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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more
Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.
Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?
You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

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The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting new areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one. Read more
The MA in Queer History is a pioneering programme in one of the most exciting new areas of historical enquiry, giving a voice to those who throughout much of history have been denied one.

This MA provides a comprehensive introduction to the themes and methods of Queer History as well as laying a solid foundation in general historical study. It offers a first-rate overview of important thought and methods from the fields of queer theory as well as the histories of gender and the body and sexuality.

This programme aims to historicise often binary categories, such as male/female, heterosexuality/homosexuality, active/passive, and uncover the processes through which these categories came to be seen as ‘natural’. It further pays close attention to questions of power, including how sexual orientation and race throughout history have often become interlinked in asymmetrical, oppressive ways.

Students conclude the programme with a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their own choice. The dissertation research is aided by access to the shared library and archival resources of the wider University of London and the city of London, one of the world’s queer capitals. Goldsmiths aims to build the National Queer Archive and involve MA students in this process.

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English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is. Read more
English Literature at Cardiff is taught by staff with an international reputation for innovative and influential research. Our passion for the subject and the strength and range of our scholarship enable us to offer a degree which is:

• Inclusive. We teach across the whole chronological span of English Literature, from Middle English to literature of the twenty-first century. We offer modules in a range of critical approaches, from bibliography and textual studies to contemporary women’s writing, and from Barthesian semiotics and postcolonial ways of reading, to theories of gender and queer studies. We are intrigued by the connections between literature and popular culture and literature and theory, and our teaching reflects these interests.

• Challenging. Staff offer modules on their research areas of expertise. This means that students engage with new, up-to-date ideas that are helping to shape and define the future of the discipline.

• Diverse. There are no compulsory modules. You have the freedom to use any critical, theoretical perspective to analyse any type of (aesthetic, cultural, historical) material.

• Engaged. The MA in English Literature is a successful programme of study that has a strong reputation for offering a comprehensive range of modules from all periods and genres that bring the latest developments in literary and critical theory to bear upon the reading of literary and cultural texts.

Distinctive features

• A wide-ranging programme of research-led modules taught by specialists in the field
• A series of dedicated research pathways, including Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory
• Access to skills training and various research activities
• The freedom to assemble a programme of study tailored to personal and professional interests
• High-level training in the latest research methods, critical theory and scholarly writing and presentation skills in a non-assessed core module
• Popular two-day residential conference and workshop at Gregynog Hall, where you will present short 15-minute papers in a supportive and lively atmosphere
• One-day symposium dedicated to increasing your employability skills
• Opportunities to take part in a series of dynamic research seminar series
• Access to specialist library collections

Structure

Our flexible structure allows you to assemble programmes of study tailored to your personal and professional interests. You can opt for the open pathway, or choose one of our specialist pathways: Medieval and Renaissance; Romantic and Victorian Studies; Modern and Contemporary Literature; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Cultural and Critical Theory, which groups together groups of taught modules with related research activities and skills training available in the School.

The degree is structured in two parts.

• Part one

You choose four modules from a range of specialist options. You take two modules per semester (one module per semester for part-time study)

All teaching is by seminars and workshops structured around student participation, featuring opportunities to present your work. Each module consists of a two-hour seminar per week and is assessed by a 4,000-word essay (or equivalent).

In addition to the taught modules, you attend weekly workshops on research methods and scholarly presentation.

• Part Two

You undertake a dissertation of 16,000-20,000 words on a subject of your choice, developed in consultation with a supervisor in the field. You begin to plan and research your dissertation in the second semester for submission in September.

Core module:

English Literature Ma Dissertation

Optional modules:

The Myth of King Arthur in The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Violent Death in Renaissance Drama
Reading/Theory
Constructing Shakespeare
Neo-Victorian Metatextualities
Writing and Experimentation
Heroes and Villains from Chaucer to Shakespeare
Spectral Femininities
Writing Victorian Science
Children's Fantasy Fiction Since 1900
Before Homosexuality? Representing Same Sex Desire from Smollett to Sexology
Romantic Poetry and Place
Project Management and Advanced Research Skills
Narrative and Nation: Romantic Prose 1980-1830
White
Virginia Woolf's Modernism
Ecotheories
Digital Theory

Teaching

Teaching is delivered in seminar groups for all modules. The teaching for each module is text-based and revolves around the exploration of concepts and ideas from a range of literary, historical, and theoretical perspectives within the broad field of English Literature.

The learning activities vary from module to module as appropriate, but will include such as activities as interactive discussions of prepared texts/topics and, in some cases, student-led presentations.

Encouraged to explore our excellent library resources, you are expected to undertake preparation including wide-ranging reading to enable full participation.

Assessment

Each module on Part One is assessed by a 4,000-word essay or equivalent (which can include up to 10% of the module being assessed by oral presentation).

Part Two is examined by a 16,000-20,000-word dissertation.

Career prospects

Postgraduate study is a gateway to many careers within and beyond academia.

Many of our alumni enter (or return to) various professions including academia, primary and secondary education, journalism, publishing, archival and library work, the Civil Service, arts administration and the creative industries.

In addition to taught modules and academic workshops, we also offer dedicated sessions to increase your transferable skills and employability prospects. We also encourage all students on the programme to work closely with the University’s Careers and Employability office.

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