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Masters Degrees (Horror)

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This course is subject to validation. The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. Read more
This course is subject to validation.

The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. We believe that all writers need a core toolkit of skills, but we also understand that our students often want to specialise in an area of writing about which they’re passionate; that’s why we offer pathways in Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror, Commercial Fiction, Writing for Children and Creative Non-Fiction. Our courses are designed with busy lives in mind, and are taught through a combination of intensive weekends, high-quality distance learning and one-to-one tutorials, either in person or via Skype. We also offer a strong focus on developing professional practice in writers, looking at skills such as self-presentation, pitching and understanding the publishing industry.

Our Pathways

Commercial Fiction:
Students selecting this pathway will explore literary and more commercial forms of creative writing, fiction, poetry and non-fiction. This degree will appeal to students who wish to generally enrich their writing skills, or whose practice falls broadly into these areas.

Fantasy, Science-Fiction and Horror:
This pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialise in speculative fiction genres. You will develop a detailed understanding of the history and diversity of these literary forms, and work on techniques such as world-building, metaphor and narrative structure.

Creative Non-Fiction:
This pathway allows students to explore the creative aspects of non-fiction writing, including memoir, features journalism and travel/nature writing. Students will explore the creative tension between fact and fiction, and will develop practical skills in pitching and selling their work.

Writing for Children:
An ideal choice for those who want to develop a career in writing novels, picture books or children’s non-fiction, this pathway will develop the specific writing skills needed for writing for under-12s, and give students a practical understanding of issues such as the specific publishing environment for this practice, working with illustrators and interfacing with school curricula.

Steeped in literary history, Canterbury is an excellent setting for the next chapter of your Creative Writing story. Canterbury Christ Church University is a young, dynamic university, and the degree is run by a team of writers who have live experience of the publishing market. We pride ourselves in taking innovative approaches to the way our students learn, offering flexible options that help you to fit an MA into your life. We also have strong links to publishers, agents and literary festivals, and work hard to create opportunities for our students to develop their writing practice and career.

The MA Creative Writing includes core modules in The Craft of Writing, Professional Practice and Research Skills, which develop a toolkit for great writing across all genres. In all other modules, you will specialise in your chosen pathway of either Commercial Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Writing for Children or Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror. You will study in guided reading groups to develop a critical understanding (and warm appreciation) of your specialised area of writing, and will work intensively to develop your practice in termly residential weekends. Finally, every student submits a 15,000 word piece of extended writing, working closely with a prominent writer from their chosen area of specialism.

Who Is The Course For?

The programme is aimed at adults who are passionate about writing, and want to hone their craft while developing an understanding of the publishing market and how to access it. Unlike traditional MAs, we ensure that our teaching falls outside of office hours, which allows students to learn at times that suit them. It may appeal to recent graduates who wish to specialise further in their chosen writing practice, or to adult learners who have been writing independently for a while, and are now ready to take the next steps towards a writing career. We are proud to work with many mature students, and aim to continue to do so in the future.

Students completing this MA could go on to a Creative Writing PhD, or could undertake a teaching qualification to take their practice into a school, FE or HE setting.

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Fantasy. Science fiction. Horror. Mystery. Young adult. Become a genre fiction author with our . Online Master of Fine Arts in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing. Read more

Fantasy. Science fiction. Horror. Mystery. Young adult. Become a genre fiction author with our Online Master of Fine Arts in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing. Our flexible graduate program allows you to work on your writing from anywhere in the world, with online workshops, literature seminars, and publishing courses that fit your schedule. Become a better writer, explore the history of your genre, and learn how to take the first steps toward publishing. 

In this program, you'll have the chance to:

  • Develop your skills and focus on creating plot and character-driven stories,
  • Learn how books are published and marketed from trade publishing professionals, 
  • Connect with a network of renowned writers, publishers, and academics, and
  • Craft a thesis to submit to agents or self-publish, with one-on-one support from your advisor

Why Popular Fiction?

The MFA in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing is one of the first online writing programs to prepare students to write professional-level stories and novels in the genres of fantasy, science fiction, horror, mystery, thrillers, and young adult. The program is an opportunity for students to read deeply, think critically, and discuss popular fiction with peers from various professional perspectives. Students will strengthen their writing and editing skills and learn contemporary practices for publishing their work or finding and working with literary agents, professional editors, and marketers to bring their vision to a wide readership. The program, which draws on the expertise of writers, literary scholars, and publishers, offers students the unique experience to take creative workshops and literature courses as well as hands-on publishing courses aimed at teaching them how to turn a completed manuscript into a polished, publishable work.

Why Online?

The online MFA program provides a chance to understand the nature of story-telling from a personal, historical and market perspective. Online writing workshops serve as the core of the curriculum and are designed to allow writers of different genres to work together to gain a deeper understanding of the art and craft of writing popular fiction. To complement the workshop experience, our online program also requires you to take literature courses on the history and current trends in specific genres as well as publishing course that explore the different paths to publications.

The online program is convenient and flexible, allowing students from anywhere in the world to work on their fiction writing, including working adults, parents, or those who are unable to attend a traditional college. The program is designed to work around students’ schedules, and there are no residency requirements. Our online workshops, literature seminars, and publishing courses give students the ability to participate in class discussions with ease and to plan their study time around family, work, or other life commitments. The program provides a comfortable learning environment for writers.

What Unique Opportunities does the online MFA in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing Provide?

  • A focus on developing plot and character-driven stories in genres of speculative fiction, thriller, and young adult
  • A chance to learn from professionals from trade publishing on how books are published and marketed
  • A network of writers, publishers, and academics
  • The ability to take classes from anywhere in the world
  • Courses that fit your busy schedule

Why Emerson College?

The Department of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College is home to one of the longest running creative writing MFA programs in the country and one of the only Masters programs in publishing in North America. Based in the heart of downtown Boston, Emerson sits at the crossroads of intellectual inquiry, creative endeavor, and innovation. The College has fostered a community of writers, editors, publishers, and teachers for several decades. The online program in Popular Fiction Writing and Publishing promotes a space for fiction writers who want to focus on working in the areas of speculative fiction, crime novels, or young adult literature.

The MFA at a Glance

With rolling admissions in Fall, Spring, and Summer, our online program offers students online workshops where they can learn how to build their worlds and develop their skills. Students will take writing workshops, literature classes that will provide a framework for understanding the tradition of their genre, and publishing courses that will instruct them on the various options for publishing genre fiction. Students will also work one-on-one with a faculty advisor to craft a thesis to send out to agents or be self-published.



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Introduction. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.

As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate

- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time

- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,

- Start date: September

- Course Director: Dr Timothy Jones

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:

- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill

- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C

- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component

- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.

Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.

The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.



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This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. Read more
This course offers an opportunity for the advanced study of popular literature. In recent years a body of theoretical and cultural historical material has developed that attempts to define what 'the popular' means now, and what it has meant historically. At the same time texts that do not seem to belong to traditional canons increasingly attract critical attention, and have come to be taught at university level alongside more canonical texts. In this light the course will cover such popular genres as adventure fiction, children's literature, horror, detective fiction, romance, pornography and science fiction, as well as offering an advanced introduction to such topics as the bestseller, genre theory, print culture and readership.

The course comprises two elements:

A core course meeting twice a week for 2 hours over 2 terms
Option courses meeting once a week for 2 hours - students take one per term

This creates a total of 6 contact hours per week. Students are also expected to spend a substantial amount of time in library research. Assessment is a combination of four 5,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation to be supervised by a member of staff.

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Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers. Read more
Add expertise to your talent and ideas and learn in the company of industry experts on this innovative, inspiring course for aspiring writers.

If you want to make a career in writing, this course is for you. You already have talent and ideas, we’ll add the expertise you need to approach your chosen market with confidence, originality and skill. No ambitions are out of bounds: we love commercial genre fiction and literary experiments equally.

We aim to ensure our graduates are equipped to succeed - and to change the culture they choose to enter.

See the website http://www.napier.ac.uk/en/Courses/MA-Creative-Writing-Postgraduate-FullTime

What you'll learn

We take an innovative approach to the training and support of aspiring writers, driven by intellectual ambition and practical industry experience. There are four strands to the programme:

• developing narrative technique
• practising vocational skills (including abridgement, adaptation and collaborative creation)
• experimental, theoretical and personal development work
• regular one-to-one editorial mentoring

Uniquely, the course offers a dynamic range of cross-disciplinary options. Writing for graphic fiction, screenwriting, interactive media and creative non-fiction are all offered as specialisms, while our pioneering module in genre fiction covers crime, horror, fantasy and science fiction with YA options in each.

We host an exciting programme of lectures and master classes from award-winning authors and high-profile industry experts. In addition, an internationally recognised author joins us for 12 months as Writer in Residence, to develop new work alongside students, share experience and offer one-to-one consultations.

Our approach to full-length narrative development trains you to deploy a range of unique and dynamic pre-writing techniques invented by our programme. This energetic combination of conceptual development and critical self-reflection will transform you into a technically adept, purposeful writer ready to make your mark.

The course is taught by industry professionals Sam Kelly, a former literary agent and David Bishop, a successful working writer and former editor. In addition to campus facilities, our students have access to the Writers’ Room, a private workspace with Wi-Fi, available evenings and weekends. It houses an exclusive library of 2,000 hand-picked books, DVDs and graphic novels and is the venue for reading groups and social events.

The MA is piloting a Teaching Internship Scheme, offering selected graduates the opportunity to develop their teaching practice with the course for a further year.

Modules

• Creating Narrative – Writer’s Toolkit
• Innovation and Authorship
• Creative and Editorial Development
• Writing Practice – First Person Narrative
• Writing Graphic Fiction
• Writing Genre Fiction
• Creative Non-Fiction
• Interactive Media
• Major Project

Study modules mentioned above are indicative only. Some changes may occur between now and the time that you study.

Careers

Among our graduates’ achievements are:

• book deals
• representation by literary agents
• international and national competition wins
• publication in magazines and anthologies
• Edinburgh International Book Festival appearances
• paid editing and writing commissions
• performances and teaching
• working for national literary organisations

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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This course offers a sophisticated insight into the role and function of media in contemporary society. It focuses on the centrality of modern media forms and practices in our daily communication, and examines the ways in which they facilitate and constrain the way we communicate with each other. Read more
This course offers a sophisticated insight into the role and function of media in contemporary society. It focuses on the centrality of modern media forms and practices in our daily communication, and examines the ways in which they facilitate and constrain the way we communicate with each other.

Key features
-The choice of option modules allows you to tailor the course to your personal interests, and the dissertation gives you the chance to study an area of interest in greater depth and gain valuable research skills.
-Teaching is research-led by internationally renowned academics and therefore reflects the most recent ideas and innovations in the field.
-You will have the chance to attend many research seminars and talks presented by a range of guest speakers, professors and professionals visiting the University.

What will you study?

The course offers a variety of core and option modules, with the compulsory core modules providing a comprehensive grounding in the theoretical and empirical approaches to studying media institutions, texts and communication practices. The option modules allow you to specialise in research areas that interest you within this broad field, and enable you to examine various media industries and communication practices within their historical, economic, political and social contexts.

You will explore, among other things, how the question of power - whether political, economic or cultural - is inextricable from the analysis of media, and will focus on the ways in which new media technologies have dramatically altered the dissemination and reception of knowledge. You will also look at the inherent role that mediated communication plays in globalisation - one of the defining characteristics of the contemporary world.

Assessment

Assessment takes a variety of formats, such as seminar presentation, exams, essays and a dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-From Mass Media to New Media: Theories, Approaches, Applications
-Media and Cinema in a Global Context
-Media and Communication Dissertation

Optional modules
-British Cinema 1960s to Today
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Psychoanalysis and Media
-Special Study: Multi-Platform Political Communication
-Special Study: Screaming out Loud: International Horror Television and Film

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Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. Read more
Bringing together those with a passion for contemporary cinema, this course focuses on a range of current approaches to film studies and provides an in-depth study of specific areas such as American independent, European, British and Far East cinema. It will enable you to develop a critical understanding of the importance of theory, method and analysis to the study of film, and you will be encouraged to test out original approaches, both in seminars and written work.

Key features
This MA offers the opportunity to carry out research into a variety of areas, including gender and sexuality on screen; religion, philosophy and film; censorship and ideology; industry and independents in New Hollywood; and cinema and media in the global context. You may also carry out research at the British Film Institute (the largest film archive in the world).

If you are interested in further research, this course provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD study.

What will you study?

You will study all that is new, vital and innovative in contemporary and emergent cinemas. You will evaluate and critically analyse a range of perspectives on cinema in light of contemporary developments, shifting cultural alliances and patterns of cross-fertilisations. In addition, you will be introduced to the main areas of debate in the history of film criticism. Current modules focus on American cinema (mainstream and independent), post-1960 British cinema, European cinema (with specialist studies on gender and sexuality, and place and identity) and world cinema (with case studies on South-east Asia, Latin America, India and Iran).

In writing your dissertation, you will demonstrate your ability to research a topic of your choice in depth, gaining a rigorous grasp of current theoretical and methodological debates relevant to the subject area, as well as an understanding of the historical and cultural context.

Assessment

Essays, presentations, research projects, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Film History Theory and Analysis
-Film Studies Dissertation
-Media and Cinema in a Global Context

Optional modules
-British Cinema 1960s to Today
-Freedom, Censorship and Subversion
-Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary Cinema
-Special Study: Branding the Self: Celebrity, Identity and David Bowie
-Special Study: Getting High on Cinema. The Drug Experience Film
-Special Study: Screaming out Loud: International Horror Television and Film
-Vamps, Divas, Tramps, Lolitas

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This innovative course introduces you to advanced level study of the various aspects of popular culture; principally that produced and consumed in Britain since the late nineteenth century. Read more

This innovative course introduces you to advanced level study of the various aspects of popular culture; principally that produced and consumed in Britain since the late nineteenth century

The programme consists of a broad range of modules from a number of academic disciplines, including History, English, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Religious Studies, and Film Studies

All modules are taught by experts in their respective fields, and informed by research at the forefront of the various disciplines. For your own independent research into popular culture, we can also offer supervision in a wide range of areas and approaches

You will experience a variety of teaching methods with a high level of input from students on the course. Assessment is largely by coursework, essays and presentations

Read more about the School of Humanities to find out further information.

What happens on the course?

Typical modules may include:

  • Theories and Concepts for the Analysis of Popular Culture
  • Popular Consumerism in Britain 1850-1939
  • Youth Subcultures and National Identity in Post-war England
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • The Sacred and the Profane in Popular Culture
  • Crime of the Century - Murders and the Media
  • Fads and Fame: the Industrialisation of Culture
  • Screening Horror: Trauma, Fear and Fantasy in Film
  • Independent Study project.

Why Wolverhampton?

This is the only postgraduate course on Popular Culture in the UK, and the only one in the world to focus principally on the British experience, either as consumers of international culture, or through Britain’s unique contribution to youth and pop culture.

Career path

  • Successful completion of the programme will enhance your career prospects, whether studied at PGCert, PGDip or MA level
  • Skills and knowledge gained will be particularly relevant to archivists and curators, researchers, writers and journalists, librarians, and teachers of popular culture
  • The programme will equip you with the theory, methodology and appropriate critical discourse required for postgraduate work
  • It will encourage the development of more general personal and academic competencies, such as those required for effective information handling, analysis and presentation of findings, and offers a sound basis for further doctoral research

What skills will you gain?

You will bring to your studies a rich and individual experience in the consumption, interpretation, dissemination and – perhaps – the production of popular culture. On the course you will encounter many more varieties of cultural experience, and you will study theories and approaches with which you can make a different kind of sense out of them. On this programme, more than most, where you are when you end the course will depend on what you bring to it, and what you choose to take from it. But you will inevitably encounter materials and analytical methodologies you have not previously had experience of, and you will be given a valuable opportunity to discover and experiment with alternative approaches to the field of popular culture.



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Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Read more

Film and Television develops technical skills in compositional techniques and studio-based work. Designed for advanced composers, it provides an in-depth specialist training. Contextual knowledge of mainstream repertoire and significant previous experience of composition and orchestration are required.

Course detail

The MMus in Composition for Film and Television at London College of Music (LCM) is one of the longest-established qualifications of its kind. The course provides an ideal opportunity for in-depth examination of specific techniques (both historical and current) employed in the creation of music for modern media, and for drawing upon these procedures in a practical context by composing music for a diverse range of genres, including…

• television thrillers

• animation

• video game trailers

• science fiction

• dramatic cinema

• silent film

• costume drama

• documentary and…

• …horror!

In addition, you will hone and refine your skills as orchestrators by writing for a variety of specified ensembles. You will also expand your musical and dramatic vocabulary via an imaginative series of compositional pastiche exercises (an integral feature of the portfolio submission during Semester 1).

You will undertake further assessments in film score analysis (taking the form of an extended contextual essay, based upon a score/composer of your own choice) and in-studio ensemble conducting, working 'to click' with a group of 'live' performing musicians.

Modules

  • Practical Composition 1
  • Practical Composition 2
  • Orchestration and Arranging
  • Score Production
  • Combining Sounds
  • Developing Your Career

Format

The course is taught mainly through individual tutorials, but may include group work, workshops, seminars and lectures.

Assessment

We assess written portfolio work through portfolios of compositions responding to verbal briefs, and in the second semester (or second year for part-time students), composing direct to picture. There is also a practical assessment in the Film and Television Score Production module and an extended essay project for the Business of Music module. There is a viva voce exam as part of the portfolio submissions in both semesters (or both years for part-time students).

Career and study progression

Course alumni have gone on to compose music for an excitingly diverse range of projects and for an impressive list of clients, including the BBC, BBC Worldwide, BBC Three, The National Theatre, Youth Music Theatre UK, Projection Pictures, The National Theatre, Sky, Channel 4 and the British Film Institute.

Also, in addition to orchestrating their own music, many specialise in orchestrating and conducting the music of other (notable) film composers.

While most students progress directly into the industry after completing this course, graduates may alternatively choose to undertake a PhD or further their compositional studies with a DMus.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course.

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here.



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The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Read more
The NFTS screenwriting course has produced some of the outstanding writers of our generation. The course prepares writers for work in film and television. Taught by working writers, producers and commissioners, the course addresses the main aspects of the profession of writing. Recent students' work has been nominated for an Oscar, a Bafta, several Royal Television Society awards and countless other awards

-A Creative Skillset-Accredited Screenwriting MA course.
-Course covers film and television writing.
-Strong links with film and TV industry.
-Study in a collaborative filmmaking environment.
-Workshops with actors and directors.
-Opportunity to have a script filmed.
-Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School.

We welcome EU/EEA Students. Those accepted onto courses starting in 2018 will have their fees guaranteed at the UK rate for both years of the course. Postgraduate students can apply for a loan to help with their studies via the Student Loans Company Loans. A £ 10,000 loan is available to contribute to course and living costs. The Post Graduate Loan is only open to EU/EEA and UK Students who normally live in England. It is not currently available to Scottish, Welsh or Northern Ireland Students. Find out more here: https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/screenwriting

COURSE OVERVIEW

Graduating screenwriters will have had the opportunity to complete a range of work for their portfolio, demonstrating their talent and unique voice. Introductions are made to literary agents, broadcasters and film and television production companies. Unlike a Screenwriting MA based in an academic institution, this course is set in a working film and television studio. It covers all aspects of screenwriting, from the development of ideas through to production and post-production. Screenwriting students have their writing work-shopped by professional directors and actors. Working with student producers and directors, they have the chance to see their writing tested in production.

The NFTS programme also includes masterclasses from eminent practitioners in all fields, and regular previews of current film releases. Screenwriting graduates have access to feature and TV project development opportunities, set up by the School in partnership with broadcasters and film companies such as BBC Films and Vertigo Films. There are also extended industry–oriented script development workshops like Regards Croisés and Writers for Europe.

*There are a number of different scholarships that support this course, including the Wellcome Trust Science Media Studentship. For more information see Scholarships and the Wellcome Trust: http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Funding-schemes/Broadcast-games-and-film-awards/Science-Media-Studentships/index.htm

CURRICULUM

The first year of the course deals with the basic principles of storytelling, the craft of screenwriting for film and television, and the collaborative nature of production via exercises with other departments; some shorter writing assignments; and the formal groundwork for writing industry-length material. Writing for the expanding field of animation will be introduced via a series of practical collaborations. Writers also learn about writing for the stage and their short plays are performed to the school by a professional cast.

The second year is a project-based course focussing on longer writing assignments. Individual talents and interests will determine the content of the final portfolio, though this must include at least one full-length screenplay (feature film or television-hour), plus a short piece (a short fiction, animation, short stage play or sitcom). At the School’s discretion, one or more of the short pieces may be filmed. Writers may opt to write two feature screenplays. The second year will also feature specialist modules tailored to the interests of the students, e.g. comedy, horror, factual-based drama, radio. There is also an introduction to online drama and virals.

The course ends with extensive introductions to the industry with preparation on the practicalities and legalities of working. In this process, writers learn to pitch the projects in their portfolio. This has resulted in many graduating students securing agents either prior to graduation, or immediately following their studies.

The course is full time and requires a high level of dedication; a prolific output, and the ability to meet professional–style deadlines. Graduation is also based on completion of a tutored dissertation.

Unlike other schools, all production costs are met by the School. In addition you will be given a cash Production Budget. NFTS students are engaged in more productions as part of the curriculum than any of our competitors.

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The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. Read more
The MA in Professional Creative Writing enables students to develop their writing craft and hone their writing skills towards the real world needs of the publishing, communication and media industries. The course covers traditional, contemporary and emerging forms of writing, from novel writing to the graphic novel and creative nonfiction, from playwriting to writing for television, screen and multimedia, from poetry to pyschogeography and ecowriting.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

The MA Professional Creative Writing has been so named as to emphasise the professional aspects of creative writing: it is designed to enhance employability and focus is directed towards the development of students into professional writers. In particular:
-There are major mandatory modules in the key professional genres of narrative and dramatic writing (including ‘writing for television’), reflecting the real world professional activities of writers and employability opportunities for writers;
-Modules have professional coursework outputs in industry-ready form;
-Specific attention is given to commercial and related opportunities (professional networks, awards and competitions, submission windows, commissions and grants).

Innovation and internationalisation are key, with a focus on contemporary and emerging forms, such as the graphic novel, creative nonfiction, multimodal writing, eco-writing, e-publishing and writing for online video production. There will be a high level of virtual learning resources including video lectures, podcasts, virtual workshops, online writers’ groups, writers’ blogs and online peer-to-peer feedback, enabling easy global access. The course has and international outlook with texts studied coming from around the world and we have Online International Learning partners in institutions overseas: these offer the possibility of online student writing collaborations.

Two themed writers’ retreats are incorporated into the course: these are one week long field trips to coincide with significant writing up periods and may be in the UK or abroad. Current options include two of the following:
-The Horror: a winter week in the seaside town of Whitby, where Bram Stoker gave birth to Dracula;
-Romance: a spring week in the Lake District, haunt of the English Romantic poets;
-The Lost World: a spring or summer week in Spain, ‘lost’ in the remote mountains of the Alpujarras;
-Crime: a spring or summer week in Sicily, home of the Mafia;
-Myth and the Muses: a summer week in Greece, ancestral home of Western literature.

A student may as an alternative elect to organise a DIY writers’ retreat, aligned to their own specific needs as a writer.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The core mandatory modules are:
-The Novel, the Graphic Novel and Creative Non-Fiction
-Writing for Stage and Television
-Writing Genre Fiction
-Creative Dissertation

Optional modules* include:
-Writing for Film and Video Production
-Poetry and Style in a Digital Age
-Eco-writing
-Multimodal Writing

*Choose two. Note that the provision of optional modules is dependent on student choice and numbers and may vary year to year.

HOW WILL THIS COURSE BE TAUGHT?

Teaching and learning will take place in workshops, seminars, lectures and tutorials. Eco-writing sessions will take place outside of the classroom and multimodal writing will take place in an Art and Design laboratory. Specialist software is available for scriptwriting and screenwriting and there will be a large array of online materials and resources available. There will be guest lectures by industry professionals and themed trips. Writers’ retreats will also be an inclusive feature of this course: these enable students to write in a relaxed environment and are in places of special interest to writers.

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This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. Read more

This highly-regarded taught programme offers the opportunity to engage in cross-disciplinary investigation of various aspects of cinema and moving image culture, and has diverse routes available via theoretical, vocational and practice-based perspectives to provide a uniquely flexible course. These routes allow students to combine vocational, theoretical and practice-based modules as preferred.

Theoretical modules involve study of British, American, European, Far Eastern and Middle Eastern Cinemas. Here, students will examine how film and television texts produced in these regions relate to their historical, social, and cultural contexts through a variety of critical and theoretical approaches, which range from aesthetics as cinematic discourse to the implications of terrorism for film and its audiences.

Vocational choices, which are available throughout, include Teaching Film and Media, Becoming an Academic, Film Festivals, Film Festivals Independent Study (that offer opportunities to attend a film festival, and to be involved in film festival organisation) and Film Journalism, supported by expert film critics, that develops skills required for the writing of film reviews and articles in journals such as Sight and Sound.

There are practice-based options to undertake experimental and documentary film production, and scriptwriting.

What happens on the course?

Full time students normally attend lectures for 9-11 hours per week, and part-time students attend 3-6 hours per week, depending on module choices. Most modules run on Thursdays so that a full time student might expect to attend from 10am – 9pm on Thursdays

Students are assessed via a diverse range of assignments including:

  • Formal Essay
  • Film Review
  • Film Festival Analysis
  • Film Festival Organisation
  • Student led seminar
  • Student presentation
  • Journal article
  • Lesson plan
  • Construction of ‘A level’ teaching plan
  • Annotated bibliography
  • Essay Plan
  • Conference Paper Proposal
  • Research/Funding Proposal
  • Submission of draft thesis chapters
  • Film Production
  • Scriptwriting
  • Thesis

Course Specific Cost:

Course costs are at the usual MA rate with 20% discount for UoW graduates. The module Film Festivals requires an additional flat rate cost of £350 to over hotel, travel and festival entrance fee to a national/international Film Festival. Any additional cost for attendance at a film festival will be met by the university

Why Wolverhampton?

Most of the modules are delivered at Light House Media centre which houses 2 purpose built cinemas. Otherwise, teaching is at other appropriate venues on City Campus. All teaching on the MA Film and Screen is informed by staff expertise, with their research directly underpinning each module. This expertise is reflected in the significant number of high-quality publications produced by Film and Media Staff who contributed successfully to REF2014.

Who will teach you on this course:

  • Dr Fran Pheasant-Kelly, Reader in Screen Studies, Faculty of Arts and Course Leader MA Film and Screen: teaches Space, Place and Culture in American Cinema, Screens of Terror, Becoming an Academic, and Far Eastern Cinemas
  • Dr Stella Hockenhull, Reader in Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Picturing Britain and Screening Horror
  • Dr Eleanor Andrews, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, Course Leader BA Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts: teaches Screening the Holocaust and Beyond
  • Dr Gavin Wilson, Lecturer in Film and Television Production, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Festivals
  • Dr Peter Robinson, Principal Lecturer and Head of Marketing, Innovation, Leisure and Enterprise, University of Wolverhampton Business School
  • Dr Aleksandra Galasinska, Reader in Discourse and Social Transformation, Faculty of Arts: teaches Poetics and Practices of Polish Cinema
  • Dr Maria Urbina, Senior Lecturer in Multi-media Journalism, Faculty of Arts; teaches Film Journalism

What our students think

One student commented on module 7FI014 Teaching Film and Media: This course was the best course I have attended - the teaching was comprehensive and I found the content to be some of the most useful I have experienced throughout my time at university. This was a relatively new subject and I found the work challenging - dealing with new concepts and ideas, but the most important parts for me was to understand where students are educationally before they arrive in University and to develop some of the skills to engage students in their learning experience. I can't express how useful, engaging and interesting this was, I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in teaching at higher education as well as further education.

Career path

In addition to facilitating competence in a range of intellectual and social skills that will be advantageous to the majority of occupations, an MA in Film and Screen is academically relevant to careers in the arts and media, leading to employment in arts administration, film archiving, film and media research, film journalism, film festival management, lecturing and teaching. A specific and unique advantage of this course is a module enabling new lecturers to deliver Film Studies and Media to AS/A2 level. It also provides suitable grounding for doctoral research in film, television and film history.

What skills will you gain?

The course offers theoretical, vocational and practice-based options throughout and you will gain a broad range of academic, vocational and transferable skills that are vital to academic employability and to the screen industries, such as the ability to organise film festivals, present papers at conferences, and publish both journalistic film reviews and scholarly publications. Core modules include Teaching Film and Media which offers unique training for teachers and lecturers in Film and Media Studies, and Becoming an Academic whereby you will acquire a range of academic skills entailing, for example, the ability to write a journal article, academic book, and funding bids. As part of your MA programme, you will independently conduct a research project to a publishable standard, which will provide good opportunities for research-based writing in various contexts. You will also develop event management skills for academic events, such as film festival programming, film curation and the organisation of post-graduate symposia.



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Students have the flexibility to pursue a project that they are passionate about, and to be supported by the expertise of the staff team. Read more

Students have the flexibility to pursue a project that they are passionate about, and to be supported by the expertise of the staff team. This allows for a range of diverse backgrounds in terms of learning experiences, ethnic diversity, disability, gender and age; projects will be developed and tailored to the individual’s learning needs.

All staff members are actively publishing their writing and have won several awards between them for creative outputs. The team have expertise in speculative fiction, historical fiction, scriptwriting, screenwriting, adaptation, poetry, experimental poetry, hybrid forms, horror fiction, literary fiction, creative non-fiction (including memoir and true-crime), and are able to support writing in a number of genres.

The staff team of award-winning writers have an exciting and diverse approach to creative writing and are able to supervise a huge range of proposed projects. Current full-time staff members include: 

In addition, the Creative Writing team at York St John has a strong focus on the relationship between critical theory and creative writing and the intersection of a number of theoretical perspectives with creative practice, including eco-criticism, psychoanalysis, biopolitics and regionality. Members of the team have undertaken interdisciplinary and collaborative research exploring music, memory, medicine, uncanny landscapes and pollination.

Course structure

Creative Writing at York St John University is distinguished by:

  • The integration of writing practice, critical appreciation of texts and employability skills.
  • A focus on contemporary writing.
  • Regular engagement with visiting speakers and writers.
  • Partnerships with local publishers and writing festivals
  • The innovative use of the local and regional landscape in learning and teaching.
  • Research-led teaching.
  • Diverse and inclusive syllabi.
  • Opportunities for students to experience field trips as part of their learning experience.
  • Value added in terms of student achievement.

Routes

The three distinct routes offer focussed, but flexible structures to fulfil a range of motivations. This is distinctive in the UK market:

  • Publication/book route – your aim is to produce a full-length work (e.g. novel, poetry collection, script, biography) for publication/performance/dissemination. The Critical/reflective Commentary will focus on this, whilst the creative submission can be in any form/genre.
  • Community/Heritage route –your aim is to produce a book-length work, performance or account exploring an outreach project with a partner, for example in health, arts, music or heritage. The Commentary may focus on the development and implications of this project, and could incorporate some qualitative/quantitative data or case studies, where appropriate.
  • Critical/theoretical route – your aim is to produce a book-length work in any form (novel, poetry, script). The project has a strong theoretical/critical underpinning, in which the Critical/reflective Commentary explores and analyses a movement, literary theory or other critical idea and the creative work performs a practice-based exploration of the same. Intended for students considering moving onto a PhD, but not exclusively for them.
  • Your final manuscript will comprise 40,000-70,000 words of prose or approx. 1,200 lines of poetry (the aim being a book-length manuscript appropriate to the chosen the form). Writers wishing to produce a script will produce an equivalent ‘time’ length. Your final manuscript will be accompanied by a Critical Commentary of 6,000 words which reflects on the process of composition.
  • Your project will be supported by one to one, expert supervision. This can be undertaken full- or part-time, face to face, online or a blended approach to suit your circumstances.
  • You will take part in a termly Writers’ Workshop to share work in progress with like-minded peers in a nurturing atmosphere.
  • A Residential Writing Retreat offers an opportunity to reflect and focus on your progress amongst a community of writing peers, facilitated by tutors, in a beautiful and inspiring regional or city setting.
  • Close links to agents, publishers, literary events and local arts and heritage organisations will fuel your creativity and hone your employability skills.

Teaching and learning

  • Taught via one to one supervision in three ten-week terms starting in October.
  • Termly peer Writing Workshops.
  • Weekend Residential Writing Retreat in April/May of the final year (with Portfolio Progress presentation assessment worth 20 of the 180 credits).
  • Manuscript submitted in September of the final year.
  • Whilst the learning is independent, but supported, students are encouraged to take a professional approach and attend the variety of events provided by the York Centre for Writing, which include visits from agents, publishers, editors and writers and foster an important sense of belonging and community.

Key Graduate Attributes

  • To have the confidence to research, compose and critically evaluate a substantial, complete body of creative writing for potential publication/exhibition/dissemination
  • To be reflective in relation to their own work and a body of texts, cultural artefacts and cultural contexts.
  • To be aware of, and sensitive to, a range of audiences/readers.
  • To take a professional approach to editing, drafting and critiquing creative work.
  • To have an awareness of the wider role of creative writing in culture.
  • To understand the publishing industry and feel confident in approaching agents, publishers, editors, directors etc.
  • To engage with a writing community, both at a local and national level.
  • To be generous in the support of creative peers within a community of practitioners.

Programme specification

Further information on this course is available in the programme specification. Please note that the programme specification relates to course content that is currently being studied by students at the University. For new programmes, the programme specification will be made available online prior to the start of the course.

Learning support

York St John University works hard to create an inclusive environment for all our students. We offer a range of learning support services to assist students throughout their studies.



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This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates. Read more
This course is currently under suspension for the current academic session. However, it may return. Please see the website for updates: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/

Aberystwyth University’s MA in Film Studies focuses upon the advanced study of cinema. Normally, you will already have attained a degree of expertise in film studies or in a cognate area before starting the course and you will be ready to study film at a more advanced level by mastering theoretical, historical and empirical approaches to the subject.

This MA in Film Studies course is designed to give you a comprehensive overview of the development of film and film theory, taking in the development and intersections of both Hollywood and European cinemas and popular and 'alternative' cinemas. You will also have the opportunity to study specific movements within cinema, such as the changing manifestations of German Expressionism, American film noir and avant-garde movements; you will do so by studying philosophical, aesthetic, social and cultural influences.

This course will enable you to interrogate a wide range of factors which inform the production, distribution and reception of film, including a range of cultural and aesthetic contexts, the representation of class, ethnicity and gender, changing and shifting film marketing and distribution practices, and the study of a range of film fans and audiences. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies which will prepare you for the production of a 15,000 word dissertation (on a topic of your choice) at the end of the course.

The MA in Film Studies will provide you with essential research, historical and analytical skills designed to support your future career progression either in the cultural and critical industries or in academia. Throughout the MA, staff will be happy to advise you on potential progression, after your MA, to PhD study. For profiles of previous MA Film Studies students, which outline their experiences on the MA and their subsequent career progression, see: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/tfts/study-with-us/masters/former-ma-profiles/

The Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies at Aberystwyth is the highest rated Arts and Humanities Department in Wales, according to the results of the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, with 60% of research submitted being rated world-leading.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/film-studies-masters/

Suitable for

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to engage in the advanced study of cinema.
- If you are ready to take on the subject in theoretical, historical and empirical terms;
- If you aim to pursue a career in film journalism, criticism or analysis, film historical work or arts administration, or if you wish to progress to PhD study;
- If you wish to sharpen your academic rigour and develop a cache of critical evaluative, communication, and time and project management skills.

Course detail

The MA in Film Studies focuses on the importance of film within an ever-changing global environment. As a student, you will be encouraged to investigate the ways in which technologies and social changes have impacted, and continue to impact upon different aspects of film, including filmic representation and the ways in which film has been taken up within broader cultural contexts. You will also receive a thorough grounding in key theoretical traditions and research methods within film studies, and will be alerted to the historical developments that have marked film as a medium, focusing on historical case studies in order to think about changes and continuities throughout film history. While you will be introduced to a broad array of filmmaking traditions, you will focus particularly on the interrelations between Hollywood and European cinemas.

The MA will introduce you to different ways of understanding film: as entertainment, as art, as an industry, and as a cultural medium through which identities, histories and ideologies are both represented and negotiated. You will be taught by active researchers in the field of film studies, with a broad array of expertise and knowledge particularly in British, French, Russian and Hollywood cinemas, avant-garde, experimental and cult film, film history and representation, film genre and star studies, and fan, audience and reception studies. As such, the MA aims to enrich your knowledge of film’s importance through different methodological and theoretical approaches to the subject, and to sharpen your own research and study skills in the process.

The MA in Film Studies is run by the Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, one of the largest and most significant departments of its kind in the UK, and has a particularly vibrant postgraduate and research culture (including an annual postgraduate conference). Based in Aberystwyth University’s Parry-Williams Building, the Department boasts superb facilities including: 36 digital and HD editing suites; over 40 industry standard HD and digital cameras: a new HD, digital television studio; three fully-equipped theatre spaces (seating approximately 100 people each); and much more. We also maintain close links with Aberystwyth Arts Centre's digital 3D cinema. The cinema has a vibrant and lively film programme including the annual Abertoir horror film festival of Wales.

Format

The course is taught over one year (if taken full time), and three years (if taken part time). The MA encompasses a total of six (out of a choice of seven) taught modules (120 credits in total) covering film theory, research methods, film history, film representation, documentary and avant-garde film, film marketing and distribution, and film audiences. In order to complete your MA, you will then apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research totalling no more than 15,000 words. It will be on a subject of your own choice, informed by discussions with your designated dissertation supervisor in the Department.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, seminars, oral presentations and essays. Successful completion of your dissertation leads to the award of an MA.

Employability

Every aspect of the Aberystwyth Master’s in Film Studies programme is designed to enhance your employability. The benefits of the course for employment are twofold: not only will you possess first-rate, subject-specific knowledge of film history and theory, but you will also be equipped with widely applicable skills and abilities that will suit many employment contexts.

Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is its emphasis on group discussion and individual student presentations (which will enable you to develop your team work and communication skills). As an emerging film academic your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification. The pattern of research and analysis you will undertake in this course creates highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into employment. The course will also provide you with the training and skills you will need if you decide to progress to PhD study.

The dissertation element of the course will enable you to develop and demonstrate an array of professional qualities and skills. You will do this by reflecting on the methods and approaches you have encountered in the study programme and then identifying and creating appropriate methodologies for your own research work. Success in this area of study proves to prospective employers that you take the initiative to develop and improve your research and project management skills.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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