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Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. Read more
Our MA Applied Criminology course has been designed for both recent graduates and practitioners who wish to develop their understanding of the debates surrounding crime and the criminal justice system. It offers an exciting opportunity to study both theoretical criminology and the more applied aspects of criminology and criminal justice issues.

The course has three formal stages:
-The Diploma stages consist of three taught modules, a proposal module that is delivered through work groups and a practice-based module involving reflection upon work or volunteering experience.
-Those proceeding to the Master's stage will be required to complete an extended project to be determined individually.
-It is possible to complete your studies at any of the Certificate, Diploma or Master's stages.

Full-time students will complete all these stages in one year. Part-time students would normally complete the diploma and masters stages over two years.

What's covered in the course?

During study, you are asked to reflect upon your experience of crime and the criminal justice system, looking at significant factors involved in crime in contemporary society. These include globalisation, consumerism and political economy, as well as considering more psychological and theoretical drivers of harmful and criminal behaviour and the responses to crime.

In order to provide an engaging and flexible educational experience to diverse range of students, the course utilises a wide range of learning and teaching methods and technologies. Given the small size of each group of students recruited, the postgraduate status of the programme and the experience which many of its recruits have had of the criminal justice system, the course is highly participative. While sessions will provide periods of structured teaching, they will also provide a forum, within which you will take responsibility for your own learning, and share your knowledge and views with other students and staff.

The precise nature of sessions and delivery will vary with the year, the cohort of students, and the general and specific experience possessed by individual students. The programme team also makes increasing use of the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, where teaching staff will upload lecture notes, web links, video programmes and extracts from academic sources. Moodle is also used for general announcements and communication with a group of students, many of whom are unlikely to be on campus every day.

The course has a strong link with research practice, and will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, as well as enabling you to form judgements on the relative merits of, and relationships between, different research tools and methods. You will also develop the capability to design, manage and disseminate a research project to a professional standard.

Why Choose Us?

-The course has strong links with the University’s Centre for Applied Criminology, a leading research centre staffed by established criminologists. They are renowned for their international reputations, with their specialist areas including homicide, violence and organised crime.
-You’ll have flexible study options, enabling you to focus on either an academic route or a more practice-based approach.
-The course will help you develop and understand the principles and practice of research, and allow you to form judgements on different research tools.
-The course team has valuable links with the regional criminal justice system and leading non-Government organisations, including therapeutic prison HMP Grendon, where the University holds an annual debate.

How you learn

The course is taught in weekly seminars, tutorials and workshops, which encourage substantial student participation. Our virtual learning environment is also used to deliver some content and facilitate communication remotely.

The MA Applied Criminology will normally be studied on a one-year full-time basis and a two-year part-time basis, with the taught elements of the programme being delivered over a teaching period of approximately 30 weeks from September to May/June.

The programme is divided into study units called modules, each of 20 credits (excluding the Extended Project which amounts to 60 credits). Most modules on the programme are core, but there is also optional modules which cover influential areas of work undertaken in the Centre for Applied Criminology. You’ll complete 120 credits at the Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Stage, and a further 60 credits at the Master’s stage. It is expected that most applicants will wish to progress to Master's stage, which is delivered and assessed through an extended project supervised through evening workgroups and through one-to-one supervision, which will come from an expert academic attached to the Centre for Applied Criminology.

The taught Master’s component covers a range of core and option modules, including topics such as - Research Methods (where you will develop your proposal for the final Applied Research Proposal module); Criminological Thought; Criminal Psychology; Penal Theory and Practice; Crime and Rehabilitation in Media; and Reflective Practice or Criminological Issues.

At the Diploma stage, you may select options modules covering topics such as Restorative Justice, Crime Prevention in Homicide and Organised Violent Crime (HAVOC), and Understanding Domestic and Sexual Violence (UDSV). Additionally, the MA is awarded on the completion of the Applied Research Project [Dissertation] module (60 credits), which contains a taught component with evening sessions.

Employability

The teaching team draws on the combined with the expertise of members of the Centre for Applied Criminology, who will give you cutting-edge criminological knowledge from their impactful and high-profile research, as well as giving you excellent access to experienced practitioners and Criminal Justice System organisations.

The access provided to professionals, the presence of practitioners among fellow students and the capacity to reflect upon relevant volunteering or work experience within the structure of the course means that the course provides excellent opportunities for building contacts and networking, as well as developing opportunities for employment.

The School of Social Sciences has relationships with a number of criminal justice agencies and non-government organisations, including the local Community Safety Partnership, HMP Grendon and the Howard League.

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We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject. Read more
We have tailored the MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice course to meet the requirements of graduates and professionals wishing to further their studies in this vibrant and increasingly important subject.

Covering exciting contemporary issues within the criminal process, such as homicide investigation, the threat of global organised crime and fraud investigation the course will equip you with the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed in this competitive field.

The research methodology and dissertation modules aim to ensure that you receive training in a range of research skills; invaluable in both the professional and academic worlds.

Course detail

During the course, you will gain an understanding of key issues in criminal justice policy and the administration of justice.

You will study topics which will give you a specialised understanding of organised crime, the complex relationship between policing and public perception, the investigation of homicidein the UK and internationally, and you will develop a working knowledge of the techniques used in investigating fraud and money laundering.

Modules

• Contemporary Criminal Justice Issues
• Counter Terrorism Policing
• Investigating Financial Crime
• Homicide Investigation
• Organised Crime
• Research Methodology
• Dissertation.

Format

We use a wide range of teaching and learning methods to meet different learning styles and objectives. Our teaching strategy places you at the centre of the teaching and learning process in order to stimulate your interest so that you learn through involvement. We aim to encourage you to learn by your participation in well-structured learning activities.

During your MA studies, you can expect to benefit from small group lectures and workshops, class discussions with your peers and academics, and frequent formal and informal feedback on your ideas and your progress. Although postgraduate level study requires a significant amount of individual study outside of scheduled classes, you will be supported by staff, who will direct you to relevant resources and help guide your learning.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary between modules, but will comprise of a combination of coursework and examinations.

Career and study progression

A Criminology postgraduate degree can open the door to many exciting and rewarding careers. Some of the most popular careers include:
• police
• probation and prison officers
• private companies in the security industry
• in the court system
• administration of justice.

The skills you acquire on this postgraduate level course are also transferable and valued across many other sectors, such as:
• finance
• the charity sector
• the civil service
• the public sector
• the public services.

Research study enables you to specialise in the field you are passionate about.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management. Read more
Ideal for practitioners, managers and policy makers, this Masters degree is the first of its kind in the UK with a specialist focus on the theory and practice of offender management.

With recent changes to the organisation and management of community orders in the UK, and the partial privatisation of probation, there is now a greater focus on developing practices for managing post-sentence work with people who have been convicted.

This specialist Criminology Masters will provide graduates with the knowledge and theory to further influence and lead the development of practice in post-custody supervision. Throughout your studies, you’ll delve into the philosophy, theory and practice of working with individuals who are sentenced to either serve a community order or a prison sentence and who are subject to post-custody supervision.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1852-msc-working-with-adult-and-young-offenders

What you will study

You’ll be encouraged to explore the criminal justice system in detail covering theories of crime, rehabilitation, retribution, deterrence, desistance and restorative justice. You’ll gain an insight into how different civil services (including prison and probation) work with offenders whilst also gaining a better understanding of the work carried out in the third and private sectors.

Guided independent study, a module in research methods, and a dissertation will also form part of your studies. You will also study a further option module available from a choice of topics including drug interventions, managing and leading interdisciplinary teams, supervision and support skills, ethics, reflection and safeguarding, restorative and approaches.

Learning and teaching methods

Taught by a team of lecturers with long-standing expertise in the field, you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. As part of your studies you’ll also undertake independent study that will be supervised by a member of the teaching team.

The teaching team comprises of active researchers who specialise in drug use, crime prevention, homicide and violence, animal abuse, youth justice and youth policy, policing protests, informal justice and alternatives to prosecution and imprisonment.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Upon successful completion of this Masters degree you could pursue a career in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods are varied and include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. You’ll also be required to complete a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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Our Major Crime Investigation and Management Masters has been designed to provide detectives, police officers/staff and others with the knowledge and skills to conduct and manage major crime investigations from start to finish. Read more
Our Major Crime Investigation and Management Masters has been designed to provide detectives, police officers/staff and others with the knowledge and skills to conduct and manage major crime investigations from start to finish.

Whether you’re simply fascinated by issues relating to crime or aspire to lead a major crime unit, this Masters degree provides a unique platform to hone management skills specifically tailored for significant criminal investigations.

Your studies will be underpinned by the latest international recognised research in the field undertaken by the Centre for Criminology at the University. Many of our staff are research active and have expertise in homicide and major crime investigations - working in collaboration with police and senior crime detectives all over the world. For you, this means not only will you be taught by academics who are leading their field, but you’ll hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in delivering the course and will be able to share their experiences of criminal investigations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1851-msc-major-crime-investigation-and-management

You’ll gain an in-depth understanding of the diverse nature and range of major crime investigations throughout the course. Building up your knowledge and investigatory skills in every facet of crime investigation, you’ll develop an advanced understanding of the characteristics and causes of difficult-to-solve homicides, an appreciation of evidence and theory around ‘failed’ and successful investigations, the gathering and managing of data, intelligence, and scientific evidence.

A key element to your studies will also focus around aspects involved in managing and conducting major investigations, from managing small and large investigative teams to working with external agencies including forensic science providers and the media.

The course has a strong theoretical foundation and will include research methods training that will develop your with critical and analytical skills. This means you’ll be better equipped to make sense of large volumes of complex data and intelligence – a typical characteristic of modern day major crime investigation.

Taught by a team of lecturers with long-standing expertise in the field, you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. The teaching team comprises of active researchers in the theory and practice of criminal investigation, so you’ll benefit from being taught by staff at the forefront of their subject.

The University has an established Criminal Investigation Research Network (CIRN), led by Professor Fiona Brookman that brings together leading academics, senior investigating officers and practitioners - ensuring your learning is informed by the latest development in the field. An important feature of your studies will be hearing directly from those with distinct professional experiences of, and in some cases diverse roles within, police investigations.

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The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Read more
The MSc Crime and Justice provides an understanding of issues relating to crime and the criminal justice system, enhancing your career in this and related fields. Tuition draws upon the expertise of research staff in the University’s well established Centre for Criminology.

You will examine a range of crimes and criminal behaviour, the context of crime and responses to it. In addition to core areas of study, you can choose modules and/or pathways to suit your career development. You will explore an area of interest to you, through a 20,000-word dissertation, and gain a thorough grounding in qualitative and quantitative research methods – invaluable skills for any profession that includes planning, analysis and evaluation.

On the Substance Misuse pathway, you will study a range of criminological modules and a module on drug interventions. This specialist module provides an insight into the nature and extent of substance misuse and responses to it, including prevention, treatment, harm reduction and enforcement. Your dissertation will be related to substance misuse.

On the Youth Justice and Offender Management pathway, you will study the contexts in which offenders come into contact with the criminal justice system. The work of relevant agencies and systems that engage with those at risk of offending are also considered. Your dissertation must be related to youth justice and offender management.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/230-msc-crime-and-justice

What you will study

- Criminological theory
Explore the philosophical foundations of criminological theory and the way in which it relates to general social theory. You’ll examine the social and political contexts within which the various criminological theories have developed.

- Criminal justice – theory and practice
Learn about the general theories, principles, and models of criminal justice within a national and international context. You’ll examine the key institutions and processes that deliver criminal justice, and evaluate the interplay between them.

- Approaches to criminological research
Gain an understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted. You’ll be given a broad overview of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research in criminology and criminal justice and will learn about the relationship between theories and methods.

- Criminological research in practice
Develop your understanding of the ways in which criminological research is designed and conducted, putting into practice both qualitative and quantitative approaches considered in ‘Approaches to Criminological Research’.

- Dissertation
A significant piece of research into an appropriate area of study.

Optional modules include:
- Violence and Homicide
- Policing in a Global Age
- Drug Interventions (specified for Substance Misuse pathway)
- Youth Justice and Offender Management (specified for Youth and Offender Management pathway)

Learning and teaching methods

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials. Certificate (PgCert) and Diploma (PgDip) stages are taught in group sessions.

Teaching on the MSc Crime and Justice takes place in the evenings and at weekends specifically to enable you to continue to work alongside your studies.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

This course provides the knowledge and skills to pursue careers in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, prison, probation services and youth offending services. You could also choose a career in government organisations such as the Home Office, Ministry of Justice, Welsh Government and local authorities. Graduates also go on to careers within voluntary agencies such as offender rehabilitation, victim support, community safety, and drug treatment services. It is also an excellent basis for further research at MPhil and PhD levels.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods include essays, critiques, written examinations, multiple choice tests, and oral and poster presentations. The MSc award requires a dissertation of around 20,000 words on an individual piece of research, which may be work-related.

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How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. Read more
How do we understand crime? How can it be prevented? Why should crime be punished, and how should we go about it? Criminologists engage with some of the most pressing issues, decisions and dilemmas facing societies today. On our course you explore the nature of crime, criminal justice and punishment within wider social contexts.

Criminology at Essex builds on strong sociological foundations and reflects the diversity of staff interests, including leading contributors to studies of women, young people and criminal justice, prostitution, homicide, victimisation, visual criminology and media, organised crime and law enforcement, terrorism and surveillance, environmental crime and more. Our courses provide critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of crimes and harms, from the local to the global.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues covered by cutting-edge criminology. You explore a wide range of topics, including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of crime
-Globalisation and various forms of crime
-Security and the state
-New criminological theory
-Terrorism, counter-terrorism, surveillance and human rights

You also develop the skills needed to make your own contribution to the field, gaining a critical and coherent perspective on empirical research and examining the key assumptions and ideological underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

You are taught by a team of award-winning internationally renowned scholars widely regarded as leading experts in their fields.

Criminology at Essex is led by Professor Eamonn Carrabine, Professor Pamela Cox, Dr Isabel Crowhurst, Professor Pete Fussey, Dr Anna Sergi, Professor Nigel South, Dr Darren Thiel and Dr Jackie Turton.

All staff are actively engaged in research at the cutting edge of their respective fields of interest and specialism and bring the very latest developments and findings into the classroom. All are prominent writers and the criminology team collectively author the best-selling criminology textbook, Criminology: A Sociological Introduction (now in its 3rd edition), used on undergraduate courses across the country.

Our staff have worked at local, national and international level with bodies from local councils and the Home Office, to Amnesty International and the United Nations.

Specialist facilities

-Our Centre for Criminology hosts expert speakers and practitioners
-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities through a unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society is a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and research organisations.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Formative Debates in Criminology
-Current Controversies in Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy
-Sociological Research Design
-Dissertation
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis (optional)
-Organised Crime: Global and Local (optional)
-Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (optional)

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The course has a highly applied focus, designed to develop the knowledge and skills which will be directly relevant to employment in careers with the police, public services or third sector organisations. Read more
The course has a highly applied focus, designed to develop the knowledge and skills which will be directly relevant to employment in careers with the police, public services or third sector organisations.

Alongside modules that examine specialist academic themes, students also undertake an individual or group project with a host organisation, exploring the application of research evidence to effective professional practice.

The course benefits from strong staff and student links with a wide range of bodies which offer opportunities for collaboration including: Gloucestershire Constabulary; the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Gloucestershire; Restorative Gloucestershire; charities providing support and training around domestic violence, homicide, stalking and sexual offences; and community organisations active in crime prevention and reduction initiatives.

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The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Read more
The Department of Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University boasts research expertise of international repute. Choosing to study with us will not only provide you with an intellectually stimulating degree, but also by providing you with access to the latest research expertise and specialist equipment, we will develop your thirst for knowledge and inspire you to question, research and analyse your theories.

We are committed to ensuring that our graduates are employable professionals. It is increasingly important that your postgraduate degree programme develop the skills that employers are after and alongside the acquisition of academic knowledge, our students will develop and apply skills in:
Assessment
Verbal communication
Professional report writing
Evaluation
Analytical thinking

International Research

Research in the department primarily focuses on solving real world problems, ensuring that our theoretically strong work has an impact outside academia. Currently holding grants from the Medical Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council our research is not only relevant and underpinned by a unique blend of qualitative and quantitative orientations but has international reach and esteem.

Members of the Forensic Psychology team conduct applied and practitioner focused research. Particular areas of expertise are:
The investigation of crime; homicide and police decision making
Eyewitness and alibi evidence
Expert witness evidence
Juror decision making

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This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world. Read more
This one-year degree is designed for students who already hold a first degree (BA or BSc) in Forensic Anthropology or a related subject, and is intended to provide advanced training in subject areas which are germane to current professional requirements, but which are not available collectively at any other institution in the world.

Why study Anatomy & Advanced Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Recent mass fatality incidents have highlighted the requirement for national and international disaster victim identification (DVI) capability, and cemented the forensic anthropologist’s role as a significant component within the multi-disciplinary response facility.

Traditionally the forensic anthropologist has dealt with human skeletal remains resulting from unexplained deaths; this professional definition is unrealistically restrictive given the multi-disciplinary nature of the demands of human identification in the twenty-first century. In particular there is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID) and is located in the Medical Sciences Institute at the University of Dundee, Scotland.

Prof Sue Black heads the Centre, she was awarded an OBE for her International Human Identification work from mass graves and co-authored Developmental Juvenile Osteology and The Juvenile Skeleton.

The award-winning staff of this Centre are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body.

The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy. The Centre delivers high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body. The Centre relies on the generosity of donors for the ability to teach students to the highest standard possible.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the

Aims of the Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide training in anatomically-based forensic anthropology, and specifically to provide advanced training in musculoskeletal anatomy, juvenile osteology, comparative forensic osteology and DVI training.

What you will study

Course Structure:
This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

Human Gross Anatomy (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides the opportunity to conduct whole body dissection, with particular emphasis on functional and musculoskeletal anatomy
Exposure to human form and function with direct relevance to the identification process
Only institution in the UK offering the opportunity to dissect cadavers which have been embalmed using the Thiel soft-fix method, which provides life-like preservation of the soft tissues.

Developmental Juvenile Osteology (Semester 1):
Focuses on the development of the human juvenile skeleton as a means to understanding adult skeletal form
Through practical examination, each bone of the body will be studied from its embryological origin, through key developmental milestones, until the attainment of its adult form
Practical sessions will focus on the unique Scheuer collection of juvenile skeletal remains.
Forensic Anthropology as Expert Evidence

Covering the more specialised skills including forensic anatomy, trauma analysis and age estimation in the living this module will cover the skills required to present your analyses in a court of law.

Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (Semesters 1 & 2):
Provides a thorough understanding of the DVI process in the UK and abroad
Developed by experienced practitioners, it is based on the National DVI Training course for the UK DVI team
Delivers a robust theoretical underpinning for anyone undertaking DVI work on a practical basis.

MSc Research Project (Semester 3):
Students will undertake an advanced level practical project supervised by a research-active practitioner
CAHID staff have significant experience in many areas of forensic human identification, including juvenile osteology, facial anthropology, facial reconstruction, age assessment in the living and dead, analysis of sexual dimorphism and ancestry, soft tissue biometric systems, human provenance, skeletal pathology and trauma, and virtual anthropology

How you will be assessed

A variety of assessment methods will be employed including practical spot exams, online assessment and traditional essay based examination.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfill the requirements of DVI deployment. This degree will train individuals to be competent in specialist areas of anatomy and forensic anthropology.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Department of Criminology at Swansea University has run a successful MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology since 1997. Students of the Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to learn about crime, the criminal justice system and cutting edge themes in criminology from leading experts in the field. The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology specialises in the application of criminological knowledge to the workings of the Criminal Justice System and this is strongly reflected in the exciting range of diverse and cutting-edge modules on offer.

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology focuses mainly on the application of knowledge to the operation of the criminal justice system, reflecting the policy/ practice orientation of members of the staff team.

Whether you are a practitioner working in the criminal justice system, a researcher wishing to gain a firm foundation for a research degree in an ESRC recognised Doctoral Training Centre, or an undergraduate aspiring to a career in criminal justice, our Masters-level degree in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology is for you! The MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology offers you:

• an up-to-date and high quality programme which includes some of the most important theory and research in criminal justice and criminology
• an opportunity to develop your ability to apply criminal justice and criminological knowledge to research and the operation of the criminal justice system
• an opportunity to develop and apply research methods knowledge and skills
• enhanced employability for those wishing to pursue a career in the criminal justice system and for those interested in an academic or research career

Modules

Modules on the MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology typically include:

• Ethics and Philosophy of Social Research
• Quantitative Methods
• Qualitative Methods
• Case Studies in Applied Social Research
• Data Visualisation
• Crime, Drugs and Alcohol
• Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice
• Applied Criminal Justice
• Understanding Policing
• Youth Justice: Research, Policy & Practice
• Criminal Justice System in England and Wales
• Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children
• Human Trafficking

Careers and Employability

The MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology will open the door to a range of careers, including: Local Government, Police Force, Prison Service, Social Work, Victim Support, Teaching, and Probation Service to name a few. Enhancing your career prospects whilst studying on this course, you will have a wealth of opportunities to take advantage of in order to boost your CV and form important employment links for the future.

Additional Information

Every student is allocated a Personal Tutor who offers academic and pastoral care throughout the student’s stay in Swansea. Several lecturers invite senior criminal justice practitioners, managers, and policy makers to deliver lectures on key aspects of criminal justice policy and practice. The Department of Criminology also ensures that MA in Applied Criminal Justice & Criminology students participate in social events through the Criminology Society which organises events that give students opportunities to socialise and meet others in the Department of Criminology. There may also be placement and research internship opportunities available to students (subject to availability). Research internships provide opportunities for students to observe practices in a criminal justice agency and then produce their dissertation on a topic that is relevant to the work of the agency.

Student Quotes

- Christie Owen, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate 2010 -11

“There are a range of different modules covering a broad spectrum of subjects. Helpful tutoring means that those who have not studied Criminology previously will find the subject easy to pick up. There are plenty of approachable staff and lecturers to seek advice if you are unsure. Lectures are well structured with scope for debate with your peers and lecturers, as well as informative media such as videos and power point presentations. There is continuous mentoring while completing dissertations, with supervisors engaging well with students and aiding them in making it more manageable. Supervisors are continuously available to answer any questions or solve any problems that arise while writing such a large piece of work. The library services are also extremely helpful, with access to many books, journals and the internet with a room specifically for postgraduates which is very much needed during busier periods.

The Masters degree in Criminology encouraged me to pursue a career in the Prison Service. After graduating I was offered a position following my first interview and the course has given me skills to use in my new position.”

- Peter Doyle, MA in Applied Criminal Justice and Criminology graduate

Retired Detective Chief Inspector and Senior Investigating Officer Peter, from Kenfig near Porthcawl, had specialised in Homicide and Serious Crime Investigation and has an extensive background in Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) investigation.

“The course was challenging for me as I do not possess a first degree – a particular challenge was writing in an academic style. I overcame the challenges by applying practice and more practice – plus support from those within the College and my family. I believe the key is not worrying about every mistake you make but learning from them instead.

“I chose Swansea University because it has an excellent reputation for criminology studies and I also worked in Swansea for many years as a police officer. It was a great honour to meet people on my course from such a wide spectrum and of all ages – this was very inspiring, I was made to feel welcome by everyone involved.”

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This unique course views the criminal justice process as a set of decision points involving numerous agencies working singly or jointly. Read more
This unique course views the criminal justice process as a set of decision points involving numerous agencies working singly or jointly.

It provides you with comprehensive, up-to-date, information while exploring in detail some key contemporary transformations in the field (digitalisation, partnership working, internationalisation, privatisation and accountability).

It is aimed at criminal justice practitioners, or those intending to work in this field. Our strong and growing links with local and regional criminal justice agencies support a critical and reflective approach to the workings of criminal justice.

Key benefits:

• Gain a critical and comprehensive overview of the criminal justice process
• Enjoy excellent opportunities to interact with criminal justice practitioners, both on and off campus
• Develop the reflective skills that will help you perform more effectively in a criminal justice career

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/the-criminal-justice-process

Suitable for

Practitioners working in the criminal justice system, and associated agencies, wishing to further their knowledge and understanding of the contemporary criminal justice process. Also graduates with degrees in criminology, law or associated disciplines who are planning to work in the criminal justice system.

Programme details

MSc The Criminal Justice Process will lead you to:

• Develop a systematic understanding of the criminal justice process.
• Gain a critical awareness of key transformations in the contemporary criminal justice process.
• Acquire the analytical skills required to formulate original and innovative analyses of the contemporary criminal justice process.
• Develop critical reflection on the nature, linkages and accountabilities of key roles in the criminal justice process.
• The course has both full-time and part-time routes, comprising three 12-week semesters or five 12-week semesters, which you can take within one year, or 30 months, respectively.

Format

All modules except the Dissertation and Criminal Justice Placement/Project are delivered via blended learning, combining some three-hour evening sessions on campus with distance learning activities (e.g. online reading, discussion board, webinars). Classes frequently use case studies as the focus for discussion. Lecturers provide key overviews of each topic. Students use classroom or online group discussions and questions-and-answers to explore each week’s topic. Where appropriate, experienced practitioners will join the session as visiting instructors.

All modules are supported by the virtual learning environment (Blackboard), which allows students to access learning materials remotely, participate in discussion boards and webinars, and access lists of recommended readings. The vast majority of the latter are available through the Library in electronic form and can be retrieved remotely.

Students opting to write a dissertation are supported by a designated supervisor. Students opting to undertake the Criminal Justice Placement/Project are supported by an on-site supervisor in the corresponding agency and by an academic supervisor on campus.

Module titles

• Processing Criminal Justice
• International Criminal Justice
• Digital Criminal Justice
• Human Rights and Criminal Justice
• Investigating Homicide
• Dissertation
• Criminal Justice Placement/Project

Assessment

You will be assessed through written assignments (66%) and dissertation (33%) or project (25%) and oral presentation (8%)

Career potential

This course will help you progress your career within the criminal justice field.
Graduates of this course can secure roles in the wide range of organisations involved in the criminal justice process. They can go on to jobs in the police, private security, victim and court services, probation, the prison service, youth offender services, and treatment and intervention programmes.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. Read more
The MSc Forensic Anthropology is designed to equip students with the skills necessary for the analysis and identification of human skeletal remains. The one-year degree is uniquely designed for students who already hold a degree in a relevant biomedical science and wish to pursue further study in Forensic Anthropology.

Why study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee?

Forensic anthropology is the analysis of human remains for the medico-legal purpose of establishing identity. The discipline has adopted a pivotal role in UK and International investigations in cases of inter-personal violence and homicide, repatriation, mass disasters and war crimes.

Our course provides you with training in dedicated laboratory areas with exclusive access to the unique skeletal collections in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identfication (CAHID). The programme offers a unique mix of theoretical subject matter combined with hands on practical experience which is delivered by case active academic staff who are world leaders in the field.

Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification

This course is taught within Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). The award winning staff of CAHID are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, cranio-facial reconstruction and the study of the human body. The Centre is regularly contacted for advice and input in high-profile forensic cases both at home and abroad. The cases in which staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen's Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK's universities and colleges.

Top 10 reasons to study Forensic Anthropology at Dundee

Only institution in the UK to offer a career progression pathway in Forensic Anthropology
Opportunity to review forensic case work undertaken by CAHID staff
Teaching by world leading forensic practitioners
Access to several unique skeletal collections
Opportunity to act as an expert witness in simulated courtroom exercises
We teach and train towards RAI accreditation standards following the approved Forensic Anthropology curriculum
Multidisciplinary approach with excellent links across subject boundaries
Access to cases from CAHID's virtual anthropology communication service
Regular programme of seminars delivered by invited speakers from the UK and abroad
Diversity of career opportunities – our graduates work in a variety of related fields

Teaching & Assessment

This course is taught by a team based in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID). Specialist teaching is undertaken by case-active forensic practitioners. The cases in which our staff have involvement are reflected in much of the research undertaken by the Centre, enabling it to maintain a high profile within the forensic community. In turn, this research feeds into our teaching.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis.

How you will be taught

The programme will be taught through a combination of face-to-face lectures and on-line learning resources as well as a large practical involving direct examination of the adult human skeleton.

Course Structure

This is a one year full time taught Masters programme in which all modules are compulsory. The research dissertation can be in the form of original laboratory research in an area pertinent to anatomy and forensic anthropology.

- Forensic Osteology (20 Credits)
- Peri and Post mortem processes (20 credits)
- Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) training (20 credits)
- Research Methods (20 credits)
- Forensic Human Identification (20 credits)
- Forensic Science and the Law (20 credits)
- Developmental Juvenile Osteology (20 credits)
- Research Project (60 credits)

How you will be assessed

Assessments will take the form of in-course essays, paper appraisal and presentation exercises in addition to final degree examinations and MSc research dissertation.

Careers

There is a significant requirement for anatomically-trained forensic anthropologists who are competent in dealing with both soft and hard tissues in order to fulfil the requirements of DVI deployment. This course will greatly increase the professional employment characteristics of any student undertaking it who seeks a career in forensic anthropology, forensic osteology or DVI.

Where are our graduates now?

Previous graduates in Forensic Anthropology have progressed to become teachers and researchers in the field with some going on to provide their skills and services on both the national and international forensic front.

Some of our graduates have gone on to pursue careers in biomedical research, scene of crime analysis, forensic science, human biology and osteological research.

Many have chosen to enter a degree in medicine or dentistry and have found that the skills they have acquired in Forensic Anthropology stand them in good stead, particularly with regards to radiology, paediatrics, gerontology and orthopaedics.

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