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Masters Degrees (History Of Design)

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis. Read more
The History of Design and Material Culture MA focuses on both objects from everyday life and representations of them since the eighteenth century as a basis for research and analysis.

The course allies theory and practice in seminar-based discussions that embrace various methodological issues and perspectives, including Marxism, discourse theory, phenomenology, semiology, museology, gender, race, class, memory and oral testimony. Depending on the material you analyse in your essays and seminars, as well as the dissertation topic you choose, you can also emphasise your own intellectual and subject-specific interests.

Since its inception in the late 1990s, the MA has garnered a national and international reputation as one of the pioneering and most successful programmes of its kind. As a research-led course, it harnesses the academic expertise of staff with a recognised wealth of teaching and research excellence in subject areas such as fashion and dress history, the history and theory of advertising, photography and the mass-reproduced image, and heritage and museum studies.

Under guidance, you will be encouraged to explore the relationship between theory and practice and to develop your own skills as an independent researcher, thinker and writer.

Course structure

The History of Design and Material Culture MA draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history.

It stimulates innovative and interdisciplinary study in the history of design and material culture in both their western and non-western contexts, considering the relationship between local, national and international patterns of production, circulation, consumption and use.

The course is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, study visits and tutorials. Considerable emphasis is placed on student involvement in the weekly seminar readings and discussions within the two thematic core modules, Exploring Objects and Mediating Objects.

Based at Pavilion Parade, a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion, teaching takes place close to the seafront and city centre amenities.

Syllabus

• Exploring Objects

The Exploring Objects module introduces you to a series of different research methods and historiographical approaches, as you interrogate and make sense of designed objects in terms of how they are designed, produced, circulated, consumed and used in everyday life. It covers the period from the late eighteenth century to the present time and typically involves discussion and debate on the following themes, theories and methods: Marxist and post-Marxist historiography; production and consumption; gender and taste; phenomenology; object-based analysis; the use of archives; and 'good writing/bad writing'. It also introduces you to the academic rigour of postgraduate dissertation research.

• Mediating Objects

This module complements Exploring Objects by focusing on the mediation between 'this one' (the object itself) and 'that one' (the object as represented in word and image). On one level, it examines how objects are translated in various texts and contexts, from museum and private collections to photographs, advertisements, film and fiction. On another level, it examines how objects are transformed through the embodied processes of everyday rituals such as gift-giving and personal oral and collective memories. The module therefore deals with the idea of intertexualities and how the identities of things and people are phenomenologically bound up with each other. By extension, you examine objects in relation to ideas concerning sex, gender, class, generation, race and ethnicity.

• Dissertation

The centrepiece of your MA studies, the dissertation is a piece of original writing between 18,000 and 20,000 words on a research topic of your own choosing. It allows you to pursue a specific research topic related to your own academic and intellectual interests in a given area of the history of design and material culture, for example fashion and dress, textiles, ceramics and glass, product design, interior design and architecture, graphic communications, advertising and photography, film, museums, collecting and curating, and design pedagogy. The dissertation is largely based on primary research, often using specialist archives and surviving historical material.

Facilities

This course makes use of the University of Brighton Design Archives, which include the archives of the Design Council, Alison Settle, FHK Henrion and the South of England Film and Video Archive.

Close professional contact with national institutions such as the Victoria and Albert Museum, as well as with local collections and centres of historical interest (such as Brighton’s unique Royal Pavilion and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, with its internationally famous collection of decorative art from the 1890s onwards), present research opportunities for students registered on the course.

The course is closely linked to our arts and humanities research division through a joint research lecture series, and we have successfully encouraged high achievers to register for the MPhil/PhD programme.

The student environment also includes the thriving postgraduate Design History Society as well as opportunities for conference presentation, professional contact and career development in the field.

Careers and employability

The course has an extremely healthy track record in helping students to take up careers in related areas of employment and further study. Many of our postgraduates have succeeded in finding work as lecturers, curators, journalists, designers and design consultants, while many others have pursued doctoral research, most often also securing prestigious funding from the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council).

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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Professionals in construction management are at the heart of the delivery phase of buildings and infrastructure in every economy, and play an essential part in the realisation of the physical development aspiration of clients. Read more
Professionals in construction management are at the heart of the delivery phase of buildings and infrastructure in every economy, and play an essential part in the realisation of the physical development aspiration of clients.

Society continues to value and shape the built environment resulting in both public and private investment in construction assets and the successful completion of construction projects. As these projects become more socially and technically complex in a changing world dominated by a concern for sustainability, there has been a growing challenge to develop existing and new skills and expertise in construction management. This challenge is not only national but global as the need for construction management skills continues to grow internationally. Indeed, our student cohorts reflect this global challenge with students from across multiple continents.

This particular programme benefits from being rooted in a long 40 year history of delivery. It has evolved and aligned itself with the challenge above to reinforce it as one of the most long-standing and successful Construction Management Masters programmes of its kind. The programme has and continues to be the flagship of our postgraduate programmes and is heavily subscribed and endorsed by the global construction management community.

The programme is designed for recent graduates from construction and related disciplines and introduces the fundamentals and challenges to contemporary construction management. It is also ideally suited to those who have a strong technical background and need to complement it with requisite management know-how for developing their national and international careers in the construction sector.

Students on the programme significantly benefit from the programmes strong connection with the expertise of the UK’s longest-established research group ‘Construction Technology and Organisation’ and the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

Accreditation of the programme is provided by the UK’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Key facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- Fully accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-management/

Programme modules

Semester one, compulsory modules
- ICT for Construction Projects
This module introduces managers to a wide range of tools and technologies appropriate for their role and projects. The module covers a range of topics including project information flows, e-business, database technologies, emerging technologies, building information modelling technologies, groupware and collaborative systems.

- Research and Communication
The aims of this module are to provide the student with an overview of sources of information in construction; to explain to students how to conduct a literature review and introduce students to the principal methods of investigation in construction research; and provide an opportunity for each student to develop professional and academic skills in oral and written communication.

- Principles of Design and Construction
This module teaches students the fundamental principles of managing a project during the design and construction phases. The module develops knowledge and understanding of the role and principles of the estimating, tendering and planning of construction projects and the importance of health and safety in relation to design and construction activities.

- Principles of Project Management
Students will gain an understanding of construction project management principles and theory. Specific areas covered include management responsibility for running construction projects; contemporary issues facing the construction industry; cultural complexity and the impact of behaviour and motivation on performance; and applying appropriate project management techniques for the different project phases.

- Postgraduate Research Project
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Construction Management.

Option Module (part-time students only)
- Management and Professional Development 1
The aim of this module is to enable students to plan, develop and demonstrate progress against a suitable professional development framework, such that they become equipped with a range of transferable management and professional development skills.

Option Modules One
Choose two from:
- Design Management
This module introduces various Design Management techniques and approaches. These include process mapping techniques for design; ways to analyse and optimise the design process; and students will gain an understanding of the internal workings of a design office and their relationship with the construction team.

- Sustainability in the Built Environment
Students will gain an understanding of sustainability issues that relate to the built environment; ways in which these issues can be managed and effective communication of both strategic and technical information.

- Management of Construction Processes
This module introduces students to cutting edge contemporary management concepts and innovations; complexities of setting up and managing logistics on large construction sites; and essential project management techniques such as risk management.

- Federated 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)
The creation, deployment and use of aggregated and integrated models are key goals of collaboration through BIM. This module aims to deliver hands-on practical skills on the use of BIM technologies (i.e. design software and collaboration tools) for real-time co-creation and data sharing of federated/aggregated 3D BIM models. The concept of shared situational awareness within design teams/processes will be explored.

Option Modules Two
Choose two from:
- Strategic Management in Construction
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of strategic management and the tools for formulating and implementing strategies within the construction sector. The application of strategic management tools to develop appropriate change strategies will be explored and fundamental skills in communication, negotiation and leadership will be developed.

- People and Teams
Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment. Students will also be able to analyse current theoretical approaches to people management, appreciate importance of ethics and cultural issues and evaluate the key factors driving HRM systems.

- Procurement and Contract Procedure
This module aims to develop students understanding of procurement methods, different forms of contract and contract practice. The module is designed to give students key practical skills including advising clients on appropriate procurement and tendering methods; selecting the most appropriate form of construction contract; and manage a construction contract effectively.

- Business Economics and Finance
Students will gain a sound understanding of macro, meso and micro economics and types, sources and management of finance relating to construction organisations and projects. This will allow students to analyse the policies and operations of construction organisations and projects from an economic perspective to determine likely performance consequences and analyse corporate financial data for investment prospects and business management decisions.

Careers and further study

Graduates are sought after by a wide range of companies including Arup, Atkins, Bauer Technologies, Carillion plc, Eurovia Group, Kier Group, Morgan Sindall, Skanska and Vinci Construction. Many of these organisations engage with the University in both collaborative research and in delivering lectures on the courses. This provides an ideal opportunity for students to engage in discussions about employment opportunities.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-management/

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This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy. Read more
This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy.

Modules are taught by world-leading experts in the field who have designed some of the world’s most innovative low energy buildings. These design experiences provide unique case study material which students find exciting and invaluable for their own research and design work.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by CIBSE and the Energy Institute and benefits from its links with the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

Programme modules

- Building Energy Consumption [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the impact that climate, people, equipment selection and design have on energy consumption on a range of building sizes from domestic to large commercial.

- Renewable Energy and Low Carbon Technologies [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of renewable energy and low carbon technologies and their integration into buildings, and to be given a perspective on the potential benefits and applications of these technologies.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Airflow Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building airflow and ventilation modelling with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Lighting Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of lighting modelling in buildings with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the application of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow, thermal and daylight modelling software as well as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Hulley and Kirkwood and SE Controls. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the CIBSE and Energy Institute.
The 'SE Controls prize for best overall performance' is awarded to the student graduating from this course with the highest overall mark. This presentation is made on graduation day.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

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Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme. Read more
Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme.

Society continues to value and shape the built environment resulting in both public and private investment in construction assets and the successful completion of construction projects. As these projects become more socially and technically complex in a changing world dominated by a concern for sustainability, there has been a growing challenge to develop existing and new skills and expertise in construction project management. This challenge is not only national but global as the need for construction project management skills continues to grow internationally. Indeed, our student cohorts reflect this global challenge with students from across multiple continents.

We have been running programmes in MSc Construction Project Management for nearly 20 years. This arose from the need to extend the managerial remit to those activities that fall outside the construction phase to include areas such as financing, design and hand-over. The programme is therefore tailored for construction professionals looking for a more holistic perspective of construction project processes and the challenge of project management in complex building and infrastructure projects.

Accreditation of the programme is provided by the UK’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Core study areas include: Building Information Modelling, Design Management and Sustainability in the Built Environment.

Key facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- Fully accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

Programme modules

- ICT for Construction Projects
This module introduces managers to a wide range of tools and technologies appropriate for their role and projects. The module covers a range of topics including project information flows, e-business, database technologies, emerging technologies, building information modelling technologies, groupware and collaborative systems.

- Research and Communication
The aims of this module are to provide the student with an overview of sources of information in construction; to explain to students how to conduct a literature review and introduce students to the principal methods of investigation in construction research; and provide an opportunity for each student to develop professional and academic skills in oral and written communication.

- Principles of Design and Construction
This module teaches students the fundamental principles of managing a project during the design and construction phases. The module develops knowledge and understanding of the role and principles of the estimating, tendering and planning of construction projects and the importance of health and safety in relation to design and construction activities.

- Principles of Project Management
Students will gain an understanding of construction project management principles and theory. Specific areas covered include management responsibility for running construction projects; contemporary issues facing the construction industry; cultural complexity and the impact of behaviour and motivation on performance; and applying appropriate project management techniques for the different project phases.

- Design Management
This module introduces various Design Management techniques and approaches. These include process mapping techniques for design; ways to analyse and optimise the design process; and students will gain an understanding of the internal workings of a design office and their relationship with the construction team.

- Sustainability and the Built Environment
Students will gain an understanding of sustainability issues that relate to the built environment; ways in which these issues can be managed and effective communication of both strategic and technical information.

- Management of Construction Processes
This module introduces students to cutting edge contemporary management concepts and innovations; complexities of setting up and managing logistics on large construction sites; and essential project management techniques such as risk management.

- Postgraduate Research Project
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Construction Project Management.

Option Module (part-time students only)
- Management and Professional Development 1
The aim of this module is to enable students to plan, develop and demonstrate progress against a suitable professional development framework, such that they become equipped with a range of transferable management and professional development skills.

Option Modules One
Choose one from
- Strategic Management in Construction
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of strategic management and the tools for formulating and implementing strategies within the construction sector. The application of strategic management tools to develop appropriate change strategies will be explored and fundamental skills in communication, negotiation and leadership will be developed.

- People and Teams
Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment. Students will also be able to analyse current theoretical approaches to people management, appreciate importance of ethics and cultural issues and evaluate the key factors driving HRM systems.

- Procurement and Contract Procedure
This module aims to develop students understanding of procurement methods, different forms of contract and contract practice. The module is designed to give students key practical skills including advising clients on appropriate procurement and tendering methods; selecting the most appropriate form of construction contract; and manage a construction contract effectively.

- Business Economics and Finance
Students will gain a sound understanding of macro, meso and micro economics and types, sources and management of finance relating to construction organisations and projects. This will allow students to analyse the policies and operations of construction organisations and projects from an economic perspective to determine likely performance consequences and analyse corporate financial data for investment prospects and business management decisions.

- Federated 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)
The creation, deployment and use of aggregated and integrated models are key goals of collaboration through BIM. This module aims to deliver hands-on practical skills on the use of BIM technologies (i.e. design software and collaboration tools) for real-time co-creation and data sharing of federated/aggregated 3D BIM models. The concept of shared situational awareness within design teams/processes will be explored.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for a variety of organisations nationally and internationally. These include Arup, Atkins, BAM Nuttall Ltd, Balfour Beatty, Kier Group, Morgan Sindall, Skanska and Transport for London. Many of these organisations engage with the University in both collaborative research and in delivering lectures on the courses. This provides an ideal opportunity for students to engage in discussions about employment opportunities.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.
The course is also accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. Read more
This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. With energy consumption within the design and operation of buildings becoming an ever increasingly important factor this programme is designed to combine building services engineering knowledge with specific energy considerations in their design.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the Energy Institute and CIBSE. CIBSE has praised the programme as ‘one of the leading MSc courses of its kind in the UK’.

Areas studied include low energy building design, designing for suitable indoor air quality and thermal comfort, state-of-the-art control systems, and the design of building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide students from related engineering backgrounds with an understanding of the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow and thermodynamics for application to buildings and their engineering systems.

- Thermal Comfort & Indoor Air Quality [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles and practice involved in the design of indoor environments, with respect to occupant thermal comfort and air quality.

- Building Thermal Loads & Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles of building thermal load analysis and required systems for medium to large buildings.

- Building Energy Supply Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to be provided with a practical foundation in system design and analysis, by developing the students' understanding of thermal plant in buildings including air conditioning systems and systems for heat recovery.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow and thermal modelling software as wells as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Cundall, Foster & Partners, and Atkins. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

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This Distance Learning programme has been developed for graduates working or hoping to work in the emergency water and sanitation sector in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This Distance Learning programme has been developed for graduates working or hoping to work in the emergency water and sanitation sector in low- and middle-income countries. It is designed to develop your understanding on the principles and practice of infrastructure provision in emergencies and during reconstruction. It will equip you with the key skills, expertise and knowledge for emergency work in low- and middle-income countries.

Modules are delivered by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Participants have a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing opportunities for learning from them and development of a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide.

- Excellent graduate prospects. Many of our participants are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/infrastructure-emergencies-dl/

Programme modules

Core Modules:
- Introduction to Infrastructure in Emergencies
The aims of this module are for the student to understand: the range of infrastructure needs for affected communities during and following emergencies; the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes during and following emergencies; and the links between human health, water, and waste management.

- Emergencies, Management and People
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the key characteristics of disasters and emergencies; the management of effective humanitarian relief; the importance of adequate assessment, planning and management of emergency response and how communities and individuals may be affected by disasters.

- Emergency Water Supply
The aims of this module are for students to understand the important aspects of the design, construction, operation and maintenance of water supplies in emergencies in low and middle income countries.

- Emergency Sanitation
This module is designed to deliver understanding in: the range of environmental sanitation needs of communities during and following emergencies; the range of technologies and approaches for addressing environmental sanitation needs in emergencies and the importance of assessment, planning and management of emergency environmental sanitation programmes.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose three):
- Wastewater Treatment
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the various stages, and unit operation and process options, for treatment of wastewaters, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

- Urban Infrastructure
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the key issues in the planning and conceptual design of infrastructure improvements for low income urban communities.

- Environmental Assessment
The aim of this module is for participants to develop a broad understanding of both the needs for and the mechanisms of environmental assessment and management, with emphasis on aquatic environments, in low and middle-income countries.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

Facilities

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities. They can also remotely access the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

Facilities on campus include our laboratory which houses equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. Although Distance Learners will not normally have access to this equipment they can ask the advice of laboratory staff if they are carrying out fieldwork as part of their dissertation.

How you will learn

Distance Learning students study from home but are welcome to visit the Loughborough campus. They can make remote use of the University Library’s electronic search facilities and the WEDC ‘Knowledge Base’, which has links to many sources of useful and relevant information.

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules, and optional modules which may be selected. The Case Study module draws together material from across the programme. A research dissertation between 75 and 150 pages long on a chosen topic relevant to interests or career development concludes the programme. Many of the Distance Learning modules have web-based discussion forums, where Distance Learners can choose to interact with each other and Module Tutors.

The method of delivery for the learning materials is mainly portable and paper-based, to suit students who are living or working in areas of the world with poor internet connectivity, or those who travel frequently. We also arrange some webinars which are recorded for students who are unable to participate.

During the programme students build up an excellent library of well-produced bound module notes, additional resources and relevant text books. In addition to the printed version we are developing and planning to provide e-reader versions of some module notes to enhance portability.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by two written assessments (three items for core modules). The individual research dissertation module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of staff. For students who cannot visit the UK this oral takes place over Skype.

Careers and further study

Many WEDC students and alumni work for international NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Distance Learning students already working in these sectors find their new skills to be directly relevant and readily applicable to their jobs.
Graduate job titles include WASH Coordinator, WASH Engineer, Emergency WASH Manager, Technical Adviser and Project Manager.

Scholarships

On occasion we offer specific full-fee and partial-fee scholarships for distance learning applicants.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/infrastructure-emergencies-dl/

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This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and sanitation services in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and sanitation services in low- and middle-income countries. You will develop knowledge, expertise and skills in many aspects of inclusive and sustainable public health infrastructure and services.

The programme is based in the School of Civil and Building Engineering’s Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC), one of the world’s leading education and research institutes of its kind.

Modules are taught by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Classes include a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing both a stimulating learning experience and a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide

- Excellent graduate prospects. Many of our graduates are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste/

Programme modules

Core modules:
- Water and Waste Engineering Principles
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes in low- and middle-income countries.

- Management of Water and Sanitation
The aim of this module is to introduce the principles, concepts and key issues of managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services for low-income consumers in developing countries.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Group Project
The aims of this module are for the student to work within a group to understand the necessary inter-relationships between different components of their programme of study; to consolidate and integrate material contained in earlier taught modules; and to learn how to work as part of a team.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose 3):
- Water Source Development
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the occurrence, location, exploration, exploitation and pollution of groundwater and surface water sources.

- Wastewater Treatment
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the various stages, and unit operation and process options, for treatment of wastewaters, particularly in low- and middle-income countries; and to understand the principles for planning and design of wastewater treatment facilities, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Solid Waste Management
The aim of this module is to introduce participants with available and possible options in solid waste management for low and middle income countries. To make participants familiar with the key issues for low income countries.

- Water Distribution and Drainage Systems
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the most important aspects of how to design, construct and maintain piped water distribution, drainage and sewerage systems.

- Short Project
The aim of this module is for participants to be able to undertake extended study of a subject of their own choosing which is related to their Postgraduate Programme to enable them to conduct an independent review and analysis to understand state of art issues or a topic.

Facilities

All masters students have access to our excellent laboratory facilities which include equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. There are three dedicated water laboratory staff available to help you use our equipment who are specialists in pollutant analysis, hydraulics and running continuous trials.

Practical training includes:
- Hand-pump maintenance using the largest single site collection of hand-pumps;
- latrine slab construction;
- flow measurements; and
- water quality sampling and analysis.

Field visits are made to relevant UK facilities.

WEDC has a unique sector Resource Centre with a dedicated and skilled information officer. Over 19,000 items can be searched on a customized database allowing ready access to this collection of books, series, country files, student projects, videos, journals, maps, and manufacturers' catalogues.

The Resource Centre also provides a dedicated quiet study space for WEDC students. Many items including all WEDC publications and over 2500 papers presented at 37 WEDC International Conferences are available in the open access sector knowledge base.

How you will learn

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules and optional modules which may be selected. A group case study module draws together material from across the programme and develops team working skills. The individual research project and dissertation (frequently linked to specific needs of an agency) of between 75 and 150 pages in length concludes the programme. To support your learning you will have access to our comprehensive facilities including laboratories, hand-pumps, and a dedicated Resource Centre.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by one item of coursework (two items for foundation modules) and an in-class test. The Group Project module is assessed on the basis of written documents and spoken presentations, including an individual component for the module mark. The individual Research Dissertation is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation, and this module includes an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of academic staff.

Careers and further study

Many WEDC students and alumni work for international NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Graduate job titles include Sanitation Technical Manager, Water and Sanitation Consultant, Project Manager, Environmental Engineering Consultant and Civil Engineering Specialist.

Scholarships / Bursaries

Bursaries are available for self-funding international students.
The University also offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account. You can apply for one of these scholarships once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste/

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Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Read more
Whether you’re interested in the making of the modern world or witchcraft through the ages, at Essex we give you the freedom to explore the history that excites you. Our geographic spread, topic diversity and social reach give you an unrivalled opportunity to pursue your historical passions and discover new ones.

Our MA History is rigorous, flexible and wide-ranging, so that you can to choose the modules and thesis topic which best suit your interests.

Alongside four optional modules which enable you to explore the latest in historical research in our specialist areas, you also study a practical module in research techniques, and write a 20,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Historical research at Essex concentrates on the period from 1500 to the present, and covers a wide geographical area that includes British and European history, as well as Latin America, the USA, China, Russia and Africa.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Alternatively you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

Public History Pathway
Further your understanding of, and expertise in, a variety of public history contexts, ranging from museums and documentary films to conflict resolution and computer games.

This pathway makes the most of our status as an institution at the cutting edge of communicating history to the general public, and will involve classes led by scholars who are currently involved in documentary, heritage, oral history and school curriculum projects.

You will be given the opportunity to create, participate in, and/or critique a current piece of public history as part of your coursework assessment on the Public History Workshop module, and your dissertation will demonstrate an engagement with the methods and/or theories of public history, analyse an example of public history, or be an example of public history.

Cultural and Social History Pathway

Explore the varied ways in which understandings of the relationship between evidence and interpretation, language and the material world, economies and identities, have been challenged and changed by the ‘cultural turn’.

This pathway offers you modules which deal with a range of areas, themes and periods, placing you at the cutting-edge of historical thought on issues such as gender, race, class, consumption, modernity, mentalities and identities.

Local and Regional History Pathway
Local (or micro) history, as well as community and family studies, has played an increasingly important part in the development of historical analysis.

We reflect on these developments, drawing on the rich national and comparative literature in these fields, with a primary focus on the period from 1800 to the 20th century.

You also design and conduct a substantial independent study on a chosen historical topic or in the field of local, community or family history.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Your future

We have excellent links with the research community, both in the UK and worldwide, so many of our students have gone on to teach in higher education institutions. Others have found employment in archives, research, managing research funds, other forms of educational provision, the Civil Service, the National Health Service, and management.

Within our Department of History, we offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation. Themes of particular research interest include:
-Class, race and gender formation
-Nationalism
-Wars and revolutions
-International relations and oil diplomacy
-The history of medicine
-The history of crime
-Popular culture and consumption
-Slave societies
-The history of ideas and print culture
-The history of the Roma and Sinti in Europe
-Historical censuses and surveys

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

We also work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in History
-Race and Class in the United States, South Africa and Britain: Select Topics (optional)
-Illness and Culture in 18th-And 19th-Century Europe (optional)
-The Public History Workshop (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern Europe c.1500- c.1800 (optional)
-Approaches to Cultural and Social History (optional)
-A Global History of Food, c.1400 - c.1750 (optional)
-The Making of Consumer Culture: Britain 1780-1960 (optional)
-Narcotic Culture: A History of Drugs (From the Sixteenth to the Twenty First Century) (optional)
-Decency and Disorder: Institutions in Essex 1700-1900
-The Patterns of Victorian Life: Reconstructing Nineteenth-Century Communities (optional)
-The Uses of Space in Early Modern History (optional)

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This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Read more
This programme is an unrivalled opportunity to study the arts of China, Korea and Japan. Students consider a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, exploring their specificity and the links between them, in historical and contemporary periods. In many parts of East Asia archaeological evidence is key to understanding early societies. The programme therefore relates excavated materials to the history of art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of East Asia.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

This MA can also be pursued over a two-year period combined with intensive language study in Japanese or Korean (http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/).

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaea/

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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