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Masters Degrees (Human Factor)

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Within the context of the globalisation of markets and of competition, human resources are an ever more decisive factor of competitive advantage for both companies and non-profit organisations. Read more

Within the context of the globalisation of markets and of competition, human resources are an ever more decisive factor of competitive advantage for both companies and non-profit organisations. With the progressive leveling of the fields of technological and process know-how, the individual is indeed the one true discriminating factor.

Ultimately, the individual’s competencies, motivations, innovation capabilities and overall professional performance quality determine an organisation’s success. From such a perspective, companies and institutions must equip themselves with experts capable of both fully understanding the central role of the individual and of overseeing the related managerial processes, such as: selection, hiring, training, communication, development and compensation.

On the other hand, modern human resources professionals cannot neglect the international dimension that all activities are increasingly taking on and must therefore be able, for example, to understand and handle global organisations’ diversity management dynamics and complexity profiles.

Within this framework, the Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree course in International Human Resources Management is the ideal choice for all those who wish to excel as human resources professionals in the job market at the international level, providing all the necessary knowledge, operational competencies and professional and networking opportunities on a global scale.

TARGET RECIPIENTS

This Master’s Degree course is aimed at all those who are getting their first exposure to the world of human resources management or those who, although already operating in this sector, wish to acquire a more structured education and update their competencies.

TRAINING OBJECTIVES

The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree course in International Human Resources Management is aimed at providing a technical-cultural training that will enable attendees to become human resources operators capable of effectively carrying out their jobs in complex organisational contexts at the international level.

COURSE CONTENTS

Part 1 - General Management

• The company and the competitive environment

• Business strategy

• Project management

• Marketing management fundamentals

• Finance and business planning

Part 2 -Professionalising teachings

• Strategic management of human resources: approaches, trends and tools

• Job analysis and strategic planning of human resources

• Selection, hiring and retention

• Training

• Development: coaching, counselling, mentoring

• Career plan and career development

• Performance management and evaluation

• Global Compensation

• Organisational theories and development

• Industrial relations and collective bargaining

• Workplace health and safety

• International management of human resources

Part 3 - Themed Focuses

• Work psychology

• Organisational behaviour

• Leadership and team management

Part 4 - Study and research seminars

• Workforce diversity, inclusion and equal opportunity employment

• Internal communication

• Change management

• Human resources metrics

Part 5 - Special Contents

The technical/professional teaching is

enriched by:

• Company tours, to get to know managerial systems and players from the inside

• Artistic-cultural programmes, aimed at stimulating creativity, innovation capability and complex system understanding

• Training in interdisciplinary competencies, such as:

• Business English

• Self-marketing

• Interpersonal communication techniques and PNL

• Public speaking

PAID INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIPS

Interested attendees may take part in paid intenships in numerous Countries at major companies and organisations.

A MULTICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT

The Rome Business School prizes intercultural exchange as a source of personal and professional development. Students from all continents regularly attend its courses.

2 INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOURS, IN PARIS AND BARCELONA

The Rome Business School offers you the possibility to complete your studies in the heart of two of the most influencing cities in Europe and in the world, Paris and Barcelona. This will give you the opportunity to learn further management models and gain experience in the world’s leading business cities, thus growing as a true international manager.

TEACHING TECHNIQUES

The Rome Business School employs a wide array of teaching methods:

• Lectures

• Case study analysis

• Exercises

• Assisted private studying

• Guest speakers

• Videos

• Company tours

• Complementary cultural initiatives

LEARNING OPTIONS

The Rome Business School’s Master’s Degree in Marketing and Communications can be attended, based upon preference, either on campus or by distance learning, with the following options:

- Full-time (from Monday to Thursday)

- Executive (on Saturday)

- Professional

Rome Business School is an International Institution that has already hosted students from 140 countries.

Rome Business School employs university lecturers, company trainers, consultants, managers and entrepreneurs chosen because of their proven experience and skills. The faculty has a strong multicultural inclination, with representatives from diverse backgrounds and nationalities. It will synergistically leaves you with a patrimony of knowledge for your personal development.

Rome Business School is developing an International didactic and corporate Network, thanks to several partnerships with business schools, universities and companies.



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Overview. Human Resource Management is currently one of the fastest-growing management fields. Organizations are increasingly recognizing the strategic role of human capital for achieving significant business results, sustainable growth and innovation. Read more

Overview

Human Resource Management is currently one of the fastest-growing management fields. Organizations are increasingly recognizing the strategic role of human capital for achieving significant business results, sustainable growth and innovation. Our vision is to develop managers with a sharp insight on people issues who will act as agents of transformation and as strategic investors in their organizations’ human capital. HR professionals can make a critical contribution to the process of business value creation. If you share this vision and aspire to play such a role in your organization, our program can help you reach your goals.

The MSc in Strategic HRM Is Designed for:

  • The new generation of HR professionals that will act as strategic partners and effectively align people strategies with business strategies.
  • Other professionals in managerial positions who will strategically lead their organizations' human capital and act as coaches to unleash their people's talents and full potential.
  • Strong applications from recent university graduates who wish to launch their career in the HR field will also be considered.

Investment in Human Capital pays off:

  • Those companies with a highly engaged workforce improved operating income by 19.2% over a period of 12 months, whilst those companies with low engagement scores saw operating income decline by 32.7% over the same period (Towers Watson).
  • The lost productivity of actively disengaged employees costs the US economy $370 billion annually (Gallup Institute).
  • 70% of Chief Executive Officers consider talent management top strategic priority and believe talent retention is a struggle (PwC Annual Global CEO Survey).
  • 53% of CEOs see skill shortage for key positions as a major challenge (PwC Annual Global CEO Survey).
  • 93% of Chief Financial Officers consider human capital as a critical factor for customer satisfaction (Mercer).

Key features of the program

  • Weekday classes between 18:00 – 22:00 (and occasionally weekends), twice a week on average
  • A 18-month program commencing every January
  • Assessment: group reports/presentations, case study analysis, mid-term tests, final exams (18:00 – 21:00)
  • 14 core courses and 8 workshops
  • Dissertation or Internship or Coursework

Highlights

  • International Recognition: Accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), accredited from EPAS (European Foundation for Management Development), and Acknowledgement for Full Alignment with the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) HR Curriculum Guidebook and Templates.
  • The quality and academic standing of its faculty, both resident and visiting.
  • The practical workshops offered within its curriculum in collaboration with field specialists like Korn Ferry / HAY Group. The personal coaching and focus on personal skills through the course of Leadership Development.
  • The internship opportunities it offers for eligible students, in HR-related positions.
  • The role of ALBA as a Scientific Coordinator of the BEST WORKPLACES Competition in Greece as well as for the Recruitment Confidence Index (RCI). Participants in the MSc in Strategic HRM have the opportunity to learn the best HR practices as well as the latest labor trends in Greece and Europe.
  • Opportunities to take courses abroad through student exchange agreements with a large network of top Business Schools worldwide.

Career

Upon the completion of the Programme students will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively using a range of media.
  • Manage time effectively, demonstrate initiative and personal responsibility for their work.
  • Work effectively as part of a team.
  • Demonstrate self-awareness and the ability to reflect on experience and to plan and carry out continuous personal development.


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This course is intended for postgraduate students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It will equip you with the necessary theory, practical knowledge and skills required to design, evaluate and implement interactive computing systems. Read more
This course is intended for postgraduate students from a wide variety of backgrounds. It will equip you with the necessary theory, practical knowledge and skills required to design, evaluate and implement interactive computing systems.

As computing applications become ever more pervasive, it is widely recognised by industry that the success or failure of this technology is very considerably influenced by the "human factor".

It is increasingly considered essential that end users - as well as wider stakeholders - are accounted for in the design process. In recent years, attempts to understand the complexities of user-system interactions associated with modern computer systems have led to the emergence of the discipline of interactive systems design.

The course is intended for students from a wide range of backgrounds, including those with first degrees in Computer Science, or many other areas such as Pure/Social Science (e.g. Psychology) or Engineering. If you are interested in designing interactive systems, then this course is aimed at you.

It will also appeal to prospective or current software engineers who wish to build upon their previously acquired skills and knowledge, as well as those of you who are looking for a strong basis for PhD research.

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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The M.S. in Conflict Analysis & Resolution is designed to train reflective professionals in the practice, design, and evaluation of a variety of conflict resolution applications. Read more

The M.S. in Conflict Analysis & Resolution is designed to train reflective professionals in the practice, design, and evaluation of a variety of conflict resolution applications. The M.S. program focuses on pragmatic approaches to solving problems inherent in human social relations. Students are exposed to a wide array of techniques and strategies to help people achieve nonviolent, non-litigious solutions for conflicts that arise in many personal, professional, organizational, and social environments. The M.S. program consists of a 12-course (36 credits) sequence that includes conflict resolution theory, practice skills, field placement, research design, and program evaluation.

Transferring Credits

Graduates of our Master's program in Conflict Analysis and Resolution who decide to continue their studies and are accepted into our Ph.D. program in Conflict Analysis and Resolution, can transfer up to 15 credit hours to the Ph.D. program, thereby reducing the total number of credits for the doctoral program.

Program Formats

The M.S. program is offered in both residential and distance learning formats. These flexible formats allow mid-career working adults and those unable to attend the on-campus program, to study conflict resolution in a creative, rigorous, and structured fashion.

Students may enroll full or part time, taking six to nine credit hours per trimester. Students who attend full-time can expect to complete the program in 15 months. Part-time students will complete the program in 2 years. Summer attendance is mandatory.

Students taking online classes are required to attend 2 Residential Institutes (RI) per academic year. Each RI is 5 days. Currently the RIs are held in February and October. Please visit the Residential Institute for current information.

Master's students are provided NSU computer accounts including email and Blackboard, but must obtain their own Internet service providers, use their own computer systems and have a usable web camera. Online students use the web to access course materials, announcements, email, distance library services, subscription library databases, and other information, and for interaction with faculty and fellow students. Online, interactive learning methods are based on the use of Blackboard as a course management system. Online activities facilitate frequent student-to-faculty and student-to-student interaction. They are supported by threaded discussion boards, white boards, chat rooms, email, and multimedia presentations. In addition, Blackboard enables students to submit assignments online in multimedia formats and to receive their professors' reviews of assignments online in the same formats.

Curriculum

Masters students must complete a minimum of 36-credits; successfully pass a field practicum and a Comprehensive Examination or an optional thesis to be eligible for the degree. Students must also maintain a 3.0 GPA through completion of the degree. Some courses have specific prerequisite requirements that students must meet; these should be checked to ensure compliance. If a student chooses to they may opt to do the master's thesis.

Core Courses

  • CARM 5000 - Foundations and Development of Conflict Resolution & Peace Studies (3 credits)
  • CARM 5040 - Communication Dynamics in Dispute Resolution: The Human Factor (3 credits)
  • CARM 5100 - Mediation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 5140 - Negotiation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 5200 - Research Design and Program Evaluation (3 credits)
  • CARM 6120 - Culture and Conflict: Cross-cultural Perspectives (3 credits)
  • CARM 6130 - Practicum I: Supervised Field Experience (3 credits)
  • CARM 6140 - Facilitation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
  • CARM 6150 - Professional Practice and Ethics (3 credits)
  • CARM 6450 - M.S. Capstone (3 credits)

Masters Theses Option

The student may write a research thesis. The thesis is 6 credits and counts as two electives. Instead of the electives offered in the fall and winter trimesters of the second year, thesis students register for Master's Thesis. Entrance into the thesis track is not automatic; students must meet eligibility requirements. For details regarding the Master's, please visit Conflict Analysis and Resolution Student Resources for the Master's Thesis handbook.

Practicum

Practicum is a student centered learning experience that is supervised by professionals at a variety of local, regional, national, and international organizations, as well as monitored by the practicum coordinator and guided by faculty teaching the practicum sequence. Practicum I and II are offered both residentially and online, during the fall, winter and summer terms. Doctoral students do have the option of doing Teaching and Training which is offered in the fall, followed by a Teaching and Training practicum in the winter term. Students may follow either of these tracks.

Practicum provides opportunities that you must be active in creating. It provides the chance to explore employment settings and obtain a realistic feel for your level of expertise in conflict analysis and resolution. Practicum also offers you a preview of locations where conflict resolution is currently being used or where it can be introduced. Practicum essentially allows you to explore the field in an individually focused, yet supervised manner. Take advantage of this opportunity to explore and to appreciate the new contacts you make. Experiences like these can help establish your personal and professional reputation within the community.

Please visit Student Resources for the Practicum Handbook and forms.



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This programme provides an exciting opportunity to gain intensive training in the psychology of individual differences by a large team of world-class researchers. Read more

This programme provides an exciting opportunity to gain intensive training in the psychology of individual differences by a large team of world-class researchers.

It provides advanced graduate-level study in the field of the psychology of individual differences and psychological research skills, and forms a strong basis for further (typically PhD) study.

There are two key subdivisions in the study of human individual differences: personality and mental abilities. Psychology at Edinburgh has a uniquely large number of world-class researchers in both subdivisions.

The programme covers psychometric research methods, the foundations and correlates of human individual differences (including approaches involving information processing, brain-imaging, molecular genetics and biometric models), and the application of individual differences in personality to health. No prior experience of the psychology of individual differences is assumed.

Programme structure

This programme comprises two semesters of taught courses, followed by a research-based dissertation supervised by a member of staff with similar research interests.

Compulsory courses:

  • Seminar in Cognitive Ability or Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology
  • Current Topics in Psychological Research
  • Multivariate Statistics and Methodology Using R
  • Professional and Generic Psychological Research Concepts and Research Design
  • Psychological Research Skills
  • Univariate Statistics and Methodology using R
  • Seminar in Personality

Option courses may include:

  • Advanced Statistical Methods: Categorical and Survival Data
  • Brain Imaging in Neuropsychology
  • Clinical Neuropsychology
  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Evolutionary Psychology
  • Human Genetics
  • Bioinformatics
  • Working with Specialist Psychological Data

Learning outcomes

The programme is aimed primarily at students who are considering advanced research in the area. Students who follow this programme will gain:

  • an in-depth understanding of current research issues, research and methodology in the psychology of individuals
  • the ability to formulate research questions and apply appropriate research methods to increase understanding of individual differences in human personality and human mental abilities
  • advanced understanding of seminal and recent scientific findings relating to the study of human individual differences and the ways in which individual differences are currently being studied or applied
  • skills in research management, including managing data and disseminating research in ways consistent with professional practice in the field of individual differences and the normal principles of research ethics
  • advanced knowledge of the basic principles of multivariate statistical data analysis techniques (including multiple regression, factor analysis and structural equation modelling) and epidemiological techniques (including logistic regression and survival analyses), and the ability to carry out data analysis on different data sets using appropriate statistical packages
  • a firm basis for subsequent advanced specialised research within the psychology of individual differences
  • a broad understanding and awareness of issues and findings in the psychology of individual differences through application to other disciplines such as human cognitive neuropsychology, molecular genetics, evolutionary psychology, epidemiology and health psychology

Career opportunities

This programme has been designed to help you progress your research career and offers a firm basis for further postgraduate study.



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Study at the frontiers of archaeological science. Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Read more
Study at the frontiers of archaeological science

Why choose this course?

Like a handful of comparable courses, the York MSc in Bioarchaeology provides training in the advanced osteoarchaeological analysis of skeletal remains. Uniquely, however, it is the only course in the UK to combine this discipline with the molecular analysis of human remains. Nowhere else can you immerse yourself in the study of stable isotopes, lipid residue analysis, palaeoproteomics and ancient DNA – and play an active role in the development of new techniques in this constantly evolving branch of archaeology. In 2014, seven of the top 100 discoveries in science were in archaeology, and BioArCh staff were involved in three of these.
-Advanced training in human osteoarchaeology, delivered by the UK’s leading practitioners
-Study ancient biomolecules in world-class facilities at the BioArch centre and Department of Biology
-Unique opportunity to combine bioarchaeology with complementary subjects and tailor a course to suit your interests
-Access an incredible range of in-house analytical equipment
-Take part in cutting-edge science and build essential practical skills
-Work alongside leading researchers and academics in a diverse range of specialisms
-Work on diverse material that is often ‘fresh out of the ground’ and make valuable contributions to live projects Receive career and research guidance from staff with significant experience in the sector and a track record of successfully placing PhD students

What does the course cover?

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and dissertation research, this course provides a thorough grounding in all aspects of bioarchaeology theory, investigation and practice.

Uniquely, you can combine bioarchaeology with a range of subjects and tailor your degree to your own interests. You could adopt a ‘period’ focus, for example, to specialise in the bioarchaeology of the Medieval, Viking, Mesolithic or early prehistoric periods. You could combine human bioarchaeology with zooarchaeology and orientate your course towards more advanced studies of bone function and anatomy. Or you could focus on skills such as GIS modelling and field archaeology.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for students with a passionate interest in the future of archaeology, who want to work at the frontiers of archaeological science. The degree is primarily aimed at those whose previous experience is in archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, but we do accept students from diverse backgrounds. The common factor among our student intake is a keen interest in science and in human remains at a biomolecular or bone level.

What can it lead to?

Molecular analysis is used increasingly widely in archaeology, but the range of osteological and molecular skills offered by the course provide valuable training and expertise for a wide range of careers and further study.

Many students go on to take PhDs at York and other institutions around the world. Others pursue a wide range of professional careers, from osteoarchaeology and environmental archaeology to the medical humanities and laboratory technician work.

Careers

By the end of the MSc Bioarchaeology course you will be able to:
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Understand advanced methods for analysing bone tissues, including biomolecular methods
-Apply chemical and biomolecular methods to skeletal material
-Understand the processes of decay and diagenesis of bone tissue
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Work effectively within a laboratory environment
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many our MSc Bioarchaeology postgraduates go on to further research in bioarchaeological and environmental fields. The BioArch department has a successful track record of placing students on PhD courses in York and institutions worldwide.

Here’s a selection of the career and research destinations of some of our recent students: US graduate school programmes
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

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Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. Read more
Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. The aim of the programme is to provide graduates with a range of management knowledge and skills, together with a thorough foundation in information management, information technology, and its commercial applications. The programme includes topical case studies, and reflects contemporary developments within the sector. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Web Technologies: This module provides an understanding of the basic technologies and structures for developing web applications, including internet resource creation, search techniques and programming languages for creating web content. You will create and use multimedia content in web applications, and gain familiarity with technologies for creating secure web applications. Specific topics include:

Internet concepts; networks; ISO 7 layer model; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; ftp; telnet; HTTP
WWW concepts; Internet resources; URI, and URI resolution, URL, URN; relation to XML namespaces; search engines; search algorithms; search engine optimisation
JavaScript; PHP; CSS; programming tools and environments
Multimedia; WWW support for multimedia; file compression
Internet Security; Cryptography; standards for the Internet; public key systems; signatures; authentication; trust management; electronic cash; security issues; firewalls
Web programming; HTML; XML; form input; CGI scripting; Perl programming

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Databases: This module shows how to design a database and intelligently query a database using SQL; and provides an introductory level of understanding in database systems. A mini project is carried out towards the end of the module. This project allows you to complete the entire development process, from informal user requirements, to ER/EER modelling, transformation into relations, normalisation, and finally to the SQL commands to create and query the database. Specific topics include:

Characteristics of a relational database
ER/EER modelling of simple applications
Relational model and relational algebra
Transformation of an ER/EER model into a relational database
Normalisation techniques
Uses of SQL language to create and query a database

Technologies for Internet Systems: This module introduces technologies and tools for Internet Systems and e-commerce systems. Technologies and structures for developing web applications are examined. Technical issues for implementing an e-system, and commonly-available technology components, are covered. You will implement a practical web based e-commerce system using relevant technologies, taking into account current market implementation. Specific topics include:

e-commerce ideas and concepts
Internet concepts; networks; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; telnet; HTTP
Architectures and technologies, e-payment, e-commerce software and hardware, e-security, auctions
Design and implementation: HTML, XML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM, SVG
Research awareness: agent-based e-commerce; web services; grid computing; virtual organisations

Information Systems: This module examines the major types and components of Information Systems, their functions, benefits and limitations. The theoretical underpinnings of Information Systems are analysed. You will study the main business and personal uses of Information Systems, and how such systems are developed, procured and deployed. Specific topics include:

Understanding the nature of organisations and the people within them, and their use of information for strategic business purposes
The influence of human and organisational factors on the successful introduction of information systems
Methods and techniques involved in project and programme management
The importance of business processes and techniques for process modelling

Part 2:

For MBA Information Management, you MUST:

Complete two of the following Applied Business Projects: Business Planning; e-Business and Chain Value; Human Resource Management; International Business; Operations Management; Investment and Private Banking.
Write a Computing project, Software Hut. Software Hut is a project in which students (in groups) analyse, design and implement a software product for an organisation.

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The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. Read more
The course focuses on developing a student’s scientific understanding of the human mind, behaviour and experience, and of the complex interactions between these and the domain of sport and exercise. It has been designed to be flexible and relevant to the student’s individual needs and interests, with a strong emphasis on the application of theory to professional practice. Within the modular structure all students undertake core/compulsory modules in:

Research Skills;
Independent Study (a one to one supervised programme of work leading to the development of the proposal for the Research Project);
Supervised Experience – a module tailored to the needs of the individual and could include directed work with a specified client group or individual;
Research Project relevant to the programme being studied.
Research Skills
Research Skills is a double credit taught module. Students study the broad nature of the research process that will allow them to complete, initially, an appropriate Independent Study (in which a research proposal for the Research Project is completed) and subsequently, a full Research Project. The module covers material relevant to the design and analysis of both quantitative and qualitative research. It also provides a broad understanding of the benefits and limitations of various research methods, research designs, data collection instruments and data analysis tools. Students are given the opportunity to develop their ability to be critically evaluative.

Specific content includes: Statistical issues in quantitative research and design; Simple and multiple (forced entry, moderated and mediated) regression analyses; Single factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Two factor analysis of variance with and without repeated measures; Single factor and two factor multivariate analysis of variance (with and without repeated measures); Repeated measures analysis of variance using the multivariate solution; Doubly repeated measures analysis of variance; Analysis of covariance; Follow-up procedures for all of the above; Assumptions underpinning all of the above and available options for dealing with violations to these assumptions; Experiments and causal inference; External and construct validity; Experimental and quasi-experimental designs; Correlational and epidemiological research; Reliability and validity in quantitative and qualitative research; Issues in qualitative research and design; Interviews; Single case design and analysis; Observation; Narrative; Ethnography; grounded theory and discourse analysis.

Independent Study
The Independent Study should consist of a critical and concise review of the research literature pertaining to a particular research question. A rationale for the proposed research question must be provided, along with a sound methodology for exploring the research question, planned analyses, and expected outcomes. Further, anticipated problems such as resources, equipment, possible ethical issues, informed consent forms, a statement of feasibility of the project and expected costs must be discussed.

Supervised Experience
The content of this module will be largely student specific and include activities (workshops, directed reading, client based work) that will develop the individual’s personal applied support skills. Initially, students complete an individual self-assessment of their current skills/knowledge base and set personal goals to enable them to improve their applied support skills. All students will attend units (workshops) on Ethics in Research and consultancy, communication and counselling skills and how to conduct a needs assessment. Specific physiology and psychology workshops (eg Imagery) will also take place.

Students will complete a contract of intended activities agreed with their supervisor in the first four weeks of their programme of study. This contract may, where appropriate, include the intention to apply to British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) to commence a formally logged Supervised Experience.

A portfolio will then be developed; the portfolio records activities including meetings with supervisor, attendance at workshops, meetings and a plan of work with at least one client, and thought/evaluations of all meetings and workshops (ie evidence of reflective practice).

Overview and Format of the Research Project module
The Research Project is an independent piece of research, and acts as the culmination of the academic challenges faced by the student. The module comprises 60 credits (ie equivalent to three double modules) and will formally equate to some 600 hours of student time.

Students work closely with their supervisor to develop the work on their research proposal submitted during the Independent Study module. As External Examiners have noted, throughout this module students receive excellent research training from leaders in the field, with the resulting projects being published in international, peer reviewed journals.

Specifically, this will involve a review of research evidence with the aim of formulating an appropriate research question, and will likely involve some refinement and pilot work. Once achieved, the student will implement a research design and method suited to the area of enquiry. The supervisor provides excellent expert guidance throughout the process.

Mono-disciplinary studies and interdisciplinary work, which might involve the student’s ongoing sport/exercise experience, will be encouraged. Each topic will normally involve data collection, analysis and interpretation and allow students to demonstrate their powers of imagination, initiative, independence and time management. Students will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of the relevant sources of information and the ability to use them with discrimination; to provide full references; to exercise sound and independent judgment; to structure work logically and to express themselves with clarity and precision.

Students also undertake additional compulsory modules in Sport Psychology and Exercise Psychology, and choose one optional module from Rehabilitation of the Injured Athlete or Effective Coaching.

The programme is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, group activities, practical work, tutorials and role play. Each module comprises approximately 200 hours (including formal contact).

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This Biomedical Sciences degree offers research training for students in order to gain all the required Biomedical Sience entry requirements to proceed to a PhD. Read more
This Biomedical Sciences degree offers research training for students in order to gain all the required Biomedical Sience entry requirements to proceed to a PhD. It is largely based on individual research projects rather than coursework, and allows you to specialise in a particular area of study.

Why this programme

◾Ranked world top 100 for Biological Sciences
◾The Masters in Biomedical Science provides training in a wide range of modern molecular biology techniques required to pursue a research career.
◾You will gain valuable practical research experience by using the skills and techniques acquired during the programme to complete two extensive research projects.
◾The Biomedical Science programme is distinctive in that students complete two different extensive research projects of their choice, allowing them to acquire a wide range of knowledge and skills directly relevant to the study of human disease.
◾If you are aiming to study for a higherBiomedical Science degree , this programme is designed for you.
◾If you want to enter the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, this programme provides excellent training; and is an ideal introduction for overseas students who may wish to proceed to PhD biomedical science studies in the UK.
◾You can choose to specialise within a particular discipline or area, which can be important for career development, see programme structure below for more information.

Programme structure

The overall aims of the programme are:
◾to provide students with the knowledge, skills and confidence needed to pursue a career in laboratory research.
◾to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of advanced techniques used in modern biomedical sciences research.
◾to provide students with the opportunity to practice research skills in the laboratory by completing two extensive research projects.

MRes students have the opportunity to specialise in a particular discipline or area, which can be important for their career development. The specialisations are:
◾Biotechnology
◾Cancer Studies
◾Cardiovascular Studies
◾Cell Engineering
◾Integrative Mammalian Biology SFC funded places available

◾Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
◾Molecular Genetics
◾Neuroscience
◾Proteomics

To qualify for a specialisation, students must select two research projects in a cognate research area.

Research projects

The central and most important part of the MRes is the two research projects that students undertake. Students choose both projects themselves in the subject areas that interest them and that will allow them to follow the career path they wish to follow. The MRes programme has a huge number of projects which students can choose from, across a wide spectrum of biomedical science.

The following are examples of the types of projects offered, to illustrate the range of subject areas.

• Making blood from human embryonic stem cells

• A gene-microarray based approach to the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin doping in endurance athletes

• Neuropathology of trypanosomiasis

• Development of a new technique for stem cell transfection

• Cloning and analysis of an inflammatory factor in cancer and autoimmune disease

• Analysis of viral induced cancer

Each year students have about 100 different projects to choose from and all students find research topics that interest them.

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The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. Read more
The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. This necessitates a more sophisticated environmental manager who can interpret legislative and audit requirements and deliver them in a manner conducive to continued economic development, whilst recognising the market trends. The aim of this programme is to develop skills in the delivery of economic activities related to environment, green technology and sustainability. The programme includes highly topical case studies from across these sectors reflecting changing strategies and alternative approaches. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Environment, Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.
Testimonials

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Business Planning for the Green Economy: This module explores the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan which incorporates environmental planning and management. It takes the student through the actual process of developing a business plan and its different components, the market and sustainability. Specific topics include:

Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial role in relation to the initiation and development of a sustainable business
Key environmental factors of business development
The differences between the entrepreneur and the environmental manager, and the problems faced by small growth firms in sustainable growth.
The importance and complexity of entrepreneurship and environmentalism within a large firm environment

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Strategic Environmental Management: This module is designed to provide a an understanding of the principles of sustainable development, environmental legislation, environmental auditing and assesment, and green technological development. Specific topics include:

Sustainable development
Environmental legislation
Environmental auditing
Environmental assessment
Corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investment
Life cycle analysis

Green Technology: This module reviews the environmental consequences of economic activities, including energy generation, waste management, food and water supply, consumer goods. It then goes on to consider recent policy initiatives and drivers and examines key green technologies. Specific topics include:

Development and deployment of green technologies
Environment impacts of energy generation
Green technology policies and initiatives
Green technologies - commerce, ideas and concepts
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for green technologies

Part 2:

For MBA Environmental Management, you must complete Part 2 by undertaking a relevant dissertation.

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The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree is suitable for students with an interest in anthropological approaches to diverse aspects of tourism as a cultural force in the contemporary world, from sustainable development to cultural heritage. Our students come from all over the world, following BA study, a masters degree in another field, or work and travel experience. This combination of diverse backgrounds and skills creates a uniquely stimulating intellectual environment. Many of our graduates go on to a PhD; others pursue careers in research and consulting; NGOs; museums and other cultural institutions; travel-writing; alternative tourism enterprises; and government agencies.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/

Programme Overview

The SOAS MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism enables students to pursue specialist interests in global voluntary mobility while gaining advanced training in social and cultural anthropology in a world-leading department. Combining a rigorous set of core courses with options to suit each student’s unique interests, the programme is designed to accommodate students with or without a prior degree in Social Anthropology.

Students will develop expertise in anthropological theory and practice; learn to undertake ethnographic research; and gain comprehensive grounding in the anthropological study of travel and tourism, including issues of development, political economy, cultural change, heritage, cross-cultural encounter, representation and meaning, space and place, commodification, and interconnections between diverse histories and cultures of travel worldwide.

Tourism is not only a culturally and historically shaped form of travel, but a complex social field that spans the globe, comprised of diverse actors, institutions, activities, and modes of interaction that overlap with and cross-cross other forms of global interconnection. As a whole, it comprises the world's largest industry and the single greatest peacetime factor moving people around the globe.

Both a manifestation and a medium of globalisation, tourism has profound significance in multiple realms of human life—economic, environmental, material, social, and cultural. This makes it an ideal lens through which to explore core themes in contemporary social anthropology, such as identity and alterity, political economy, development, heritage, locality, representation, imagination, commodification, and the global circulation of people, objects, ideas, images, and capital.

The MA programme draws upon:

- the emerging body of theoretically sophisticated, ethnographically rich work involving tourism and travel;

- a thorough grounding in the history and contemporary theoretical trends of social-cultural anthropology;

- close engagement with noted and rising scholars in the field, via the programme's Colloquium Series in the Anthropology of Tourism and Travel, as well as opportunities for informal dialogue with visiting anthropologists and sociologists of tourism;

- other areas of expertise in the Department of Anthropology, including anthropology of development, migration and diaspora, museums and material culture, anthropology of food, global religious movements, anthropology of media, human rights, and anthropology of globalisation;

- the unparalleled concentration of area expertise among SOAS' academic staff, covering Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, together with their diasporas;

- the opportunity to engage with numerous other units at SOAS, such as the Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, the Food Studies Centre, and the Centre for Media Studies, among many others; and

- the vibrant intellectual and cultural life of the School, the University of London, and the city of London itself—a global tourist destination inviting study on a daily basis.

Prospective students are encouraged to contact the Director of Studies, Dr Naomi Leite, at an early stage of their application in order to seek advice on the most appropriate options for study.

View a sampling of past MA dissertation titles (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/ma-anthropology-of-travel-tourism-dissertations.html)

View profiles of alumni and current students (http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-of-travel-and-tourism/student-profiles.html)

Language Study

Beginning in 2016-27, the MA programme will also be available as a 2- or 4-year (full- or part-time) MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism with Intensive Study of Arabic, Japanese, or Korean (other languages likely to be added). For information, contact Director of Studies Dr Naomi Leite.

All SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are entitled to register for one language course for free through our Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). This course is additional to your regular syllabus and is not for credit. Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others are often offered. You must sign up before instruction begins and space fills quickly. Learn more and reserve your place here: Language Entitlement Programme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/languagecultures/studentinfo/language-entitlement-programme/)

Email:

Programme Structure

The SOAS MA in the Anthropology of Travel and Tourism is designed to offer students a chance to pursue specialist interests via a considered selection of courses to suit their individual needs. It provides:

1. a broad-based MA programme for students with some background in issues of tourism/travel who wish to enhance their knowledge in light of contemporary anthropological research.

2. a special-interest MA which will enable students to study topics involving tourism/travel in-depth, in relation to a specific theoretical approach or region.

The programme consists of four units, comprised of a combination of full-year (1 unit) and half-year (.5 unit) courses.

Teaching & Learning

The learning environments making up the MA programme in Anthropology of Travel and Tourism run the gamut from lecture halls to intimate seminar rooms, suiting a wide range of learning styles. Study a language; take a course (or two) in anthropology of human rights, development, globalisation, religion, or gender, among many others; choose a course in another department that catches your interest and contributes to your dissertation plans, from world music to development studies.

The academic staff in the Department of Anthropology are dynamic, experienced teachers who are widely recognised for their expertise and enjoy working directly with students. Renowned scholars from other institutions also come to share their knowledge: nearly every day of the week, the SOAS Anthropology Department has a public lecture series running, including series in the general Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Migration and Diaspora Studies, and, of course, Anthropology of Tourism and Travel.

In addition to these formal settings for learning, our students also learn from one another. Hailing from around the globe and bringing diverse life experiences to bear on their studies, all MA students in the Department of Anthropology can take courses together, making it a rich environment for intellectual exchange. Students also benefit from campus-wide programmes, clubs, study groups, and performances.

Many students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism opt for hands-on learning via the half-unit Directed Practical Study in Anthropology of Tourism course, with placements in leading UK-based NGOs like Equality in Tourism and Tourism Concern, among others, as well as in private tour operator firms, providing background material for future research.

While students in the MA Anthropology of Travel and Tourism may take a language course for credit, all SOAS MA students, regardless of department or degree, are also entitled to register for non-credit free courses in a single language through the Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Destinations

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (https://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Developed in reaction to the dominance of behaviourism and psychoanalysis, the humanistic paradigm emphasises the human capacity for self-determination. Read more
Developed in reaction to the dominance of behaviourism and psychoanalysis, the humanistic paradigm emphasises the human capacity for self-determination. It holds that we have the freedom to shape and give meaning to our own lives, and helps clients to regain their independence.

The humanistic paradigm draws on concepts and ideas from phenomenology and existentialism and is a philosophy of mind.

The postgraduate diploma helps to ground your understanding of humanistic counselling in the relevant literature, clinical practice and your developing self-awareness.

It is accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP) and therefore recognised as preparing students for work as a professional counsellor. The university itself is an organisational member of the BACP as well as the Universities Psychotherapy and Counselling Association (UCPA).

Course structure

The course consists of seven modules taught over a period of two years. Study involves one day per week at the university, seven non-residential weekends, two two-day blocks in September of the second year and two further study days.

In addition to academic study, you need to complete 100 hours of supervised counselling practice in an approved clinical placement, for example at the South Downs NHS Primary Care Trust, the Youth Advice Centre or Brighton and Sussex University counselling services.

You also need to undertake a course of personal therapy that lasts for the duration of the course, from October of year 1 to June of year 2, and we recommend that you factor in the cost of this therapy before your application.

Assessment consists of three written essays and two audio-taped assignments; one case study and a research proposal. You will also be asked to keep a reflective journal during the life of the course that focuses on academic and professional studies; clinical practice, training supervision and personal growth and development.

Areas of study

The course contains four major elements: academic and professional studies, clinical practice, training supervision, and personal growth and development.

The course is designed to:

• provide a sound base of theory and practitioner skills for persons practising counselling;
• illuminate theory and practice by drawing upon students’ personal experience;
• promote personal growth and self-awareness essential to successful counselling.

The philosophy of the course is based on the principle that there is no single presiding theory or model of counselling that commands widespread agreement and support, and that the practice of counselling cannot be separated from underlying values, theoretical assumptions and hypotheses concerning the nature of human experience and change.

Successfully completing this postgraduate diploma makes you eligible to apply to continue your studies on our Psychotherapy MSc.

Syllabus

Year 1 modules:

Humanistic Counselling Theory
Human Growth and Development
Humanistic Counselling Practice and Personal Development
Themes in Professional Practice
Process Groups

Year 2 modules:

Research Methods for Counselling and Psychotherapy
Critical Perspectives in Humanistic Counselling
Applied Humanistic Counselling Practice
Process Groups

Careers and employability

The postgraduate diploma has an excellent reputation in the locality and our students have gone on to hold counselling posts across the public, private and voluntary sectors. Others have progressed to further training or used their counselling skills in their existing professions.

If you enjoy the course and are interested in further study, you may want to consider our Psychotherapy MSc, to which all successful graduates of the PGDip are eligible to apply.

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Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Microbiology deals with the interface between fundamental biological and medical sciences. Read more
Radboud University’s Master’s specialisation in Microbiology deals with the interface between fundamental biological and medical sciences. It focuses on molecular, medical and environmental microbiology to improve our health and environment and provides in-depth insight into present-day microbial research in general and clinical microbiology.

The major topics of the Microbiology specialisation are:

Environmental microbiology and Biotechnology

Microorganisms can be used to break down environmental pollutants and toxic chemicals. Therefore microbiology has the potential to replace common energy-intensive chemical processes with more sustainable solutions. Radboud University collaborates closely with environmental scientists and industrial partners to create energy-efficient and environmentally friendly solutions for societal waste problems.

Immunology

Unfortunately some microorganisms make us ill. A better understanding of battle between our immune system and these microorganisms will lead to the development of improved vaccines.

Molecular Microbiology

The genome of a microorganism is a key factor in research, because it determines how the organisms interact with the host cell and how they cause diseases. Molecular Microbiology acts on the interface between microbiology, molecular biology and genetics and is fundamental for the development of novel antibiotics and improvement of vaccines against microorganisms.

Top research

The department of Microbiology at Radboud University has been bestowed with the most prestigious science prizes, including two ERC Advanced Grants, a Spinoza Prize, and two Gravitation Grants. Additionally, many of out students have been awarded prizes for best thesis, poster and paper. The department works at the forefront of environmental microbiology and is specialised in the discovery of ‘impossible’, new anaerobic micro-organisms. The laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art bioreactors, electron microscopy, GC-MS, metagenomics, and metaproteomics facilities to grow and study micro-organisms that contribute to a better environment by consuming greenhouse gasses and nitrogenous pollutants.

Our approach to this field

- Research themes
The Master's specialisation Microbiology is mainly focused on research. You can choose one of the following themes as the subject of your research internship:

- Environmental Microbiology & Biotechnology
For students who are intrigued by questions like: How does life without oxygen work? How do global biogeochemical (nutrient) cycles govern the functioning of the Earth? Can we use microorganisms to create a more sustainable wastewater industry? How do microorganisms break down environmental pollutants and toxic chemicals?
You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, environmental sciences and biochemistry. The research questions cover several levels, from gaining fundamental understanding of energy metabolism of bacteria to their applications in wastewater treatment.
Societal relevance: Microbiology has the potential to replace common energy-intensive chemical processes by more sustainable solutions. Radboud University collaborates closely with environmental scientists, animal ecologists and industrial partners to create energy-efficient and environmentally friendly solutions for societal waste problems.

- Immunology
For students who are intrigued by questions like: Why do some bacteria make us ill whereas others do not? How do bacteria outsmart our immune system? What are the mechanisms of human defence against microorganisms?
You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, and can, for example, work on how microorganisms are recognised by the host defence system
Societal relevance: A better understanding of host defence will lead to the development of improved vaccines against microorganisms.

- Molecular Microbiology
For students who are intrigued by questions like: How are microorganisms able to persist inside the human body and how do they cause diseases? What does gene regulation tell us about their pathogenic capabilities? Can microbial genomes help us determine how microorganisms interact with human host cells?
You will do research at the interface between Microbiology, molecular biology and genetics, and can, for example, work on functional gene analyses by mutagenesis studies and on the interaction between epithelial cells and pathogenic bacteria.
Societal relevance: Understanding host-pathogen interactions is fundamental for the development of novel antibiotics and improvement of vaccines. Radboudumc collaborates with public health institutes – such as the RIVM (National Institute of Public Health) – and with industrial partners.

- Personal tutor
Our top scientists are looking forward to guiding you during a challenging and inspiring scientific journey. This programme offers you many opportunities to follow your own interests under the excellent supervision of a personal tutor. This allows you to specialise in a field of personal interest.

- The Nijmegen approach
The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the people working, exploring and studying there. It is no wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, with direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personalised Master's in Biology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/microbiology

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This MSc programme in Biomedical Sciences offers research training for student intending to proceed to a career in biomedical sciences, either directly or through a PhD. Read more
This MSc programme in Biomedical Sciences offers research training for student intending to proceed to a career in biomedical sciences, either directly or through a PhD. It is based on a research project and coursework.

Why this programme

◾Ranked world top 100 for Biological Sciences
◾The programme provides training in a wide range of modern molecular biology techniques required to pursue a research career in biomedical science.
◾You will gain valuable practical research experience by using the skills and techniques acquired during the programme to complete an in depth research project.
◾If you are aiming to study for a higher degree, or enter a biomedical career, then this programme is designed specifically for you.
◾If you want to enter the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, this programme provides excellent training.
◾It is an ideal introduction for overseas students who may wish to proceed to PhD studies in the UK, Europe or the USA.
◾This course is similar to the MRes Biomedical Sciences, but instead has more teaching in the first part of the programme, and one research project, which starts later in the year. This allows students more time to acquire knowledge and skills before they start their research work.

Programme structure

The overall aims of the programme are:
◾to provide students with the knowledge, skills and confidence needed to pursue a career in laboratory research.
◾to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of advanced techniques used in modern biomedical sciences research.
◾to provide students with the opportunity to practice research skills in the laboratory by completing an extensive research project in an area of their choice.

Projects

An important part of the MSc is your choice of research project; there are a huge number of choices available from a wide spectrum of biomedical science. Please see examples below:

• Making blood from human embryonic stem cells

• A gene-microarray based approach to the detection of recombinant human erythropoietin doping in endurance athletes

• Neuropathology of trypanosomiasis

• Development of a new technique for stem cell transfection

• Cloning and analysis of an inflammatory factor in cancer and autoimmune disease

• Analysis of viral induced cancer

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