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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. Read more
Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. We are proud of our team of staff and students whose impressive performance is critical to sustaining and enhancing the national and international reputation created by our distinguished alumni.

Cambridge itself is, from an art historical point of view, a stunning city in which to live and work. We make full use of Cambridge’s unique holdings of art and architecture, including the Fitzwilliam Museum (on our doorstep), Kettle’s Yard and the University Library as well as the College libraries. The Hamilton Kerr Institute at Whittlesford, a department of the Fitzwilliam Museum, is dedicated to the conservation of easel paintings and contributes to our teaching and research.

The MPhil in the History of Art and Architecture is a nine-month course providing advanced study and training in research in specialised areas of the subject. It is intended as a self-contained programme of art-historical study, but also serves as a preparation for students intending to proceed to doctoral research. Please note that this is a research degree with taught methodological elements, not a conversion course for students whose first degree lies in another subject.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to provide teaching and learning to post-graduate students in the history of art and architecture in a range of fields linked to the research interests of the staff;
- to provide high-calibre students with training in relevant research skills and to offer excellent specialist supervision of their individual research in these fields;
- to provide a stimulating environment in which students can reach their full intellectual potential;
- to help students develop a wide range of intellectual abilities and skills which will enable them to make a significant contribution in their chosen careers and walks of life, including academic teaching and research.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ahhamphaa

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil, students should have:

- made the transition in learning style and pace from undergraduate to postgraduate level;
- acquired the necessary research skills in the use of bibliographical, archival and museum resources as relevant to their field of study;
- gained practice in the use of the languages and archival skills relevant to their chosen research area;
- gained confidence in the choice and use of different methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives;
- refined their critical skills in the examination, recording and analysis of works of art and/or architecture, especially at first-hand (through travel and fieldwork if appropriate);
- gained experience in oral and written presentation, and in a sustained piece of research in the form of a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words;
- acquired the proficiency needed to present in writing a coherent and sustained piece of academic research.

Format

Teaching is delivered through a series of seminars held in the Faculty during the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms, focusing on salient critical and theoretical issues in the discipline, and organised into two parallel strands in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the beginning of the Michaelmas Term.

Throughout the course, students are encouraged to undertake independent reading and study, in order to consolidate what is under discussion in the seminars. In addition, they attend the Department’s weekly public Graduate Research Seminar organised by the graduate students, the Department's fortnightly Medieval Seminars and other lectures and seminars in the Department and elsewhere in the University.

The syllabus is as follows:

- Attendance at two selected seminar courses in specialised areas of research, one in the Michaelmas (Autumn) Term and one in the Lent (Spring) Term;
- Attendance at the department's weekly graduate seminars;
- Attendance at classes in skills training and career development;
- Frequent individual consultation with the candidate's supervisor, who will guide the candidate's choice of topics and preparation of individual written work for essays, presentations and dissertation.

Each of the seminar courses runs over two terms (Michaelmas and Lent), with a different emphasis in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the start of Michaelmas Term.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 15,000 words represents 60% of the overall mark and is submitted at the end of May.
- Two essays of not more than 6000 words (one of which may include a literature review). The essays represent 40% of the total mark. One will be submitted at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and one at the end of the Lent (Spring) terms respectively.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD following the course, MPhil in History of Art & Architecture students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to the approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Read more
The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

It includes a term in Rome where we run the MA with the American University of Rome. A range of themes and approaches are considered in this MA with a particular focus on medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art in Italy. The first term is taught in Canterbury.

During the term in Rome you will study the art of Rome first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study the history of Rome and specific artists. Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. The campus is located in the Monteverde district of Rome, a picturesque district with a wide range of shops and amenities. From nearby Trastevere, it is a short bus-ride to the historic centre of Rome with its astonishing range of Roman sites, monuments, churches and museums.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history and other arts subjects. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/344/history-of-art-rome

About the Department of History of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Term 1 (Canterbury):

Compulsory modules:
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art

One option from:

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought
HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
HA835 - A Matter of Taste: The Art and Aesthetics of Food and Drink
HA898 Dissertation

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:
HA833 Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from antiquity to the present day

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

- Michelangelo in Rome

This seminar on Michelangelo examines the work of the Renaissance master; his sculpture, painting, architecture and literary production. His works are investigated within their specific historical context, focusing on issues of commission, iconography, censorship, biography, historiography and aesthetics. An excursion to Florence is also planned. Beyond a complete comprehension of Michelangelo’s work, the course aims toward a mastery of art historical research skills, the evaluation of current scholarship and independent critical thought on art.

Term 3: Dissertation
HA833 - Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from Antiquity to the Present Da (30 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art; enhanced through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate; especially through study abroad and site visits

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years. A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. Read more
The MSt in the History of Design is a taught Master's Degree offered part-time over two years.

A tea cup, be it hand-painted porcelain, studio pottery or mass produced ceramic, offers a glimpse of the rituals of everyday life and historical experience. A designed object or space reflects the individual, the society for which it was created, as well as its creator. It expresses aesthetic preoccupations and articulates historical and political conditions. Decoration challenges the hierarchies and contested inter-relationships between the disciplines and careers of artists, designers, crafts workers, gardeners, and architects. Such concerns reside at the heart of the study of the history of design.

This history of design course is taught on nine monthly Saturdays and one residential weekend per annum. The syllabus focuses particularly on the period from 1851 to 1951 in Europe (including Britain) and America. Combining close visual and material analysis with historical methodologies, the course explores decorative and applied art, the design of interiors and public spaces, and for performance and industry.

There will be two Open Mornings, on one Saturday in November 2016 11am - 12.30pm and on one Saturday in February 2017 11am - 12.30pm, where you can meet the Course Director, Dr Claire O'Mahony, and learn more about the course. Please contact usl if you would like to attend including which day you prefer: .

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-the-history-of-design

Description

Core themes of the History of Design course will include the rivalries between historicism and modernity; internationalist and nationalist tendencies; handicraft and industrial processes, as well as the analysis of critical debates about the makers and audiences of decoration in advice literature and aesthetic writing.

The programme aims to provide students with a framework of interpretative skills useful to understanding design. It provides grounding in the analysis of the techniques and materials deployed in creating objects or sites. It enables students to develop a grasp of historical context, encompassing the impact of the hierarchies within, and audiences for, the critical reception of 'decoration'. It encourages the analysis of the historiography of political and aesthetic debates articulated by designers, critics and historians about design, its forms and purposes.

Teaching and learning takes a variety of forms in this programme. In keeping with the Oxford ethos, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an important of the course, particularly whilst researching the dissertation, whilst earlier stages of the programme principally take the form of seminar group discussion, lectures and independent study. First-hand visual analysis is an essential component of the discipline of the history of design. As such each course element of the programme includes site visits, both to Oxford University's unique museum and library collections, and to those nearby in London and the regions. Formal assessment is by means of analytical essay and dissertation writing, complemented by informal assessment methods including a portfolio of research skills tasks and an oral presentation about each candidate's dissertation topic.

The monthly format of the programme should enable applicants who are employed or have caring duties to undertake postgraduate study, given they have a determined commitment to study and to undertake independent research.

The University of Oxford offers a uniquely rich programme of lectures and research seminars relevant to the study of Design History. Research specialisms particularly well represented in the Department for Continuing Education are:

- Art Nouveau and Modern French Decoration
- Modernist Design and Architecture
- The Arts and Crafts Movement
- Garden History
- The Art of the Book
- Ecclesiastical Architecture and Design

As a discipline Design History is well represented in conferences organised and academic journals and books published by The Design History Society; the Association of Art Historians; AHRC Centre for the Historic Interior at the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Modern Interior Centre at Kingston University; The Twentieth Century Society; The Garden History Society; The Textile History Society; The Wallpaper Society, The Societe des Dix-Neuviemistes.

Graduate destinations

Future research and career paths might be a DPhil programme; creative industries; museum curatorship; the art market; teaching; arts publishing.

Programme details

- Course structure
The MSt is a part-time course over two years with one residential weekend per annum. Each year comprises nine Saturdays (monthly; three in each of the three terms in the academic year) students will also have fortnightly individual tutorials and undertake research in reference libraries in Oxford between these monthly meetings. The course is designed for the needs of students wishing to study part-time, including those who are in full-time employment but will require 15 to 20 hours of study per week.

- Course content and timetable
The course is based at Rewley House, 1 Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JA. Some classes may take place at other venues in Oxford. Class details, reading lists and information about any field trips will be supplied when you have taken up your place.

Core Courses

- Materials and Techniques of Design
- Historical Methods
- Research Project in the History of Modern Design
- Dissertation

Options Courses

- Decoration in Modern France
- The Arts and Crafts Tradition in Modern Britain
- Design in the Machine Age
- Design, Body, Environment
- Visual Cultures of the World Wars
- Academic Writing and Contemporary Practice

Course aims

The MSt was devised with the aim of providing effective postgraduate-level education in history of design on a part-time basis in which case it should be possible to participate fully in the programme while remaining in full-time employment.

The programme aims to provide students with skills:

- To develop further their critical understanding of the principles and practice of the history of design

- To enhance their subject knowledge, analytical and communication skills needed for professional involvement in the history of design

- To demonstrate a grasp of primary evidence to build on their critical understanding of the types of evidence used in the historical study of designed objects and sites and how they are selected and interpreted

- To build on the appropriate skills and concepts for analysing material objects and textural sources

- To enable the student to undertake their own research to be presented in essays, oral presentations and as a dissertation

- To demonstrate an understanding of primary evidence and secondary sources through the application of appropriate analytical skills and concepts within a research context resulting in a dissertation.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre to study in a historic corner of Montparnasse. This programme can also be studied in Paris only.

Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics pathway, which draws on the expertise of our Aesthetics Research Group.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and cognate subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/99/history-and-philosophy-of-art-paris

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics strand.

The MA gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art, and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

The programme is also available at split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices, which draw upon our links with other subjects within the School of Arts and the Faculty of Humanities. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA898 - Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. Read more
This two-year part-time Masters Degree in Literature and Arts course offers the opportunity to study the literature and arts of three different periods of English history (ranging from the c16th to the c19th) in an interdisciplinary manner over four five day residences and two online modules. The course offers full access to the library and electronic resources of the university, a team of expert tutors, and a high level of personal and academic support.

VIDES (volume of interdisciplinary essays)

VIDES 2016 - Volume 4
In the second year, as part of the preparation for the dissertation, each student writes a short essay around two documents or artefacts which they have chosen which comment on a particular topic but from contrasting viewpoints. The student group is divided up into a number of small committees responsible for peer reviewing and editing the journal, deciding on its house-style and designing it.

To make navigation around the journal easier the volume is also presented on the open.conted site where you can find a list of all the essays with their abstracts to help you identify the essays which are of interest you. We hope you enjoy the read!

If you have enjoyed VIDES 2016 - Volume 4 you might also like to read VIDES 2015 - Volume 3, VIDES 2014 - Volume 2 and VIDES 2013 - Volume 1.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-literature-and-arts

Description

This literature and arts course brings together the creative, intellectual and manufactured output of people in the past. It has a twofold aim – to explore the past through the lens of human creativity, and to inform our understanding of that creativity by studying the context within which it emerged. It is therefore an interdisciplinary programme which encompasses literature, art and architectural history, history, philosophy and theology. Based in Oxford, and taking full advantage of the remarkable human and cultural resources which this university has at its disposal, the literature and arts course is designed around three sequential periods of British history, from Early Modern (c.1450) to the early twentieth century (c.1914). By studying each period through a range of disciplines, students will acquire a broad and multi-faceted picture of the past. In this framework giant achievements such as Milton’s poetry or Wren’s architecture can be understood not only as products of their times but also in so far as they stand as uniquely inspired statements, or as harbingers of future developments.

Interdisciplinary study raises challenges for a student in terms of methodologies. How do I analyse and interpret a picture when I have only ever worked with text? A poem when I have only worked with documentary sources? A building when I have only ever studied abstract ideas? How do I make viable connections between these different areas of study? An online element offered towards the beginning of the course will provide the opportunity to discover, practise and develop these skills, and to engage with current theoretical discourses concerning the way scholars relate with their source material. Similarly a more advanced on-line component in the second year will focus on interdisciplinary research skills, including trying out those skills by contributing to a small volume of papers on a subject related to the chosen dissertation topic.

Whilst focusing on British history and culture, the course will begin with an introductory unit which sets Britain in a world context and explores her cultural relationship with the rest of the world since the sixteenth century. Using the layout of the Ashmolean museum’s international collections with its emphasis on global interaction, this unit will principally be concerned with the formation of British culture through the stimuli of influences beyond Europe.

The literature and arts course aims to enable students to specialise in certain disciplines and ultimately in a particular historical period, whilst structuring their learning within a strong contextual and critical framework. It aims to enable students to make the most of the university’s resources (e.g. its libraries, computer facilities, museums and historic monuments), to provide a high quality of academic and pastoral support, and to maximise the potential for learning within a peer group. It sets out to encourage a richly democratic view of cultural history in which all men’s and women’s lives play their part.

Programme details

Structure of the Literature and Arts Course
Year One

Two core courses in year one will introduce students to post-graduate research skills and methodologies and use a series of case studies to explore some of the challenges inherent in the practice of interdisciplinary study.

Students will also take two options during year one, which will allow them to begin to specialise either by period or theme.

Year Two

A third option at the start of year two will enable students to gain wide-ranging insight into their chosen area of study before deciding on their dissertation topic. A final core course in cultural theory will prepare the student for the writing of the dissertation. This involves writing an article for and contributing to the production process of the course's online journal, Vides. The dissertation occupies the final two terms of year two.

Core Courses

Core courses will be both residential and delivered through online distance learning modules.

Residences: students will attend tutorials, seminars and lectures during five-day residences in October, February and late June/July in year one and in October of year two, plus an initial residential induction weekend, prior to the first core course. Residences will account for eighty face to face teaching hours over the two years (structured around intensive discussion in seminars).

Distance-learning: these modules are fully supported by a dedicated Virtual Learning Environment. Students will engage in on-line group discussions using the course website and email. Students will also have access to the electronic on-line resources of Oxford University's Library Services, including the Bodleian Library, and all other University libraries, including the English Faculty Library, the History Faculty Library, the Philosophy Faculty Library and the Theology Faculty Library. These modules are designed such that students need not have a sophisticated understanding of IT; materials may be provided in a variety of ways to suit the student's preference and situation.

In keeping with the Oxford ethos of tutorial instruction, individual tutorials and supervisions will be an integral part of the programme, most notably with regard to the dissertation. Individual supervision will be undertaken both face-to-face and by e-mail.

Options

Each of the options residences is structured in the same way, beginning with an historical introduction to the period and ending with a plenary discussing where connections can be made between the subjects studied through the week. The options are taught in the mornings and afternoons and represent a range of disciplines, specifically Literature, History, Visual Culture and Philosophy/Theology/History of Ideas. Each student chooses two options out of four offered. Please note that due to timetabling constrictions it is not always possible to allocate each student to their preferred options. The following list indicates the subjects which were available in 2014/15, there may be some changes for 2016.

Late Medieval and Early Modern
Shakespeare in History - Dr Lynn Robson
Tudor Monarchy– Dr Janet Dickinson
The Role of Wit, Conceit and Curious Devices in Tudor and Jacobean Art and Architecture - Dr Cathy Oakes
The Uses of History in Seventeenth-century England - Dr Gabriel Roberts

The ‘Long Eighteenth Century’
Writing, Money and the Market - Dr Carly Watson
British Collectors and Classical Antiquities – Dr Stephen Kershaw
The British Empiricists: Locke, Hume and Berkeley – Dr Peter Wyss
Overseas Trade and the Rise of Britain as a Superpower - Dr Mike Wagner

The ‘Long Nineteenth Century’
Love and Sex in the Victorian Novel - Dr David Grylls
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Late Nineteenth Century British Culture – Professor Barrie Bullen
The British Empire and the Indian Mutiny– Dr Yasmin Khan
'Habits of Heart and Mind' - Victorian Political Culture – Professor Angus Hawkins

Dissertation

A dissertation of 11,000 words will be the focus of the final two terms of the second year.

The final core course, delivered in Hilary term of the second year, is envisaged both as a graduate-level survey of relevant cultural theory, which will provide the necessary intellectual contexts for the students' chosen dissertation topics, and as an opportunity to fine-tune the students' research and writing skills in preparation for the dissertation. After completing Vides, students will decide on their dissertation subject in consultation with the Course Director. They will be advised on reading lists and a timetable of work by their dissertation supervisor.

The dissertation is intended to demonstrate the student's knowledge and awareness of more than one subject discipline in this final piece of assessment.

Who should take the course?

The design of the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts is part-time over two years, and as such it is intended for gifted students who, due to their obligations to professional work or caring duties, would otherwise be unable to pursue higher degrees. The MSt in Literature and Arts is taught in the format of regular short residences in Oxford, together with an element of closely-monitored distance-learning.

The course is ideal for the following:

- Graduates in Humanities disciplines who have entered employment, but who wish to maintain their momentum of study progressing to a postgraduate qualification. This group will include teachers, librarians, and archivists, and others involved in humanities-related professions.

- Humanities graduates who would like to study part-time because of other responsibilities (including caring roles).

- Graduates who have reached a stage in life where they wish to pursue a new area of study, either for personal development, or to establish new career paths.

While the Masters Degree in Literature and Arts can be seen as a stand-alone qualification, it will also prepare students for doctoral work.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy. Read more
This programme is aimed at anyone interested in learning more about the design and operation of low energy buildings with the added attraction of three modules dedicated to computer modelling of building performance – an essential skill for anyone wishing to work in today’s rapidly changing world of building engineering consultancy.

Modules are taught by world-leading experts in the field who have designed some of the world’s most innovative low energy buildings. These design experiences provide unique case study material which students find exciting and invaluable for their own research and design work.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by CIBSE and the Energy Institute and benefits from its links with the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

Programme modules

- Building Energy Consumption [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the impact that climate, people, equipment selection and design have on energy consumption on a range of building sizes from domestic to large commercial.

- Renewable Energy and Low Carbon Technologies [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of renewable energy and low carbon technologies and their integration into buildings, and to be given a perspective on the potential benefits and applications of these technologies.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Airflow Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building airflow and ventilation modelling with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Advanced Lighting Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of lighting modelling in buildings with respect to comfort and energy efficiency, and be given a perspective on the application of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow, thermal and daylight modelling software as well as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Hulley and Kirkwood and SE Controls. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the CIBSE and Energy Institute.
The 'SE Controls prize for best overall performance' is awarded to the student graduating from this course with the highest overall mark. This presentation is made on graduation day.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-carbon-building-design/

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The master History of Architecture and Town Planning (Healthy Cities, new Perspectives on History and Theory of Architecture and Town Planning) explores the evolution of cities, villages and landscapes in Europe within the framework of changing geopolitical conditions at the global scale. Read more
The master History of Architecture and Town Planning (Healthy Cities, new Perspectives on History and Theory of Architecture and Town Planning) explores the evolution of cities, villages and landscapes in Europe within the framework of changing geopolitical conditions at the global scale.

Are you interested how architecture and urbanism can improve our conditions, and how they contribute to public health? Wish to gain knowledge about the global dimension of architectural and urban theories and practices? Starting with a profound historical overview, this Master prepares students for an active role in debates and policy making processes involved in the renaissance of the European city. It analyzes physical and spatial phenomena as historical documents conveying the motives underlying their continuous changes, as instruments to pursue specific policies, and as works of art. Starting with the Enlightenment, and paying attention to issues related to public health, the program investigates tensions between global and local, gaps between formal and informal, the post-socialist condition in former Eastern Europe, and architectural and urban strategies aiming at sustainable living conditions and their historical precursors. Part of the courses is provided by the Thomassen a Thuessink Chair, a joint venture of Groningen University Medical Center, the University of Groningen and Delft University of Technology; the chair focuses on the public health dimension of urban interventions.

Job perspectives

The master opens a myriad of career opportunities, in the Netherlands and abroad, as has been proved over the years. For instance:
- jobs in the field of urban history and consultancy for municipal agencies and scientific institutions
- jobs for private or public architectural and urban platforms
- jobs in the field of journalism and public relations
- the master prepares students for a scientific career
- jobs as advisors for healthcare institutions

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The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Read more
The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world.

The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a 1-year programme of advanced study on modern and contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds work in an interdisciplinary environment with urbanists, environmental specialists, architectural theorists and historians and design practitioners. Students will explore a wide range of ideas, research methods and theoretical approaches in order to undertake critical and rigorous analysis of issues relating to both architecture and the challenges and complexities of the world’s rapidly changing cities.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaus

Course detail

The course offers a flexible structure that is tailored to the needs of individual student’s research interests. Seminars and lectures are organised along two basic streams: 1) one focuses on sustainability and environmental design from a more technical point of view; 2) the other emphasises the socio- political and cultural context of architecture and cities with an approach rooted in the humanities and social sciences. Students may participate in both streams, but can also focus on one only. In the second term there is choice of more specialist seminars within both streams. Students are actively encouraged to explore issues across these basic disciplinary boundaries. The course asks students to expand upon their own experiences by pursuing research in their areas of interest.

Format

Teaching in the course is closely integrated with the Department’s research arm, the Martin Centre for Architecture and Urban Studies -http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/ which has a world reputation for research on a wide range of issues and geographical areas. The MPhil benefits from direct input in the form of lectures and seminars and/or individual supervision from the Martin Centre’s research groups:

- Cities and Transport - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/citiesandtransport
- Behaviour and Building Performance - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/behaviour-and-building
- Centre for Urban Conflicts Research - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/conflict-in-cities
- Sustainable Building - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/sustainablebuilding
- Cities South of Cancer - http://citiessouthofcancer.org/
- Digital Studio - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/digital-studio
- History and Theory of Architecture - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/history-and-theory
- Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/risk
- Natural Materials and Structures - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/natural-materials-and-st...

Professor Richard Sennett - http://www.richardsennett.com/site/senn/templates/home.aspx?pageid=1&cc=gb, The Department of Architecture’s Sir Arthur Marshall Visiting Professor, contributes a workshop to the programme in the second term. The course also entertains close connections with the Masters in Architectural and Urban Design (ARB/ RIBA Pt2) (MAUD) - http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/courses/mphil-degree-in-architecture-and-urban-design-maud-arb-riba-pt2 programme enabling research-driven dialogue with designers.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops, which are supported by individual supervisions. Individual supervisions are an essential part of the programme, they help to assist, direct and monitor progress of students’ work while, at the same time, help to provide continuous feedback throughout the course.

There is also a range of activities in the Department of Architecture, and throughout the University, that will help students to develop their research interests and to meet the programme outcomes. These include the Martin Centre lunchtime seminar, the City Seminar and ARCSOC Talks. Students may choose to attend units on the MPhil in Sustainable Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Faculty - http://www-esdmphil.eng.cam.ac.uk/ and the MPhil in Screen and Media Cultures, Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages - http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/graduates/mphil_SMC.html with whom we have a reciprocal arrangement. MAUS students are welcome to be involved with MAUD in reviews and discussions. The programme includes research skills training designed specifically for the needs of our students.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired the type of research training required to carry on to the PhD, or if conceived as a standalone degree, will have acquired the skills to specialise and enhance their professional prospects.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 20,000 words represents 50% of the overall mark. The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of July.

- An oral examination (viva voce) on the dissertation and on the general field of knowledge within which the work submitted falls may be required. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge for such oral examinations, which will be held in September.

- Three essays of 3,000 - 5,000 words including footnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by your supervisor and the Faculty will be presented for examination. One will be submitted at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) term and the additional two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) term respectively. The three essays represent 50% of the total mark.

- Students undertake a review of their work on a termly basis day which take place at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms and the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. Students present their work to a supportive forum which will include academic critics who will provide constructive criticism about the students' proposed essays and dissertations.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Studies students must achieve an overall total score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. Read more
This programme is aimed at graduates of building services engineering and other science and engineering disciplines who wish to extend their technical expertise in the field of building services engineering. With energy consumption within the design and operation of buildings becoming an ever increasingly important factor this programme is designed to combine building services engineering knowledge with specific energy considerations in their design.

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by the Energy Institute and CIBSE. CIBSE has praised the programme as ‘one of the leading MSc courses of its kind in the UK’.

Areas studied include low energy building design, designing for suitable indoor air quality and thermal comfort, state-of-the-art control systems, and the design of building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems.

The course attracts students from all over the world, including countries such as Greece, Iran, China, France, Germany and Colombia. This is attractive to potential employers who often have international offices around the world.

Key Facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- The programme is accredited by the two main institutions representing energy and buildings – the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers and the Energy Institute. On successful completion of the course, students are deemed to meet the education requirements for both institutions and their applications can be endorsed by course tutors.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
- Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer & Fluid Flow [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide students from related engineering backgrounds with an understanding of the fundamentals of heat transfer, fluid flow and thermodynamics for application to buildings and their engineering systems.

- Thermal Comfort & Indoor Air Quality [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles and practice involved in the design of indoor environments, with respect to occupant thermal comfort and air quality.

- Building Thermal Loads & Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the principles of building thermal load analysis and required systems for medium to large buildings.

- Building Energy Supply Systems [70% exam, 15 credits]
The aim of this module is for the student to be provided with a practical foundation in system design and analysis, by developing the students' understanding of thermal plant in buildings including air conditioning systems and systems for heat recovery.

- Building Control & Commissioning [70% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the application of automatic control in energy monitoring and commissioning and to examine the control problems in buildings and develop control strategies that will improve thermal comfort and building energy use.

- Concept Design [0% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to be introduced to the process within which buildings are conceived and designed by undertaking the architecture design of a major building using multi-disciplinary input. Students will develop team skills through working in design groups to generate schematic concepts before developing the best. They will apply previous knowledge of building services and low carbon design in the selection process and carry out performance analysis. Students will work with 3D architectural and 3D mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems within BIM software to further develop their concepts.

- Low Carbon Building Design [50% exam, 15 credits]
The module aims to introduce the principles of low and zero carbon building with special attention to the process of design and decision-making.

- Advanced Thermal Modelling [50% exam, 15 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the principles of building thermal modelling and HVAC plant simulation, and be given a perspective on the applications of these techniques to the design process.

- Research Project [0% exam, 60 credits]
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Building Energy

- Research Methods in Building Performance [0% exam, 10 credits]
The aims of this module are for the student to become familiar with and comprehend the wide range of research methods and skills needed to investigate, understand and communicate building performance.

Facilities

All masters students have access to a wide range of building simulation codes which include commercial software, as well as bespoke codes developed in-house. Students can run these codes on their personal laptops or access any one of our computer laboratories, including access to our recently commissioned 2000-node high performance computer cluster.

One of our key strengths at Loughborough is our experimental facilities which enable us to validate computer models. Our masters students have access to a vast range of experimental facilities, some of which are used during the taught modules and all of which are available for use by students during their research dissertations.

These include: a fully controllable environmental chamber; sophisticated thermal and breathing manikins; an indoor solar simulator; a 'darkroom' facility to carry out optical and high dynamic range measurements; and full-scale houses for pressure testing and studying innovative heating and control strategies. A recent investment of £360k was made to purchase an extensive array of monitoring and measuring equipment for use during field studies.

How you will learn

You will learn through a carefully balanced combination of lectures, in-class guided workshops, hands-on computer modelling, field measurements and independent research. Students have access to a wide range of air flow and thermal modelling software as wells as extensive laboratory facilities. Following nine taught modules, students pursue a research dissertation of their choice which draws on the skills developed during the taught modules.

Students are assessed by a combination of traditional written exams, coursework and assignments. This split is typically 70/30 (exam/coursework) or 50/50, although some modules, such as research methods and concept design are assessed entirely based on coursework which comprises individual presentations and group work.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for leading consulting engineering companies such as Arup, Pick Everad, Hoare Lea, Cundall, Foster & Partners, and Atkins. Some of these companies offer work placements for students to undertake their research dissertations. Many visit the university to deliver lectures to our MSc students providing ideal opportunities for students to discuss employment opportunities.

Scholarships

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/low-energy-building-services/

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This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. Read more
This programme is a unique opportunity to study the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Students concentrate on architecture, sculpture, painting and the decorative arts and have the option of pursuing topics and approaches more archaeological in focus. They consider theoretical and methodological questions and are invited to question the relevance of the disciplinary distinction between History of Art and Archaeology to the study of the non-Western world. Courses cover a time period spanning from antiquity to present-day, contemporary art.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in Asian and African art history and archaeology, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students studying the Music, Film and Media of Asia, Africa and the Middle East in historical and contemporary contexts. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of Asia and Africa.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/mahistartarch/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department listed below. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from MA options offered by other SOAS departments, also listed below. Students must complete the Dissertation in Art and Archaeology (15PARC999).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught courses in the first year, and one taught course and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught course in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It is submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Read more
History of art is a rich and dynamic discipline, combining the rigorous investigation of the visual arts with the creative exploration of their connections to culture, politics and society. Postgraduate study in this area trains you at a high level in looking at, thinking about and researching art and its histories.

Birkbeck's MA History of Art offers the opportunity to study with internationally recognised experts. Our teaching staff are defining the field, conducting ground-breaking research in periods from medieval to contemporary, focusing on painting, sculpture, print culture, architecture, photography, digital art and museology.

The MA History of Art exposes you to key art historical approaches, and allows you to focus in depth on areas and periods of particular interest to you, in early and modern (including contemporary) periods, through taught options (see an indicative list of modules on the 'course structure' tab) and independent research. The course also offers opportunities for work placements with London museums, galleries and archives.

The course develops your visual acuity and your understanding of art's histories, while stimulating critical debate and stretching your research skills. In addition to independent written work, you will take part in group discussion, give oral presentations and engage with the Department of History of Art's research culture.

In all of this, you will work closely with our staff while also benefiting from our diverse and vibrant student body of all ages and backgrounds. The teaching programme is enriched by museum and site visits, visiting speakers, screenings and opportunities to get involved as volunteers in research and community outreach activities. The department also offers an exciting study trip every spring.

Students are encouraged to become involved in the lively research culture of the department through the History and Theory of Photography Research Centre, the Architecture, Space and Society Centre and the Vasari Research Centre, which has pioneered the field of digital art history. In addition to the core teaching and individual research support, students benefit from many events in the Department of History of Art at Birkbeck, including: the postgraduate Research Seminar, which brings art historians from all over the UK and beyond to speak at Birkbeck; the biennial Murray Lecture; the Murray Seminar on Medieval and Renaissance Art; and the programme of exhibitions and displays at the Peltz Gallery, the School of Arts' purpose-built exhibition space. Students are also welcome to attend other seminars and events across the School of Arts and at the Birkbeck Institute for Humanities.

We offer taster events and information evenings for prospective students interested in our history of art programmes throughout the year.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
You will work closely with leading international experts in the history of art.
You can choose to specialise in a wide range of periods and geographies, from medieval European architecture and cityscapes to contemporary global art practices.
You can study flexibly, full-time or part-time, with all teaching in the evenings.
On class visits and in your independent research you will have access to London's world-class art collections, museums and libraries.
Your fellow students are from a wide range of backgrounds and are often already working in the field, offering a high level of discussion and excellent networking opportunities.
You will have access to the Birkbeck Library and an in-house resources centre. In addition, our location in Bloomsbury offers excellent access to specialist libraries in the University of London. These include the University of London Library, Institute of Historical Research, Warburg Institute and School of Oriental and African Studies, together with the major national resource of the British Library.
You will also have easy access to specialist art libraries not far from Birkbeck, including the library of the Courtauld Institute of Art, the Royal Institute of British Architects library and the National Art Library at the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A), as well as the great visual resources of the British Museum, National Gallery, National Portrait Gallery, Tate Britain, Tate Modern and V&A, commercial galleries and salesrooms. Temporary exhibition galleries like the Barbican Gallery, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Hayward Gallery and Royal Academy also make London a particularly good place in which to undertake research.
You can participate in the rich research culture of the Department of History of Art.
Keep up-to-date with our research on the Birkbeck History of Art blog.

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