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Masters Degrees (History Of Warfare)

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This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present. Read more
This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present.

The core modules on the course examine: the Royal Navy in the twentieth century, warfare in ancient and medieval times., the impact of the French and Industrial Revolutions on warfare in the age of 'total war'.

Optional modules give students the opportunity to study the Second World War, warfare in modern Africa and, additionally, the programme draws on Brunel’s expertise in intelligence studies. You also have the chance to take an optional module in this area with Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS).

Students will also complete a 15,000 dissertation on any military history topic, drawing on the wide expertise of staff in the department.

Module descriptions

War in History 1789-present includes:
Limited war and the period before 1789; the French revolution and the birth of the modern style of warfare; the impact of the industrial revolution on warfare; Jomini and Clausewitz; the idea of 'absolute war'; warfare in the 19th century: on the road to 'total war'; the First World War; changes in warfare in the inter-war period: Blitzkrieg and 'deep battle'; the Second World War; the nature of warfare after 1945; Korea, Vietnam and the Arab-Israeli conflicts; counter-insurgency; low-intensity conflicts; warfare in the 21st Century.

Intelligence History:
Failure & Success takes students through the history of the practice of intelligence from "Plato to NATO", or ancient times to the modern days, linking political, social and technological factors into a greater understanding of the profession. The second term is largely student-led, individual students presenting case studies, improving their own historical understanding while developing their skills at formal presentations in front of critical audiences.

The Second World War:
explores the military, political and socio-economic events and developments of the Second World War; focuses on the historiography and cultural significance of the war up to the present day; and adopts an "international history" approach by building its analysis around the interaction of states and peoples in this global conflict. Seminar discussions will focus around the interpretation of various controversial aspects of the Second World War through examination of primary sources of different kinds and of different secondary interpretations.

The Royal Navy in the Twentieth Century:
examines a turbulent period in British naval history. At the start of the twentieth century The Royal Navy was the largest and most powerful maritime power projection force in the world, with more ships and more bases than any other. However, it faced dangerous enemies. Initially focused on the ‘traditional’ threat posed by France and Russia, it soon had to adjust to the menace of a rising and hegemonic Germany. Subsequently, it would also find itself facing the resurgent might of Italy and Japan. As such, the Royal Navy faced the need to be everywhere and combat everyone, a daunting proposition in overstretch. The need to win out in several arms races, to fight two global wars and then prepare to face the prospect of a third posed challenges in the military, economic, social, technological, geographical and ideological realms. How the British state and its navy addressed and surmounted these challenges is a matter of considerable dispute among historians. This module will navigate these debates and in so doing chart the rise and decline of British sea power.

War and the Military in Modern African History: explores the role of warfare and the military in the course of modern Africa’s history, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. The module will combine broad themes as well as specific case studies, and it will explore the ways in which violence and conflict have influenced economy, society and polity in the modern era. The module aims to encourage students to consider the enduring imagery and stereotyping around African warfare in the West, and to think of warfare in constructive as well as destructive terms. Key topics for study will include the growth of identities based on violence and militarism, for example the development of the Zulu state; the relationship between military and political administration; the economics of African war; anti-colonial insurgency and guerrilla wars of the late twentieth century, and recent developments in ‘warlordism’, interstate and proxy conflict.

Warfare in the Age of Muscle: introduces students to the study of European warfare from the Classical era to the age of gunpowder in an historical and social context and it will provide them with a critical introduction to the impact of warfare on politics and society in Europe from ancient times to 1453. It will introduce the methods of historical research as applied to military studies and will also achieve the following: introduce students to applied problems in military planning and operations via ancient examples; teach students to develop a practical insight into why certain operations succeed and fail; illuminate significant areas of military operational, logistical, and intelligence activities in order to arrive at an objective and neutral evaluation of the possibilities, limitations and perils of warfare.

International Security:
This module will introduce you to the changing nature of war, conflict and insecurity. In the first semester you will critically analyse traditional and contemporary Theories in Security Studies. In the second semester, you will be asked to systematically apply these theories to major security issues and policies, such as the arms trade and proliferation, ethnic conflict and humanitarian interventions, pandemics and biopolitics.

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This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective. Read more
This distinctive full-time MA programme provides you with an opportunity to study the history and historiography of warfare from a multi-disciplinary and multi-period perspective.

A thorough grounding is provided in research methods and in the historiography and economics of warfare while a wide choice of options complements the broad range of possible dissertation subjects that can be supported by our staff.

All students will study three core modules:

Historical Methods
Research Skills: Dissertation Preparation
Economics of War

Students who did not take the BA War Studies degree at the University of Birmingham will also study an additional core module: Writing the History of Warfare.

Those who did not take the BA War Studies degree will then take 40 credits of optional modules, while University of Birmingham BA War Studies graduates will take 60 credits of optional modules. These are chosen from:

40-credit special subject modules (which run across the autumn and spring semesters)
20-credit advanced options (taken in the autumn or spring semesters)

Each module is assessed by 4,000-word essay and you will complete the programme with a 15,000-word dissertation (60 credits).

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. Read more

Overview

This MA allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll be trained in historical research methods and conceptual and methodological approaches to the history of health, medicine and society. You can combine British, European and African history under the guidance of leading researchers in History, History and Philosophy and Science and Medieval Studies. You’ll have the chance to focus on topics and periods that suit your own interests, whether that’s the history of health, medicine and society in the Middle Ages or the First World War.

Looking at the health of individuals, families and communities, you could study the human life course from birth to death, the experiences of medical practitioners and caregivers, medicine during periods of war and conflict, or the impact of health policy in different societies. It’s an exciting opportunity to explore how health and medicine have always been shaped by the social and cultural context.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Facilities and Resources

We have an exceptional range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library holds a wealth of resources in its Special Collections, including historical works on health, medicine, cookery and medicinal uses of food, as well as extensive archival material about the history of medicine, surgery and nursing during the First World War and across the region since the eighteenth century.

You’ll be encouraged to participate in events run by the School of History’s lively ‘Health, Medicine and Society’ research group, including seminars, reading group sessions and a postgraduate symposium. You’ll also be able to attend a huge range of other events at the University of Leeds, including seminars at the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science and the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities.

You’ll also have access to the University’s Museum of Science, Technology and Medicine, which is especially rich in its medical collections, and we have close links with the Thackray Medical Museum in east Leeds and its 47,000 medical objects.

Course Content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods, and key sources, debates and methodologies in the history of health, medicine and society. You’ll take part in a source analysis workshop and gain practical knowledge of documentary, visual and material sources in the university and local area which can be used to study the history of health, medicine and society.

You’ll also develop specialist knowledge of the development of the history of medicine and the social history of medicine as historical sub-disciplines, and the place of health and medicine within the discipline of history.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules, including specialist topics such as birth , death and illness in the Middle Ages; Medicine and warfare in the 19th and 20th centuries or disease and sexuality in Africa. You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive collaborations’ module.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these skills when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

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Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. Read more
Durham's MA in Medieval History is a broad-ranging Master's programme which seeks to equip students with historical research techniques and approaches, advanced skills in critical analysis and independent study, as well as strong and effective communication skills. The MA programme is designed to enable students with different career ambitions to succeed in their chosen area, and it caters for students of different backgrounds, previous training, and areas of specialisation. The breadth of research interests of the medievalists at Durham allows the department to offer supervision in topics about the medieval world from Late Antiquity through to the sixteenth century. The programme seeks to enable students to build an awareness of the contemporary boundaries of medieval scholarship, to master advanced understanding of historical concepts and methods, and ultimately to make their own contributions to the field.

Durham's History Department is an international centre for the study of the Middle Ages, and is situated in the historic setting of the World Heritage Site, which includes Durham Cathedral, Durham Castle and the surrounding area. Students of medieval history at Durham benefit from the rich archival and manuscript resources in the collections of the University (at Palace Green Library and at Ushaw College) and in the Cathedral Library, while the wider regional resources for study of the period are also highly significant: these include the landscape of Viking invasion, of Bede, of high medieval monasticism, of centuries of border warfare with their rich and distinctive legacy of castles, and of early industry and proto-capitalism.

Course Structure

The MA in Medieval History is a one-year full-time programme (or two-years part-time). All students are allocated a supervisor at the beginning of the first term, and s/he guides each student through the year. The programme is structured as follows:
Michaelmas Term (October-December)
-Archives and Sources (15 credits)
-Issues in Medieval History (30 credits)
-*Skill module (30 credits) - taken over Michaelmas and Epiphany Terms

Epiphany Term (January-March)
-Critical Practice (15 credits)
-Option module (30 credits)

Option modules allow students the opportunity to learn about a particular topic or issue in medieval history in depth, and to consider different historical approaches to this topic over a full term's study. In previous years, options for medieval history included The Anglo-Saxon World, AD 400-1100, Power and Society in the Late Middle Ages, and The Wealth of Nations. Option modules are taught in weekly two-hour seminars for a full term's study.

Easter Term (April-June), and the summer vacation (until early September)
-Dissertation (90 credits, or 60 credits if taking a *Skill module)

Students meet with their supervisors on an individual basis and will discuss the topic, direction and content of their dissertation, as well as the relevant medieval evidence and scholarship which they should explore. The dissertation is a substantial, independent piece of research: the 90-credit dissertation is 20,000 words, while the 60-credit dissertation is 15,000 words. You are not required to write your dissertation on a topic which is in the same period and area as your optional modules, but it is recommended that students discuss their individual programmes of work with their supervisors and/or with the Director of Taught Postgraduate Programmes.

The formal requirements and structure of the programme can be found at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9187&title=Medieval+History&code=V1K107&type=MA&year=2016#essentials a full list of optional modules is available at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/history/postgraduate/ma_degrees/optionalmodules/

The MA can be taken part-time, over two years. In the first year the module combination consists of Archives and Sources, Critical Practice, Issues and in addition a Skills module OR Optional module. In the second year your work will consist of either a 90 credit, 20,000 word dissertation (if you took an Optional module in the first year) OR a 60 credit, 15,000 word dissertation, AND an Optional module (if you took a Skills module in the first year).

Additional courses can be taken on an audit-basis (not for credit), and can include language modules as well as optional modules. You will need to ask and receive the permission of the module leader before auditing a class. If the class is outside the department you will also need to inform the Director of Taught Postgraduates.

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered primarily through small group seminar teaching with some larger classes, and lecture-style sessions. Termly division of contact hours between terms depends on student choice. Issues in Medieval History has 16 contact hours, all classroom-based; this module is team-taught and exposes students to a wide variety of staff support and expertise. Archives and Sources has 8 contact hours, split between lectures, classes and seminars. Skills modules are taught through seminars or classes and are usually more contact-hour-intensive. In previous years, optional modules were taught in seminars and provided a total of 16 contact hours. Critical Practice involves lectures, a drama workshop, and oral presentation to a group (at a 'mini-conference'). Dissertation supervision involves 8 hours of directed supervision, individually with a dedicated supervisor.

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A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Read more
A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Research training in any academic discipline helps to channel creativity into critical innovatory reasoning. The legitimate authority of original, independent research depends upon persuasive analytical arguments supported by critically evaluated evidence.

We provide a supportive context for research in the following areas: ancient Greece and Roman social and cultural history; late antiquity; history of medieval societies and cultures; British social, cultural and political history since 1400; French history since 1400; Italian history since 1500; the cultural history of early modern cities, especially London and Venice; the history of ideas from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries; Russian history since 1800; nineteenth- and twentieth-century American social and cultural history; Balkan history and the history of the Ottoman Empire and its successor states; West and Southern Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the history of Japan and East Asia; the history of modern Germany, France and Italy; the history of science, medicine and psychoanalysis in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and the cultural history of death, warfare, race, gender and sexuality.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
The Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is internationally recognised for innovative research, focusing on the interaction between cultural, social and political history, ranging from antiquity to the twenty-first century, and covering Britain, Europe, Africa, Asia and North America. View the department's full-time academic staff.
Birkbeck welcomes all students interested in beginning a research degree. We combine a unique expertise in catering for part-time students with considerable success in attracting full-time students from the UK and overseas.
You will gain from contact with leading specialists in your chosen field of research. You will broaden your range of academic and intellectual contacts. You will significantly widen your general experience of academic life and institutions.
Working with a supervisor who is an internationally renowned specialist in the field should be a major stimulus to developing your work and infusing it with fresh ideas and new approaches.
The School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy is an exciting, cosmopolitan and intellectually stimulating environment in which to pursue research. Our community of research students includes full-time and part-time students.
In recent years, a number have successfully applied for funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as well as other sources. Many of our students come from outside the UK. Some are studying for a research degree out of personal interest, while others are undertaking research with the aim of pursuing an academic career in due course.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

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The MSc by Research in History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

History at Edinburgh is one of the largest and most distinguished departments of its kind.

Research interests within History are extremely wide-ranging and include medieval culture, religion, gender, and law; historical theory; early modern witchcraft and the occult; the Italian Renaissance; North America from the colonial era; intellectual history from Machiavelli to Marx; genocide; Nazi and post-war Germany; Russia and the Soviet Union; the Cold War; and political, social, and cultural aspects of the history of China, Japan, and India in the modern era.

In particular, we host expertise in:

-Pre-modern and early-modern history: our research interests lie in the social, political, religious and cultural history of Europe – from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance, with particular emphasis on England, France and Italy.
-Modern British and Irish history: we have particular interests in early modern religion, belief and intellectual history (including the Scottish Enlightenment); social and political history; relations between Britain and Ireland; Irish migration; and international relations and warfare.
-Modern European history: specialisms include astrology and belief; Renaissance Venice; 18th-century political and intellectual history; genocide; France; Germany; Russia and the Soviet Union; and Spain.
-American history: our expertise includes revolutionary and early national America; the Civil War; US diplomatic history in the 19th and 20th centuries; politics in the 20th century; African-American history and the civil rights movement.
-Asian and African history: we research African history; the history of the British Empire and Commonwealth; modern India, Pakistan, and China and Japan since the early modern period.

Training and support

You will be assigned two supervisors who will provide expert academic guidance on your chosen research topic. You will meet regularly to discuss your progress and research plans, as well as drafts of your thesis/dissertation chapters, conference papers and potential articles.

In addition to individual supervision, you will also have access to research training and postgraduate seminars.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students are able to use two further large School study and resource rooms, which are open to all staff and students. There is access to lockers equipped with laptop charging facilities as well as standard lockers.

The building is wireless enabled and includes state of the art teaching rooms, meeting rooms, a common room, a refreshment area, and open social/breakout areas.

Programme structure

You can choose to complete the MSc by Research degree in one of two ways:

-A long dissertation of 30,000 words, accompanied by two compulsory training courses (Historical Research: Skills and Sources and Historical Methodology) and further option courses.
-A 15,000-word dissertation accompanied by the compulsory training courses and two directed reading and research courses (the total word count for all work submitted will be 30,000).

You will be assigned two dissertation supervisors at the outset of the programme.

Learning outcomes

The programme will enable you to:

develop a specific body of advanced knowledge
become competent in advanced historical methodology and in the evaluation of evidence through the close study of relevant primary and secondary sources
become familiar with historiographical debates and modes of historical explanation
develop rigorous historical argument
conceive and execute a coherent project in historical research and writing

Career opportunities

The concentration on research under supervision makes this degree suitable for those contemplating doctoral study, whether in our own School or elsewhere, and many who take this degree follow that route.

But undertaking substantial and independent research and a writing project is equally excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.

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This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives. Read more
This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives.

The MA in History provides students with opportunities to study the subject at an advanced level. It allows students to undertake detailed study of a range of periods and processes – from Britain’s experience of warfare to the material culture of the English country house. By studying particular topics in depth, students are encouraged to think not only about the diversity of the past, but also how history itself is constructed.

Students will develop the skills necessary to understand, critique, utilise and communicate concepts and theories used within the discipline of History. They will acquire methodological skills for historical research, particularly the selection, evaluation and interpretation of primary sources.

The course comprises 120 credits of taught modules and a 60 credit dissertation. Students must take the History Research Methods module and complete a dissertation. The remainder of the programme is made up from a selection of specialist modules (normally three 30 credit modules) which reflect staff research expertise.

Course content

The MA is taught on a full time and part time basis, with the opportunity to complete in one and two years respectively. The year is split into three trimesters.

Full time students take 60 credits in each of the first two trimesters, running from September to January and February to May. They then complete their dissertation over the spring and summer trimesters, from February to September.

Part time students take 60 credits of modules in their first year (normally two 30 credit modules in each of the first two trimesters) and 60 credits of modules in their second years, plus the 60 credit dissertation.

Modules are normally fourteen weeks in duration – alternating fortnightly between evening classes on campus (typically 6pm to 9pm on a weekday) and online learning activities. Students are also encouraged to attend the History Research Seminar, which runs monthly in the evening. All students must take History Research Methods before proceeding to their dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-History Research Methods
-British Colonialism and Islamic Politics, c. 1800-1970
-Men at Arms: Masculinity and War in Britain, 1756-1918
-Consumption and the Country House, 1660-1830
-Exploring English Society, 1500-1750
-Medicine and Healing Through the Ages
-Violence and the Law in English Society
-Britain and the First World War
-From Privilege to Pressure: English Landed Society, 1850-1950
-Breeding Supermen: Eugenics in Britain, America and Germany
-Narrating the Nation: Rethinking Modern British History
-Dissertation
-Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Britain from 1945 to the Present Day

Methods of Learning

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students will have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Schedule

One year full time or two years part time.

Assessments

Assessment is by coursework only, consisting of assessments such as essays, student presentations, book reviews and seminar portfolios.

For the award of Master’s, students must accumulate a total of 180 credits, including a 15,000 word dissertation, undertaken under the supervision of an appropriate member of the course team. A Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits.

Facilities and Special Features

-Teaching takes place in evening classes, blended with online learning activities, providing a convenient programme for postgraduate learners.
-Students study a range of specialist topics in-depth with staff who are engaged in research and publication.
-Much of the teaching is centred on the use and interpretation of primary sources, giving students the opportunity to engage in active learning.

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The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses (NB this is not an exhaustive list)
-American Way of War
-Approaches to History
-Belief and Conversion in Europe c. 300 – c.1000
-Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective
-Chivalry and Warfare
-Crusading Warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean
-Culture, Politics and Society in Highland Clearances
-Gender and Text
-Gender, Politics and Power
-Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency
-Issues, Ideologies & Institutions in Modern Scotland
-Medieval Palaeography 1
-Medieval Deep Structures of Russia and Eastern Europe
-Scottish Castles and Palaces in European Context, c.1100-1600
-Scottish Radicalism
-Scottish Reformation
-Secularisation and Society: the decline of religion in the west since 1800
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 1
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 2
-Special Topic History 1
-Special Topic in History 2
-The Normans
-The Ottomans in history, 1300–1922
-Thomas Paine as an Enlightenment Revolutionary
-Western Intelligence in an Age of Terror
-Women and Power in Renaissance Italy

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The MA in Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests. Read more
The MA in Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests.

Course Overview

If you wish to expand your knowledge of the history of Ancient Greek and Roman societies at a postgraduate level, then the MA in Ancient History is for you. The Ancient History scheme allows you to study a wide range of modules covering not only fascinating figures like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, but also basic aspects of everyday life, such as warfare and the economy.

The MA Ancient History offers students whose interests centre on the study of ancient history the opportunity to take a specialist higher degree tailored to those interests. Students will take a balance of modules in both Greek and Roman history, and may focus on one or other of the two societies in their dissertation module. The Greek modules cover the archaic, classical and Hellenistic periods while there are three primary foci for the study of Roman history: the Republican period; the Imperial Roman West; and, the Roman East, including Egypt and India.

Modules

-Power and Culture in the Hellenistic East
-Between Narrative and Interpretation: Writing History in the Ancient World
-The Greek Economy in the Archaic and Classical Periods
-Early Rome and Italy
-Life in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

Key Features

Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Ancient History with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Ancient History involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The MA in International Relations explores subjects such as globalisation, ethics and human rights, the international political economy, war, political violence and security. Read more
The MA in International Relations explores subjects such as globalisation, ethics and human rights, the international political economy, war, political violence and security. These topics are explored in the context of contending discourses in politics and international relations, philosophy, and social theory.

Key benefits

- The programme offers the unique opportunity to study International Relations in a multi-disciplinary Department devoted to the study of all aspects of war and conflict and the broad remit of International Relations.

- An opportunity to study a wide range of theories and approaches to International Relations, develop skills of in-depth and critical analysis of international politics, and become familiar with the latest, cutting-edge research in the discipline

- A chance to be part of a vibrant research community, world renowned staff and an international student body who are drawn from a wide variety of academic and professional backgrounds. You will be taught by some of the very best academics in the field. The Department staff publish world-leading research and are committed to offering outstanding research-led teaching and training.

- A focus on conceptual, methodological and analytical issues in the discipline through the exciting combination of core modules and optional modules on a variety of wide-ranging topics

- A chance to network and connect with visiting academics, government ministers, diplomats and other experts who give regular public lectures and seminars. The Department has an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions both in the UK and abroad.

- The unrivalled location in the heart of London beside the River Thames brings outstanding advantages. Students enjoy excellent academic, social and cultural opportunities. The department is close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/international-relations-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our MA International Relations provides an advanced and comprehensive understanding of the forces shaping the world and of the challenges that these pose both to individual states and to the international community. The movement of monies and peoples, the emergence of network organisations that transcend state boundaries, the impact of a global media and information technology, the rise of identity politics, regional integration, as well as warfare on a global scale have all had a transformative impact on the state, inter-state relations and global politics more widely conceived.

This programme provides you with advanced training in the conceptual and theoretical debates within international relations and an awareness of a comprehensive range of approaches relevant to the study of global politics. You will develop an appreciation of the historical development of the discipline, from one concerned primarily with war in the international system to one that has a wider remit concerned with the social, economic and political aspects of international relations in a globalised era.

You will have the opportunity to engage with contemporary thought in the social sciences and humanities and its use in unravelling the dynamics of change in social and political relations. The aim is always to provide you with the capacity to engage critically with the literature in the field of international relations and the ways in which this literature interprets the empirical world of global politics.

- Course purpose -

The aim of this programme is to provide you with the capacity to engage critically with the literature in the field of international relations and the ways in which this literature interprets the empirical world of global politics.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Although not a vocational programme, students on our MA programmes have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Read more
Based in the Department of War Studies, the MA History of War examines the social, cultural and operational aspects of war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives. With close links to the Department of History and the Institute of Contemporary British History, students can study most aspects of the history of armed conflict and society from the late medieval period to the present day.

Key benefits

- The Department of War Studies is internationally recognised as a global centre of excellence and is highly regarded by the British Academy, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research council as a high calibre training institution.

- It is one of the only university departments in the world devoted exclusively to the study of war as a human phenomenon. A remarkable diversity of research interests, disciplinary approaches, opinion and background exists in the department among both staff and students, reflecting the variety and complexity of the issues raised by war and the study of war.

- Students are taught by the best; experts and pioneers in their fields who are often at the forefront of world events as they happen. Our stellar academic cohort bring not only a wealth of knowledge but also an extensive and continually growing network of links with other departments, think-tanks, organisations, policy-making bodies and institutions.

- Situated close to the seat of Government, the City, the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Inns of Court students have unique opportunities to network with key high profile visitors, from academics to government ministers, ambassadors and generals.

- The MA programmes in the Department of War Studies are designed to enhance your analytical, conceptual, research and critical thinking skills which will increase your employability and aid professional career development.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/history-of-war-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Our programme challenges you to examine war from broad historiographical and interdisciplinary perspectives, taking as a given that the history of warfare cannot be isolated from the study of general history. It encompasses more than what usually falls into the category of military history to include war from the viewpoint of combatants, societies, economies and cultures across the landscape of modern history, and in the spirit of war studies draws on the literature and methodology of other academic disciplines where appropriate.

Our MA History of War aims to equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills you require to progress to advanced research in the field. To that end, it has been created with a compulsory module focused on research and analytical skills, supported by a range of optional modules addressing individual aspects of the history of warfare over time and across a wide geographical and thematic range. Our programme prepares you for future doctoral research into the history of warfare and related fields. It can also be taken as a free-standing master's degree if you are interested in warfare in the past and the intellectual, methodological and practical skills essential to its study.

- Course purpose -
Our programme offers you the opportunity to engage critically with the methods, materials and debates inherent in the study of the history of warfare.

- Course format and assessment -

Most of the 20-credit modules will be assessed by one 4,000-word essay or two 2000-word essays. However, some 20-credit modules will be assessed on class participation and attendance, oral vivas or exams, or a combination of these.

Most 40-credit modules are assessed through a combination of essays (3,000-6,000 words), class participation and attendance, oral vivas and exams.

The dissertation module assessment will be on the research proposal (10%) and the dissertation (up to 15,000 words) (90%) for some programmes or solely on the dissertation for others.

Career prospects

Designed as a research preparation degree for those wishing to continue and to study for a PhD, it is also a valuable stand-alone degree. Students on MA programmes in the department have gone on to build careers in further academic research, NGOs, civil service, NATO, UN, media and publishing, finance and investment, teaching and the armed forces. For more information about career prospects and graduate destinations see: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/warstudies/employability.aspx

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. It examines a variety of issues such as:
- the development of psychiatry since its birth in the 19th century
- the rise of regulation for drugs and medicines
- the impact of warfare on medical technologies
- the challenges faced by those seeking to transform the health of British children

The degree is suitable for those from humanities, social science and health science backgrounds as well as those who have worked in the health professions.

The MSc Health History is organised around the expertise of staff in the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare (CSHHH) Glasgow. The CSHHH is a research collaboration between historians of medicine and of health and healthcare at Glasgow Caledonian and Strathclyde universities.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/healthhistory/

You’ll study

Modules can be built into a Masters degree. This can form the basis for future doctoral research funded by:
- the Wellcome Trust
- the Arts & Humanities Research Council
- the Economic & Social Research Council

Compulsory modules:
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 1
- Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians 2

Option classes:
Choose four from:
- Health & Healthcare in the Long 19th Century
- Pharmaceuticals, Ethics & Health, 1800 to 1980
- Governing Highs & Health: History & the Control of Drugs, c1800 to c1945
- Work & Occupational Health in the 20th Century: Comparative Perspectives
- Food & Health in the West during the 20th Century
- The Politics of Health in 20th-century Britain
- Child Health & Industrialisation, c1750 to 1870
- Medicine & Warfare, 1800 to 2000

- Dissertation
MSc students also write a dissertation of 10,000 words. You’ll research a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a member of the programme staff. You’ll be able to use the extensive archive holdings relating to the history of medicine and of health and healthcare available in Glasgow and elsewhere in Central Scotland.

- Seminars
The CSHHH Glasgow seminar series is designed to showcase the latest research from across the subject area at the centre. All students on the MSc are expected to attend these sessions.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.
To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form, or to ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

To recognise academic achievement, the Dean's International Excellence Award offers students a merit-based scholarship of up to £3,000 for entry onto a full-time Masters programme in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences.
http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/humanitiessocialsciencesscholarships/deansinternationalexcellenceawards/

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/studywithus/scholarships/

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This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Read more
This programme is for historians seeking to specialise in the study of the early modern period. Our early modern interests extend to England, Scotland, France, Scandinavia, the Low Countries, Italy and North America, and range from the late 15th to late 18th centuries. Our methodologies are drawn from social, political and cultural history. The Masters in Early Modern History provides you with thorough research training, and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Our links with The Hunterian, the University’s own museum and art gallery, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will enjoy ready access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history.
-The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-A regular Early Modern Research Seminar brings together staff, PhD and Masters students on an informal basis, including eminent active scholars with continuing attachments to history.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Early Modern History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians
-Approaches to history.

Optional courses - course options may include:
-Politics and literature in Jacobean Scotland
-Print, public opinion and Enlightenment in 18th-century Europe
-The History of Medicine I: studies in the History of medicine before 1850
-Reformation! Europe in the age of religious wars
-Scottish popular culture.

The courses taught each year vary depending upon staff availability.

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Early modern warfare
-Climate and civilisation
-Lessons from the greats
-Decline and fall: organisational failure, ancient and modern
-The authority of the state and duties of the citizen.

Courses in Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. Read more
We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. This Masters in Medieval History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Glasgow is home to the Glasgow Centre of Medieval & Renaissance Studies and the Centre for Scottish & Celtic Studies.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will join an extensive medieval research community. Glasgow has active charter and chronicle research groups in medieval studies, a reading group and regular staff-student seminars. The annual Edwards Lecture is the keynote event in the calendar of this scholarly community.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Medieval History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include
-Chivalry and warfare in late Medieval Europe, c1300-1500
-Constructing faith: systems of belief and religious networks in the Middle Ages
-From antiquity to the Middle Ages
-Introduction to medieval manuscript studies
-Barbarians in the Mediterranean
-Popular revolt in the late Middle Ages
-The Crusades
-The Normans
-Medieval paleography

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Explorations in the Classical tradition
-Inventing the 'Clash of Civilisations': East against West from Homer to Hadrian
-Approaching the past: sources and methods in medieval Scottish and Celtic Studies
-Themes in later medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Heritage and cultural informatics

Courses in Latin, Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career Prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies based at a central London Club. Read more
With Britain having recently been more heavily involved in overseas wars than at any point in the last half century, the University of Buckingham has launched a Master’s degree in Modern War Studies based at a central London Club. The course commences in late September 2013 with three ‘research skills seminars’ and after a year of supervised independent research, culminates with the student’s submission of a dissertation. During the first six months, candidates are encouraged to attend a series of guest seminars and dinners (set out in detail below) at which some of the most eminent names in the field present papers. This series of talks examines why and how modern wars are fought, and the principal influences that will affect the conduct of war – and Britain’s role – in the future. This seminar programme will also be attended by Associate Students who are not degree candidates but wish to attend the talks and enjoy the ensuing discussion over dinner.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching methods

For Master’s degree candidates the core of the programme is the writing, under supervision, of the dissertation on a subject chosen by the student in the field of Modern War Studies. Subject to approval by the Course Director, the topic to be examined in the dissertation can address any aspect of warfare since 1945, and the precise topic is usually formulated in a process of discussion with the Course Director and/or the student’s supervisor. The length of the dissertation is not more than 40,000 words and usually not less than 20,000. Research does not have to be confined to British-related subjects. Some of the themes which students may wish to examine include: political decision making; alliances; warfare and faith; the impact of critical strategic thinkers; intelligence gathering; the impact of technology on the battlefield; the development of doctrine; military-media relations; leadership; command and control; the application of force at the strategic, operational and tactical levels of war on land, sea and air; and the influence of war on non-combatants, politics, society, economies and cultures.

Where will you study?

This is a London-based course. The seminars will be held at a central London Club. Seminars begin at 19:00 and are followed by a formal post-seminar dinner at which students can engage in a general discussion with the speaker.

Seminars

There will be a programme of three research skills sessions and ten guest seminars, directed by Professor Lloyd Clark. Running approximately every other week from October ]to March, seminar speakers will include recently serving generals and some of the most distinguished scholars and commentators in the field of modern war studies.

How is the programme assessed?

Examination is by a research dissertation on an approved topic of not less than 20,000 words.

Associate students

For those who wish to attend the seminars and dinners, but do not have time to complete the coursework involved in the MA programme, it is possible to register for the course as an Associate Student. This status enables Associate Students to attend the seminars and to meet the guest lecturers, but not to proceed to the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/warstudies.

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