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As a Film Studies MPhil or PhD student you will form a crucial part of our research culture. Our thriving community of postgraduate students work across schools and disciplines. Read more

Course overview

As a Film Studies MPhil or PhD student you will form a crucial part of our research culture. Our thriving community of postgraduate students work across schools and disciplines. Research ranges from modern languages to English literature, English language, linguistics and arts and cultures.

We are keen to work with postgraduates in the major research projects listed below, or in the more general areas related to them. We supervise projects that span academic schools and sub-disciplines, ensuring the best fit between your interests and the expertise of our staff.

Early cinema and cinema culture in Britain and the USA (the history of film style; popular cinema culture; points of contact between literature and film; Hollywood after 1975)

Latin American cinema (cinema and memory studies; cinema and the imaginaries of post-conflict; cinema and contemporary Latin American society; cinema and the city; cinema and theatre - performance studies)

French cinema (popular film from the 1930s to the present; stardom; gender and representation; cinema audiences and theories of spectatorship)

Algerian cinema (postcolonial cinema; cinema and the representation of trauma; cinema and the Algerian War; contemporary French cinema; French horror and fantasy cinema; cinema and the work of Pierre Bourdieu)

Transnational Chinese cinema (Chinese independent films and film festivals; transnational Chinese cinema; stardom and performance; gender and sexuality; audience and reception studies; action and martial arts genres)

We organise an annual postgraduate conference for the Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and you can get involved in a number of film-related research seminars on campus, including: the Research Group in Film and Media series; the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics visiting speaker series; the School of Modern Languages research seminar series.

You will benefit from the North Eastern Regional Film Seminar, which brings together film scholars from the Universities of Newcastle, Northumbria, Sunderland, Teesside, Durham and York for a one day symposium.

There is also the Film Factory, an exciting new film forum for students and staff, initiated by two PhD students from the School of Modern Languages, Gary Jenkins and Mani Sharpe. It consists of a series of film screenings followed by discussion and debate at the Culture Lab.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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The Film and Philosophy MA offers a structured analysis of the relationship between film and philosophy, be it in terms of philosophical treatments of film (as an art form or through particular films) or the power of film itself to create philosophy. Read more
The Film and Philosophy MA offers a structured analysis of the relationship between film and philosophy, be it in terms of philosophical treatments of film (as an art form or through particular films) or the power of film itself to create philosophy.

We offer a unique programme that provides the best interdisciplinary context in which to study film and philosophy – superior to those available elsewhere – on account of our comprehensive expertise in film and 'continental' philosophy. This differentiation highlights Kingston University as the best destination for this area of study.

What will you study?

It enables you to explore current and emerging discourses within the fields of film theory and philosophy, engaging with theoretical concerns at the forefront of visual culture, art theory, moving image media and critical theory.

The programme covers varied topics such as film as cognition, the philosophy of art history and cinema, film and feminism, the body and cinema, Freud and cinema, avant-garde film and philosophy, French philosophy and film, Derrida and adaptation, animals and the horror genre. There is also the opportunity to write a dissertation on your own topic of research.

Assessment

Assessment is through essay, presentations and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Film and Philosophy
-Dissertation

Option modules (choose three, with at least one from Group A and one from Group B)
-Group A modules
-Group B modules

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Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. Read more
Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. It will enable you to develop a critical understanding of the importance of theory, method and analysis to the study of film, and you will be encouraged to test out original approaches, both in seminars and written work.

Key features
This MA offers the opportunity to carry out research into a variety of areas, including gender and sexuality on screen; religion, philosophy and film; censorship and ideology; industry and independents in New Hollywood; and cinema and media in the global context. You may also carry out research at the British Film Institute (the largest film archive in the world).

If you are interested in further research, this course provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD study.

What will you study?

You will study all that is new, vital and innovative in contemporary and emergent cinemas. You will evaluate and critically analyse a range of perspectives on cinema in light of contemporary developments, shifting cultural alliances and patterns of cross-fertilisations. In addition, you will be introduced to the main areas of debate in the history of film criticism. Current modules focus on American cinema (mainstream and independent), post-1960 British cinema, European cinema (with specialist studies on gender and sexuality, and place and identity) and world cinema (with case studies on South-east Asia, Latin America, India and Iran).

In writing your dissertation, you will demonstrate your ability to research a topic of your choice in depth, gaining a rigorous grasp of current theoretical and methodological debates relevant to the subject area, as well as an understanding of the historical and cultural context.

Assessment

Essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Film History Theory and Analysis
-Film Studies Dissertation
-Media and Cinema in a Global Context

Optional modules
-British Cinema 1960s to Today
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Special Study: Branding the Self: Celebrity, Identity and David Bowie
-Special Study: Getting High on Cinema. The Drug Experience Film
-Special Study: Screaming out Loud: International Horror Television and Film
-Vamps, Divas, Tramps, Lolitas

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Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more
Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers
• animation
• video game trailers
• science fiction
• dramatic cinema
• silent film
• costume drama
• documentary and…
• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

• Practical Composition 1 and 2
• Film and Television Score Production
• Business of Music
• Orchestration
• Combining Sounds
• Composers' Workshop Series.

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Read more
The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Taught by working writers, producers and commissioners, the course addresses the main aspects of the profession of writing. Recent students' work has been nominated for an Oscar, a Bafta, several Royal Television Society awards and countless other awards

Quick Facts

- 2 Year Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec each year
- Next intake: January 2017
- NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

TO APPLY CONTACT REGISTRY - https://nfts.co.uk/contact-us

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/screenwriting

COURSE OVERVIEW

Graduating screenwriters will have had the opportunity to complete a range of work for their portfolio, demonstrating their talent and unique voice. Introductions are made to literary agents, broadcasters and film and television production companies. Unlike a Screenwriting MA based in an academic institution, this course is set in a working film and television studio. It covers all aspects of screenwriting, from the development of ideas through to production and post-production. Screenwriting students have their writing work-shopped by professional directors and actors. Working with student producers and directors, they have the chance to see their writing tested in production.

The NFTS programme also includes masterclasses from eminent practitioners in all fields, and regular previews of current film releases. Screenwriting graduates have access to feature and TV project development opportunities, set up by the School in partnership with broadcasters and film companies such as BBC Films and Vertigo Films. There are also extended industry–oriented script development workshops like Regards Croisés and Writers for Europe.

*There are a number of different scholarships that support this course, including the Wellcome Trust Science Media Studentship. For more information see Scholarships and the Wellcome Trust (http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Broadcast-games-and-film-awards/Science-Media-Studentships/index.htm).

CURRICULUM

The first year of the course deals with the basic principles of storytelling, the craft of screenwriting for film and television, and the collaborative nature of production via exercises with other departments; some shorter writing assignments; and the formal groundwork for writing industry-length material. Writing for the expanding field of animation will be introduced via a series of practical collaborations. Writers also learn about writing for the stage and their short plays are performed to the school by a professional cast.

The second year is a project-based course focussing on longer writing assignments. Individual talents and interests will determine the content of the final portfolio, though this must include at least one full-length screenplay (feature film or television-hour), plus a short piece (a short fiction, animation, short stage play or sitcom). At the School’s discretion, one or more of the short pieces may be filmed. Writers may opt to write two feature screenplays. The second year will also feature specialist modules tailored to the interests of the students, e.g. comedy, horror, factual-based drama, radio. There is also an introduction to online drama and virals.

The course ends with extensive introductions to the industry with preparation on the practicalities and legalities of working. In this process, writers learn to pitch the projects in their portfolio. This has resulted in many graduating students securing agents either prior to graduation, or immediately following their studies.

The course is full time and requires a high level of dedication; a prolific output, and the ability to meet professional–style deadlines. Graduation is also based on completion of a tutored dissertation.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

TUTORS

Brian Ward (The Interpreter, Death Defying Acts, Tabloid, Shoebox Zoo) is the NFTS Head of Screenwriting. Other tutors include Simon Beaufoy, Visiting Chair in Screenwriting (Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours, The Full Monty), Holly Phillips (Sugar Rush, As If, Trinity), Peter Berry (The Luzhin Defence, The Last Enemy, Prime Suspect), Clive Bradley (City of Vice, The Harlot’s Progress, Last Rites), Brian Ward (Death Defying Acts, Shoe Box Zoo, The Interpreter), Roger Smith (Script Consultant: My Name is Joe , Sweet Sixteen; Writer: Up The Junction), Sarah Golding (Script Consultant; Head of Development at Rainy day Films and previously at Potboiler Productions (The Constant Gardener, Brothers of the Head), Rob Ritchie (Script consultant; Writer: Who Bombed Birmingham; ex-literary manager Royal Court Theatre).

ALUMNI

Ashley Pharoah (Ashes to Ashes, Life on Mars), Shawn Slovo (A World Apart, Captain Corelli’s Mandolin), Sandy Welch (Jane Eyre, Emma), Amanda Coe (Filth, Margot), Simon van der Borgh (Script Consultant: Kidulthood), Ben Court & Caroline Ip (The Hole, Cracks, Whitechapel), Amanda Coe (Room at the Top, Elizabeth David -A Life in Recipes, Filth – The Mary Whitehouse Story), and Nick Hoare (Waterloo Road) studied at the NFTS.

APPLY WITH

- One original screenplay, typed, twenty pages in length, together with a two-page (A4) synopsis. The screenplay may be short (up to twenty pages) or the first twenty pages of a longer work. All work must be original and must not be adapted or co-authored. Uploaded or e-mail to as a Word, Final Draft or pdf document

- Optional: If your writing to date has been in a different field (other than screenplays) you may consider that you are better able to demonstrate your ability by submitting a piece of original fiction typed and double spaced, together with a two-page (A4) synopsis. This piece of fiction may be a story, novel or play. It may be a short work, up to twenty pages, or the first twenty pages of a longer work.
You must also submit the screenplay. Uploaded or e-mail to as a Word, Final Draft or pdf document.

HOW TO APPLY

The application deadline has now passed, however there may still be a chance to apply. Please contact registry via email stating your name, course of interest and contact details:

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Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.
As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.
The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Dale Townshend

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.
Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.
The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.

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Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Read more
Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Normally, you will already have attained a degree of expertise in film studies or in a cognate area before starting the course and you will be ready to study film at a more advanced level by mastering theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to the subject.

This MA in Film Studies course is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the development of film and film theory, taking in the development and intersections of both Hollywood and European cinemas and popular and 'alternative' cinemas. You will also have the opportunity to study specific movements within cinema, such as the changing manifestations of German Expressionism, American film noir and avant-garde movements; you will do so by studying philosophical, aesthetic, social and cultural influences.

This course will enable you to interrogate a wide range of factors which inform the production, distribution and reception of film, including a range of cultural and aesthetic contexts, the representation of class, ethnicity and gender, changing and shifting film marketing and distribution practices, and the study of a range of film fans and audiences. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies which will prepare you for the production of a 15,000 word dissertation (on a topic of your choice) at the end of the course.

The MA in Film Studies will provide you with essential research, historical and analytical skills designed to support your future career progression either in the cultural and critical industries or in academia. Throughout the MA, staff will be happy to advise you on potential progression, after your MA, to PhD study. For profiles of previous MA Film Studies students, which outline their experiences on the MA and their subsequent career progression, see: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/study-with-us/masters/former-ma-profiles/

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/film-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to engage in the advanced study of cinema.
- If you are ready to take on the subject in theoretical, historical and empirical terms;
- If you aim to pursue a career in film journalism, criticism or analysis, film historical work or arts administration, or if you wish to progress to PhD study;
- If you wish to sharpen your academic rigour and develop a cache of critical evaluative, communication, and time and project management skills.

Course detail

The MA in Film Studies focuses on the importance of film within an ever-changing global environment. As a student, you will be encouraged to investigate the ways in which technologies and social changes have impacted, and continue to impact upon different aspects of film, including filmic representation and the ways in which film has been taken up within broader cultural contexts. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies, and will be alerted to the historical developments that have marked film as a medium, focusing on historical case studies in order to think about changes and continuities throughout film history. While you will be introduced to a broad array of filmmaking traditions, you will focus particularly on the interrelations between Hollywood and European cinemas.

The MA will introduce you to different ways of understanding film: as entertainment, as art, as an industry, and as a cultural medium through which identities, histories and ideologies are both represented and negotiated. You will be taught by active researchers in the field of film studies, with a broad array of expertise and knowledge particularly in British, French, Russian and Hollywood cinemas, avant-garde, experimental and cult film, film history and representation, film genre and star studies, and fan, audience and reception studies. As such, the MA aims to enrich your knowledge of film’s importance through different methodological and theoretical approaches to the subject, and to sharpen your own research and study skills in the process.

The MA in Film Studies is run by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, one of the largest and most significant departments of its kind in the UK, and has a particularly vibrant postgraduate and research culture (including an annual postgraduate conference). Based in Aberystwyth University’s Parry-Williams Building, the Department boasts superb facilities including: 36 digital and HD editing suites; over 40 industry standard HD and digital cameras: a new HD, digital television studio; three fully-equipped theatre spaces (seating approximately 100 people each); and much more. We also maintain close links with Aberystwyth Arts Centre's digital 3D cinema. The cinema has a vibrant and lively film programme including the annual Abertoir horror film festival of Wales.

Format

The course is taught over one year (if taken full time), and three years (if taken part time). The MA encompasses a total of six (out of a choice of seven) taught modules (120 credits in total) covering film theory, research methods, film history, film representation, documentary and avant-garde film, film marketing and distribution, and film audiences. In order to complete your MA, you will then apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research totalling no more than 15,000 words. It will be on a subject of your own choice, informed by discussions with your designated dissertation supervisor in the Department.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, seminars, oral presentations and essays. Successful completion of your dissertation leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Film Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. The benefits of the course for employment are twofold: not only will you possess first-rate, subject-specific knowledge of film history and theory, but you will also be equipped with widely applicable skills and abilities that will suit many employment contexts.

Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is its emphasis on group discussion and individual student presentations (which will enable you to develop your team work and communication skills). As an emerging film academic your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification. The pattern of research and analysis you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into employment. The course will also provide you with the training and skills you will need if you decide to progress to PhD study.

The dissertation element of the course will enable you to develop and demonstrate an array of professional qualities and skills. You will do this by reflecting on the methods and approaches you have encountered in the study programme and then identifying and creating appropriate methodologies for your own research work. Success in this area of study proves to prospective employers that you take the initiative to develop and improve your research and project management skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. Read more
The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. The course covers traditional, contemporary and emerging forms of writing, from novel writing to the graphic novel and creative nonfiction, from playwriting to writing for television, screen and multimedia, from poetry to pyschogeography and ecowriting.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Professional Creative Writing has been so named as to emphasise the professional aspects of creative writing: it is designed to enhance employability and focus is directed towards the development of students into professional writers. In particular:
-There are major mandatory modules in the key professional genres of narrative and dramatic writing (including ‘writing for television’), reflecting the real world professional activities of writers and employability opportunities for writers;
-Modules have professional coursework outputs in industry-ready form;
-Specific attention is given to commercial and related opportunities (professional networks, awards and competitions, submission windows, commissions and grants).

Innovation and internationalisation are key, with a focus on contemporary and emerging forms, such as the graphic novel, creative nonfiction, multimodal writing, eco-writing, e-publishing and writing for online video production. There will be a high level of virtual learning resources including video lectures, podcasts, virtual workshops, online writers’ groups, writers’ blogs and online peer-to-peer feedback, enabling easy global access. The course has and international outlook with texts studied coming from around the world and we have Online International Learning partners in institutions overseas: these offer the possibility of online student writing collaborations.

Two themed writers’ retreats are incorporated into the course: these are one week long field trips to coincide with significant writing up periods and may be in the UK or abroad. Current options include two of the following:
-The Horror: a winter week in the seaside town of Whitby, where Bram Stoker gave birth to Dracula;
-Romance: a spring week in the Lake District, haunt of the English Romantic poets;
-The Lost World: a spring or summer week in Spain, ‘lost’ in the remote mountains of the Alpujarras;
-Crime: a spring or summer week in Sicily, home of the Mafia;
-Myth and the Muses: a summer week in Greece, ancestral home of Western literature.

A student may as an alternative elect to organise a DIY writers’ retreat, aligned to their own specific needs as a writer.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The core mandatory modules are:
-The Novel, the Graphic Novel and Creative Non-Fiction
-Writing for Stage and Television
-Writing Genre Fiction
-Creative Dissertation

Optional modules* include:
-Writing for Film and Video Production
-Poetry and Style in a Digital Age
-Eco-writing
-Multimodal Writing

*Choose two. Note that the provision of optional modules is dependent on student choice and numbers and may vary year to year.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

Teaching and learning will take place in workshops, seminars, lectures and tutorials. Eco-writing sessions will take place outside of the classroom and multimodal writing will take place in an Art and Design laboratory. Specialist software is available for scriptwriting and screenwriting and there will be a large array of online materials and resources available. There will be guest lectures by industry professionals and themed trips. Writers’ retreats will also be an inclusive feature of this course: these enable students to write in a relaxed environment and are in places of special interest to writers.

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Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook. Read more
Explore your passion for contemporary literature and the way it can be used to understand our society. You will examine current developments and critical issues in the past 30 years of literature on a course that provides an international and cross-cultural outlook.

Whether your interests lie in the world of the postcolonial or you have a fascination with women's writing, this challenging course will allow you to study recent volumes of poetry, research cultures and explore novels and films relating to current debates. You will use key theoretical models and concepts to gain a greater understanding of how we study literature and the motivations and historical events that have driven the authors you choose to read.

Taught by a team with an international reputation for their research in diverse areas, ranging from Caribbean culture, history and literature to cultural representations of the 2007-08 credit crunch across literature, stage and screen, this course will expose you to new ideas and encourage you to question them.

Check out our twitter feed @BeckettEnglish for up-to-date information on staff and student events, short courses and fun happenings around the school.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: 38% of our research was judged to be world leading or internationally excellent in the Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Library and Information Management unit.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/englishcontemp_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Course Benefits

You'll learn how to use a range of cutting-edge theoretical approaches to texts, while you will be able to draw upon the course team's research and teaching strengths in contemporary women's writing, postcolonialism and popular fiction.

You will acquire a well-informed, critical understanding of current developments, questions and critical issues in the field of contemporary literatures and develop the transferable skills needed to undertake independent research into contemporary literatures and associated criticism and theory.

Core Modules

Researching Cultures
Is an interdisciplinary research methods module, taught with students on other Masters programmes. It prepares students for their dissertation, and equips them with research skills and strategies necessary if they intend to progress to PhD.

Doris Lessing: Narrating Nation & Identity
Explore a selection of the extensive body of work produced during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries by the Nobel Prize-winning writer, Doris Lessing.

Contemporary Genre: (Re)Presenting the 21st Century
Examine contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovations and socio-cultural developments.

Haunting the Contemporary: the Ghost Story in 20th & 21st Century Fiction
Discover the contemporary field of haunted narratives and consider them in relation to a variety of theoretical approaches, primarily the work of Jacques Derrida.

Post-Structuralist Theory: Foucault & Derrida
Develop a deeper awareness and more sophisticated understanding of two theorists who have been of fundamental importance to debates in literary studies in the twentieth century: Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Neoliberal Fictions
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.

Dissertation
Presents the opportunity for students to synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the course and to write a substantial piece of supervised research, in the guise of a 15,000-word masters dissertation.

With the exception of Researching Cultures and Dissertation, the modules offered each year will be rotated. Other modules include:

Poetry & Poetics
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.

Contemporary Gothic
Examine the relevance of the Gothic today by studying contemporary Gothic texts. You will engage not only with novels but with Gothic-influenced US TV drama, South-East Asian vampire films, and Latin American horror.

India Shining: Secularism, Globalization, & Contemporary Indian Culture
Discover the diverse and challenging selection of literary and visual texts offered by modern postcolonial India and explore the different conceptual and political approaches taken by writers and film-makers.

Journeys & Discoveries: Travel, Tourism & Exploration 1768-1996
Consider the journeys, voyages and discoveries described in a range of travel writing from 1768 through to 1996 and gain an understanding of how travel, tourism and exploration have evolved.

Translating Tricksters: Literatures of the Black Atlantic
Explore postcolonial writing in the form of short stories, novels and poetry, and unpick the ways writers use religion and folklore to define their identity and resist the legacy of western imperialism.

New Yorkshire Writing: Scholarly Practice & Research Methods
Develop the research and writing skills needed to conduct advanced research in your field as you study representations of Yorkshire and the region's position within Britain.

Other Victorians: The Neo-Victorian Contemporary Novel
You will use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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This course offers a sophisticated insight into the role and function of media in contemporary society. It focuses on the centrality of modern media forms and practices in our daily communication, and examines the ways in which they facilitate and constrain the way we communicate with each other. Read more
This course offers a sophisticated insight into the role and function of media in contemporary society. It focuses on the centrality of modern media forms and practices in our daily communication, and examines the ways in which they facilitate and constrain the way we communicate with each other.

Key features
-The choice of option modules allows you to tailor the course to your personal interests, and the dissertation gives you the chance to study an area of interest in greater depth and gain valuable research skills.
-Teaching is research-led by internationally renowned academics and therefore reflects the most recent ideas and innovations in the field.
-You will have the chance to attend many research seminars and talks presented by a range of guest speakers, professors and professionals visiting the University.

What will you study?

The course offers a variety of core and option modules, with the compulsory core modules providing a comprehensive grounding in the theoretical and empirical approaches to studying media institutions, texts and communication practices. The option modules allow you to specialise in research areas that interest you within this broad field, and enable you to examine various media industries and communication practices within their historical, economic, political and social contexts.

You will explore, among other things, how the question of power - whether political, economic or cultural - is inextricable from the analysis of media, and will focus on the ways in which new media technologies have dramatically altered the dissemination and reception of knowledge. You will also look at the inherent role that mediated communication plays in globalisation - one of the defining characteristics of the contemporary world.

Assessment

Assessment takes a variety of formats, such as seminar presentation, exams, essays and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-From Mass Media to New Media: Theories, Approaches, Applications
-Media and Cinema in a Global Context
-Media and Communication Dissertation

Optional modules
-British Cinema 1960s to Today
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Psychoanalysis and Media
-Special Study: Multi-Platform Political Communication
-Special Study: Screaming out Loud: International Horror Television and Film

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