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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Environmental changes, ageing populations, the media and new technologies, asylum and migration, intergenerational justice, complex multilevel governance arrangements, the impact of trade and investment, poverty and inequalities, the rise of identity politics and the changing nature of the personal sphere are contemporary global challenges facing human rights calling into question the fundamental tenets of human rights law both in terms of its formulation and implementation through policy development and law-making.

Differentiated from existing LLMs, the LLM Human Rights explicitly focuses on these contemporary challenges and how best to respond to them though law, policy and practice. The Human Rights programme draws on the research strengths in the College of Law and Criminology, but also from other colleges, in its teaching; and, exploits strong relationships with external partners to integrate a distinctive applied focus to the Human Rights programme.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM Human Rights will benefit from a programme designed around high calibre research and impact in human rights. Human Rights students will also benefit from academics' strong relationships with external partners working in the field of human rights, giving the programme a distinctive approach centred on the implementation and application of human rights.

The focus on implementation and practice in human rights is complemented by a multidisciplinary approach. Human rights policy and practice often do not recognise disciplinary divides. The Human Rights programme allows students to experience teaching from other disciplines to enhance their knowledge and understanding of human rights as an integrated project (e.g. politics and international development).

Uniquely the Human Rights programme addresses diverse challenges in human rights faced by law and policy, and by practitioners at the global, regional, State and sub-State levels. The approach focuses on how these challenges might be effectively managed through law and policy. The Human Rights programme offers:

- The opportunity and choice to address a range of human rights topics and challenges across a number of thematic areas, with teaching by expert researchers in the field.

- A multidisciplinary approach reflecting the reality of human rights in practice.

- A practical and practice focused philosophy.

Modules

The LLM Human Rights is a modular programme, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts:

Part I consists of 3 taught modules, each 20 credits. Students will be required to undertake 2 compulsory modules, these are: International Human Rights Law and Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention. Students are also required to select 1 further optional 20 credit taught module from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Part II gives students a choice of 3 optional modules, each 20 credits, from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Students of LLM in Human Rights are also required to undertake a dissertation, which contributes 60 credits.

The following are examples of modules offered to Human Rights students (modules available for selection will be dependent on contingencies, e.g. whether a module leader is in study leave).

Human Rights and Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability

Trade, Investment and Human Rights

Human Rights and the Media

Human Rights and Family Law

Human Rights and Identities

Accountability for Human Rights Implementation

Impact Assessment and Human Rights

Children’s Human Rights

Human Rights and Poverty

Human Rights, Migration and Human Trafficking

Human Rights and Criminal Justice

Human Rights and Terrorism on-line

Human Rights and Medical Law

Human Rights and Employment

Extra-curricular Activities

Throughout their studies Human Rights students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities to enhance their practical understanding of human rights. These include:

Guest lectures by expert practitioners in human rights.

Workplace learning through voluntary work and/or placement.

Involvement in collaborative research projects with research partners.

Engagement with the College’s projects focussed on practical implementation and impact from research (e.g. Cyberterrorism Project, Wales Observatory, Centre for Environment, and the Sex Work Consortium).

Careers and Employability

The LLM Human Rights will open the door to a range of careers, including:

- Human rights institutions: increasingly international and regional human rights institutions are seeking to support, monitor and influence State policy and social arrangements. Potential graduate destinations include: the United Nations and the Council of Europe as well as other regional institutions.

- The public sector, including government at all levels. Potential graduate destinations include: civil service, regional, national and sub-national government, local authorities and other public bodies, and, political and policy advice work.

- The private sector: human rights are increasingly the concern of the private sector in the realm of socially responsible capitalism. Potential graduate destinations include: global business (including institutions such as the World Bank); the business sector (from large scale business such as the banking sector, to smaller concerns seeking to appeal to the ethical consumer).

- The NGO sector: non-governmental agencies are well-established stakeholders in human rights. Potential graduate destinations include: international NGOS (e.g. UNICEF); regional or local level NGOS.

- Research and academia: research on human rights is a well-established concern for academia.

The LLM Human Rights enhances student employability as:

- The Human Rights programme ranges across a broad spectrum of human rights topics relevant to law, policy and practice and encourages a practical approach in these areas.

- Students will have the opportunity to engage with projects providing opportunity for hands-on experience of human rights research as well as dissemination to support practical application.

- The Human Rights programme offers a range of work place learning opportunities.

- Entrepreneurial skills will be developed by encouraging students to contribute ideas to project work and project activities.



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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/. Read more
This MA examines contemporary issues concerning justice. You will learn how to conceptualise and study the possibilities of human rights, going beyond legal formulations to look at the conditions in which human rights claims are made- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-human-rights/

Human rights mobilise millions of supporters across borders, inspiring passion and hope. And they operate at and between all the scales involved in globalisation: local, national, international, transnational. They are moral claims to justice. Although often associated with law, human rights are not the same as legal rights – human rights can be claimed where no legal rights are codified, even if changes in the law are invariably called for as part of attempts to realise human rights in practice.

Human rights are carried by different actors:

-grassroots social movements, small Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and huge International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs)
-lawyers and judges
-bureaucrats and experts in Inter-Governmental Organisations (IGOs) even, sometimes, national politicans
-journalists, novelists, translators, artists, film-makers

These different actors are often at odds with each other in defining and defending particular justifications of what human rights are and should be.

In this Masters you will learn about how human rights are constructed, exploring framings of human rights through case studies; and you will begin to practice some of the methodologies and methods that are currently used in NGOs and grassroots activist networks trying to remedy global injustices.

The focus on culture that runs through the programme makes for an emphasis on concrete, situated practices and meanings. Can human rights contribute to a global culture in which injustices figure as ‘wrongs’? Or are human rights invariably skewed, constructing injustices in ways that suit international elites better than they suit people who are suffering? Do human rights do violence to local cultures? Are they an appropriate response to local violence? In this MA we contextualise the study of how human rights are constructed in micro-processes, in the media and face-to-face in relation to debates over macro-structures, processes of globalisation and the institutions of global governance.

In terms of social justice, the MA is set up to study human rights beyond narrow, legalistic definitions. We look at what really makes a difference in terms of realising human rights in practice. Can human rights really be constructed in ways that challenge and overturn established social structures? Can rights be claimed in such a way that they can really protect us as human beings against the ‘creative destruction’ of global capitalism, state repression, the subjugation of women, and hatred and violence against minorities of all kinds – sexual, ethnic, religious?

This course covers the following disciplines: sociology, politics, anthropology, law, geography, english, literature, cultural studies, criminology

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Kate Nash.

Modules & Structure

The MA in Human Rights, Culture and Social Justice is taught in the Department of Sociology, where there are a number of people who are working on areas broadly related to human rights as well as directly on how human rights are constructed and claimed.

In the first part of the course you will take the core module ‘Constructing Human Rights’ in which you will be introduced to debates over the possibilities of human rights, different ways of conceiving culture and the role that is played by a diverse range of organisations involved in challenging injustices connected to globalisation. You will also consider practical attempts to realise human rights.

You will take two short, skills-oriented modules 'Researching Human Rights' and 'Organising Human Rights' in which you will be introduced to methods and skills that will be of direct practical use in working for NGOs (eg evaluating user engagement, team-building and decision-making through role play, tracing the media impact of a campaign).

In the second term, you will choose among a number of options. You can choose to take 'Practicing Human Rights' and make use of some of the skills you have learned in a placement. Students who choose this option find and negotiate a placement in an organisation or a grassroots campaign whose work can be related to human rights and attend a series of workshops that allow them to reflect on the practical work, on their professional skills and on the broader significance of their observations.

While the core modules of the programme are taught by lecturers in Sociology, you may choose your option modules from those that are run here or in other departments, including Politics, Media and Communications, and Anthropology.

Finally you will write a dissertation based on research you will carry out, possibly related to the NGO or network you have worked in, and making use of a range of concepts and methods taught in the Department. You will be supervised by someone with expertise and interest in the topic you are studying and the methodologies and methods you plan to use.

Option modules

You will choose option modules worth 60 credits in Sociology, Media and Communications, the Centre for Cultural Studies, English and Comparative Literature, Anthropology, Politics, Music and Educational Studies.

This includes the following option module, available to Human Rights students only:

Practising Human Rights (30 credits)
This series of workshops accompanies your placement in an organisation or grassroots activist network. We will discuss diaries that each participant will carry out during the placements in the context of broader debates about human rights on the one hand, and about professional practice, organisations and activism on the other hand. As a requirement for this option, you will negotiate a placement in an organisation whose work can be related to human rights or practical involvement in a grassroots campaign.

Skills & Careers

As issues of globalisation and justice are frequently in the media, and government policy in the UK, US, and elsewhere in Europe is now supposed to be guided by considerations of humanitarianism and human rights, there is a need for graduates with knowledge of human rights.

There are openings for careers in organisations including charities, humanitarian and human rights NGOs and even multi-national corporations, many of which are now concerned with their image in terms of human rights.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The Universe of Human Rights. We aim at providing you with the scientific knowledge and the practical skills to work as a human rights expert in different professional environments. Read more
The Universe of Human Rights

Aims and objectives

We aim at providing you with the scientific knowledge and the practical skills to work as a human rights expert in different professional environments.

Target group

We welcome students with at least a bachelor degree in a broad variety of academic disciplines from all world regions, with an open mind, empathy for human beings and a strong interest to experience the fascinating world of human rights.

Modules

We offer an innovative and interdisciplinary approach to human rights, with a strong emphasis on practice. We keep the class size small in order to provide you with the best possible support, so you can get the most out of the programme. Your interests are taken very seriously – you have the opportunity to determine certain contents of your courses.

Semester overview
Semester 1: Courses introducing human rights, its mechanisms and its interdisciplinarity
Semester 2: Courses focusing on specific human rights and specific groups
Semester 3: Internship / research placement
Semester 4: Simulation of a human rights body's session and thesis writing

Overview of the Modules
a) Introduction to Human Rights from an Interdisciplinary Perspective (7 ECTS)
b) International and Regional Human Rights Systems (16 ECTS)
c) Current Human Rights Issues from an Interdisciplinary Perspective (21 ECTS)
d) Selected Human Rights and Human Rights of Specific Groups (10 ECTS)
e) Practical Human Rights Skills (6 ECTS)
f) Scientific Competence (5 ECTS)
g) Internship Related Courses (30 ECTS)

A detailed desription of the Modules is available here:
http://www.postgraduatecenter.at/en/programs/international-affairs-business/human-rights/curriculum/modules/

Our philosophy

As equal members of the interdisciplinary Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights, staff and students of the University of Vienna we welcome all academic disciplines and all cultures.

We are dedicated to supporting and maintaining a community in which the universal principles of human rights are shared through the common enterprise of intellectual curiosity and research as well as of the translation of the acquired knowledge into action for the betterment of the human rights situation.

Spirit and Culture of the Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights
We strive for a sense of community in which the individual growth of all members is advanced through the cultivation of mutual respect, tolerance, and understanding.
The Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights values and encourages individuality while also affirming the community dimensions of academic life. Our human rights community shall provide a structure within which individual freedoms may flourish without threatening the freedoms of other fellow students, teaching staff and the academic management team of this Vienna Master of Arts in Human Rights.
The Master Programme is committed to honest, open, and equitable engagement with all, while respecting differences in religion, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, abilities and needs among others. We seek to promote an academic and social environment that in its diversity is integral to the educational purposes of the institution, by engaging in team building exercises, study trips and workshops while cultivating an open culture of communication.

Faculty

We offer you a broad variety of courses taught by university professors and academic lecturers from various disciplines as well as human rights practitioners working in international organisations, human rights institutes, the corporate sector, development agencies and civil society organisations.

Field trip

We provide you with an enlightening and memorable field experience in the post-conflict situation in Kosovo, where the UN, the OSCE, the EU, NATO and other international organisations are jointly operating an international administration with a strong human rights mandate. The trip will last for one week where you stay with a local family and get the opportunity to have lively discussions about Kosovo's human rights issues with international actors, national human rights institutions, NGOs, media, universities and politicians.

Job opportunities

We will train you for a career as a human rights expert to be employed by governments, international organisations, development agencies, business corporations, research institutes and civil society organisations. You might work as an election observer, officer for human rights monitoring and capacity building in the field, diplomat, trainer, mediator, consultant, researcher etc.

Vienna

- The Vibrant Heart of Europe

Not only is Vienna well known as the world city with the highest quality of life, but situated in the heart of Europe, it lies at the cross-roads of different cultures. People from all over the world come to Vienna to meet, to enjoy its charm and the sound of music, to study, to dance, to hold peace congresses and attend scientific conferences.

Many international organizations and agencies, including the United Nations, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Fundamental Rights Agency of the European Union, have chosen to be hosted in Vienna. After the end of the Cold War, the Vienna World Conference on Human Rights in 1993 laid the ground for the current human rights architecture of the United Nations. Combining tradition and modernity, arts and science, work and leisure, Vienna provides the ideal international environment to spend two unforgettable years studying the art of human rights. More information on Vienna is available here:
https://www.wien.info/en

Application Deadlines 26 February 2017 / 26 March 2017 / 30 April 2017 / Open Round
For more information please visit our website on http://humanrights.univie.ac.at

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The course is aimed at law graduates wanting to work in the field of human rights as legal practitioners, policy or development work or as human rights advocates. Read more

The course is aimed at law graduates wanting to work in the field of human rights as legal practitioners, policy or development work or as human rights advocates. It provides students with the legal human rights attributes to work locally or internationally.

During the course you cover • human rights law • conventions • policy and theory • principles of human rights and social justice • advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice • legal scholarship in human rights • project management for human rights (optional).

You gain skills in • legal application and understanding of human rights principles and law • critical appraisal of human rights legalisation in the UK and internationally • problem solving • practical application and realisation of human rights in practice.

Key features of the course include opportunities to

  • develop a comprehensive understanding of the relevant legal, policy and social contexts in which human rights legislation operates
  • develop an understanding of how human rights organisations ensure legal practice
  • engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice, and Social-Legal Research Clusters and the Department of Law and Criminology
  • complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights
  • learn from experienced lawyers, practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations.

You also benefit from

  • the unique opportunity to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects/event, case reviews, seminars and workshops
  • high profile guest speakers who work in the real world of human rights principles, with past speakers including Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips
  • input from leading human rights organisations allow you to meet leading human rights practitioners and defenders and to find out about their work
  • opportunities to organise human rights events
  • real world case studies and application
  • the opportunity to undertake in-depth work with a human rights organisation and obtain real world experience
  • links to international partners and projects.

You can also complete a dissertation based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest.

Course structure

Modules

  • human rights in the 21st century
  • principles of human rights and social justice
  • advanced case studies in international human rights and social justice
  • legal scholarship for human rights
  • dissertation
  • project management for human rights

Assessment

  • case studies
  • reports
  • essay
  • presentation
  • dissertation

Employability

On the course you gain transferable skills and develop knowledge of human rights, social justice theories and legal practice. This prepares you to work in

  • human rights non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • legal profession
  • local and central government services
  • research and development organisations.


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This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. Read more

This multidisciplinary course draws upon the disciplines of law, criminology and social science. It enables you to gain the experience and skills needed for employment with key human rights organisations and government departments. It also offers international human rights practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge and further develop intellectual and critical skills.

Key features of the course include opportunities to

  • develop a multidisciplinary understanding of human rights and social justice as they exist today in theory, policy and practice
  • develop an understanding of how human rights organisations work in theory and practice
  • engage with the research work of staff in the Human Rights and Social Justice Research Cluster and the Department of Law and Criminology
  • complete in-depth case studies on key topics in human rights
  • learn from experienced practitioners and policy-makers from local and international human rights organisations

The MA Applied Human Rights combines a robust academic and intellectual learning environment covering law, politics, criminology and and social science with first-hand opportunity of experiencing how human rights organisations work in theory and practice. This course addresses the implications of global changes for human rights practitioners.

During the course you investigate contemporary local and global human rights topics, including • gender violence • children as soldiers • radicalisation and counter-terrorism • deaths in custody • refugees and asylum seekers • global security • torture • poverty.

You also gain the experience and skills needed to carry out in-depth case studies on key contemporary challenges to the human rights regime/

A unique opportunity available on this course is being able to take part in the work of the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice on a range of practical human rights projects, public events, case reviews, seminars and workshops.

Throughout your studies you develop a range of intellectual, conceptual and practical skills by analysing complex material and communicating the findings in clear, concise and accessible language. These transferable skills help you develop knowledge of human rights in an applied context. This gives you a sound basis for a career in many areas of human rights policy and practice.

You also learn through guest speakers (previous guest speakers include Shami Chakrabarti and Trevor Phillips) how human rights principles are applied in practical situations, to inform responses to a particular social problem. In addition, we have experts working on various human rights projects (such those for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, British Council, United Nations, Amnesty and Clarion Global) providing real world case studies to provide a strong applied flavour to the course.

You can complete a dissertation which can be based on a topic of your choice, enabling you to specialise in an area of interest, or can choose to plan and take part in a project on human rights.

Course structure

Modules

  • human rights in the 21st century
  • principles of human rights and social justice
  • researching human rights
  • project management for human rights
  • dissertation

Assessment

  • essays
  • reports
  • case studies
  • presentations
  • dissertation

Employability

On the course you gain transferable skills and develop knowledge of human rights and social justice theories and practice to prepare you to work with

  • human rights non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • local and central government services
  • research and development organisations 


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The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses. Read more
The key paradox of international human rights law is that the recent proliferation of treaties and adjudicative bodies has not significantly diminished serious human rights abuses.

The LLM in International Human Rights Law and Practice engages students in a critical and nuanced examination of this paradox, while providing them with the practical skills necessary to apply global norms at the local level.

Why study International Human Rights at York?

The LLM in Human Rights Law and Practice provides the knowledge, skills and networks necessary for mid-career professionals and recent graduates to work in the human rights field. The LLM is offered on both a full-time and part-time basis. Our LLM is distinctive because students:
-Work on real human rights issues, which gives practical skills, hands-on experience and improved job prospects
-Get the opportunity to work alongside human rights defenders during a two-week field visit to Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or placement in York
-Learn from international human rights defenders based at the Centre
-Explore how international human rights law interacts with national public policy in various states

LLM Structure

Three core modules cover international human rights law, policy and advocacy. Optional CAHR modules cover several topical issues through a human rights lens: culture, development, migration, and post-conflict justice.

The programme requires you to undertake a placement with human rights organisations in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or the UK. This is an important part of the degree programme and will develop your practical skills and provide hands-on experience, both of which will prepare you for working in this field and improve your career prospects.

The LLM is taught in weekly lectures and seminars covering specific case studies and including skills training on oral presentations, advocacy, report writing, and memos.

Compulsory Modules
The compulsory modules reflect the three sides to human rights activism: law, policy and practice.
-Defending human rights (40 credits; terms 1-2)
-Applying international human rights law (20 credits; term 1)
-International human rights law and advocacy (20 credits; term 1)
-Dissertation (60 credits; terms 3-4)

Optional Modules
In the second term students will be able to take two options. Four optional modules taught by Centre staff will explore areas where rights are being used in new and innovative ways. Students may also choose optional modules taught by other departments, from the list below.

Optional modules taught at CAHR
-Asylum, migration and trafficking
-Culture and protest
-Development Alternatives: Development, Rights, Security
-Truth, justice and reparations after violence

Optional modules taught at the York Law School
-Corporate responsibility and law
-Financial citizenship and social justice

Optional modules taught in other departments
-Conflict and development (Politics)
-Globalisation and social policy (Social Policy and Social Work)
-Global social problems (Social Policy and Social Work)
-International organisations (Politics)
-New security challenges (Politics)
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education (Education)
-Women, citizenship and conflict (Centre for Women's Studies)

Please note that optional modules may not run if the lecturer is on leave or there is insufficient demand.

Placements
A key part of the LLM is exposing students to the practice of international human rights law at the domestic level. Thus students have the opportunity to pursue a placement and related project with our NGO partners in Malaysia and York. The fieldwork takes place over a two week period in weeks 9 and 10 of the autumn term in either Kuala Lumpur or York. Please note that the Malaysia trip/placements will only run if there are sufficient student numbers.

Students will be expected to work together in small groups in partnership with a human rights organisation. This will include:
-Extensive background research on country context, the host organisation, relevant thematic issues etc.
-Devising a project prior to the field visit, in collaboration with the host organisation
-Two weeks of intensive work in Malaysia (student numbers permitting) or York in November and December
-Ongoing discussions about project completion once students return to York

Where after the LLM?

Our LLM provides career advice, networking opportunities, hands-on experience, and personalised reference letters to help our graduates find good jobs with human rights NGOs, humanitarian organisations, charities, policy think-tanks, national governments, and UN agencies.

For example, recent graduates are working with:
-Foreign and Commonwealth Office
-UK-based bar association
-Egyptian human rights NGO
-Development NGO in West Africa
-East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Network
-Human Rights Watch
-Pakistan's judicial sector
-UK-based NGO working with sub-Saharan children affected by HIV/AIDS

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This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Read more
This degree offered by the Human Rights Consortium (http://www.sas.ac.uk/hrc/graduate-study/ma-human-rights) is the longest-running interdisciplinary, practice-oriented human rights MA programme in the UK. Its priority is to provide students with practical skills essential to working as human rights practitioners, including advocacy, fundraising and research. The degree develops students as human rights professionals and is therefore particularly suitable for individuals who are, or seek to become, human rights practitioners in the NGO, governmental and inter-govermental sectors This degree addresses essential questions and debates within the field of human rights, such as: where do rights come from? What are their foundations and justifications? Can the discourse of rights secure social justice?

Structure

Degree code: MTCHR
Credit value: 120/180

Required modules:

Understanding Human Rights I: Ideas and Contexts
Securing Human Rights I: Actors and Mechanisms, Skills and Strategies
Translating Human Rights into Law I: The Foundations of International Human Rights Law
Optional modules*:

Understanding Human Rights II: Genocide, Gross Human Rights Violations and Reconciliation (Optional) [10 ECTS]
Securing Human Rights II: Securing Human Rights in Development and in Conflict [10 ECTS]
Translating Human Rights into Law II: Topics in International Human Rights Law [10 ECTS]
The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Researching Human Rights: Social Research Methods [10 ECTS]
Business and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Indigenous Peoples, Minorities and Human Rights [10 ECTS]
Citizenship and New Social Movements in Latin America [10 ECTS]
Human Rights and Everyday Life in Latin America [10 ECTS]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation

All students must complete a minimum of three compulsory modules and three optional modules, plus a 15,000-words dissertation, in order to fulfil the requirement for the MA (totalling 90 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System)). In addition, students may wish to select one extra optional module (equalling 10 ECTS) and / or the internship (20 ECTS) for additional credit, totalling between 110 and 120 credits.

Assessment

The MA is assessed through essays and examinations, along with more innovative forms of assessment such as legal reports, a media project, mock funding proposal presentations and class participation.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months or 36 months.
Part time students may choose at least three optional modules during the spring term of years 1 or 2. Part time students may undertake more than one internship, e.g. in both years and/or during the summer between years 1 and 2.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Development and Human Rights (Extended) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Extended MA in Development and Human Rights examines the comparatively new interface between Human Rights and International Development.

Key Features of Extended MA in Development and Human Rights

This MA in Development and Human Rights is a multi-disciplinary programme combining insights from the fields of development studies, politics, political theory and international law. The Development and Human Rights programme examines some of the key issues confronting twenty-first century global societies through a dynamic programme that combines theoretical and applied perspectives and is taught by a team of leading academics in their fields of development and human rights.

Students on the MA in Development and Human Rights will be encouraged to apply legal theory, social and political theory and research tools in analysing and understanding development and human rights, as well as being taught key historical and policy dimensions and concepts.

The Extended MA (EMA) in Development and Human Rights is a 240-credit postgraduate qualification that is equivalent to 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) and is thus a recognised Masters qualification throughout the European Union. The EMA is a standard UK MA plus an additional 60 credits (30 ECTS) and this additional coursework is undertaken in one semester at a partner institution overseas. The EMA is therefore not only an EU recognised postgraduate qualification it also adds a study abroad experience thus enhancing the qualification’s employability credentials.

The partner institution for EMA Development and Human Rights is the Department of Political Science and the Institute of Human Rights in the College of Law at the University of the Philippines, Diliman (UPD). The Department of Political Science was established in 1915 and is the only Commission on Higher Education (CHEd) Center of Excellence in Political Science in the Philippines. The College of Law admitted its first students in 1911 and a century after it was founded, the College of Law can point to its alumni in the highest positions of the government: Four became President of the Philippines and thirteen served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The University of the Philippines is the country’s national university, with UPD its biggest campus and the physical seat of its Administration. UPD occupies 493 hectares of prime land in Quezon City, it has in excess of 25,000 students and the library resources are the largest in the country.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Development and Human Rights typically include:

• Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention

• Rights Based Approaches to Development

• International Human Rights Law

• Approaches to Political Theory

• International Security in the Asia Pacific

• Postcolonialism, Orientalism and Eurocentrism

• Critical Security

• War, Identity and Society

• Civil Society and International Development

• European Union Governance and Policy Making

• War in Space

Development and Human Rights MA Aims

- To develop critical, theoretical and analytical skills and improve written and oral communication skills.

- To acquire research skills and research methodologies.

- To appreciate the role of development and human rights within wider social, economic and political contexts and the implications for policy formation.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Development and Human Rights, from a development studies, law, politics, international relations, humanities, social science, international business or related backgrounds. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to Development Studies.

Research Interests

The following research groups at Swansea provide a distinct international and multi-disciplinary forum for the advancement of study,

including:

• Development Studies

• International Communication

• Cultural Political Economy

• Software Studies

• Digital Theory

• Policy and Governance

• International Relations & Security

Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Work-based Placements

Development and Human Rights students are offered opportunities (awarded on a competitive basis) for work-based placement learning either through the Study in Gambia programme or placements arranged with government organisations in Wales.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Development and Human Rights graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment sectors such as the diplomatic corps, the armed forces, intelligence and risk analysis, relief and humanitarian organisations, law and finance, government and politics and international business.



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The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Read more
The Human Rights MA develops the skills and theoretical tools needed to carry out human rights research. It provides an understanding of the foundations, nature, limits and implementation of human rights. Students are introduced to philosophical, legal and policy issues and encouraged to engage with them in a critical way.

Degree information

Students develop an understanding of the central issues and problems in the formulation, defence, development, interpretation and application of human rights instruments, law, practice and policy. They gain knowledge of central disciplines and their contribution to human rights studies, and are equipped with key research skills in human rights.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-International Law and Human Rights (30)
-International Human Rights: Standards and Institutions (15)
-Theoretical Foundations of Human Rights (15)
-Normative Methods, Legal Analysis and Research Skills (15)

Optional modules - choose one of the following 15-credit modules:
-Introduction to Qualitative Methods (15)
-Advanced Qualitative Methods (15)
-Introduction to Quantitative Methods (15)
-Advanced Quantitative Methods (15)

And then a further 30 credits from other modules. The following are suggestions:
-Terrorism (15)
-War and International Law (15)
-Equality, Justice and Difference (15)
-The Ethics of Poverty (15)
-Democracy and Accountability: Holding Power to Account (15)
-Governing Divided Societies (15)
-Gendering the Study of Politics: Theory and Practice (15)
-The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: challenges to Democratisation (15)
-Global Ethics (15)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme has an integrated research and teaching approach, where key and cutting edge areas are brought into the seminar room for discussion, and students are encouraged to carry out original research into these areas. Assessment is through essays, unseen examination, seminar presentations, and the dissertation.

Careers

The Human Rights MA is a challenging, formative experience that provides the foundations for a variety of future careers. Graduates of the programme are now working in an impressive number of international, national, governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations, including:
-United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
-Advocates for International Development
-Amnesty International
-British Institute for Human Rights
-Council of Europe
-European Parliament
-International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association
-Japanese Government
-Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies
-Royal Commonwealth Society
-Save the Children
-UK Foreign Office
-UN Development Programme
-Universal Rights Group

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Researcher, Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice and studying LLM International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, University of Essex
-Legal Intern, UNHCR (United Nations High Comissioner for Refugees)
-Politics Editor, Urban Times
-Legal Assistant, Christine Lee & Co.
-Research Assistant, Overseas Development Institute

Employability
Graduates of the programme have secured employment in an impressive number of international, national, governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations, including the UK Foreign Office, Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman UK, British Institute for Human Rights, the European Union, the Council of Europe, Amnesty International, ILGA, Mediterranean Institute of Gender Studies. Some of our students are now human rights lawyers. Our students have also pursued PhDs and have become human rights academics.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Political Science is recognised as a centre of excellence in the field and offers a uniquely stimulating environment for the study of human rights.

Students benefit from weekly seminars featuring distinguished external speakers, and regular high-profile events for policymakers and others. Each year the students have the opportunity to participate in a study trip to Geneva to visit the United Nations Human Rights Institutions and meet human rights practitioners.

The research preparation and tailor-made interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary training students receive are of the highest standard available at one of the world's top universities, as reflected in UCL's performance in a range of rankings and tables.

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The MSc Human Resources and Organisations is a challenging one-year programme designed to prepare students for outstanding careers in people management and human resources. Read more

About the MSc programme

The MSc Human Resources and Organisations is a challenging one-year programme designed to prepare students for outstanding careers in people management and human resources. Grounded in LSE’s critical and analytical approach to learning, the programme provides a unique bridge between theory and practice. Not only will you develop critical thinking skills as an adaptive, innovative and strategic manager, but you will also gain a clear understanding of the practical issues which organisations face today in managing individuals and workforces.

You will also have the opportunity to acquire valuable experience and industry contacts with a real-world independent consulting project with an external client, through our Links Scheme. The Scheme enables students to apply their learning in practice during the programme, and past projects have worked with a broad range of clients such as HSBC, Accenture and Revlon.

You will gain core knowledge in the general foundations of human resource management and strategy. Building on this foundation, you will then develop your learning into one of three specialist streams according to your specific career goals and interests: Human Resource Management, International Employment Relations, or Organisational Behaviour.

Graduate destinations

The programme is designed to prepare students for a range of careers in the fields of human resource management, organisational behaviour, and international employment relations.
Our students have gone on to work in human resource management, international management, and consultancy positions in the private and public sectors, as well as for labour unions and in academic and policy roles.

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