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This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis, aspects of the history of the English country house between 1485 and 1945. Read more

Course Description

This course is to be an interdisciplinary programme enabling students to examine, by way of a thesis, aspects of the history of the English country house between 1485 and 1945. Students will be encouraged to consider the interrelation of architectural history, art history and social history in the evolution of the country house as a political power house, a setting for the display of art and craftsmanship, a self-contained community and a symbol of continuity and loss in a changing world.

The seminar programme, which serves to complement the student’s individual research, will explore these themes in a series of ten meetings which will be addressed by some of the United Kingdom’s most distinguished country house historians. These will be prefaced by an introduction to research techniques, with particular reference to the use of primary sources such as inventories, estate records and collections of private papers; an introduction to relevant library resources available in London and through the University of Buckingham’s online subscriptions; and an introduction to the most recent academic approaches to the subject.

Each seminar will take place in the early evening, followed by a 40-minute question-and-answer session with the seminar speaker, and a dinner at which there will be further questioning of the speaker and a general conversation about the topic in hand. Four seminars will be scheduled for the period between October and December, and a further six in the period between the New Year and March.

The programme begins with an overview of the architectural and social history of the country house and an examination of recent academic perspectives on the subject, including the latest thematic and period-based approaches and studies of particular mansions and individual architects from Robert Smythson to Sir Edwin Lutyens. It goes on to discuss the changing function of the country house between 1485 and 1945, and to explore how architectural form has been modified by social change.

A series of seminar papers will then explore architectural style; the mechanics of building, owning and living in a country house; and the wider cultural context, which has seen the country house playing a crucial role in the invention of the past, from Ben Jonson’s ‘To Penshurst’ to Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/.

The Course Director

Adrian Tinniswood, OBE, MPhil, Senior Research Fellow of the Humanities Research Institute, Buckingham, and Visiting Fellow in History and Heritage, Bath Spa

Adrian Tinniswood has a distinguished reputation as an architectural and social historian on both sides of the Atlantic. He has worked for many years as a consultant and adviser to the National Trust, and has lectured extensively on the country house and on the architecture and social history of the seventeenth century at British universities including Oxford, Bristol and Nottingham and for the University of California at Berkeley.

His books include His Invention So Fertile: A Life of Christopher Wren, The Verneys (short-listed for the 2007 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction) and The Polite Tourist: Four Centuries of Country House Visiting.

His latest book, The Long Weekend: The Country House Between the Wars, is published by Jonathan Cape in March 2016.

He was awarded an OBE in 2013 for services to heritage.

Associate students

For those wishing to attend the evening research seminar programme, but unable to devote the time to the coursework or to register for the MA degree, there is the option of becoming an Associate Student. This status will enable the student to attend the ten research seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, in the first six months of the programme, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/country-house.

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Campus-Based. October each year. Distance Learning. February each year. This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. Read more

Start Dates

Campus-Based: October each year.
Distance Learning: February each year.

Course Description

This MA will provide you with a unique and wide-ranging introduction to the complex and ever-changing role of the country house in its local, regional and national environment. The course is taught by distance learning, so you can learn around your existing commitments in a way that suits you.

This fascinating course investigates the architectural development of the English country house and its artistic contents, as well as its place within history and literature. The course also examines the economic and political importance of the house and its impact on the landscape, plus the technologies employed to design, build and run it.

[[Course aims ]]

To gain a detailed knowledge of the major issues related to the study of the country house and of the literature on the subject, and to develop an understanding of the complex and changing position of the country house in its local, regional and national environment.

Distance Learning

This course is also available for study by distance learning with a start date in February each year. Modules for the distance learning course may vary.

(Please note: The information included on this webpage is indicative of the course provision provided by the University of Leicester. Due to regular enhancement of the University's courses, please refer to Leicester's own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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The MA Advanced Professional Practice is a highly accessible, flexible programme of study suitable for professional staff from a variety of backgrounds including Health, Education, Social Care, Social Work, Early Years, Criminal Justice and professions allied to Health (such as Occupational Therapists). Read more
The MA Advanced Professional Practice is a highly accessible, flexible programme of study suitable for professional staff from a variety of backgrounds including Health, Education, Social Care, Social Work, Early Years, Criminal Justice and professions allied to Health (such as Occupational Therapists). The programme offers stand-alone modules used for CPD as well as the opportunity to gain a full MA.

The MA Advanced Professional Practice enables you to work towards Master’s level qualifications by combining campus –based modules with short courses, work- based learning and other Continuing Professional Development (CPD) activities.

The MA consists of three phases:

Phase 1: Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice.
Phase 2: Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Professional Practice.
Phase 3: MA in Advanced Professional Practice.
The first phase of the MA leads to a Postgraduate Certificate which is normally completed in one year, January to December Upon completion you have the choice of proceeding to the Postgraduate Diploma phase or taking a break from study. The full MA will take between three to seven years to complete, depending in how you choose to organise your studies. Alternatively, the programme structure enables you to exit after each phase with a professional award, should you wish.

The first phase of the MA leads to a Postgraduate Certificate which is normally completed in one year, January to December Upon completion you have the choice of proceeding to the Postgraduate Diploma phase or taking a break from study. The full MA will take between three to seven years to complete, depending in how you choose to organise your studies. Alternatively, the programme structure enables you to exit after each phase with a professional award, should you wish.

Indicative modules
The Programme Co-ordinator will work with you to design your individual pathway through this programme. At the Postgraduate Certificate phase many of the modules provide vehicles for you to import and evidence CPD activity that you may have undertaken in the workplace , or learning from short courses. Once you have applied to the programme you will be allocated a Professional Mentor who will advise and support you in combining taught study with work-based learning.

The MA consists of three phases:
Phase 1: Postgraduate Certificate in Professional Practice.
Phase 2: Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Professional Practice.
Phase 3: MA in Advanced Professional Practice.

This innovative modular Masters programme offers practitioners the opportunity to gain Higher Education credit alongside their work in a range of core and elective modules. Modules can be taken at the University of Chichester and ‘imported’ from other accredited ‘M’ level courses. The MA Advanced Professional Practice is a unique and responsive programme, which allows practitioners to combine taught modules with verification, and accreditation of learning from work based activities and in-house training.

The MA Advanced Professional Practice can be aligned with the outcomes of learning and career development outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF)

The following distinctive features ensure that the programme is responsive to practitioner and employer need:

Verification of learning from work-based activities and in-house training

A key feature of the MA Advanced Professional Practice is the opportunity to import work- based projects and in-house training, allowing a greater degree of flexibility and fit with other CPD activity. This is achieved through the use of ‘Shell Modules’, which require students to evidence their attendance of training opportunities, or the time devoted to work-based projects. This evidence constitutes the module ‘content’. The module assignments then assess the outcomes of the CPD activity: how the activity has enhanced the effectiveness of the practitioner or contributed to service development.
A flexible response to accreditation of learning

University of Chichester regulations differ from those of many universities in allowing students to import up to 50% of academic credit from modules and courses completed at other Higher Education Institutions. The advantage of this facility is that students could, for example, complete a module from University A, a course at University B and combine these with further modules, or other forms of CPD, to build credit towards the MA. This approach to CPD accreditation affords practitioners and employers an unprecedented level of choice and flexibility.
Aligning in-house CPD programmes with an M level framework

The flexibilities afforded by the MA Advanced Professional Practice enable employers to deliver CPD Programmes, which also allow staff to gain ‘M’ level credits. This can be achieved through the University approval of CPD programmes delivered by employers, or by use of the shell modules to import in-house learning into the MA, Postgraduate Diploma, or Post Graduate Certificates.
Aligning University modules with in-house CPD strategies

The MA incorporates a number of modules which can be commissioned by employers and the content adapted to specific CPD requirements. This enables employers to address niche CPD interests or to incorporate agency-specific content in the module delivery. A recent example was the commissioning by a local authority of an off-the-shelf module, the content of which was then focused on the specific needs of the organisation’s Occupational Therapists.
Bespoke pathways

It is a challenge to find CPD programmes which accurately reflect the often individualised requirements of individuals or employers. The flexibilities afforded by the MA Advanced Professional Practice enable participants to pursue a truly bespoke and individualised pathway. This is particularly attractive to individuals who have complex or composite roles (for example manager and practitioner) which may not be fully addressed in the more restricted content of traditional programmes.
Blended learning

Our blended learning approach has developed with emerging technologies for enhanced communication. Our experience and research in learning and teaching have highlighted the need for a personalised approach for some learners. We understand the high levels of motivation required for independent study and many of our learners need the support of tutors and fellow students to retain their engagement with study. We offer named tutors who support students and can, where necessary, signpost them to other services, as well as a combination of traditional and emerging methods of study to enhance students’ engagement and experience.

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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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In the fast-changing field of finance, the understanding of investment theories and portfolio performance appraisal are critically important. Read more

About the Course

In the fast-changing field of finance, the understanding of investment theories and portfolio performance appraisal are critically important. This MSc Finance and Investment course is designed to provide you with a solid foundation in the understanding of financial theory, investment techniques and the financial regulatory environment.

The course has been designed to provide you with an in-depth grounding in key areas such as corporate finance, investment and portfolio analysis, financial services regulation and compliance. You will study with a stimulating and intellectually-challenging learning experience, through academic reading and the use of simulation software and powerful financial databases, such as TraderEx and Thomson Reuters Eikon.

You will also have the opportunity to choose an optional module in a specialist area, such as corporate financial reporting, quantitative methods for financial markets, and multinational operations in finance and banking (the offer of optional modules are subject to timetabling and availability).

The course is delivered in Atlantic House, Cardiff – a fully-equipped learning resource centre, offering a state-of-the-art trading room powered by leading industry software and interactive teaching spaces. Located in the heart of Cardiff’s Business Enterprise Zone, it provides accounting and finance students with the facilities and supportive environment to flourish.

The MSc Finance and Investment aims to develop the knowledge and skills needed for an understanding of the theories, techniques and regulatory environment of financial market investment.

You will study a range of finance and investment modules from both a theoretical and practical point of view, through academic reading and use of simulation software and powerful financial databases. A study of research methods in a finance and investment context will prepare you to undertake your own chosen research project in an area of finance and investment with supervision from expert academic staff. You will also have the opportunity to choose an optional module in an area of specialism such as Multinational operations in finance and banking or Quantitative methods for financial markets.

Wales accounts for 49,000 employees in the financial and professional services sector, and is predicted to see further growth in the next 10 years, as the sector grows, there will be an increase in demand for a skilled workforce.

You could be part of this workforce, you will be studying in Atlantic House, which is right in the heart of Cardiff’s Business Enterprise Zone and is very close to the University’s Cardiff Campus.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1019-msc-finance-and-investment

What you will study

The MSc Finance and Investment establishes a firm foundation in the theory and practice of financial decision making. You will gain the management and analytical skills needed to take you to the forefront of the financial world.

Students will take the following modules:
- Investment and portfolio analysis
- Financial services regulation, law and compliance
- Corporate finance
- Corporate governance
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Option from:
- Multinational operations in finance and banking
- Quantitative methods for financial markets
- Corporate financial reporting

Learning and teaching methods

The MSc Finance and Investment is delivered full time or part-time through a combination of lectures, tutorials, computer workshops, case-study analysis and discussion groups. A hands-on, student led approach is employed; whereby students are exposed to real-world situations and given the skills and opportunities to find practical solutions.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This MSc Finance and Investment will enhance your critical, analytical and appraisal skills when handling business data from a financial and investment perspective. These skills, coupled with your previous qualifications in business studies, accounting or audit, will make you a highly desirable candidate.

Assessment methods

Assessment is by a range of methods, predominantly coursework based assignments.

Facilities

This course is delivered in Atlantic House, Cardiff and offers facilities and a supportive environment in which Accounting and Finance students can flourish. From a fully equipped learning resource centre and a state-of-the-art trading room powered by leading industry software from Thomson Reuters to interactive teaching spaces.

The Accounting and Finance Clinic will also soon be based in Atlantic House, utilising specialist expertise within the University to provide free financial advice to the public and small businesses. The Clinic provides opportunities for Accounting and Finance students to gain experience in an applied setting, enabling them to gain and enhance the transferable skills they’ll need when entering the workforce.

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The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. Read more
The Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, at the University of Dundee, was founded in 1967 when the University of Dundee split from St Andrews’ University and established an independent teaching medical school. The department is based in the Tayside Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Technology (TORT) Centre. The current staff includes a professor, two clinical senior lecturers, two non-clinical senior lecturers, one clinical and one non-clinical lecturer, one research assistant and four clinical fellows, who are supported by various staff members.

With a tradition of teaching and research in the field of mechanisms of disease, treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system and biomedical and rehabilitation engineering. The founder, Professor Ian Smillie, gained a worldwide reputation in knee surgery and the role of the meniscus. His successor, Professor George Murdoch, founded and developed the Dundee Limb Fitting Centre and the Tayside Rehabilitation Engineering Services, which have acquired an international reputation for the treatment of the amputee and assessment of gait analysis. His successor, Professor David Rowley, sustained the department’s international reputation and innovation in the area of joints replacement complemented by a worldwide service in Clinical Audit Outcomes

Overview

The MSc in Orthopaedic Science programme will provide a robust and wide-reaching education in the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It is the only programme amongst the few comparable MSc programmes in the UK with a specific focus on the theoretical and practical application of technology within orthopaedics. Additionally, it equips trainees with the knowledge of fundamental science required for the FRCS exit exam.

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide students with a Masters level postgraduate education in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental physical sciences relating to orthopaedic surgery. It also aims to provide experience in the design and execution of a substantive research project in the field of orthopaedic, biomechanics and rehabilitation technology and its underlying science.
By the end of the programme, students should have a systematic understanding and knowledge of the physical sciences and technology relevant to orthopaedics, a critical awareness of current research questions in the field and the appropriate practical and analytical skills in order to be able to:

- Understand and interpret complex scientific concepts.
- Critically evaluate current research.
- Understand and utilise relevant technology, and have the ability to evaluate and critique methodologies.
- Develop and test scientific hypotheses, including the design of laboratory research projects aimed at addressing specific hypothesis-driven questions.
- Undertake the practical and technical aspects of a laboratory-based project.
- Communicate complex scientific concepts to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both verbally and in writing.
- Demonstrate an understanding of whether specific research outcomes make a significant, novel contribution to the field.

Programme Content

The programme will be taught part-time by distance learning over a period of normally 3 to 5 years, or one year full time in house. It is comprised of five compulsory 30-credit taught modules and one 60 credit research project module.

Module 1 - Mechanics
Module 2 - Biomechanics
Module 3 - Rehabilitation Technology
Module 4 - Orthopaedic Technology
Module 5 - Statistics

Methods of Teaching and Assessment

Modules 1-5:
Teaching in modules 1-5 will be delivered through distance learning module components, each comprised of a module component guide and several component units. Tutor support will be available via email, web conferencing, written correspondence and telephone.

Assessment of modules 1-5 will be by examination with the option of sitting exams upon completion of each individual module or upon completion of all five modules. Assessment is weighted (80%) by exam and (20%) by coursework.

Successful completion of the PGDip modules 1-5 is required to progress to the research project component. Successful completion of course work will normally be required prior to sitting the examination papers. Each of the two components of assessment for the PGCert and PGDip (course work and examination) must have a minimum grade of D3 to pass and progress to the full MSc programme.

Module 6 - Research Project:
During the research project, learning will be partly experiential, partly directed and partly self-directed. The research project will be assessed through the presentation of a thesis, and the final mark will be moderated through an oral exam (60 credits).

why study at Dundee?

In 2013 the MCh (Orth) Dundee, course was granted full accreditation by the Royal College of Surgeons of
England. This accreditation is extremely important and comes as the department is celebrating the 20th
anniversary of the course. This is the only face-to-face course accredited by the College outside of England.

“It was a great learning experience. Coming here, my overall
personality has changed. I have learnt the right way to write
a thesis and also got to know the recent advancements in
field of Orthopaedic surgery” International Student Barometer, 2009

Career Prospects

The programme will prepare graduates for a research-focused clinical career in the NHS or academia, and is particularly well positioned to prepare graduates for entry into a clinical academic career path.

If taken in-house, the start date for this course is September. The distance learning start date can be at any point in the year.
* The taught elements are conducted by self-directed learning modules as with distance learning but the project will be undertaken in-house. The candidate will be attached to a consultant firm as an observer.

Students wishing to pursue the MSc must complete the Diploma within 3 years part-time or 9 months full-time. The MSc must be completed within a period of 1 year full-time or 2-5 years part-time.

Fees must be paid in full prior to commencing the course (in-house only).

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Canterbury Christ Church University, in partnership with Shared Service Architecture, has established the UK’s first postgraduate qualification for developing Public Purpose Collaborations. Read more
Canterbury Christ Church University, in partnership with Shared Service Architecture, has established the UK’s first postgraduate qualification for developing Public Purpose Collaborations. For example, Combined Authorities, City Regions, Health & Social Care, Blue Light Collaborations, Systems­Wide Transformations and back­office, or front­office, Shared Services.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/collaborative-transformation.aspx

Course detail

This course provides you with the knowledge and skills to initiate and develop public purpose collaborations and shared service projects, whilst also giving you a valuable postgraduate qualification. You will become a skilled and valuable in-house resource, able to cascade your learned skills across colleagues in collaboration activities and reduce or negate the necessity to pay for external consultancy on projects.

Suitability

Public sector managers and consultants who wish to study the effective development of collaborations and shared service initiatives in the public sector and gain a qualification.

Content

• Module 1: The Essentials of Shared and Collaborative Working
• Module 2: Change Management Theory and Practice
• Module 3: Developing a Collaborative Transformation roadmap

Format

All three modules will consist of a mixture of tutor-led input and structured activities in which you are invited to explore and critically discuss how relevant concepts, theories and models have been and might be applied in the workplace to enhance organisational and managerial effectiveness. The structured direct contact sessions are designed to provide a tutor-led forum for the exploration of the underpinning principles, issues and demands of collaborative transformation activities within the current complex environment.

A typical session may comprise a lecture of approximately 60 - 90 minutes, where overarching conceptual frameworks and aspects of the literature may be introduced. This would normally be followed by an opportunity for issues to be discussed or a seminar topic to be presented. In seminars you will participate interactively in exercises or problem solving, or lead the group on specific topics for debate. Further support is provided through a virtual learning environment (i.e. Blackboard) and direct contact via email with the respective module leaders.

Assessment

Through a portfolio of work and critical reflection.

What is the benefit for my organisation?

Value for money by potentially saving thousands of pounds by building in-house capacity and thereby minimising external consultancy fees. These savings can be gained by applying a range of the 100 tools, techniques and templates, provided to each graduate, to create in-house reports, assessments, risk registers, stakeholder group analyses and action plans, and business case reports. Traditionally these are undertaken by external consultants at standard fees of between £750 and £1,000 per day. By developing and using in-house managers this could realise many thousands of pounds in tangible savings for shared service partnerships.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

This new MA provides the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for a lead role in collections care and management within a historic house context. It is aimed at conservators and curators with significant collections care responsibilities, as well as graduates from conservation or other museum related disciplines intending to develop their careers in this area.

The two year course offers a flexible study path to achieve your MA. The curriculum is delivered in themed 5 day modules spread out over the two year programme. Course modules cover a comprehensive programme of theory coupled with practical conservation exercises and visits that focus on key aspects of contemporary collections care and management practice. Residential modules are supported by off-site research assignments and a dissertation.

::You can expect::

- To learn key theoretical concepts and apply them in practical exercises
- To assess and prioritise risks to a collection in order to develop management strategies
- Use of the diverse collection at West Dean in real-life scenarios
- To study all aspects of collections care including context, security, salvage planning, loans and more
- Collaboration with conservation students
- Transferrable skills in research, academic writing, data analysis and critical thinking

::Learning environment::

- High tutor: student ratio
- Study within a working historic house and estate
- An interdisciplinary environment
- Networking and building of professional contacts
- Access to a range of experts in different object disciplines

Programme subject to validation.

Programme Aims

The aims of the Masters programme in Collections Care and Management are to:

Practical:

1. Provide a context, environment and study collection where collections care and conservation
management skills can be developed and applied within a working historic house context.

2. To develop core competencies in collections care and conservation management including
understanding object, material and collection contexts and types, agents of deterioration and
how the damage that they cause can be monitored and mitigated, risk assessment and
management, object handling, storage, loans, transport and display; along with skills relating to
budgeting, fundraising and managing people.

Theoretical:

3. Foster a critical awareness of the significance of objects and collections, including their cultural,
historical and site specific context.

4. Develop a critical awareness of key theoretical concepts that underpin collections care and
conservation management, including the agents of deterioration, the principles of risk and
change management.

5. Develop originality in the application of principles and knowledge, coupled with a practical
understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and
interpret knowledge in the field of collections care and conservation management.

Professional:

6. To enable the students' potential and aptitude for professional practice, research and
employment by encouraging self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems and in
planning and implementing projects.

7. To encourage open-minded attitudes and approaches that equip students to become selfmotivated,
independent professionals, able to make decisions confidently in complex and
unpredictable situations

8. Prepare students for professional practice in collections care and conservation management
roles in a range of heritage contexts.

Facilities

Facilities include an analytical laboratory and computer suite. The on-site Art and Conservation Library gives you access to specialist databases and thousands of specialist books and journals.

Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. The two-year structure provides students with sustained periods of studio-based activity, with dissertation requirements coming early in the second year of study. The emphasis on practice is nonetheless informed and supported by theoretical and professional Study Units throughout the academic year. Whether specialising in a single discipline or working across media, MFA students will have time to develop and expand their studio work to the highest standards, bringing in relevant historical, theoretical and professional perspectives.

::MFA students can expect::

- Support in consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to studio practice through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- To develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Programme Aims

The MFA programme Aims and Learning Outcomes are consistent with the descriptors for a
qualification at QAA Level 7, as defined in the QAA Quality Code for Higher Education (Part A,
Chapter 1).

The programme aims are to provide:

Practical:

1. Provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students to develop their
creative, intellectual and material practices

2. Provide facilities and support through which students can further develop their skills and fluency
to an advanced level as accomplished practitioners, gaining a comprehensive understanding of
techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

3. Enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding and detailed knowledge of key
aspects of their field of study, as well as creative originality in their application

4. Encourage and support advanced experimental, creative approaches to studio work, much of
which is at, or informed by, the forefront of academic discipline, field of study or area of
professional practice (QAA Quality Code Part A, Chapter A1, p12)

Theoretical:

1. Provide a stimulating environment where advanced research methods and critical practices can
be articulated and where a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to personal
research and advanced scholarship can flourish

2. Increase student’s ability to deploy accurately advanced techniques of analysis and inquiry within
their chosen discipline

3. Enable students to articulate an advanced critical understanding of studio practice and its
contexts within contemporary visual art culture, much of which is informed by the forefront of
art practice and theory

Professional:

1. Provide support for personal and professional development, including development and
application of transferable skills such as self-management, decision-making, communication,
collaboration, problem solving, IT and research skills

2. Educate students to possess independence, self-understanding, self-reliance motivated toward
future learning, practice or employment

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

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Do you have a passion for creative communication? Would you like to improve your employability within the advertising industry? This challenging master’s programme focuses on the development of hands-on creative advertising techniques, helping you to build a set of skills that you’ll use throughout your career. Read more

Overview

Do you have a passion for creative communication? Would you like to improve your employability within the advertising industry? This challenging master’s programme focuses on the development of hands-on creative advertising techniques, helping you to build a set of skills that you’ll use throughout your career. You’ll also develop a thorough understanding of relevant academic theory, exploring popular culture and the ways in which it is shaped by promotional media.

- The teaching team maintain strong links with industry, providing students with the chance to participate in live briefs, networking events, and guest lectures.
- The course allows plenty of time and support for portfolio development, helping students to secure creative roles after graduation.
- Advertising at Solent has been supported by local and national advertising agencies including Thinking Juice, Five by Five, EHS 4D Group, Fallon, Beattie McGuinness Bungey, Karmarama, We Are Social and The Work Club. The course team continue to build new relationships.
- Students are invited to pitch for work at Solent Creatives, our on-campus creative agency. These projects involve real businesses and are ideally suited for portfolio development.
- Southampton Solent’s advertising staff encourage students to work on projects in collaboration with those from other creative disciplines, mirroring industry practices.
- Students will work on competition briefs for organisations such as the Design & Art Directors Association (D&AD) and the Young Creative Network (YCN).
- The course concludes with a final master’s project. Students will work on either a dissertation or a practical project, focusing on an area that is relevant to their future career ambitions.
- Students will have access to a range of specialist facilities throughout their studies. These include Mac computers, professional creative software, digital printing facilities and traditional printing presses.
- Solent also provides a comprehensive media loans scheme, giving students access to high-end photographic equipment.

The industry -

The evolution of the internet has created an explosion in the number of advertising channels available to businesses, creating even more chances for motivated graduates to pursue a career in advertising.
Advertising career progressions are known to be varied and interesting, offering a range of different positions including art direction, copywriting, account management and strategic campaign planning.

The programme -

Southampton Solent University’s MA Creative Advertising curriculum focuses on industry relevant workplace skills, teaching students to function as part of a professional advertising business. These skills include idea generation, working to a brief, research, copywriting, strategy and presentation. Students will also complete a master’s project, which is an ideal opportunity to focus on the specific areas of advertising that interest them. For further details on the course’s academic content, please visit the ‘course content’ tab.

Students benefit from creative guidance throughout the course, receiving regular feedback from the tutoring team, other students and specially invited advertising professionals. This feedback helps students to craft a portfolio of commercially appealing work, and encourages them to reflect on their own creative process.

Advertising students at Southampton Solent may get their first taste of the industry by freelancing at Solent Creatives, an on-campus advertising and marketing agency that specialises in connecting students with business clients. This offers students the opportunity to gain work experience, create additional work for their portfolios and make industry contacts.

Students are encouraged to take on work experience throughout their studies. Advertising students have previously secured placements at Saatchi & Saatchi, McCann Erickson, EHS 4D, Chemistry Communications, B&Q, Channel 4 (Jersey) and Palmer Hargreaves.

Course Content

Programme specification document - http://mycourse.solent.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=6152

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through seminars and workshops, with an emphasis on creativity and critical thinking.

Work experience -

We’ll encourage you to complete work experience as part of the Professional Practice unit. Through this you’ll gain real-world experience of working in an agency environment, helping you to plan your future career. You’ll also have the chance to develop your industry connections and freelance portfolio through working for Solent Creatives, our in-house creative agency.

Assessment -

Assessment includes: creative portfolios, presentations, reflective portfolios and essays, using industry-standard media production facilities.

Our facilities -

We have a fully equipped IT centre, with both PC and Mac computers featuring industry-standard software packages including Adobe Creative Suite, and video and audio editing programmes. Training and access to photographic equipment is also available.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, suggested reading and other course information. We also have our own e-learning facilities, social networking sites and blogs.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

Following this course, you will be well placed for a variety of careers in national or international advertising agencies.

Suitable roles for graduates include:

- Copywriting
- Media buying
- Account management
- Art direction.

Links with industry -

Our experienced teaching team has strong links with high-profile professional bodies, enabling you to develop useful contacts in the advertising world and to meet key industry figures.
You will be encouraged to complete work experience and we’ll help you to find a suitable placement, if possible at a top agency. Leading creative directors will be among those to critique your work, giving you valuable feedback.

Industry guest lectures, agency visits and careers events will help to boost your insight into the advertising industry and your network of contacts.
You’ll also have the chance to develop your industry connections and freelance portfolio through real-world work for Solent Creatives, our in-house creative agency.

Transferable skills -

You will develop a range of skills, encompassing creative thinking, problem-solving, writing and art direction, along with experience in presentation and teamwork.

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £4,635

International full-time fees: £11,260

UK and EU part-time fees: £2,320 per year

International part-time fees: £5,630 per year

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Could your career prospects benefit from a postgraduate advertising degree? Southampton Solent’s MA Creative Advertising programme will help equip you with the creative skills and industry awareness required to thrive in a range of in-house, agency or freelance advertising roles.

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The Specialist LLM in International Banking and Finance Law offers you the opportunity to study a fascinating and vital area of practice in the world’s financial centre, the City of London. Read more
The Specialist LLM in International Banking and Finance Law offers you the opportunity to study a fascinating and vital area of practice in the world’s financial centre, the City of London.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in International Banking and Finance Law will appeal to a wide variety of students at all stages of their career who have an interest in financial services law. It will enable you to develop your career in private commercial practice or in-house at a financial institution. You will also be well-prepared to embark on policy-oriented careers in the vibrant financial services sector as well as in compliance and public service.

Objectives

The Specialism in International Banking and Finance Law offers you the opportunity to study an important area of practice in the global financial centre, the City of London. The Specialism in International Banking and Finance Law will provide you with the knowledge, skills and insight into a highly complex and large area of law.

It will equip you with the fundamentals of international banking and financial law for which the City of London is so famous. The breadth and depth of the curriculum in this specialist degree are regarded highly by banking and finance professionals. You will be given the support to explore and study banking law, taxation, investments, money markets, and many more.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything CIty has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle.

Assessment

Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification. You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-EU Banking Law
-EU Tax Law
-International Banking Law
-International Corporate Finance Law
-International Investment Law
-International Tax
-Money Laundering
-Project Finance.

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the financial services sector. The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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Explore the main areas of international commercial law and regulation, covering a wide range of exciting subjects from international trade law, to shipping, to business regulation. Read more
Explore the main areas of international commercial law and regulation, covering a wide range of exciting subjects from international trade law, to shipping, to business regulation.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in International Commercial Law will appeal to students at all stages of their career and from around the world who have an interest in the commercial dimension of legal issues. It will enable you with this focus to develop your career in private commercial practice at law firms or in house across in a variety of sectors. With the broad knowledge available under this wide-ranging specialism, you will also be well-placed to embark on policy-oriented careers in the private or public sector.

Objectives

One of the more popular specialisms, the LLM in International Commercial Law offers you expert guidance and academic support in the main areas of international commercial law and regulation. This course provides you with the opportunity to study an extensive range of distinct but related subjects in international commercial law.

Our internationally-renowned International Commercial Law specialism is in serious demand in legal practice, government and industry. This specialism offers an impressive selection of commercial modules covering areas as widespread as international trade and shipping, finance and banking, competition law and tax. This amazing selection allows students to tailor the focus of their studies to suit their interests and career goals.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything City has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle.

Assessment

Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - each module is worth 30 credits.
-International Banking Law
-International Insurance Law
-International Tax
-Substantive EU Competition Law
-European Business Regulation I
-European Business Regulation II
-World Trade Law
-Comparative Antitrust Law
-Admiralty Law
-Marine Insurance
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Law of International Trade
-International Corporate Finance
-International Energy Litigation
-Project Finance and Law
-International Commercial Arbitration
-Energy Law
-International Investment Law
-EU Litigation
-Energy, Environment & Security
-EU Banking Law
-EU Tax Law
-International Cartels
-International Intellectual Property Law
-Mergers
-Air & Space Law
-Regulation of Online Entertainment.

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in trade and commerce. The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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The Specialist LLM course in International Energy Law and Regulation gives students the unique opportunity to study sustainable use and trade in energy resources, among the most vibrant and dynamic sectors in the global economy. Read more
The Specialist LLM course in International Energy Law and Regulation gives students the unique opportunity to study sustainable use and trade in energy resources, among the most vibrant and dynamic sectors in the global economy.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in International Energy Law and Regulation will appeal to students at all stages of their career and from around the world who have an interest in the energy sector from a global perspective. It will enable you with this focus to develop your career in private commercial practice or in-house in the oil and gas sector. You will also be well-prepared to embark on policy-oriented careers for government of the private sector.

Objectives

The Specialist LLM in International Energy Law and Regulation is one of very few LLMs in the UK and elsewhere which provide you with an in-depth study of energy law and regulation.

This masters degree emphasises the role of law in ensuring a sustainable use and trade in energy resources. It affords you the opportunity to study the subject in context - that means, you will explore the subject from the lenses of competition law, business regulation, and public international law.

The Specialist LLM in International Energy Law and Regulation takes a public-private law approach to energy. You will be given an opportunity to examine how public law regulates the use and trade in energy and to evaluate how private commercial parties could trade in energy resource. The programme emphasises the role of law in ensuring a sustainable use and trade in energy resources. It affords you the opportunity to study the subject in context – exploring the subject from the lenses of competition law, business regulation, and public international law.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work.

Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as ten weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - choose from the following 30-credit modules:
-International Energy Litigation
-Energy, environment and security
-Energy Law
-Public International Law
-Substantive EU Competition Law

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the energy sector.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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The LLM course in Maritime Law will give you the opportunity to acquire and develop the legal knowledge and skills vital to a career in the vibrant and fast growing sphere of Maritime Law. Read more
The LLM course in Maritime Law will give you the opportunity to acquire and develop the legal knowledge and skills vital to a career in the vibrant and fast growing sphere of Maritime Law.

Who is it for?

The Specialism in Maritime Law will appeal to students at all stages of their career and from around the world who have an interest in legal practice as it relates to maritime issues. It will enable students with this focus to develop their career in private commercial practice or in-house in this specialized sphere of commercial law.

Objectives

The unique specialist LLM course in Maritime Law provides you with an opportunity to acquire and develop the knowledge and skills for this niche but important field of law. This course is unquestionably one of the more popular specialist programmes for law students at the City Law School. It is taught by academics and practitioners who have years of experience in the field. The emphasis of the programme is on understanding how the law works in relation to matters such as shipping contracts, insurance, admiralty practice, international sale of goods, and commercial arbitration.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the Institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

You will benefit from City, University of London’s extensive library of hard copy and electronic resources, including its comprehensive database of domestic and international caselaw, legislation, treaties and legal periodicals. There are two law-specific libraries – one at the Gray’s Inn campus and one at our Northampton square campus - with individual study spaces and dedicated rooms for group work. Additionally, we are a short walk away from the British Library and the Law Library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words). All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other. Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes.

In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules - each module is worth 30 credits.
-Admiralty Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Law of International Trade
-Marine Insurance
-World Trade Law
-International Law of the Sea
-International Commercial Arbitration

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the maritime law sector.

Graduates from this specialist LLM course are well placed to pursue careers in:
-Professional legal and shipping practice
-Transport
-Business
-Management
-Government
-International or EU organisations
-Non-governmental organisations
-Media and press
-Academia and research

The skills and knowledge you develop during your postgraduate study will help you in a wide variety of career options and you will acquire many transferrable skills. The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM in Maritime Law may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by the City Law School.

Maritime law research is prominent at the City Law School - PhD research in maritime law is currently undertaken by students supervised by Professor Jason Chuah, director of the London Universities Maritime Law and Policy Research Group.

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