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Masters Degrees (Human Anatomy And Physiology)

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The MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy is a one-year taught postgraduate programme offered by the School of Simulation and Visualisation at The Glasgow School of Art in collaboration with the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow. Read more
The MSc in Medical Visualisation and Human Anatomy is a one-year taught postgraduate programme offered by the School of Simulation and Visualisation at The Glasgow School of Art in collaboration with the Laboratory of Human Anatomy, University of Glasgow.

The course presents a unique opportunity to combine actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation using state of the art virtual reality facilities. It allows students to examine human anatomy, and to reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training. This Masters programme provides an ideal opportunity for enhancement of research into human anatomy, diagnostics, simulation, and visualisation, and is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators.

Programme Structure:

The MSc Medical Visualisation & Human Anatomy programme is delivered over one year (45 weeks) in 3 Stages. Students undertaking the programme will split their time equally between the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art. The programme is delivered as two core areas - digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the School of Simulation and Visualisation in Stage 1) and human anatomy (delivered by the Laboratory of Human Anatomy in Stage 2). In Stage 3, students work towards a large-scale self-directed final project, supported by supervisors from both DDS and GU.

Stage 1

3D modelling and animation
Applications in medical visualisation
Volumetric visualisation
Core research skills for postgraduates

Stage 2

Introduction to anatomy
Structure and function of the human body
Cadaveric dissection techniques

Stage 3

MSc Research Project

Part time study is also available. Please see the Part Time Study Guide for more information.

Scholarships and Funded Places:

A range of scholarships are available which cover partial or full fees. More information can be found here.

Entry requirements:

You should have a good Honours degree or equivalent in any of the following disciplines:

• Life sciences, medical or biomedical science, e.g. anatomy, physiology, dentistry or dental technology, forensic anthropology, molecular biological degrees and the allied health professionals
• Computer science, 3D visualisation, computer graphics, health informatics, mathematics, and physics
• Medical illustration, 3D design, product design, digital media, digital arts, 3D modeling and animation
• or equivalent professional practice

High calibre graduates from other disciplines may be considered if they are able to demonstrate an interest and ability in the field of medical visualisation.

IELTS 6.5 for overseas applicants for whom English is not their first language.

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This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. Read more
This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation.

Why this programme

◾You will examine human anatomy and reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training.
◾You will have access to the largest stereo 3D lab in Europe, and its state-of-the-art facilities such as laser scanner (for 3D data acquisition), stereo 3D projection, full body motion capture system, haptic devices and ambisonic sound.
◾You will also have access to the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow, one of the largest in Europe.
◾The programme has excellent industry connections through research and commercial projects and there are possible internship opportunities. You will benefit from guest lectures by practitioners, researchers and experts from industry.
◾This programme is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators.

Programme structure

You will split your time between the Glasgow School of Art (Digital Design Studio) and the University of Glasgow (Laboratory of Human Anatomy). The programme is structured into three stages.

Stage one: digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the Digital Design Studio at the Glasgow School of Art)

Core courses
◾3D modelling and animation
◾Applications in medical visualisation
◾Volumetric and 3D surface visualisation
◾Core research skills for postgraduates.

Stage two: human anatomy (delivered by the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow).

Core courses
◾Introduction to anatomy
◾Structure and function of the human body
◾Cadaveric dissection techniques.

In stage three you will complete a self-directed final project, supported throughout with individual supervision.

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist within the commercial healthcare device manufacturer, the public and private healthcare sectors, as well as in academic medical visualisation research. Students with medical, biomedical, anatomy, or health professional backgrounds will be able to gain 3D visualisation skills that will enhance their portfolio of abilities; students with computer science or 3D graphics background will be involved in the design and development of healthcare related products through digital technology, eg diagnostic and clinical applications, creating content involving medical visualisation, simulation, cardiac pacemakers, and biomechanically related products for implantation, such as knee, hip and shoulder joint replacements.

Here are some examples of roles and companies for our graduates:
◾Interns, Clinical Assistants and Clinical Researchers at Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems
◾Research Prosector (GU)
◾3D printing industry
◾Demonstrators in Anatomy
◾PhD studies - medical history, medical visualisation
◾Medical School
◾Dental School
◾Digital Designer at Costello Medical
◾Lead Designer at Open Bionics
◾Founder of Axial Medical Printing Ltd
◾Digital Technician at University of Leeds
◾Digital Project Intern at RCPSG
◾Researcher and Factual Specialist at BBC
◾Graduate Teaching Assistants
◾Freelance Medical Illustration
◾Numerous successful placements on PhD programmes (medical visualisation, anatomy, anatomy education, medical humanities)
◾MBChB, BDS courses

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Tissues in the human body have a defined structure in that their growth and differentiation have developed in specific ways to create a cellular architecture that supports their function. Read more
Tissues in the human body have a defined structure in that their growth and differentiation have developed in specific ways to create a cellular architecture that supports their function. Following this fundamental principle that ‘from structure comes function’ we can develop in vitro models that resemble elements of the anatomy and physiology of real human tissues. This can be achieved through our understanding of tissue development and morphology, and the application of innovative technologies to build mature, functional tissue equivalents. Such innovation often occurs at the interface between disciplines such as biological, chemistry, and engineering.
In my laboratory, we specialise in the development of novel approaches to culturing cells in vitro, to enhance cell viability, growth, and differentiation, to enable the creation of human tissue mimetics that can subsequently be used for basic research, drug screening, and the assessment of chemicals. Cell biology-based Master by Research projects are available in tissue engineering in various areas, notably: epithelial biology (for example, skin, oral mucosa, intestine); neural biology (for example, in vitro models of neurological disorders); and basic biological mechanisms involved in stem cell differentiation, tissue development and function in vitro. In other projects, we are also interested in developing new cell technologies to further improve the culture and differentiation of human tissues in vitro and invite applicants who are interested in working at the interface between biology and the physical sciences. The exact nature of the project will be determined in discussions with the applicant but will involve engineering human tissues in vitro and their development, characterisation, and application in areas consistent with our fields of interest. For further information about our research please visit my research staff profile https://www.dur.ac.uk/biosciences/about/schoolstaff/profile/?id=1016
Successful applicants will join a busy and productive research group. The Masters projects on offer provide excellent training in the development of non-animal in vitro technologies, cell biology, tissue specific anatomy/physiology, engineering human tissues, stem cell science and cell differentiation, and advanced cell technologies. Students will master a range of cutting edge techniques to advance their research programme, including advanced 3D cell culture, cell and molecular biology, tissue analysis, histology, cell-based assays, and imaging (advanced light and electron microscopy). Students will train to become a research scientist, develop ownership of their project, and become expert in their field of interest. The Department of Biosciences at Durham University has excellent research facilities and training support programme to prepare students for a successful career in scientific research.

APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED ALL YEAR ROUND

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This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice and careers in academic medicine by applying the principles of the scientific method to studies in both anatomical research and clinically-applied anatomy. Read more

Overview

This award has been designed to facilitate the learning of the generic skills and knowledge essential to successful higher clinical practice and careers in academic medicine by applying the principles of the scientific method to studies in both anatomical research and clinically-applied anatomy. Anatomy encompasses all levels of structural organisation, topographical, neuroanatomical, histological, cellular and developmental, as well as providing a basis for studies in radiological imaging and pathology. This approach allows students to integrate recent advances in molecular genetics, cell biology, microscopy, imaging and computer simulation to biological and clinical problems concerning the human body.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalscienceanatomicalsciences/

Course Content

A total of 180 credits are required to achieve the MMedSci (Anatomical Sciences) Intercalated.

One third of the credits are associated with the major dissertation/project, one third are anatomy-related taught modules with practical content, and one third comprises a combination of core generic methodology modules and a choice of modules in areas of cell and molecular biology or applied clinical science.

COURSE MODULES

FOUR CORE modules which are compulsory:

Applied Morphological Techniques and Imaging (30 credits):

This module, taken early in the semester, introduces some of the key research techniques employed in anatomical, experimental and pathological investigations, including whole body methods, optical, confocal and electron microscopy, histochemical and immunocytochemical staining methods, and quantitative techniques such as morphometry and stereology. In general, half-day theory sessions are followed by practicals and visits to various research and pathology laboratories and seminars involve critical analysis of the literature and applications to project design and research grant funding.

Applied Clinical Anatomy 1 (15 credits):

A six-day module spread over semester 1, covering practical, theoretical and applied aspects of the anatomy and development of the muscular, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The unit includes anatomy prosection practicals, anthropometry, ultrasound imaging and critical analysis of the research literature particularly in the field of neuromuscular anatomy, variations, anomalies, and applied anatomy.

Applied Surgical Anatomy (15 credits):

This module, spread over both semesters, provides students with the opportunity to acquire a thorough knowledge of anatomy as applied to surgical diagnoses and procedures as a foundation for understanding and developing the scientific and evidence base of current practice. Activities include anatomy dissection labs, small group work and presentations, case-based discussions and critical appraisal work on the anatomical and surgical literature and self-directed learning.

Research Methods in Health (15 credits):

The aims of this module are as follows:

• To develop the students’ understanding of the philosophical and methodological bases of health and social research
• To enable the student to make an informed and appropriate choice of research design and methods
• To equip the student with critical appraisal skills
• To provide the student with the methodological foundation for a research dissertation

THREE OPTIONAL modules, ideally ONE from each of groups A, B, and C by discussion with the course tutors:

Group A

• Statistics and Epidemiology (15 credits)
• Medical Education 15 credits)

Group B

• Stem Cells: Types, Diagnoses and Applications (15 credits)
• Cell & Tissue Engineering (15 credits)

Group C

• Physiology of Neuromusculoskeletal Tissue (15 credits)
• Psychosocial Aspects of Pain (15 credits)
• Concepts of Neurological Rehabilitation (15 credits)
• Physiology and Pharmacology of Pain (15 credits)
• Assistive Technologies in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (15 credits)
• Dynamic Ultrasound Imaging (15 credits)

Dissertation/Project:
This may take the form of one long (9 month) dissection or laboratory-based research topic written up to include a literature review, methodologies, results and discussion. Alternatively, this could comprise a short dissection or laboratory research project and a related medical education research project written up as above. Some short exploratory anatomy lab research projects may be undertaken in the style of Applied Clinical Anatomy 2.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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An MS in Exercise and Sport Physiology with a concentration in Athletic Training is available at West Chester University in a collaboration between the Departments of Kinesiology and Sports Medicine. Read more
An MS in Exercise and Sport Physiology with a concentration in Athletic Training is available at West Chester University in a collaboration between the Departments of Kinesiology and Sports Medicine. It is a 40 credit, 2 year degree program that mandates the completion of a Thesis. Coursework includes Cadaver Antomy, Orthopedic Surgical Techniques, Seminars in Sports Medicine, as well as Topics in Sports Medicine.

Curriculum

Degree core:

• EXS 600 Rsrch Methods In Hlth, Phys Ed, Recreat
• EXS 585 Biomechanics
• KIN 608 Thesis Seminar
• EXS 681 Advanced Exercise Physiology
• HEA 526 Biostatistics for Public Health or STA 511 Intro Stat Computing & Data Management
• EXS 698 Research I
• EXS 699 Research II

Concentration core:

• SMD 500 Human Cadaver Anatomy
• SMD 501 Human Cadaver Dissection
• SMD 505 Evidence Based Practice in Sports Medicine
• SMD 592 Seminar in Sports Medicine
• SMD 693 Selected Topics in Sports Medicine

Electives (choose two):

• NTD 503 Human Nutrition
• HEA 550 Evidence-Based Medicine and Public Health
• EXS 572 Advanced Motor Learning
• KIN 603 Professional Literature Seminar
• EXS 681 Advanced Exercise Physiology
• EXS 687 Applied Muscular Physiology
• EXS 688 Applied Cardiovascular Physiology
• EXS 691 Adv Clinical Exercise Testing & Prescrip
• SMD 595 Orthopaedic Surgical Techniques

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Located within a European Centre of Excellence for Tissue engineering, and based on Keele University’s local hospital campus, the MSc in Cell and Tissue Engineering provides support and development to enhance your career within this rapidly expanding field. Read more

Overview

Located within a European Centre of Excellence for Tissue engineering, and based on Keele University’s local hospital campus, the MSc in Cell and Tissue Engineering provides support and development to enhance your career within this rapidly expanding field. The multidisciplinary environment enables close interaction with leading academics and clinicians involved in cutting-edge, and clinically transformative research.

Course Director: Dr Paul Roach ()

Studying Cell and Tissue Engineering at Keele

Our MSc Cell and Tissue Engineering programme has tracked alongside the strongly emergent global Regenerative Medicine industry and will prepare you for an exciting future within a range of medical engineering areas, be that in academic or industrial research, medical materials, devices, or therapeutics sectors, or in the clinical arena. The modular structure to the course enables flexibility and personalisation to suit your career aspirations, build upon strengths and interests and develop new understanding in key topics. The selection of modules on offer is professionally accredited by the Institute for Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

Graduate destinations for our students could include: undertaking further postgraduate study and research (PhD); pursuing a university-based, academic research career; providing technical consultancy for marketing and sales departments within industry; working within biomedical, biomaterials, therapeutic and regenerative medicine industries or working for a governmental regulatory agency for healthcare services and products.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/cellandtissueengineering/

‌The course provides support from the basics of human anatomy and physiology, through to development of novel nanotechnologies for healthcare. Due to the teaching and research involvement of clinical academic staff within the department, there are exciting opportunities to be exposed to current clinical challenges and state-of-the-art developments. Clinical visits and specialist seminars are offered and students will be able to select dissertation projects that span fundamental research to clinical translation of technologies – a truly ‘bench to bedside’ approach.

Learning and teaching methods include lectures and demonstrations from medical and engineering specialists, practical classes using state-of-the-art facilities and seminars with leading national and international researchers. Full-time study will see the course completed in 12 months; part-time study will allow you to complete it over two years.

About the department

Now delivered through the Keele Medical School and the Research Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, the course dates as far back as 1999, when it was established in partnership with Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics at the University Hospital. Most teaching now takes place in the Guy Hilton Research Centre, a dedicated research facility located on the hospital campus. The medical school is one of the top-ranked in the UK, and the research institute has an international reputation for world-leading research.

The centre was opened in 2006 and offers state-of-the-art equipment for translational research including newly-developed diagnostic instruments, advanced imaging modalities and additive manufacturing facilities. Its location adjacent to the university hospital ensures that students experience real-world patient care and the role that technology plays in that. Students also have access to advanced equipment for physiological measurement, motion analysis and functional assessment in other hospital and campus-based laboratories. The School embraces specialists working in UHNM and RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital Oswestry, covering key medical and surgical subspecialties.

The course runs alongside its sister course, the MSc in Biomedical Engineering, and an EPSRC-MRC funded Centre for Doctoral Training, ensuring a stimulating academic environment for students and many opportunities for engaging with further study and research.

Course Content

The aim of the course is to provide multidisciplinary Masters level postgraduate training in Cell and Tissue Engineering to prepare students for future employment in healthcare, industrial and academic environments. This involves building on existing undergraduate knowledge in basic science or engineering and applying it to core principles and current issues in medicine and healthcare.

Specifically, the objectives of the course are to:
- provide postgraduate-level education leading to professional careers in Cell and Tissue Engineering in industry, academia and a wide range of healthcare establishments such as medical organisations, medical research institutions and hospitals;

- provide an opportunity for in-depth research into specialist and novel areas of Biomaterials, and Cell and Tissue Engineering;

- expose students to the clinically translational environment within an active medical research environment with hands-on practical ability and supporting knowledge of up-to-date technological developments at the forefront of the field;

- introduce students to exciting new fields such as regenerative medicine, nanotechnology and novel devices for physiological monitoring and diagnostics.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The course is taught through subject-centred lectures and seminars, supported by tutorials and practical exercises. Collaborative learning and student-centred learning are also adopted giving widespread opportunity for group work and individual assignments. Students are required to conduct extensive independent study, and this is supported by full access to two libraries, online journal access and a suite of dedicated computers for exclusive use by MSc students on the course. In addition, students are supported by the guidance of a personal tutor within the department, as well as having access to university-wide support services. This includes English language support where appropriate.

Assessment

Modules will be assessed by a mixture of assessment methods, including lab reports, essays, and presentations, and final examination. This ensures the development of a range of transferrable employability skills such as time management and planning, written and verbal communication and numeracy as well as technical and subject-specific knowledge. The project dissertation forms a major component of the student’s assessed work.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council. Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Read more
Please note that the intermediate awards offered do not permit registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council

Overview

Our MSc Adult Nursing course has been designed for graduates with care experience who wish to develop a career as a registered nurse and join one of the most rewarding professions in health care. Our course will provide you with a wide range of experiences and prepare you to deliver high quality care with confidence. All of our pre-registration nursing courses are developed by nurses for nurses and will support you to work with health care teams to meet the needs of vulnerable adults requiring health care across a variety of settings. Learning and working at Masters level will support you to shape and improve your future profession and the health care experiences of patients in your care.

Adult nurses have a unique role within the healthcare setting. Making a positive change or improving the quality of people’s lives is a central tenet of this role. This may involve enabling people to improve, maintain, or recover their health, and to achieve the best possible quality of life, whatever the circumstances.

We are committed to the principles and values of the NHS Constitution (DH, 2013) and our Adult Nursing course promotes the behaviours and values that patients and staff believe to be at the heart of our NHS. These include respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, improving lives, working together for patients and the understanding that everyone counts.

The course places equal value on clinical practice and theory. It will take you from university lectures to clinical placement settings, from young to mature adults. You may well find yourself at a GP surgery, working with mulita-skilled teams in patients’ own homes or in the middle of a variety of hospital settings, from accident & emergency through to medical or surgical areas or providing compassionate care for patients with life limiting illnesses.

We’ll support you all the way. You’ll soon discover that our faculty is a stimulating place to learn, with modern facilities and registered, practising tutors who’ll make sure you’re being taught the latest techniques. We’re passionate about healthcare and dedicated to delivering the values set out by the NHS Constitution.

You’ll have the chance to share experiences and knowledge with other health care disciplines and to see how the professions work together.

Teaching on campus takes place between 9am and 7pm, Monday to Friday. On placement, you’ll be allocated to a mentor who will support your development and you’ll be expected to work the same shifts as the health care team and your mentor. Each week you will work 37.5 hours. This will include early, late and night shifts, as well as working weekends and bank holidays. Each year, five weeks’ of annual leave is built into the course at set points to support you in balancing your course and relaxation time.

Each of the two years is divided in three 30-credit modules. Each module will start with theory, followed by a hospital or community placement. A series of short Medicines Calculations modules are also embedded through the course.

Placements last around 5 weeks and will include both acute and community settings. Placement opportunities include: Older Person’s Care, Dementia Care, District Nursing, Surgical Setting, Acute Care Nursing and many more. Your final placement will be 12 weeks in length and you will also undertake additional placements each year which will enable you to explore other areas.

You’ll be linked to one of our NHS healthcare trust partners for your placements in hospitals or community settings.

If you study in Cambridge or Peterborough, you’ll do your placement in or around Cambridge, Huntingdon or Peterborough. You’ll get plenty of support from experienced mentors.

Our state of the art skills laboratories provide an ideal environment in which to learn a suite of practical skills in the safety of the university. This ensures that you gain understanding about the underpinning evidence that supports these skills, preparing you for the delivery of these skills in the practice setting.

In year 2 of the course you may choose the option to undertake an overseas placement and gain insight into another health care system.

Careers

All pre-registration nursing courses delivered by Anglia Ruskin University are approved by the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). On successful completion of the MSc Nursing course, you’ll be eligible to apply for registration with the NMC and join a profession with a wide range of opportunity. You may choose to become a community professional, such as a practice nurse, or to work as a staff nurse within a hospital. With experience you could become a nursing specialist or nurse consultant. You may enjoy managing a health care team or leading a specialist team in, for example, the community setting. Nurses also undertake roles in research and education.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules -

- Evidence Based Knowledge and Skills for Nursing:
This first module aims to prepare students for the knowledge and skills required to deliver fundamental and safe care. A series of key strands which underpin nursing practice will be commenced in this module including: patient safety; human anatomy and physiology; health promotion and the recognition of the nurse’s role in public health; mental health and common mental health problems; leadership skills and the use of research evidence that underpins care provision. Communication and interpersonal skills will also be considered including principles of de-escalation and the importance of sound interpersonal and professional skills in practice.

- Promoting Professional Practice in Nursing:
In this module students will be supported to understand the significance of prioritising patients as central to the role of the nurse and a key component of the NMC Code (2015). Person-centred care will be addressed through the exploration of patient autonomy and patients' rights. The concepts of advocacy, raising concerns and candour will provide students with an understanding of the legal and ethical parameters that support the delivery of safe care. The module builds on knowledge of bioscience and clinical skills to further enhance delivery of safe fundamental care. Introductions to leadership, management and team working will be provided.

- Nursing Adults with Challenging Health Needs:
This module addresses the complexities of long term conditions and palliative care for adult patients. Preventing the development of long term conditions and life-threatening disease, promoting health and wellbeing and supporting adults with long term conditions to live well independently are key aspects of the nurse’s role. Effective integrated care is critical to the patient experience and students will explore the impact of national drivers from a theoretical and practice based perspective, with a focus on the use and effectiveness of care pathways. This module provides the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology, pharmacology, clinical skills and ethical and legal issues to meet the challenges faced by those affected by long term and life limiting conditions.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 1

Year two, core modules -

- Ensuring the Safety of Patients Experiencing Acute Illness:
Patients become acutely unwell in clinical or home settings. This module will provide students with the knowledge, skills and experience to recognise, communicate and respond competently when a patient’s clinical condition indicates that they are becoming acutely unwell. Students will explore how psychological well-being can impact on recovery and the importance of patient focused care and empowerment. Alongside theory input students will participate in clinical scenarios around deteriorating patients (e.g. acute respiratory failure, acute coronary syndrome, and sepsis). Computer-controlled mannequins and simulation skills environments will be utilised to develop students’ skills in recognising and responding to patient deterioration.

- Decision Making, Leadership and Management in Nursing:
This theory/practice module enables students to enhance their leadership, peer coaching and decision making skills. The module aims to develop a varied and flexible repertoire of skills to be able to work effectively within multi-disciplinary teams, in the often challenging environments encountered in modern clinical practice. The module promotes students’ growth and expertise in professional knowledge and judgment, focusing on self-awareness and personal development. Development of key management skills of leadership, assertiveness, delegation and coaching will be provided as well as tools for resilience to withstand the stresses and pressures of practice.

- Major Project - MSc Nursing Adult:
This theory/practice module comprises a major project that is situated in and developed from the care setting. During the final practice placement, students will be expected to negotiate an area for service improvement to enhance the patient experience. This module will consolidate the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in clinical management and leadership and seeks to complement these with insight to mechanisms for improving the quality of healthcare. Understanding and applying concepts of quality assurance, clinical governance, standard setting and the role of audit in maintaining standards will be key drivers.
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 2
- Medicine Calculations for Safe Practice 3

Assessment -

To make sure you’re developing the skills and knowledge needed for professional practice, we use a range of assessment methods. These include essays, presentations, written exams, and multi-choice questions. We know feedback is essential for your progress and our lecturers take pride in giving you clear guidance on how to improve your expertise. Assessment also takes place in the practice setting and your mentor will support your development and undertake your assessment in each of your placements.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Cambridge - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/cambridge-campus

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The 2-year PG Diploma program uses a multi-disciplinary, research-informed approach to teach clinical and basic science related to the human systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, female reproductive, renal and genitourinary, the eyes, and skin) and diagnostics & therapeutics. Read more

The 2-year PG Diploma program uses a multi-disciplinary, research-informed approach to teach clinical and basic science related to the human systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, female reproductive, renal and genitourinary, the eyes, and skin) and diagnostics & therapeutics.

The scientific background is taught in the context of clinical placements in Community Medicine, General Hospital Medicine, Front Door Medicine, Mental Health, General Surgery, Obstetrics & Gynaecology and Paediatrics.

Successful completion of the 2 year PG Diploma enables graduates to take the national certification exam, which is mandatory to register and work as a Physician Associate.

Students benefit from a strong exposure to clinicians and scientists with active research in medically related subjects.

Course Structure

The program is delivered by the Physician Associate Faculty that brings together clinicians and other experts from across the disciplines of primary and secondary medical care. The course content reflects the curriculum and learning requirements for the Physician Associate framework (PA CC 2012).

The Physician Associate programme at Bangor includes an integrated placement programme of work-based learning that will provide progressive experiential learning in a range of clinical settings to allow students to attain the standards of knowledge and understanding in clinical practice, including regulatory structures, professionalism and clinical competences expected of a Physician Associate. Placements will be grouped according to the following clinical subject headings and minimum periods:

  • Community Medicine (180h)
  • General Hospital Medicine (350 h)
  • Front Door Medicine (180 h)
  • Mental Health (90 h)
  • General Surgery (90h)
  • Obstetrics & Gynaecology (90 h)
  • Paediatrics (acute setting) (90h) 

During the course you will learn how to recognise and manage common and complex medical conditions as part of multi-professional team, to make independent and informed judgements on clinical problems and be trained to integrate knowledge and clinical practice. As a Physician Associate graduate you’ll be able to demonstrate outstanding interpersonal and professional skills when working with patients, carers and clinical multi-disciplinary teams in a multicultural environment. You will also have a comprehensive understating of I.T., record keeping and communication using a diverse range of media in evidence based practice and understand the importance of health promotion, disease prevention and inequalities in society and local communities.

The programme aims to give students a comprehensive knowledge of the concepts, principles and technologies used in clinical practice in the following areas:

  • Cardiovascular system
  • Respiratory system
  • Gastrointestinal system
  • Musculoskeletal system
  • Eyes
  • Female reproductive system
  • Renal and genitourinary system
  • Skin
  • Diagnostics and therapeutics.
  • Neurology

On successful completion of the course, you’ll have gained the key knowledge related to practice as a physician associate, including major concepts related to the principles and theories associated with human anatomy and physiology, cell biology, body/system-drug actions and interactions, mechanisms underlying human pathological conditions and the basis of the clinical and technological methods used to diagnose and monitor these conditions. You be able to demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment in the medical domain including history taking and consultation skills, and physical examinations tailored to the needs of the patient and the demands of the clinical situation. You’ll also be able to demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the needs of patients/clients, and decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts.

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Teaching occurs via lectures, clinical placements, practical classes and group work including case centred discussions often delivered by academic clinicians who hold joint University and Health board contracts. Students benefit from a high number of contact hours that includes utilisation of our state-of-the art teaching laboratories and simulation suite at the hospital. Academic assessment includes placement reports, observed clinical skills, MCQ and written exams.



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The UCLan PGDip in Physician Associate Studies provides an exciting opportunity for graduates to become healthcare professionals and receive a salary whilst training. Read more
The UCLan PGDip in Physician Associate Studies provides an exciting opportunity for graduates to become healthcare professionals and receive a salary whilst training.

Physician Associates provide care to patients under the supervision of a Consultant or General Practitioner. Their role includes interviewing and examining patients, ordering tests and making decisions about patient management.

Our course will provide you with a foundation of scientific and clinical skills, and the opportunity to build on and use these through a variety of clinical placements in Lancashire and/or Cumbria.

Our programme makes use of case based learning, clinical and communication skills role play and focussed anatomy/physiology/pathophysiology teaching. All of our course content is in line with the requirements of the Physician Associate Competence and Curriculum framework (2012) laid out by the Royal College of Physicians Faculty of Physician Associates.

Outside of the classroom environment, the provision of clinical placements includes a full spectrum of opportunities: urban & rural, specialised hospital & general practice; single-handed or multi-disciplinary. Teamwork is essential for every PA and these placements will enable working with a variety of groups whilst under the supervision of medical colleagues. The geographical location of UCLan is ideal to enable this amazing combination of clinical opportunities, of which we are very proud.

DBS CHECKS

This course will involve access to children and/or vulnerable adults. You will be required to obtain a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (formerly termed CRB) and we will guide you through this process.

INDUSTRY LINKS

This course is provided in partnership with Health Education England North West (HEENW) as part of the North West Physician Associate Pilot programme.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND ASSESSMENT

You will be taught using our state-of-the-art facilities within the School of Medicine. The University’s campus-based clinical skills laboratories have a vast range of equipment - including a number of high fidelity clinical human simulators - to help develop clinical skills in realistic hospital, home and GP surgery environments.

A comprehensive understanding of human anatomy is enhanced with our Human Anatomy Resource and Learning Centres (HARLCs) which provide a focal point for students to engage in learning about the human body. You will also have access to our Anatomage table; similar to a body sized touch screen computer. This allows for virtual sectioning of the human body, which is particularly useful when considering medical imaging.

Knowledge and understanding of the full range of applied biological sciences is taught through a range of lectures and practical activities by our experts in a range of disciplines within the medical science field.

Here at UCLan your learning will be enriched by our patient volunteer group who are involved in clinical and communication skills training.

50% of the course will be spent on clinical placements with our NHS clinical education partners across Lancashire and/or Cumbria. This will include rotations in General Practice and a variety of hospital specialties. All students will gain experience in the care of both adults and children.

The course is taught by a variety of clinical and academic staff so that students benefit from a wide range of medical knowledge and expertise.

Assessment is by a variety of methods including written assignments, practical and theoretical examinations and workplace based assessments. The students are expected to keep an E-portfolio to evidence their progression throughout their clinical placements.

On completion of the course, students will be well prepared to take the National Exam and successful completion of this will allow them to refer to themselves as a physician associate and apply to join the profession’s managed voluntary register.

You must be prepared to travel to clinical placement sites throughout Lancashire and Cumbria. This survival guide will be useful.

OPPORTUNITIES

There is currently around 100% employment of UK graduates of Physician Associate programs.

Upon completion of the National Exam, Physician Associates have a wide range of choice of careers in both primary and secondary care.

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Biomedical science is integral to human and veterinary practice. It looks at how the body works and investigates ways to treat diseases through advanced tools and strategies. Read more

What is biomedical science?

Biomedical science is integral to human and veterinary practice. It looks at how the body works and investigates ways to treat diseases through advanced tools and strategies.
Students can do a general course or choose from three majors:
*Aquatic Microbiology
*Clinical Microbiology
*Physiology and Pharmacology.
These majors offer advanced level training in aquatic pathobiology, and clinical microbiology, and physiology and pharmacology, relevant to the domains of human and veterinary endeavour.

Course learning outcomes

Biomedical Science examines how the body works and investigates ways to treat diseases using advanced tools and strategies. It covers the fields of biochemistry, microbiology, physiology and anatomy with the aim of improving health outcomes for humans and animals in tropical, rural and remote and indigenous communities.
Graduates of the Masters of Biomedical Sciences will be able to:
*Apply and adapt advanced and integrated knowledge, including an understanding of recent developments, in the area of biomedicine and related professional competencies, behaviours and ethical frameworks
*Apply an integrated understanding of biomedical science and its application to improve human and animal health in rural, remote and indigenous community settings
*Analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories in new situations or contexts with creativity and independence
*Demonstrate a high level of personal autonomy and accountability for their own future professional development through reflection on current skills, knowledge and attitudes in the biomedical science arena
*Interpret and justify scientific propositions, methodologies and conclusions to specialist and non-specialist audiences through high level written and oral communication and numeracy skills
*Plan and execute or critically evaluate a substantial body of novel research with a large degree of independence.

Award title

MASTER OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (MBiomedSc)

Post admission requirements

Hepatitis B immunisation:
Students must provide evidence of being immune to hepatitis B within the first teaching period of their studies. A blood-borne viral disease may result in a student’s inability to obtain a placement in a Queensland Health facility and consequently may result in their inability to complete the requirements of the course as accredited by the relevant professional accrediting body. If a student has not complied with the above requirement by the last day of the first teaching period of their studies, their enrolment will be terminated immediately.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 2 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 2 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is dedicated to quality education and research. We have:
*Purpose-built emergency veterinary clinic including operating theatres and radiology facilities
*anatomy and biomedical science teaching and research laboratories, including housing for small, large and aquatic animals
*veterinary teaching facilities in Atherton, Malanda, Townsville and Charters Towers.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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We actively encourage postgraduate students on this course to undertake internships and build up a portfolio of clients and practical experience. Read more
We actively encourage postgraduate students on this course to undertake internships and build up a portfolio of clients and practical experience.

Course overview

Careers in Sport and Exercise Science can develop in at least two directions. Firstly you can help elite athletes reach their optimum sports performance. Secondly you can help the general population to improve fitness through exercise referral and community programmes.

This course allows you to specialise in both those areas, by providing you with a solid grounding in measurement, evaluation, research methods, data analysis, and sport and exercise psychology. Additionally, you will get the chance to study applied physiology, applied biomechanics or complete a personal project. The final stage is a research project that reflects your developed knowledge and skills.

Compared to undergraduate studies, this Masters has more emphasis on self-directed lab work, data collection and analysis. We encourage you to undertake real-world internships and build up experience with external clients and sports clubs. This practical experience will complement the rigorous research elements of the course.

By the end of the course you will have a portfolio of work, feedback from clients/employers, and a record of practical and academic projects. This will give you a clear advantage when it comes to applying for jobs.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core modules:
-Measurement and Evaluation (20 Credits)
-Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology (20 Credits)
-Applied Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 Credits)
-Masters Project (60 Credits)

Designated core modules (you must choose one of the following, but you may choose the other as an option):
-Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology (20 Credits)
-Applied Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise (20 Credits)

Optional modules (choose at least one):
-Strength and Conditioning in Practice (20 Credits)
-Sports Injuries, Management and Rehabilitation (20 Credits)
-Applied Weight Management (20 Credits)
-Professional Skills and Practice (20 Credits)
-Independent Learning Project (20 Credits)
-Applied Public Health (20 Credits)
-Brief Interventions (20 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, problem-based learning seminars, web-based resources, small group discussions and debates. You will develop your practical skills with workshops and laboratory classes.

Assessment methods include essays, case studies, portfolios, oral presentations, scientific reports, practical exams, data analyses, critical reviews, poster presentations and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

We have invested in the latest software and equipment so that you have maximum scope to measure and improve performance. Our facilities will propel your learning in sport and exercise sciences.

Biomechanics equipment

Our equipment can measure motion, muscle activity and forces on the body during high intensity sports and the activities of daily living. Equipment and techniques include the following:
-3D motion capture systems including Vicon® systems and Xsens® motion capture suits
-Software such as Dartfish®, Kinovea® and LongoMatch® software to capture live action images for match tagging and coaching feedback
-Movement tracking tools such as Actigraph® and Catapult®
-Delsys® Trigno electromyography equipment to see how the muscles of the body are working
-Kistler® force platforms and Batak® reaction walls to analyse sporting performance
-Novel® Pedar systems to analyse foot pressure

Exercise Physiology and Psychology
Our laboratories include the most up-to-date equipment for assessing human performance. You’ll get hands-on practical experience with the following:
-Polar® Team2 heart rate monitoring system for assessing the heart rates of a full squad of team players in real time
-Cortex® gas analysers to evaluate cardiovascular performance
-Biochemical analysers from Randox®, Jenway® and Gonotec® to measure substances and enzymes within the body
-Tendo®, Myotest® and Globus® equipment to profile your strength and power and develop specific training programmes
-Fusion Sport® SMARTSPEED light gates for assessing speed, agility and reaction times
-Assess and enhance cognitive performance using our Neurotracker® 3D multiple object tracking equipment

Sports Medicine and Anatomy
Anatomy is taught by experienced staff in a specialist clinical lab using skeletons, anatomical models, 3D software, online material and human subjects. You will learn techniques for sports injury rehabilitation, including the use of sports massage and ultrasound equipment.

You will also examine balance and stability using our Biodex® stability and balance trainer and assess strength imbalances using our sophisticated Biodex® dynamometer and new BTE Primus® rehabilitation equipment. You can investigate how new techniques such as thermal imaging are being used in injury assessment with Flir® IR cameras.

Fitness and Conditioning Suite
In our lab, you'll find fitness and conditioning equipment that would be the envy of most modern gyms. From a wide range of cardiovascular equipment to machine and Olympic weights, you will receive hands-on teaching in a professional environment.

University Library Services
The University library has thousands of relevant books, e-books and journal articles, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We subscribe to useful resources such as SPORTDiscus, which provides journal articles, book chapters and summaries about sport, fitness and related disciplines.

Sciences Complex
This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which has benefited from multi-million pound investments. The IT facilities are excellent and, across the University, there are hundreds of workstations as well as wireless internet access. If you have any computer problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Sports facilities
Students at Sunderland have easy access to some of the best facilities in the region. These include:
-50m Olympic size swimming pool
-95m artificial ski slope
-Climbing wall with some of the best route setters in the UK
-Football training pitches at Sunderland AFC’s Academy of Light
-Marine Activities Centre for sailing, canoeing, kayaking and powerboating
-LTA indoor tennis centre with 13 indoor and outdoor courts
-Floodlit athletics tracks

CitySpace
Our City Campus features a state-of-the-art facility called CitySpace. It features:
-Sports hall (suitable for hosting large-scale events)
-Fitness suite/gym
-Strength and conditioning room
-Injury prevention and support suite
-Fitness classes
-Climbing wall

Employment & careers

Potential employers of graduates from this course include national sports associations, sports and leisure companies, recreation services, local authorities, health bodies including the NHS, schools and colleges. Job roles include the following (some require further training):
-Sports and exercise scientist
-Performance Analyst
-Sports coach/instructor
-Manager of health promotion initiatives
-Manager of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise referral
-Fitness centre manager
-Personal trainer/specialist fitness instructor
-Lecturer

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working within the fitness industry, sports development and in Further Education colleges.
A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to. -Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher. Read more
Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to:
-Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher.
-Be familiar with up-to-date translational research methodologies.
-Be adept at scientific reasoning and critical analysis of scientific literature.
-Acknowledge the regulatory and ethical aspects of biomedical and clinical research.
-Have mastered scientific and medical terminologies.
-Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills, enabling you to find employment in an international and interdisciplinary professional setting.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The TRANSMED studies are built upon three core educational themes:
Development of Research Skills
These include an introduction to current methodologies, which are further developed during a training period in a research group; research ethics: principles of clinical investigation; and writing of research or grant proposals.

Studies in Human Disease
These range from normal human physiology and anatomy, and basic biomedical courses, to more specialised studies covering various topics pertinent to the specialist option. You supplement these studies with clinical rounds, during which you have an opportunity to study selected patient cases in hospital wards, under the supervision of a clinician mentor.

Development of Communication Skills
These are promoted throughout the curriculum, through utilisation of interactive approaches and discussions, problem-based learning and oral presentations. The multidisciplinary TRANSMED community encompasses a wide range of educational backgrounds and provides ample opportunities for direct interactions with medical students, science and clinical teachers to enable you to practice and adopt interdisciplinary communication skills. At the end of the course of study, your communication skills will be evaluated in the final exam, during which you will orally present your research plan to expert examiners.

Selection of the Majors

The major of the programme is Translational medicine. During your first study year you can choose any of the five available specialisation options. These options and their specific goals are:
Neuroscience and Psychobiology
-To acquire knowledge on research methodology and state-of-the-art information in systems and cognitive neuroscience, as well as in clinical neuropsychology.
-To learn to produce new scientific information in the fields of psychobiology of human life, health, and stress, and to transfer the results between basic research and clinical settings.

Cancer
-To acquire basic knowledge of the principles of neoplastic growth, cancer progression and dissemination.
-To acquire basic understanding of the interplay between different cell types during neoplastic growth.
-To acquire knowledge of major research methodologies and disease models in cancer biology.

Regenerative Medicine
-To understand the principles of developmental and stem cell biology and regenerative pharmacology as the basis of regenerative therapies.
-To be familiar with the major technologies applied in regenerative medicine, including tissue engineering, cell and organ transplantation and transplantation immunology.
-To understand the ethical principles of clinical translation of basic research and application of regenerative medicine therapies.

Metabolic Disorders
-To be able to understand the basic metabolic pathways.
-To understand the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and obesity.
-To be able to use genetic knowledge as a basis for prediction, diagnosis and treatment of metabolic disorders.

Cross-Disciplinary Translational Medicine
-To achieve a broad understanding of topics and methods in the field of Translational medicine.

Programme Structure

The scope of the programme is 120 credits (ECTS) and can be completed within two academic years (60 ECTS / year).

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree includes 60 ECTS of advanced and 60 ECTS of other studies. Both of these include both obligatory and optional studies.

The majority of the advanced studies are related to the chosen specialist option and include:
-Master’s thesis (30 ECTS)
-Placement in a research group for learning advanced methods in your selected field of study
-Methodological and human health and disease-related courses
-Clinical rounds in Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH) clinics
-Final examination in your field of specialisation

The other studies include e.g.
-Article analysis, scientific writing and presentation
-Biomedicine and introductory courses in research methods
-Career planning and orientation
-Individual study coaching and personal study plans
-Research ethics

You can select the optional courses based on your personal interests, or to support your chosen specialisation option. You can also include courses from other suitable Master’s programmes at the University of Helsinki, such as:
-Life Science Informatics
-Genetics and molecular biosciences
-Neuroscience
-Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour

You can also include studies in other universities under the flexible study right-agreement (JOO).

Career Prospects

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree provides excellent opportunities to apply for and attend postgraduate studies. Currently, 50% of TRANSMED graduates are continuing their studies in doctoral programmes, either at the University of Helsinki or abroad.

TRANSMED graduates are also highly valued in the private sector. Around 35% of graduates have been employed directly by bioindustry, pharma or other health sector enterprises either in Finland or abroad. Titles include product manager, product specialist, personalised health care manager etc. All such enterprises usually recruit both at the graduate (MSc) and postgraduate (PhD) levels.

The health and health technology sectors represent a rapidly emerging field, and one of the areas with a growing importance as the population ages and the costs of new therapies steadily increase. Thus, the demand for well-trained specialists in the field of translational medicine is likely to increase in the near future, providing excellent career prospects globally.

Internationalization

The Translational Medicine major is only available in this international programme, making the programme attractive to both Finnish and international students. Indeed, opportunities for personal interaction with students from different cultures are an integral feature of the studies. During your studies, you can also volunteer to act as a tutor for the incoming international students.

The international research community in The Academic Medical Centre Helsinki actively participates in teaching in TRANSMED. You complete the research group practice for your Master’s thesis in multicultural research groups.

It is also possible to complete your Master’s thesis work or research group placement abroad, or to include coursework done at a foreign university.

Research Focus

The specialisation options of the programme – Neuroscience and psychobiology, Cancer, Regenerative medicine, Metabolic disorders, and Cross-disciplinary translational medicine – are closely aligned with the research focus areas of the Faculty of Medicine: malignancy, inflammation, metabolism, degenerative processes as well as psychiatric disorders and their mechanisms. You therefore have an opportunity to learn from, and be supervised by, the leading experts and professors in their fields.

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This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. Read more
This award-winning programme combines the expertise of anthropologists and biologists to examine primate conservation biology in a broad context, with particular emphasis on the relationships between humans and wildlife in forest and woodland environments. It provides an international and multidisciplinary forum to help understand the issues and promote effective action.

Whether working in the lab, with local conservation groups (including zoos and NGOs), or in the field, you will find yourself in a collaborative and supportive environment, working with international scholars in primate conservation and gaining first-hand experience to enact positive change.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/primate-conservation/

Why choose this course?

- A pioneering programme providing scientific, professional training and accreditation to conservation scientists

- Awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2008

- Opportunity to work alongside leading academics for example Professor Anna Nekaris, Professor Vincent Nijman and Dr Kate Hill

- Excellent learning resources both at Brookes and through Oxford’s museums and libraries including the Bodleian Library, the Radcliffe Science Library, and the Museum of Natural History

- Links with conservation organisations and NGOs, both internationally and closer to home, including Fauna and Flora International, TRAFFIC and Conservation International

- Field trips for MSc students to Apenheul Primate Park in the Netherlands as well as to sanctuaries and zoos in the UK

- A dynamic community of research scholars undertaking internationally recognised and world leading research.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is through a combination of lectures, research seminars, training workshops, tutorials, case studies, seminar presentations, site visits, computer-aided learning, independent reading and supervised research.

Each of the six modules is assessed by means of coursework assignments that reflect the individual interests and strengths of each student. Coursework assignments for six taught modules are completed and handed in at the end of the semester, and written feedback is given before the start of the following semester. A seventh module, the final project, must be handed in before the start of the first semester of the next academic year. It will be assessed during this semester with an examinations meeting at the beginning of February, after which students receive their final marks.

An important feature of the course is the contribution by each student towards an outreach project that brings primate conservation issues into a public arena. Examples include a poster, display or presentation at a scientific meeting, university society or school. Students may also choose to write their dissertation specifically for scientific publication.

Round-table discussions form a regular aspect of the course and enable closer examination of conservation issues through a sharing of perspectives by the whole group.

Careers

This unique postgraduate programme trains new generations of anthropologists, conservation biologists, captive care givers and educators concerned with the serious plight of non-human primates who seek practical solutions to their continuing survival. It provides the skills, knowledge and confidence to enable you to contribute to arresting and reversing the current devastating destruction of our tropical forests and the loss of the species that live in them.

You will be joining a supportive global network of former students working across all areas of conservation in organisations from the BBC Natural History Unit through to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and in roles from keeper and education officer in zoos across the UK and North America to paid researcher at institutes of higher education. Some of our students have even gone on to run their own conservation-related NGOs.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our vibrant research culture is driven by a thriving and collaborative community of academic staff and doctoral students. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 70% of our work was judged to be of international quality in terms of originality, significance and rigour, with 5% "world leading".

Our strong performance in the RAE, along with our expanding consultancy activities, have enabled us to attract high quality staff and students and helped to generate funding for research projects.

Conservation Environment and Development, comprising several research clusters.

The Nocturnal Primate Research Group specialises in mapping the diversity of the nocturnal primates of Africa, Asia, Madagascar and Latin America through multidisciplinary teamwork that includes comparative studies of anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and genetics. Field studies are helping to determine the origins and distribution of these neglected species, as well as indicating the conservation status of declining forests and woodlands. The NPRG has developed a widespread network of collaborative links with biologists, game wardens, forestry officers, wildlife societies, museums and zoos/sanctuaries.

The Human Interactions With and Constructions of the Environment Research Group develops and trains an interdisciplinary team of researchers to investigate priorities within conservation research - using an interdisciplinary framework in anthropology, primatology, rural development studies, and conservation biology.

The Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group (OWTRG) aims to quantify all aspects of the trade in wild animals through multidisciplinary teamwork including anthropology, social sciences, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, environmental economics, and legislation. Their strong focus is on wildlife trade in tropical countries –as this is where most of the world's biodiversity resides and where the impacts of the wildlife trade are arguably the greatest. Recognizing that the wildlife trade is a truly global enterprise they also focus on the role of consumer countries.

The Europe Japan Research Centre (EJRC) organises and disseminates the research of all Brookes staff working on Japan as well as a large number of affiliated Research Fellows.

The Human Origins and Palaeo Environments Research Cluster carries out ground-breaking interdisciplinary research, focussed on evolutionary anthropology and environmental reconstruction and change. The study published in the journal Science reports findings from an eight-year archaeological excavation at a site called Jebel Faya in the United Arab Emirates. Palaeolithic stone tools found at the Jebel Faya were similar to tools produced by early modern humans in east Africa, but very different from those produced to the north, in the Levant and the mountains of Iran. This suggested early modern humans migrated into Arabia directly from Africa and not via the Nile Valley and the Near East as is usually suggested. The new findings will reinvigorate the debate about human origins and how we became a global species.

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he Rehabilitation Science (Physiotherapy) MSc allows you to apply for registration as a physiotherapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
he Rehabilitation Science (Physiotherapy) MSc allows you to apply for registration as a physiotherapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). This course is also approved by the professional body, The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.
It is ideal for graduates with related first degrees who wish to gain both a professional and academic qualification and start a career in this challenging and highly rewarding field.

This accelerated course is taught with the innovative problem-based learning approach, with an emphasis on practical application of skills and knowledge. Through this balance of theory and practice experience you will graduate a capable and confident physiotherapist.

The values of the NHS constitution are embedded in our curriculum; where patients come first in everything the NHS does, and include respect and dignity, compassion and working together for patients.

Our high quality teaching and research are renowned, and have an applied focus. We have established strong links with specialist practice educators to ensure the provision of support and guidance both within the university and in practice.

Course structure

This intensive programme runs over 45 weeks per year, for two years. Your time on the course will be balanced between campus-based study and clinical practice.

The course begins in February and consists of six campus-based modules and five practice modules. Year 1 is mainly campus-based and year 2 predominantly involves practice placements alongside the campus-based Research Dissertation Studies.

The course is delivered in a variety of ways, typically via problem-based tutorials, subject specialist resource sessions, skills workshops, and simulation in our high-tech Human Movement Laboratory, and Clinical Skills and Simulation Rooms.

Completion of the Project Studies module and the submission of a dissertation lead to the masters award.

Syllabus

Your study will focus on real-life situations, integrating subjects such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, therapeutic skills, behavioural sciences and research methods.

Year 1 modules:

Physiotherapy in Health
Physiotherapy in Rehabilitation
Practice Placement (six weeks)
Neurological Physiotherapy
NMS Physiotherapy
Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy

Year 2 modules:

Practice placements (five placements each lasting six weeks)
Research Dissertation

Facilities

Human Movement Laboratory:

The Human Movement Laboratory is used widely by our physiotherapy, occupational therapy and podiatry students, and is also used for commercial consultancy.

In the lab you will use the latest technology to measure and assess all aspects of human movement, joints, muscles, soft tissue structure and nerves. The laboratory has equipment for conducting cardio-pulmonary investigations including Cosmed metabolic system and spirometry.

Clinical Skills and Simulation Suite:

Our Clinical Skills and Simulation Suite is among the best equipped in the country, and is an invaluable tool for assessment and monitoring students' progress throughout the course.

You will benefit from practising nursing skills in an environment that simulates real-life professional experiences. Provided by the NHS’ South East Coast Ambulance Service, you may have access to our Simbulance, enabling you to work alongside paramedic students in an interprofessional learning environment. On board is a high fidelity mannikin with multiple uses, and a child-size mannikin for paediatric scenarios.

Learning by simulation means you will be confident in your ability to apply your knowledge and skills in your professional life.

Problem-based learning

Our educational philosophy mirrors the philosophy of occupational therapy. We believe that an individual's positive engagement in learning activity leads to advanced productivity, increased perception of self-worth, improved quality of life and enjoyment of the course.

Our occupational therapy courses use problem-based learning (PBL), a technique recommended by authorities around the world. All subjects covered are integrated around problem-solving within a real life situation. We find that learning in this way significantly increases our students’ engagement with the subjects.

Advantages of the problem-based learning approach are:

• Students report that they feel more motivated to learn theoretical knowledge as they can see where they can apply it to real-world situations
• Teamworking and improved communication skills are developed, as students share their expertise and rationale behind their potential solutions
• Students find they are more confidently able to search for information from a wider range of sources, such as journals, textbooks and the internet, and take more responsibility for learning independently
• It encourages deeper learning, as it focuses on activities and activating knowledge in practice contexts, rather than traditional rote memory recall in a predominantly classroom-based context.

Careers and Employability

This professional course prepares you to work as a chartered physiotherapist in the UK, with professional and portfolio development running from course start to finish.

Graduates are equipped for careers in the NHS and the private health sector, both in the UK and abroad.

Many graduates secure employment in the local area by developing networks through their placements.

After a period of work experience, you will also be given the opportunity to progress to PhD research programmes and contribute to the evidence base of the profession.

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This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. Read more
This course offers a wide ranging, in depth knowledge of oral biology in its broadest sense including relevant microbiology and disease processes. It also provides a sound educational background so that you can go on to lead academic oral biology programmes within dental schools.

Why study Oral Biology at Dundee?

This course is specifically designed for individuals who wish to pursue career pathways in academic oral biology, with a focus, though not exclusively, on developing individuals who can deliver and, more importantly, lead oral biology courses within dental schools.

Oral Biology is a significant subject area that is integral to undergraduate and postgraduate dental training worldwide. The scope of Oral Biology includes a range of basic and applied sciences that underpin the practise of dentistry. These subjects include: oral and dental anatomy; craniofacial and dental development; oral physiology; oral neuroscience; oral microbiology. These subjects will be integrated with the relevant disease processes, for example, craniofacial anomalies, dental caries and tooth surface loss.

What's so good about studying Oral Biology at Dundee?

This programme focuses on the research and education experience of the staff in the Dental School in Dundee. Such expertise lies in the fields of craniofacial development and anomalies; pain and jaw muscle control; salivary physiology; cancer biology; microbiology; cariology and tooth surface loss.

In addition it makes use of the extensive resources available for postgraduate programmes: extensive histological collections; virtual microscopy; oral physiology facilities; cell biology and dental materials laboratories.

Who should study this course?

The MSc in Oral Biology is for graduates who wish to pursue a career in academic oral biology. The course will be of particular interest for those wishing to establish themselves as oral biology teachers, innovators and course leaders within a dental school.

Teaching and Assessment

The Dental School is well placed to deliver such a course with an established staff of teaching and research active within oral biology, and its related fields, an in-house e-learning technologist and substantial links to the Centre for Medical Education in the School of Medicine. There will be an opportunity for students to exit with a PGCert in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 -4 or a Diploma in Oral Biology after successful completion of modules 1 - 7.

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered via a blend of methodologies including: face-to-face lectures / seminars / tutorials; on-line learning; directed and self- directed practical work; self-directed study; journal clubs.
What you will study

The MSc will be taught full-time over one year (September to August). Semester one (Modules 1 – 4) and Semester 2A, 2B (Modules 5 – 8) will provide participants with wide ranging, in-depth knowledge of oral biology, together with focused training in research (lab-base, dissertation or e- Learning) and its associated methodology. The MSc course is built largely on new modules (5) supported by 2 modules run conjointly with the Centre for Medical Education within the Medical School. All modules are compulsory:

Semester 1:

Module 1: Academic skills 1: principles of learning and teaching (15 credits)
Module 2: Cranio-facial development and anomalies (15 credits)
Module 3: Dental and periodontal tissues, development and structure (20 credits)
Module 4: Oral mucosa and disorders (10 credits)

Semesters 2A and 2B

Module 5a: Academic skills 2a: principles of assessment (15 credits)
Module 5b: Academic Skills 2b:educational skills
Module 6: Neuroscience (20 credits)
Module 7: Oral environment and endemic oral disease (20 credits)
Module 8: Project (60 credits)

The project is designed to encourage students to further develop their skills. This could take the form of a supervised laboratory research project, a literature based dissertation or an educational project. The educational project would be based around the development of an innovative learning resource utilising the experience of the dental school learning technologist.

How you will be assessed

Exams on the taught element of the programme will be held at the end of semester one. Essays and assignments will also contribute to the final mark, and the dissertation will be assessed through the production of a thesis and a viva exam.

Careers

The MSc Oral Biology is aimed at dental or science graduates who are either early in their careers or wish to establish themselves as oral biologists within dental schools. Oral Biology is a recognised discipline in many dental schools worldwide. Graduates will have gained sufficient knowledge and skills to enable them to be teachers, innovators and educational leaders in the field. In addition, successful graduates will be well placed to undertake further postgraduate study at PhD level. In some cases, this may possible within the existing research environments within the Dental School, the wider College of Medicine Dentistry and Nursing and the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification of the University of Dundee.

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