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If you do not have the appropriate undergraduate preparation to embark on one of our MA courses, you may apply for our nine-month Graduate Diploma in Art History and Theory, which can constitute a qualifying year for the relevant MA course. Read more
If you do not have the appropriate undergraduate preparation to embark on one of our MA courses, you may apply for our nine-month Graduate Diploma in Art History and Theory, which can constitute a qualifying year for the relevant MA course.

Our Graduate Diploma consists of eight modules at 3rd-year undergraduate level (up to two of these can be at 2nd-year level). You must complete the appropriate coursework and examinations, and can also write a project on a topic of your choice if this is agreed with your course director.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. We are 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Enjoy regular visits to London galleries, including Tate Modern, Tate Britain, the National Gallery and the Royal Academy of Arts, as well as many independent and alternative spaces
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Graduate Diploma - Art History and Theory
-Art & Ideas III (optional)
-Curatorial Project
-Art, the Law and the Market (optional)
-Contemporary Art: 1980 to the Present (optional)
-Dissertation - Final Year Art History and Theory (optional)
-Final Year Dissertation Project (optional)
-Inventing the Future: Early Contemporary 1945-1980 (optional)
-Photography in History (optional)
-Reworking the Past (optional)
-Study Trip Abroad (Final Year) (optional)
-Study Trip Abroad (Year 2) (optional)
-Art and Power (optional)
-The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, New Media, Software and the Internet (optional)
-Visualising Bodies (optional)
-Picturing the City I (optional)
-After Impressionism: European Art From Van Gogh to Klimt (optional)
-Becoming Modern: European Art From Futurism to Surrealism (optional)
-Art in Latin America (optional)
-Art and Ideas II: More Art, More Ideas - Critique and Historiography in the History of Art (optional)
-Collect, Curate, Display (optional)
-Picturing the City II (optional)

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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential. Read more
Our MA Art History and Theory is ideal if you are interested in working in academia, the art world or any other field in which visual, written and analytical skills are essential.

At Essex, you have the freedom to study what most interests you. Some of the topics you may choose to explore include Early Modern art and architecture; the history of photography; modern and contemporary art; curatorial practice and exhibition design; as well as more vernacular forms of visual culture, such as body art and activist placards.

Regardless of the topics you pursue, we are committed to research-based teaching, with a particular emphasis on bringing the approaches of art history into contact with other disciplines and discourses. In so doing, we seek to facilitate a critical engagement with artworks and forms of visual culture, both within and beyond the traditional canons of art history.

To supplement what you learn in the classroom, frequent staff-led visits to London museums and galleries will expose you to the some of the world’s best museums and galleries, and you will be strongly encouraged to apply for a placement in order to gain experience in the museum and gallery world. On campus, the Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA), Europe’s largest collection of contemporary art from Latin American, will provide an invaluable resource for studying art and curatorial practice first-hand.

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014). We also achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

This course is available on either a full-time or part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Essex Art History features a dynamic group of art historians who investigate the production and reception of images and built environments, across cultures and media from the early modern period to the present. Our staff are experts on topics as diverse as activist art, 19th-century medical photography, the art of Latin America, urbanism, exhibition design and body art.

We also have significant experience in curation and public engagement. Recent projects include:
-Dr Gavin Grindon curated a section of Banksy’s Dismaland show and co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, which was one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history.
-Dr Matt Lodder has acted as contributor for various television shows on body art and body modification, including the Today programme, the Jeremy Vine Show, Sky News, BBC Breakfast News, ‘Coast’, and National Geographic’s ‘Taboo’.
-Dr Natasha Ruiz Gómez co-organised a major conference on Collect, Exchange, Display: Artistic Practice and the Medical Museum at the Hunterian Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons, London.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an on-going programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our students

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work in a wide range of roles including:
-A member of the valuation team at Sotheby’s (New York)
-Head of Learning at firstsite (a contemporary arts centre in Colchester)
-Visual Merchandising Manager at John Lewis (Oxford Street, London)

We also offer research supervision for students who wish to continue their studies with a PhD or an MPhil. We cover the major areas of European art, architecture and visual culture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example Structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

Art History and Theory - MA
-Dissertation - MA Schemes
-Researching Art History
-Art, Science, Knowledge (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Critique and Curating (optional)
-Curating Inside Out (optional)
-Exhibition (Joint Project) (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Topics in Art History (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)

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Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Read more
Our newly designed programme takes account of twenty-first-century developments in the field, giving students a trans-historical and often multi-disciplinary research approach to a set of broad, founding concepts and making sure they are up-to-date with the evolving digital focus of recent research in English studies. Our research specialisms include American studies and the literary periods Early Modern, Victorian, and Modern and Contemporary.

Additional areas of expertise include linguistics, Irish studies, drama, and the history of the book. We guarantee all students that each module will include components relating to our stated research specialisms.

Alongside our flagship ‘Research Mentoring’ module—where students work under the mentorship of a range of literary experts, studying the research they are currently undertaking – this allows students to follow a specific specialism through their MA.

Study areas include resources for advanced research, research mentorship, icons and iconoclasts, boundaries and transgressions, texts and technology, and a dissertation.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

Programme modules

This is not a conclusive but typical structure of the programme.

Programme modules:
Semester 1

- Icons and Iconoclasts
This module considers issues in literary history, particularly those of canonisation, the politics of reputation, fashion, and posterity, and the processes by which certain writers and texts become culturally embedded and certain others do not. It also examines ideas of formal and generic convention and reception history. In seminars, students will look at either a single text (which could be ‘iconic’ and canonical, ‘iconoclastic’ and unassimilated by cultural institutions such as universities, or a text which is deemed canonical despite its apparent rejection of convention, respectability, etc., e.g. Ulysses), or pit an ‘iconic’ and an ‘iconoclastic’ text against each other. The module will be driven by authors and texts rather than by overarching theoretical considerations. For example, one could read an H.G. Wells scientific romance' such as The Time Machine (1895) against a less well-known example of Victorian or Edwardian science fiction, or pit a familiar early modern drama alongside one which is less often studied or performed. The course will fashion a series of dialogues between writers, texts, history and audiences. These dialogues will range across historical eras appropriate to the research interests of staff teaching on the module, so coverage may vary from one year to another.

- Resources for Advanced Research
The module aims to introduce students to a range of different research methods; develop their research skills to Master’s level; and enhance their library skills. It also aims to introduce them to different ways of engaging in research cultures appropriate to the focus of their studies; enable them to develop a research profile; and gain skills in the presentation of their research. The module prepares students for the Dissertation module and aims to provide them with skills useful for disseminating the results of their dissertation after they graduate.

- Research Mentorship
From a list of available faculty, students choose four staff members (mentors) to work with in three-week blocks throughout the semester. They study what the staff member is currently researching, giving them a unique insight into current research as it happens. The process is one of mentorship and academic shadowing. The reading is likely to be a mixture of primary and secondary texts, and potentially an introduction to specific research questions and methodologies. Staff will be offered in groups, e.g. for every three weeks, there should be between three to five members of staff to choose from and, as far as possible, there will be a spread of expertise so that students can follow an area of faculty research specialism as much as possible. This may include the early-modern, Victorian, or Modern and Contemporary literary periods, American studies, or Irish Studies.

Semester 2:
- Boundaries and Transgressions
This module aims to identify and explore forms of transgression in a wide range of written texts from the early modern period to the present. Working with members of staff with a variety of research specialisms, students will assess what is at stake – aesthetically, culturally and ideologically – in boundary-crossings of very diverse kinds. ‘Boundaries and Transgressions’ will be issue-led, analysing some of the conceptual, temporal and spatial crossings performed by literary texts. This module offers students an exciting opportunity to consider mutations in literary transgression during some four hundred years. Cultural boundaries will appear as violated rather than safely policed (as when gender divides break down, or the body and the mind mingle promiscuously, or the human is entangled with – not shielded from – the animal). Elsewhere, the module will explore texts that cross periods (writings in which, for example, Victorianism and modernism interweave) or range across plural geographies (American literature, say, that refuses a posture of national autonomy and traverses the Atlantic or the Pacific).

- Texts and Technologies
This module focuses upon how texts and technologies have developed in intertwined manners. As technology changes, so can texts, their modes of distribution, their social and cultural significance and influence, and their manner of being collected, stored, and accessed. The module seeks to explore how texts and technology have influenced each other in different historical periods; to examine the response to communication technology in literary and theoretical texts; and to trace fundamental changes in literature and literary research brought about by radical technological developments such as the printing press, the internet, digital analysis, and digital data storage. How do changes in technology alter the way we experience texts and how we use them?

Summer
- Dissertation
The module enables students to initiate, devise, develop and successfully complete a research-based dissertation, and to further their knowledge and practical experience of research methods and techniques in English Studies. Students will identify an area of study that they would like to develop further. The module will consist of independent research, but students will meet with, and receive oral and written feedback from, an individual supervisor. The supervisor will give guidance on the subject matter, focus, structure and research area of the dissertation. Between Easter and the end of semester they can submit up to 5,000 words in draft form for comment and discuss the development of their chapters with their supervisors. Students will then work independently after the end of the semester to produce a 15,000 word dissertation.

Careers and further study

This programme meets the needs of students seeking to qualify for entry to a research degree, teachers of literature and those wishing to update their knowledge or develop their own research skills.

Why choose Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough?

The School of Arts, English and Drama is renowned as one of the world’s top places for studying the visual, literary and performing arts, offering outstanding opportunities across its wide remit. Each course is designed to inspire talented individuals with the drive and determination to succeed.

We provide many exciting ways to enhance skills, including research-led teaching by recognised international scholars, access to multi-million pound facilities, contact with prominent industry links, and superb entrepreneurial support.

A unique range of post-graduate taught programmes and research opportunities encompass art, design, history, theory, performance, postmedieval literature, linguistics studies.

We offer a unique range of postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities which encompasses art, design, theory, performance by practice, post-medieval literature, creative writing, linguistics and theatre

- Facilities
Our students have full access to our state-of-the-art facilities, which offer a tantalising number of creative possibilities. They provide industry standard outputs, and you will receive an unparalleled level of professional training in using them.

- Career Prospects
Over 92% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Our students develop excellent transferable skills because of the range of topics studied on our courses and the diversity of teaching and learning methods we use.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/arts/english/

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Our MA Curating offers a practical and theoretical training in devising and curating exhibitions, as you work towards the preparation of an exhibition at our on-site Art Exchange gallery. Read more
Our MA Curating offers a practical and theoretical training in devising and curating exhibitions, as you work towards the preparation of an exhibition at our on-site Art Exchange gallery.

Our course combines practice, theory and histories of curating in equal measure. You will develop an essential base skills for a successful exhibition – from object handling to managing exhibition budgets – through visiting lectures by active museum professionals; practical workshops using our on-site collection and galleries; and competitive placements at leading institutions.

You will build your own confident grasp of the history and theory of exhibition-making, studying with academics who besides being active curators are producing new key texts on the curatorial history and theory. You study topics including:
-How an exhibition can be used as a means of social or political critique
-The historical role that museums have played in society
-Participation and social engagement between spectators, artists and curators
-A choice of history of art options

One of the major reasons for choosing Essex is the quality of the education you will receive. Our Art History programme is 6th in the UK for research excellence, with 89% of our work rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), and we achieved an exceptional 95% student satisfaction in the 2016 National Student Survey.

Our expert staff

Our staff consists of a dynamic group of art historians. While our research interests span a range of cultures and media, from the early modern to the present, core specialties include exhibition design, modern and contemporary art, public engagement and activism.

Here are a few examples of recent or current projects by staff members:
-Dr Gavin Grindon, Lecturer in Art History and co-director of our Centre for Curatorial Studies, recently co-curated the Disobedient Objects exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, one of the best attended shows in the museum’s history. He has also widely published on activist art in leading journals such as Art History.
-Dr Adrian Locke, a Visiting Fellow in Art History and Senior Curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, London, has curated a diverse range of exhibitions, including Mexico: A Revolution in Art, 1910–1940 (2013) and Radical Geometry: Modern Art of South American from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection (2014). He also co-curated the exhibition Ai Weiwei, which opens at the Royal Academy in September 2015.
-Dr Matt Lodder, Lecturer in Art History with an emphasis on modern and contemporary visual culture, is co-curating the exhibition Tattoo: Ancient Myths, Modern Meanings, which opens next year in the U.S.
-Dr Michael Tymkiw, co-director of the Centre for Curatorial Studies, has a book under contract entitled Nazi Exhibition Design and Modernism. He has also just launched an interdisciplinary research project that focuses on using digital technologies to expand disability access in museums—a project that involves collaborations with several museums in Colchester and London including firstsite and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Specialist facilities

At Essex, you have the best of both worlds: on the one hand, you are part of a tight-knit, campus community with close ties to several small but excellent museums in the nearby town of Colchester; on the other hand, you can travel from campus to London in an hour, which puts the world’s best museums and galleries at your fingertips.

Our facilities enable you to gain curatorial experience and engage in object-based learning, a cornerstone of our approach when teaching the history of art and its modes of display:
-Our Essex Collection of Art from Latin America (ESCALA) is the most comprehensive Latin American art research resource in the UK and has a state-of-the-art teaching and research space. Many of our students gain work and research experience through our collection
-Our onsite gallery Art Exchange runs an ongoing programme of contemporary art exhibitions, talks and workshops by curators and artists, as well as exhibitions organised by our postgraduate curatorial students
-Colchester’s iconic Firstsite gallery features an exciting programme of contemporary art exhibitions, film screenings and talks, and exhibitions organised by our curatorial students
-Our Centre for Curatorial Studies is home to staff who specialise in the history of exhibition design and curate high-profile exhibitions

Your future

The visual arts and culture industries have become an increasingly significant part of the national and international economy, and our art history graduates leave Essex with the skills to take advantage of this growing opportunity.

Graduates from our programmes are ideally prepared for roles in the media, in advertising, in museums and galleries, in education (in schools, universities, and cultural institutions), as conservators, as auctioneers, dealers and antiques specialists, in charities, in publishing, as specialist arts lawyers, as PR agents, in fashion, or to run their own galleries.

Our recent graduates have gone on to work for a wide range of high-profile companies including:
-National Portrait Gallery
-Victoria and Albert Museum
-Sotheby’s New York
-Momart Ltd
-John Lewis

We also offer research supervision for PhD and MPhil for those who want to continue with research. We cover the major areas of European art and architecture from 1300 to the present, as well as the art and architecture of Latin America and the United States.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production. Read more
Our programme will build your confidence and technical ability in composing creative prose and/or poetry, while deepening your critical awareness of the cultural, literary and theoretical history of text production.

Teaching is research-led, so you benefit from the individual expertise and passion of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published authors and academics, including our Poet in Residence and Distinguished Writer in Residence.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The MA Creative Writing programme will hone your research and writing skills to produce critically informed prose or poetry, and creative criticism. We will help you to locate your work in its literary and cultural context, and you will have the chance to reflect on your creative process and the finished work.

You will have access to a yearly calendar of events hosted at the University created to broaden your thinking, and develop your writing skills such as the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture, the annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and the Surrey Poetry Festival.

The MA in Creative Writing provides a strong foundation to embark upon a career in writing, communications, publishing, marketing, advertising, journalism or teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended portfolio.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand
-Research and Writing Skills I
-Research and Writing Skills II
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity I
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity II
-Creative Writing Workshop I
-Creative Writing Workshop II
-Extended Portfolio
-Open Essay I
-Open Essay II
-Special Author I
-Special Author II
-Open Creative Piece I
-Open Creative Piece II
-Beat Writing
-Realism and Its Critics
-Found Materials: Poetry and Practice
-Advanced Studies in 19th Century Literature
-Advanced Studies in 20th and 21st Century Literature
-Literature and Science
-Issues in Literary Translation
-Identity: Communication in Practice
-Organisations and Written Communications
-Children’s Literature
-Screenwriting

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MA Programme in Creative Writing will prepare graduates to undertake a PhD programme in the relevant field.

It will also provide students with the transferable skills of creative writing, critical thinking, textual analysis and communication that are attractive to a wide range of employers, from the cultural industries to marketing and advertising to tourism and leisure to the civil service and public/private partnerships.

It is designed to build confidence and technical ability in a variety of modes of imaginative writing, and to provide students with a clear-eyed grounding in contemporary and historical contexts of text production and circulation, including practical advice on the workings of the publishing industry.

Devoted to assisting students to understand and meet the challenges of producing high quality creative writing in poetry and prose, the programme also provides advanced understanding of the contexts, theoretical paradigms, methodologies and modes of interpretation that are vital in a full understanding of literary production.

The main aims are to:
-Produce work that reflects a high level of technical ability and engages productively with its historical, cultural and literary contexts
-Acquire sound knowledge of the major principles of literary criticism
-Reflect on their own practice as literary critics and how this can help to improve their own creative practice

As a Master’s level programme, it also aims to instil in students the capacity for carrying out independent research.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles and challenges of creative writing
-Relate developments in the field of literary studies to the social, political and historical contexts of their own creative work
-Distinguish different approaches to literary studies and reflect upon these in their own
-Develop a critical engagement with various theoretical approaches and methods
-Recognize the critical language required in advanced literary studies
-Identify and explain relevant techniques and strategies for producing high quality creative writing

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Able to critically appraise scholarly and creative writing
-Able to strategically develop research skills for retrieving information crucial for understanding the context of textual production
-Able to conduct conceptual and advanced research related to specific creative projects
-Able to formulate and address research questions relating to creative and research projects

Professional practical skills
-Able to produce high-quality creative work in and analysis of a variety of literary genres
-Able to verbally present abstract ideas and concepts in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Able to confidently deal with reading complex texts
-Able to acquire a sound knowledge of the key debates in literary studies
-Able to acquire review/evaluation skills for textual analyses at M-level
-Able to combine an understanding of text and context within and between periods

Key / transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including creative writing, advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting of independent research, and the efficient processing of complex ideas and arguments
-Collaborate by working in small groups to exchange ideas and engage in debates
-Develop knowledge in a specialized subject, area or period and command of terminology
-Organize, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity
-Reflect upon the knowledge gained and incorporate this into independent learning strategies
-Manage learning self-critically
-Exercise initiative and personal responsibility

ACADEMICS AND EVENTS

As a student on this Masters, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of published academics and authors.

You will have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing.

Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include:

Novelists
-Iain Sinclair
-Monica Ali
-Jaspreet Singh
-Nikita Lalwani

Poets
-J.H. Prynne
-Robert Fitterman
-Allen Fisher
-Gilbert Adair

Critics
-Rod Mengham
-Bernard O’Donoghue
-Barbara Hardy

Each year’s cultural activities begin with the Morag Morris Poetry Lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival and Surrey Poetry Festival – both affiliated with the Creative Writing programmes at the University of Surrey – aim to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involve readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and more.

This graduate program is delivered by the University's Creative Writing team, all of whom are published authors and poets:
-Dr Paul Vlitos, Lecturer in Creative Writing
-Dr Holly Luhning, Lecturer in Creative Writing
-Dr Stephen Mooney, Lecturer in Creative Writing and former Poet in Residence
-Dr Angela Szczepaniak, Lecturer in Creative Writing

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level. Read more
This interdisciplinary Master’s programme provides an opportunity for you to deconstruct the American experience at an advanced level.

It interrogates, challenges and moves beyond the Exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-states ideology of traditional American Studies to consider the USA, and its neighbours, in an insightful, challenging and relevant way.

You develop specialist knowledge and research skills in a range of disciplines by navigating complex historical, cultural, geo-political and environmental issues. A sophisticated awareness of the reach (and the limitations) of US hegemony, as well as issues of cultural collision, media penetration, region and identity, give our graduates an intellectual grounding well-suited to many careers, in addition to a solid foundation for graduate work at MPhil or PhD level.

About the Centre for American Studies

American Studies at Kent dates back to 1973 and, over the last few decades, has developed a strong research culture; this matches the commitment of the University to interdisciplinary study as well as the mandate of American Studies to explore the American experience in ground-breaking ways.

Our team of scholars maintains close links with a number of North and South American research institutions and archives, and the University’s Templeman Library houses impressive collections on slavery, Native American culture, and photography/visual materials.

We treat the American experience in a critical and reflective manner, and offer an extremely good base for postgraduate study. While able to supervise a wide range of American topics, the Centre currently operates three specialist research clusters of particular interest to candidates:

- The American West
- The Study of US Environmental Issues
- The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders.

Course structure

You take a compulsory 30 credit module ‘Transnational American Studies: Research and Approaches’. This is a year-long module designed to introduce key modes of analysis in transnational and interdisciplinary study as well as consider different methodologies, themes and intellectual debates. Assessment includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

You also select 90 credits from a range of optional modules, spread across at least two disciplines. Optional modules vary year to year and below is a selection of recent modules on offer:

- American Cold War Propaganda

- Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America

- From Wounded Knee to the Little Bighorn Casino: The Vietnam War in American History

- American Narrative in the Age of Postmodernism

- American Modernism

- Boundary Busting and Border Crossing

- Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era

- History and Memory

- American Foreign Policy

The remaining 60 credits are made up with a Dissertation. Written over the summer term, this 12,000 word extended study allows students to work on their own research project based on primary research. You have the opportunity to present your ideas as part of workshop sessions on researching American Studies in the core course and receive supervision from an academic specialist.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

Assessment

Assessment for this course includes an extended essay, seminar presentation and a critical review of an academic research paper.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a thorough grounding in the techniques and approaches necessary for advanced research in American Studies.

- promote interdisciplinarity as a conceptual mode of theory and analysis (encourage you to ‘operate across disciplines, learning how to integrate a variety of approaches in formulating and solving problems, and using diverse materials and information sources.’

- encourage critical reflection and engagement with public debates relating to aspects of American society.

- consolidate the strengths of our long-running undergraduate programmes whilst interrogating, challenging, and moving outside the exceptionalist rhetoric and nation-state ideology of conventional American Studies (develop a ‘synthesising impulse…which can work across, as well as interrogate traditional discipline boundaries in innovative ways’.

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that provides breadth and depth of intellectual inquiry and debate.

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to their vocational and personal development.

Research areas

Staff interests broadly fit within the parameters of American literature, American history, American film and American politics, although we actively welcome interdisciplinary projects that investigate several areas of study. Current strengths in American Studies at Kent are: Native American literature and culture; African-American history; slavery and the Atlantic world; the American West; US environmental issues; US visual culture; Disney and recreation; American realist fiction; modern American poetry; US immigration politics; American science fiction; Hollywood; US foreign policy.

The American West
Kent is the only UK institution to operate a research cluster on the American West, with five members of the Centre specialising in trans-Mississippi studies. The research cluster engages in pioneering work on Native American literature, Western films and video games, female frontiering and several other elements of the Western experience.

The Study of US Environmental Issues
US environmental history is a relatively new field of study, but of increasing importance. Our two environmental specialists work on wildlife management, animal studies, nuclear protest and concepts of ecological doomsday.

The Study of Race, Ethnicity and Borders
The Centre has a long history of studying race and ethnicity. Currently, six members of the team cover a range of topics that include African-American political, cultural and social history, Native American literature, Latin American relations and immigration writing and politics.

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This MSc will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills required for managing innovative product and brand or policy development, service delivery, or integration of emerging technologies in fast-paced industries- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-management-innovation/. Read more
This MSc will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills required for managing innovative product and brand or policy development, service delivery, or integration of emerging technologies in fast-paced industries- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/msc-management-innovation/

The management of innovation is the critical element ensuring successful new products and services are encouraged, survive, and flourish.

Every successful company from technologists like Google, Apple, and Spotify to think tanks and agencies like Ogilvy, Unruly Media or Mindshare, media like Monocle, BBC, and Wall Street Journal, and even movements like Bitcoin and Occupy understand the need for innovation and creativity.

Another common characteristic of these organisations is that senior executives or leaders from all of them have shared and discussed innovation challenges and opportunities with students on this programme. And recent speakers in our Innovation Case Studies series have included fashion designer Paul Smith, 'city super woman' Nicola Horlick, and editor of Monocle Tyler Brûlé.

Goldsmiths graduates have recently captured Academy Awards, Baftas, and Golden Globes (Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave), the Mercury Prize (James Blake) and the Turner Prize (Laure Prouvost). We have a long history of demonstrating innovation and our students have the unique opportunity of developing interdisiciplinary practical and theoretical management capabilities in this bustling creative and entrepreneurial environment.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Chris Brauer.

Modules & Structure

You'll learn core leadership skills, and how to apply them to manage the near continuous need for innovations and changes in organisational products, structures, strategies, and processes. You can choose to study the latest techniques and strategies for consumer behaviour and marketing or seek to develop a fully formed business model for entreprenurial ventures.

The programme mixes theory and practice and allows you to obtain a professional qualification in project management and development, which will enhance your employment prospects.

The Institute of Management Studies (IMS) at Goldsmiths benefits from excellent links with industry. Graduates of this programme will be capable of leadership and adaptive management styles, and will be able to direct and manage innovation in a variety of organisations.

Innovation Case Studies 15 credits
Project Management 30 credits
Organisational Behaviour 15 credits
Digital Research Methods 15 credits

In addition to these modules, you'll also study:

Research Project (60 credits):
You'll undertake an independent piece of research or a large-scale multimedia website and/or mobile application addressing a specific innovation gap or entrepreneurial opportunity related to digital entrepreneurship. The research dissertation should be no longer than 10,000 words. If you choose to develop a multimedia application you must provide an accompanying 3,000 word critical analysis essay reflecting on the production process. You'll be allocated to an appropriate supervisor.

Option modules (45 credits):
Students on the MSc Management of Innovation programme can choose 45 credits of options. This offers opportunities for students to focus on specific aspects of management and innovation that fit with individual student interests from developing innovative ventures to product development and progressive and contemporary forms of managing and motivating human capital.

-Consumer Behaviour (15 credits) – The psychology of decision making, the rational and irrational human, heuristics, priming, and information processing. This module introduces pricing strategies, individual differences in consumers, and legal issues in analytics and analysis of consumer behaviours. This module helps you understand individual consumers and target markets for the development of innovative products and services.

-Entrepreneurial Modeling (30 credits) – This module aims to nurture the skills and attitudes of students to allow them to become innovators and to provide models of entrepreneurial/business support relevant and useful for creative entrepreneurs. The module has evolved from NESTA’s Creative Pioneer Programme and will use the Modelling Techniques that were designed and have evolved from industry best practices that provide approaches to commercialising creativity. It will look at the range of business models that exist and review how best to build a financially sustainable organisation. Students produce a full and robust business plan for a new venture.

-Leadership & Talent Management (15 credits) – You learn about methods for assessing and nurturing leadership potential and talent along with approaches to enhancing and motivating leaders. The module uses case materials and practical examples introducing the importance of theory and research-based practice in these fields.

-Psychology of Marketing and Advertising (15 credits) – Students learn the traditional form of marketing: targeting, differentiation, loyalty, and buying behaviour and contrast this with emerging market views on physical and mental availability. The module explores the present and future of marketing strategies building on understandings of consumer behaviours and behavioural economics. The roles of communication strategies and cognitive psychology are taught in relation to advertising effectiveness and channel strategies.

-Research Design and Applied Statistics (15 credits) – Students learn to critically evaluate effective research design and analysis of data in work environments. The module aims to equip you with the skills to collect, code, analyse and interpret data; to understand how to design quantitative studies to ethically test hypotheses; to use analysis software; and to present data appropriately in text, tables and figures.

-Training and Development (15 credits) – Performance appraisal; training needs analysis; training design and delivery; employee development (eg. appraisal, 360-degree feedback, development centres); leadership; practical and strategic issues.

-Workplace Coaching and Counselling (15 credits) – Introduction to key concepts in coaching and counselling, theoretical approaches to coaching and counselling, counselling for stress management, counselling for careers, career development and management, workplace coaching, and professional issues in coaching.

Please note as an enrolled postgraduate student it is often possible to take additional modules from other departments at Goldsmiths, however these audited modules are not for credit towards your MSc.

Skills

The programme will help you develop strong project management, problem-solving, decision-making and critical evaluation skills. You'll develop an understanding of theories of leadership, and the characteristics of the organisational and social structures within which leaders and talented individuals work. You'll learn about project management and how it can be applied to a range of project environments. You'll also learn about innovation approaches and challenges, and how to translate conceptual and theoretical implications of innovation to practical applications.

Careers

Graduates of the programme will be capable of managing projects full of change, transformation, and innovation in any size of organisation – from start-ups to non-profits and Fortune 500 companies. Senior level industry guest speakers and analysts feature on several of the modules on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer. Read more
The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) Creative Writing programme at the University of Surrey is a two-year, full-time course of study that offers you a unique opportunity to enhance your creative, critical and professional skills as a writer.

Teaching is research-led, so you will be mentored by passionate, dynamic writers and academics with multidisciplinary expertise, as well as our Distinguished Writer in Residence and Poet in Residence.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our MFA Creative Writing programme will expose you to the practical skills and challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry or screenwriting) and offers the option to gain hands-on experience in a creative industry relevant to your own practice, to better prepare you for a wide variety of careers, including writing, publishing, communications, marketing, advertising, journalism, teaching, or to undertake a PhD.

In your first year, you will study alongside students in the MA programmes in Creative Writing and English Literature, where you will hone your research skills to produce critically informed creative work and deepen your practice as a writer.

To prepare for your second year, an academic advisor will offer guidance on choosing an appropriate form of Situated Professional Practice and your summative creative portfolio proposal.

During your second year you will work on producing an extended creative portfolio and critical commentary, as well as complete the Situated Professional Practice of your choice.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules, a professional placement, a critical commentary module and a creative portfolio project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research and Writing Skills I
-Research and Writing Skills II
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity I
-Literary Scholarship and Creativity II
-Creative Writing Workshop I
-Creative Writing Workshop II
-Open Creative Piece I
-Open Creative Piece II
-Genres and Contemporary Writing
-Humour in Literature
-Realism and Its Critics
-Creative Nonfiction
-Found Materials
-Situated Professional Placement
-Summative Critical Commentary
-Summative Creative Portfolio
-Children’s Literature
-Screenwriting

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

A Creative Writing MFA degree builds on the work of a traditional MA but distinguishes itself in a number of ways:
-It is intensely craft and practice-based
-It requires students’ immersion, for a part of their study time, in work environments that offer the opportunity to collaborate with established practitioners
-It is firmly based on a model of reflection in practice and on practice
-It requires teaching and learning that consistently balance theory and practice through well honed research skills
-It aims at enhancing students’ own sense of creativity and professional ambitions in specific artistic fields

For students to achieve an optimum balance between theory, practice and critical reflection, MFAs traditionally last at least two academic years and this is common practice both in the UK and the USA.

The MFA in Creative Writing is designed to assist aspiring writers to:
-Hone and develop their writing skills in prose fiction and/or poetry
-Locate their work in historical and cultural context, and to familiarize themselves with the history of literary production
-Equip themselves with the research and writing skills they will need to produce both critically informed prose or poetry and creative criticism
-Reflect productively on both the creative process itself and the finished work that has resulted from it
-Gain experience, through the Situated Professional Practice module, of the practical skills and creative challenges involved in a specific branch of creative practice (such as poetry, or writing for the stage) and/or of the workings and structure of a creative industry relevant to the student’s own practice

These educational aims accord neatly with the defining principles of Creative Writing as set out by the QAA’s NAWE Creative Writing Subject Benchmark Statement.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the main principles and challenges of creative writing
-Relate developments in the field of English Literature to the social, political and historical contexts of their own creative work
-Distinguish different approaches to literary production and reflect upon these in their own
-Develop a critical engagement with various theoretical approaches and methods
-Recognize the critical language required in advanced literary studies
-Identify and explain relevant techniques and strategies for producing high-quality creative writing

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Critically appraise both scholarly and creative writing;
-Strategically develop research skills for retrieving information crucial for text production;
-Conduct conceptual and advanced research related to specific creative projects;
-Formulate and address research questions relating to creative and research projects.

Professional practical skills
-Produce high-quality creative work in and analysis of a variety of literary genres
-Verbally present abstract ideas and concepts in a clear and appropriate fashion
-Confidently deal with reading complex texts
-Acquire a sound knowledge of the key debates in literary studies
-Acquire review/evaluation skills for textual analyses at M-level
-Combine an understanding of text and context within and between periods

Key / transferable skills
-Display competence in a range of skills at postgraduate level, including creative writing, advanced analysis and synthesis of arguments, presentation, the conducting of independent research, and the efficient processing of complex ideas and arguments
-Collaborate by working in small groups to exchange ideas and engage in debates
-Develop knowledge in a specialized subject, area or period and command of terminology
-Organize, research and deliver a sustained piece of work to a high standard
-Create and carry out a research project of significant complexity

ACADEMICS AND EVENTS

As a student on the MFA Creative Writing, you will benefit from the expertise of a vibrant, multidisciplinary group of academics and published authors.

You will also have access to a number of conferences, seminars and workshops hosted throughout the year. These events cover a range of topics to broaden your thinking in the fields of literature, language and linguistics, cultural studies and creative writing. Writers to have recently visited the University of Surrey include the novelist Monica Ali and the poet and critic Rod Mengham.

Each year’s cultural activities begin with a poetry lecture on campus by a visiting speaker and feature readings by students at the Guildford School of Acting.

The annual Surrey New Writers’ Festival – affiliated with the Creative Writing graduate programs at the University of Surrey – aims to engage with writing and creativity in dynamic ways, and involves readings, book signings, performances, panel discussions and talks by writers, thinkers, editors and literary agents.

The year’s activities culminate in the annual Morag Morris Poetry Festival, held in Guildford, which combines readings and performances by prominent, innovative and up-and-coming poets with the opportunity for Creative Writing students to present their own work in public.

This event is organised and hosted by our poet-in-residence – a position that is held by a different poet each year. English at Surrey also has a close relationship with English PEN, the charity dedicated to promoting literature and human rights.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture. Read more
Fashion media is experiencing explosive growth worldwide in response to the dynamic role of fashion in modern popular and consumer culture.

The ability to be a successful fashion journalist requires very specific skills relating to writing, visual appreciation and a technical understanding of fashion which touches on a broad range of influences.

This programme will explore fashion media in the broadest sense, including new digital media opportunities and the rapid growth of international media dedicated to fashion and lifestyle.

Why should I choose this programme?

Magazines and digital media demand well-trained fashion journalists with an understanding of context, history and trends. Journalists, whether digital or print based, need to be informed on both the technical and creative aspects of fashion design. They also need to be versatile writers capable of working across a wide variety of media.

This programme will provide you with the skills and know-how to secure jobs in a demanding but exciting sector, with a strong focus on digital media.

Key skills, aims and objectives

Ideas generation, research interviewing, writing and editing skills
Visual appreciation of fashion
Technical understanding of fashion and its context, history and trends
The ability to work in both digital and print media
Future opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a career in fashion journalism, both print and digital media.

Typical entry level jobs open to graduates of the programme include:

‌•Junior Fashion Writer
‌•Copy Editor
‌•Web Editor
‌•Social Media Editor
‌•Fashion Assistant
‌•Brand Agency Researcher
‌•Trend Researcher
‌•E-commerce Product Writer
‌•Fashion News Reporter
‌•Features Assistant

How to apply

Applying to study at RUL is a quick and easy process. We accept direct applications, have no formal application deadlines and there is no application fee.

Step 1 Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

•Apply online
•Apply directly to us using the application form available here http://www.regents.ac.uk/media/1188903/Regents-application-form.pdf
Once you have completed the application form, please send us the following supporting documents, by post, email or fax:

•Copies of academic transcripts and certificates of all academic study undertaken after secondary school
•One letter of academic reference
•A copy of your CV/resumé showing your work experience if applicable.
•A 300 to 500-word personal statement in support of your application, outlining your reasons for applying to your chosen programme and how you feel you will benefit from the course of study
•A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
•One recent passport-sized, colour photograph, jpeg format (this must be emailed to us at )
•If not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Please note: most candidates will be assessed for admission on the basis of their submitted application materials. However, RUL reserves the right to invite candidates for interview and to reject those who decline to attend.

Step 2 Making an offer

We will assess whether you meet our minimum entry requirements and will make you an offer by both email and post, or notify you that you have been unsuccessful.

If you have completed your education and have met all the entry requirements, you will be sent an unconditional offer. If you still have to finish your exams, or have yet to submit supporting documentation, we will make you a conditional offer.

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

Step 3 Accepting the offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must:

•Confirm your acceptance via email/post/telephone/in person
•Pay the registration fee (non-refundable)
•Pay the non-EU advance tuition fee deposit, if applicable (non-refundable)
•Please note: although there is no formal deadline to pay your registration fee or non-EU advance deposit, if you need to apply for an international student visa to study in the UK, then we recommend that you pay these as soon as possible.

Please see here for information on how to pay http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/how-to-pay.aspx

Step 4 Full acceptance and visa

On receipt of your acceptance we will issue the final set of documentation and, where needed, the relevant visa support documentation. To find out if you need a student visa please consult the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) website for current information: http://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-visas-and-immigration (please note it is your own responsibility to arrange the appropriate visa).

For more information on course structure, admissions and teaching and assessment, please follow this link: http://www.regents.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-study/programmes/pg-dip-fashion-journalism.aspx#tab_course-overview

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Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. Read more
Literature at Brighton is framed by an awareness of contexts and the social production of texts. As a product of this culture, the Literature MA offers a distinctive combination of practice-based literary studies and critical textual analysis. One of the original aspects of the course lies in its approach to marrying critical approaches to literary studies with an awareness of writing as a creative and critical practice. This course enjoys a distinct identity in its pronounced focus on the practice of writing as a craft, one best understood through both engaging in practice and studying the practice of others. Combining critical, experimental, historical and philosophical approaches in and beyond academia, the study of textual practices - the questioning of representations, tensions and innovations - forms a discursive framework around which understandings of the place and function of writing in contemporary society take place. Core modules address texts, theories and cultures, practising rhetoric and location-focused literary studies: option modules offer experience in the emerging fields of twenty-first century literature, gender and performance, literature and conflict, American fiction and poetry, Victorian journalism, screenwriting and writing as a creative craft. Founded on the belief that good writers also make good readers, the Literature MA makes the necessary connections between critical and creative approaches to the discipline in the twenty-first century.

Areas of study
The course is structured around essential core modules, a research skills module and the dissertation. Options allow you to explore areas of personal interest in literature and further afield in the arts.

Practising Rhetoric
Rhetoric and rhetoric studies offer a distinctive third way between creative and critical approaches to the theory and practice of writing, and enables students to see their own and others writing within a long and valued tradition on the form, place(s) and functions of effective communication. Students are encouraged to assess and analyse a wide variety of genres and modes of writing (from conventional literary texts to political speeches and advertisements), and to practice their own writing in critical, creative or professional outputs through placing language use and affect as central to their writing and speaking practice.

Cultural Theory
This core module offers an advanced introduction to the field of cultural theory and its application to literary texts. Based around close readings of key texts, the course critically interrogates central cultural concepts and thematics in the work of key cultural theorists working in the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. More generally, the course aims to examine and assess the nature and purpose of cultural theory in the contemporary world, and does so by tracing theoretical shifts and reconceptualisations of culture in relation to social, political, and geographical contexts.

Writing the City
This module uses Brighton as a case study to move from a local to a global understanding of the relationship between texts and contexts, literature and location. The module is a celebration and critical review of representations of the city, as well as a space to consider some familiar and some lesser-known cultural responses. Examining representations of cities as well as work from their communities of writers and artists, students are encouraged to theorise texts in terms of space and place as well as reframe political topographies and geographies. Developing students? understanding of the ways in which texts engage with socio-cultural contexts and enter into dialogue with representations of the past, present and future, the module will encourage critical and creative reflection on student experience of the city and promote their active role in (re)presenting location in literature.

Research Skills and Training
Studies are framed around the broad question what is research?, and seeks to place the student?s own practice and academic work in this context. Having considered the value of research into the arts and culture a series of seminars and workshops will introduce students to the key research methods. These will be discussed throughout in the context of the student?s own plans for research. As these discussions develop students move towards direct consideration of a research proposal which will in turn form the basis of the assessment.

Dissertation
The dissertation is the culmination of the degree and provides an opportunity for students to explore their research in a focused and organised fashion through a project of their own design. Building upon the learning students have benefited from throughout the programme they will be encouraged to develop their thinking on the dissertation. The intention is for students to develop a reflexive and critically engaged dissertation that makes a genuine contribution to debates in literature.

Options
Students can choose literature options and from across the faculty?s disciplines including performing gender, the ethics of fiction, creative writing, screenwriting and humanities.

Syllabus
Three literature core modules
Practising Rhetoric
Cultural Theory
Writing The City
Two research modules
Research Skills and Training
Dissertation
Two options
Students may choose from literature option modules:
Twenty-first Century Literature
Performing Gender
American Poetry in Twentieth Century History
The Ethics of FictionLiterature and Conflict
Knowing Through Writing
Victorian Journalism
Screenwriting: Craft and Creative Practices
And/or from a suite of wider subjects including:
Holocaust Memory
Gender, Family and Empire
Visual Narrative
Critical and Media Concepts

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Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. Read more

Introduction

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle.
As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence.
The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research.

Key information

- Degree type: MLitt, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Part-time, Full-time
- Duration: Full-time; MLitt-12 months, Part-time: MLitt-27 months,
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Dale Townshend

Course objectives

- The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible.

- The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde.

- The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath.

- Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema.

- At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Delivery and assessment

Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed.

Employability

With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research.
Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry.
The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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The MA Fashion degree is aimed at ambitious, talented graduates looking to enter or progress in the fashion industry and be at the forefront of global innovation and creativity. Read more
The MA Fashion degree is aimed at ambitious, talented graduates looking to enter or progress in the fashion industry and be at the forefront of global innovation and creativity. Through theory and practice you will explore fashion within a diverse range of markets and contexts; challenging the boundaries of the discipline. The curriculum will be highly relevant to both fashion graduates and those already working in the industry looking to advance their skills and knowledge. With a focus on preparing you both intellectually and professionally for employment, the course will support students to master craftsmanship and couture techniques at the same time as developing innovative, conceptual designs that break new ground.

Visiting industry professionals and studio technicians will support your exploration of traditional technical skills such as pattern cutting, garment construction, bespoke tailoring, experimental cutting and draping methods; the traditions and craft of haute couture; hand and machine finishing techniques and the use of contemporary technologies. You will be guided to refine your practice and choose to specialise in either womenswear or menswear.

As the reputation of Fashion at NUA continues to grow we continue to invest. From our campus in the heart of Norwich’s cultural quarter you will have access to industry standard resources and exceptional facilities, including three fully-equipped open plan studios overlooking the river, providing a creative and supportive environment in which to refine and professionalise your practice. With industry standard equipment you will be encouraged to take risks, challenge yourself and be open minded as you progress to the high level of practice expected.

Creative thinking and innovation are at the core of the MA philosophy and you will engage with students from across the postgraduate community to share opportunities and debate contemporary issues. You will be given the opportunity to work within specialist workshops and studios across all University departments including photography, textiles and graphic design. Through professional collaborations, live projects, guest lectures and study visits you will begin to make contacts, promote your work and embark on your professional career whilst still a student. These complement the core studio, workshop and taught sessions on research methods, theoretical approaches and business and professional skills, meaning that on leaving NUA, graduates will be equipped to work within a broad spectrum of roles in the fashion industry.

Course Leader, Sue Chowles’ high profile career has seen her freelance for John Flett, Bodymap, Bernstock/Speirs and Harvey Nichols before forming international designer fashion label. As Design Director of Chowles-Munday she exhibited at London Fashion Week and was commissioned to design a collection exclusively for Liberty’s of London. Her distinguished career in fashion higher education has seen her fulfil lecturing positions at Nottingham Polytechnic, BA Subject Leader at the University of Brighton, MA Principal Lecturer at the London College of Fashion and the Sri Lankan Institute of Design and Technology. Her current research investigates the importance of preserving the integrity of couture craftsmanship and how it is vital that future generations are educated and informed to protect the heritage of traditional skills.

The course tutors - all industry practitioners themselves - have sold their own labels through Harrods and Harvey Nichols and worked for designers including French Connection, Nicole Farhi and Roland Mouret. With this technical and creative guidance you will be encouraged to experiment with processes and materials, and contextualise your work as the tutors support you in promoting your work within the creative sector. You will also learn how to place your work against the backdrop of design history and current trends, as you question and extend the boundaries of your design.

Scholarship and funding information is available. Norwich will be taken over by a festival of contemporary art in key venues across the city in the summer of 2016, as one of four host cities for the 8th edition of the British Art Show. The biggest touring exhibition of contemporary art in the UK has selected Norwich University of the Arts (NUA) as its lead partner in Norwich. See NUA website for details: http://www.nua.ac.uk

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/. Read more
This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-brands-communication-culture/

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

The role of brands in and beyond markets
The rise of consumer culture
Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
Intellectual property
Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
Gender, colonial history and branding
Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
Ethics and transparency
The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
Fair trade and accountability
Branded spaces and communities
Social media and open source cultures
Geodemographics and new forms of social classification
The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
The rise of co-working spaces
Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
Branding of NGOs
Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
Medical tourism and branded healthcare
Intellectual property in the fashion industry
Branding London's districts

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Kat Jungnickel.

Overview

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as Sociology, Cultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

Media Futures
Online Journalism
Campaign Skills
Media Law and Ethics
Design Methods
Processes for Innovation

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. Regular seminars with visiting speakers will enable you to gain an understanding of how your degree can be used in a professional context. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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