
- European prehistory
- Greek and Roman history and culture.

Fieldwork is an important part of research in archaeology and we've projects based internationally, in Egypt, Greece, Bulgaria, Jordan, Turkey, Italy, Zambia and South Africa, as well as in the British Isles.

Taught masters programmes

We offer a unique breadth of taught masters degrees in Ancient History, Archaeology (MA or MSc), Human Evolution, Classics and Egyptology.

You can configure a wide choice of modules to suit your interests and requirements and there are opportunities to learn different approaches and techniques, as well as ancient languages such as Greek, Latin, Akkadian, Sumerian, Egyptian and Coptic.

All of our masters degrees provide intensive training to prepare you for doctoral research and employment.

Excellent resources

The Ancient World and Archaeology has been studied at Liverpool since the 1880s, so we've had plenty of time to build up an enviable library and a fantastic museum.

The Garstang Museum, which is in the ACE building, has outstanding archaeological collections, along with extensive laboratory facilities for conservation, lithics, geomagnetism, stable isotope, trace elements, finds processing and sample preparation.

We also have a GIS suite with facilities for archaeological drawing and offer 24-hour access for taught students to a dedicated Student Resource Centre, complete with PCs, personal lockers, desk space, wi-fi and a networked printer.

Career prospects

Our Masters programmes are designed to equip students with a wide range of transferable skills, with an emphasis on the development of both research and practical analytical skills. They equip students for further study at Postgraduate level (MPhil/PhD) and meet the training requirements of the AHRC and NERC. Research students have not only continued their studies at postdoctoral level, but also embarked on specialised long-term careers in lecturing, museum work and the heritage industry. Our degrees are a good investment in your future. Whichever direction you choose after graduation, potential employers (both nationally and internationally) appreciate the breadth of view, analytical skills and intellectual rigour that you gain by studying civilizations and periods so different from our own.

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This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. Read more
This programme is for students who are passionate about early life, dinosaurs, mass extinctions, macroevolution, fossil preservation and understanding the palaeobiology of extinct organisms. It examines quantitative aspects of the fossil record and the history of life. The research-oriented MSc bridges the biology-geology divide and will provide you with a strong background for independent research to PhD level or for a career in museums, libraries, management or the media.

This interdisciplinary programme is taught mainly in the School of Earth Sciences, along with some archaeology and biology units. You will engage in current debates in evolutionary biology, systematics and palaeobiology.

You will learn how to analyse problems quantitatively, and design experimental approaches to resolving questions in macroevolution and in the study of ancient organisms. First-hand training in research methods in palaeobiology involves laboratory techniques. In addition, you will learn a range of advanced skills throughout the programme, such as computer software use, numeracy, planning research, problem-solving and communication skills. You will learn multimedia techniques, including presentation of palaeontological data through talks, posters and formal written reports. A key aspect of the programme is preparing your projects for publication, and we provide continuing support to ensure as many projects as possible are published in leading international journals.

Programme structure

The first half of the programme consists of lectures, practical classes, tutorials and visiting speakers, designed to provide a firm foundation in the theory and methodology of the subject.

The programme comprises five core units which all students take, and a number of optional units of which students choose four. We recommend that biologists take some of the more geologically-orientated optional units, and that geologists take some of the biological optional units.

Core units
-Current Controversies in Palaeobiology and Macroevolution
-Scientific Communication
-Phylogenetic Methods in Palaeobiology
-Literature Review
-Research Methods in Palaeobiology

Optional units
-Biomechanics and Functional Morphology
-The Cambrian Explosion: the origin of animal body plans
-Early Human Origins
-Evolutionary Biology*
-Evolution of the Biosphere
-Geology for Research Palaeobiologists**
-Micropalaeontology
-Tree of Life
-Vertebrate Palaeobiology and Evolution

*Mandatory for non-biologists
**Mandatory for non-geologists

Careers

The degree is research-based, and about half the graduates go on to academic careers, usually starting with a PhD. The MSc is focused on methods, and you will learn the latest techniques in phylogenetics, biomechanics, and macroevolution training, which is highly sought after by PhD supervisors across the world.

The training in professional skills, including writing scientific papers, is also highly regarded. Some students have used the MSc as a means to go on to careers in museums, the media and education and now hold senior positions as curators and collection managers in national and regional museums. Graduates also work in making scientific documentaries, or are involved in science education at all levels.

Finally, some graduates have gone into commercial work in marketing, the oil industry and computing, where their practical skills in palaeobiology and communication have proved invaluable.

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The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies. Read more
The Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology MSc, run jointly by the Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology, brings together the expertise of the two departments to provide graduate students with an integrated training in the biological and archaeological aspects of human evolutionary studies.

Degree information

Students gain training in research methods and a scientific grounding in the principles, content and practice of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology, including: fossil and archaeological evidence of human evolution; temporal and spatial patterns and processes of evolutionary and environmental change; and the evolutionary background for understanding human adaptation and culture.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits) four optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Themes in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology

Optional modules - students will be encouraged to select options from the following list up to the value of 60 credits. Alternatively, they may choose from the wider range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology or the Department of Anthropology.
-Advanced Human Evolution
-Archaeology of Early Human Origins
-Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers from the Emergence of Modern Humans
-Evolution of Human Brain and Behaviour
-Geoarchaeology
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis
-Palaeoanthropology
-Primate Evolution
-Primate Socioecology
-Zooarchaeology in Practice

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, discussions, seminars, laboratory practicals and student presentations. Assessment is through essays, practical examination and seminar presentations, (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

A significant number of the graduate students from this programme have gone on to take PhDs at UCL, elsewhere in the UK and in other countries. A number of those have been awarded prestigious scholarships to cover their costs. Other graduates have gone on to work in cultural resource management and museums, and others have used their skills to pursue careers in fields such as teaching and business.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Archaeologist, George Washington Foundation
-DPhil in Archaeology, The University of Oxford
-Senior scientist: archaeology, Tetra Tech
-Research Technician, Research Department Forensic Science.
-PhD Anthropology and Archaeology, Stockholms Universitet (Stockholm University)

Employability
The skills which students develop include the critical evaluation of scholarship across the discipline, design and management of personal research, primary data collection and analysis, and the preparation of detailed reports/dissertations up to publication standard. Although these will relate to anthropology and archaeology, they are invaluable skills for other areas of employment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology and UCL Anthropology have considerable staff expertise in the fields of palaeoanthropology and palaeolithic archaeology. Staff and research students are currently involved in field projects as well as museum-based studies in Britain, various parts of Europe, the Middle East, and eastern and southern Africa.

Our excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) show that our two departments are both very highly ranked in the UK.

Situated in central London, the university is within easy access of the British Museum and Natural History Museum and their outstanding palaeontological and archaeological collections.

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This programme is taught by experts and specialists in fields such as European, Mediterranean, science-based, and theoretical archaeology. Read more

This programme is taught by experts and specialists in fields such as European, Mediterranean, science-based, and theoretical archaeology. It offers a range of courses from human origins to ancient civilisations and allows you to tailor your studies to suit your interests and take advantage of the experience of our staff, and those in related programmes in history, classics and geography.

You will develop an in-depth understanding of archaeology and its links with the historical, social and natural sciences, as well as the practice of archaeology within and outside an academic setting, incorporating skills and training. The programme prepares you for a professional role in archaeology or further study at doctoral level. We have excellent facilities: dedicated study space, archaeological and computing laboratories, and teaching and reference collections.

Edinburgh is ideal for archaeological study and research, allowing you to benefit from the presence of national and local institutions and heritage agencies, such as the excellent archaeological collections of the National Museum, the archival and bibliographic resources of Historic Environment Scotland, and the expertise and practical advice of staff in several commercial archaeology companies.

Programme structure

Our wide-ranging programme encompasses theory, methodology and practice. You will undertake a varied schedule of learning, including lectures, seminars, practicals, and individual supervisions. We help you to develop your research interests and choose a suitable dissertation topic.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Frontiers in Archaeology
  • Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology
  • Theoretical Archaeology

You’ll complete three additional courses, chosen from a list of subjects ranging from late hunter-gatherers and early farmers, later European prehistory and the archaeology of Scotland to Byzantine and Roman archaeology, osteoarchaeology, and archaeological illustration and GIS.

Learning outcomes

You will acquire:

  • a good understanding of the distinctive nature of archaeology and its contribution to a critical and informed understanding of the past
  • a good understanding of theoretical and methodological debates within archaeology
  • familiarity with a number of important fieldwork studies
  • a broad knowledge of archaeological methods, techniques and practices in current use

The programme will help you to develop potential research interests and to explore these with a view to progressing to further research. You will also acquire a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills.

Career opportunities

Archaeology graduates can follow a variety of career options. The programme equips you to go on to advanced study, and also provides a solid foundation for a career. You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts.

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, environmental assessment, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police. An archaeology degree does not restrict you to a career in archaeology.



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The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research. Read more

The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research.

Choose Archaeology at Leiden University:

Our research master's programme offers interesting regional and thematic specialisation possibilities. It stimulates extra-talented and motivated students by exposing them to cutting edge research and making them part of it.

The programme helps you to find your own place in the wide world of archaeological careers, and equips you with all the 21st century professional and transferable skills you need.

Our research facilities and labs, field schools and excavation projects, experimental archaeology projects and the national research schools (ARCHON, OIKOS) offer excellent opportunities for every prospective researcher.

Research possibilities in 2018-2019:

Human Origins

Australopithecus africanus, one of our many ancestors

Interdisciplinary studies of the human past

This programme provides an in-depth interdisciplinary introduction in the European Palaeolithic record and its wider setting, from the Early Pleistocene to the Late Pleistocene.

  • Study the archaeology of Prehistoric hunter-gatherers, from the earliest stone tools in East Africa, 2.6 million years old, to the end of the last ice age.
  • Focus on Neanderthal behaviour, and explore research questions, methods of analysis and theoretical perspectives in Palaeolithic archaeology.

Prehistoric Farming Communities

A view of past communities

The programme aims to develop a detailed and coherent view of past communities.

  • Focus on the later prehistory of Europe, especially on communities bordering the North Sea (Scandinavia, the Low Countries, France, Great Britain and Ireland).
  • Explore research topics such as Beaker cultures and settlements of the Bronze and Iron Ages, cultural identity, and burial ritual and (selective) deposition.

Town and Country in the Mediterranean Region and the Near East

The cradle of civilisation

This programme focuses on a region that has enormous culture-historical significance, and is a cradle of civilisation from Prehistory up to the Early Medieval period.

  • Study various key developments, such as the origins of farming and sedentary life, as well as the emergence of complex urbanised societies and writing, as they occurred first in this region and spread subsequently.
  • Participate in current research projects. These projects focus on the Near East (modern Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and Turkey) and Egypt, as well as the Mediterranean.

Religion and Society in Native American Cultures

Leiden Archaeology researchers used high-tech imaging to reveal rare precolonial Mexican manuscript hidden from view for 500 years

Study the past in connection to the present

The programme offers an interdisciplinary context, where archaeology, anthropology, sciences, history, linguistics, landscape and heritage studies come together.

  • Gain a broad knowledge of and deep insight into Native American cultural history, focusing on the relationships between religious worldview and social agency.
  • Participate in field schools related to long-term research projects, such as excavations in the Caribbean or Nicaragua,including studies of material culture and physical anthropology.

Bioarchaeology

Fragments of a sabre-toothed cat skull where recenty excavated

Combine archaeology with hard science

Discover our four research disciplines, together covering an extensive geographical area and time range.

  • Opt for Archaeobotany and investigate changes in vegetation and environment during the past 2.6 million years, as well as the taphonomy of plant macrofossils in lacustrine and fluvial depositional settings.
  • Focus on Archaeo/Palaeozoology and dive into Eurasia in the period from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene. Biostratigraphical studies, palaeo-ecological studies, as well as taphonomical studies are carried out.
  • Study Human Osteoarchaeology and analyse human remains from international archaeology contexts as well as behavioural and social facets of mortuary practices in past societies.
  • Explore Isope Archaeology and work on the analysis and interpretation of stable isotopes of human and faunal remains from archaeological contexts. Learn how to carry out dating projects, including radiocarbon dating as well as other dating methods.

Archaeological Heritage in a Globalising World

A new and exciting interdisciplinary approach

The programme focuses on the role of the past in the present. Explore the various aspects of recent developments in international politics, cultural tourism, the use of social media, and the revitalisation of local traditions and regional identities.

  • Develop the practical skills to translate academic research and social knowledge into strategies for heritage management, and pursue individual initiatives.
  • Benefit from our close association with the Center for Global Heritage and Development, an interdisciplinary cooperation between three high-ranking universities: Leiden University, Erasmus University Rotterdam and Delft Technical University. This allows for a partnership between archaeology, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences.

The Transformation of the Roman World

Europe on the starting blocks

This programme offers an introduction to advanced studies of Europe and the Mediterranean in Late Roman and Post-Roman times (c. 300-900 AD).

  • Analyse the economic recovery of North-Western Europe in Merovingian and Carolingian times, exchange networks in the Mediterranean, and agrarian innovation and water management in Jordan.
  • Study burial sites, the fate of Roman towns in the early Middle Ages, and centres of Christianity.

Master of Arts or Master of Science

Students who choose the Bioarchaeology track receive a Master of Science degree in Archaeology. For the other research tracks you receive a Master of Arts degree in Archaeology.



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-Graduates from this programme may seek careers in emergency planning, disaster response, and crisis communication amongst other pathways. Read more
-Graduates from this programme may seek careers in emergency planning, disaster response, and crisis communication amongst other pathways.
-You will have the opportunity to undertake an optional study visit to Sri Lanka. Costs relating to this can be found in the Fees tab.
-You can apply for a two week optional placement, see the Features tab for more details

Introduction

The MSc Crisis and Disaster Management programme aims to develop a better understanding of approaches to crisis, risk and disaster and the impact that such events may have on businesses, communities and nations. In particular, the programme addresses the issues of interruption to business and the need for preparedness, response and recovery strategies to minimise both economic and human losses arising from crises and disasters of both natural and human origins.

There is an increasing global demand for businesses, communities and nations to increase their resilience to potential crises and disasters, particularly through using the principles of crisis and disaster management, disaster preparedness, response and recovery planning. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners gives you the opportunity to develop practical knowledge and insight about the processes and procedures associated with crisis and disaster management.

You will learn to differentiate between the various phases of crisis and disaster management and be encouraged to critically reflect and appraise alternative approaches to managing crises and disasters. The programme also aims to develop your knowledge and skills in risks appraisal, operations management, and crisis communication. You will have the opportunity to learn how to identify and address conflict and vulnerability within organisations and disaster zones and how to address these effectively.

How You Study

The Crisis and Disaster Management MSc covers both topics from both a theoretical and professional perspective. The programme consists of modules in (1) business and management, (2) project and operations management, and (3) crisis and disaster management. Approaches to crisis and disaster management are taught through case studies from a broad range of sectors.

The taught element of the programme consists of seven core modules and one optional module.

The core modules are:
-Disaster management
-Crisis communication
-Humanitarian logistics
-Project planning and management
-Decision analysis for managers
-Finance and accounting
-Teams and leadership

The following is an illustrative list of options. Optional modules will run as far as at least 10 students select them. Timetabling arrangements may limit the availability of modules to some students. As the options reflect staff's research interests, they may alter over time due to staff availability.
-Global supply strategies
-Social entrepreneurship
-Trade and development
-Analysing fiction

Students can choose one of the following independent study elements:
-Dissertation
-Consultancy project
-Start-up venture

Each module typically consists of two or three weekly teaching hours over a teaching term of 12 weeks. You will normally study four modules per semester and therefore 8-12 hours per week.

Postgraduate level study involves a significant proportion of independent study exploring the material covered in lectures and seminars. As a general guide, for every hour in class students are expected to spend two - three hours in independent study.

If you are planning to study the degree on a part time basis, you will be studying two modules per term with 4-6 hours of contact time on a weekly basis.

How You Are Assessed

A variety of assessment methods are utilised during this course, including essays, examinations, oral presentations and simulation games. These assessments are designed to develop skills that will be useful for your career.

Essays involve written assignments where you structure and develop arguments based on research and critical analysis of alternative perspectives and courses of action.

Examinations test and develop your ability to think on your feet and provide logical and well-formed arguments under time pressure.
Oral presentations help you to demonstrate and develop communication and influencing skills that are highly valued in business and management roles.

Finally, simulation games provide you with the opportunity to see the results of decisions you make relating to allocating financial, human and other resources.

The University of Lincoln's policy on assessment feedback aims to ensure that academics will return in-course assessments to you promptly – usually within 15 working days after the submission date.

Modules

-Comparative Human Resource Management (Option)
-Crisis Communications
-Decision Analysis for Managers
-Disaster Management
-Finance and accounting
-Humanitarian Logistics
-Project Planning and Management
-Research Design and Methods
-Teams and Leadership

Special Features

The Lincoln International Business School has an experienced team of staff, which is made up of academically and professionally qualified lecturers with relevant industrial experience and finance experts with wide research interests.

The School hosts a series of visiting speakers each year. As part of the School, you will have the opportunity to learn from industry experts. Previous speakers have included representatives from organisations such as Deloitte, Santander, HSBC, Innocent, The Institute of Internal Auditors and Sir David Tweedie (ex-Chairman of the IASB).

You will also have the chance to build your skills and knowledge further with extra-curricular activities such as joining a society, volunteering or becoming a Student Ambassador.

Placements

Students can apply for a two week optional placement that takes place between the first and second semester or during the Summer. The placement is an opportunity to gain work experience from a UK-based employer and build a CV towards a career in your area of interest.

Placements will be sourced by the School and will be based within the local area of Lincoln. Students who undertake an optional two week placement will be required to cover their own travel costs.

Facilities

The Lincoln International Business School is based in the David Chiddick building alongside Lincoln Law School. The building provides students with teaching and learning space including lecture theatres, workshop rooms, an IT/language lab and a mooting chamber, along with places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

The building provides high quality spaces for teaching and group learning and is the perfect setting for successful Business School students to learn and develop.

Sage 50 and SPSS software is available within the Business School for student use.

Career and Personal Development

The programme aims to prepares students for careers in humanitarian organisations, emergency planning, risk management and insurance.

The University Careers and Employability Team offer qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University. As a member of our alumni we also offer one-to-one support in the first year after completing your course, including access to events, vacancy information and website resources; with access to online vacancies and virtual and website resources for the following two years.

This service can include one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities.
The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world.

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